CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1951 Sun Schedule <

1951 SESSIONS (6)
June 1, 1951 to June 30, 1951

Studio Session for The Spiritual Stars, Probably 1951 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Walter ''Mumbles'' Horton, June 1951 / RPM/Modern Records
Studio Session for Jim Lockhart, Probably June 1951 / RPM/Modern
Studio Session for Alfred Harris, Probably June 1951 / RPM/Modern
Studio Session for B.B. King, June 18, 1951 / Modern Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
MRS/Chess/RPM/Modern recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1951

Sam Phillips had been vindicated; as he declared later, ''Rocket 88'' was the record that really kicked it off for me as far as broadening the base of music and opening up wider markets for our local music''. As with most successes, though, it brought as many problems as reward. ''I was still recording weddings and funerals'', recalls Phillips, ''taking care of the PA system at the Hotel Peabody, and I was doing the Skyway broadcast every night at ten-thirty and then back at work at seven-thirty the following morning. I was an eighteen-to twenty- hours-a-day person''.

''Then I went home and told my wife, 'Becky, I can't stand it'. I'd already had a nervous breakdown and this was so emotionally and mentally exhausting. I told her, ''I've just got to make a decision. I've worked awfully hard to get where I am in radio. I like it but it's not what I want to do. She said, 'Whatever you want to do, we'll be there'. June of 1951 is when I resigned.

I had no income, my kids were growing up and going to school, and there was a lot at stake. It had been a big decision to quit WREC, and if it all fell through then I would have had to start a lot further down back in radio''. Nevertheless, on the day he resigned, Phillips knew that ''Rocket 88'' was sitting atop the rhythm and blues charts. As incentives go, it was better than most.

The feature on ''Rocket 88'' in the Commercial Appeal gives a little of the favor of Phillips' business: Phillips ''has agreements with two recording companies to locate and record hillbilly and race music. Race numbers are those tailored for the negro trade. Sam auditions musicians with original songs. When he finds something he's sure will sell, he gets it on acetate and sends it to one of the companies. He doesn't charge the musicians anything. Like them, he gets his (sic) from the companies. Sam may branch out one day . . . so he says if anyone wants to bring him a pop song, he'll be glad to look it over''.

Brenston's success on Chess ensured that Phillips now had only one record company to whom he could pitch product; the Biharis were understandably incensed.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

There have been several gospel groups with this name but the identity of the Spiritual Stars who saw one disc issued on Chess records in 1951 has escaped us. The master numbers of ''I'll Search Heaven'' and ''Good Religion'' are close to those of the Evangelist Gospel Singers. If the debate about who recorded them and when is resolved in favor of Phillips then that will likely confirm the time and place of the Stars recordings too.

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE SPIRITUAL STARS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: PROBABLY 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

''I'll Search Heaven'' is a very good record. There is no real evidence that these guys ever saw the inside of 706 Union Avenue, but it's nice to think that they might have. Again, the record label offers no clue. The only subscript is ''Spiritual Series'', and we could have guessed that. The group holds more harmonic interest and greater dynamic range than the Evangelist Gospel Singers and comes across as slightly more ''modern'' because of it. The 16-bar structure and melodic line of this song bear more than a passing similarity to the classic ''Peace In The valley'', but it was a loose adaption of Mae Glover and Beatrice Brown's 1945 song, ''I'll Search Heaven For You'', recorded by the Mill Brothers among others.

01 - ''I"LL SEARCH HEAVEN'' - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Mae Glover-Beatrice Brown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: U 7373 Master
Recorded: Probably 1951
Released: 1951
First appearance: Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1485-B < mono
I'LL SEARCH HEAVEN / GOOD RELIGION
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-10-22 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1959

The Spiritual Stars were good! You heard it here. This time they turn their hands and voices to the oft-recorded tune ''So Glad I Got Good Religion'' (check out the Blind Boys of Alabama for a definitive version). just listen to this record and hear great harmonic variants of what would in lesser hands be simple 4-square chords. Not on this record, though. Nothing is ordinary here. If Sam Phillips truly had recorded this music in his tiny studio back in 1951, maybe he fallen on his knees, poured his Jack Daniels down the drain, trashed his little black book on the spot, and gone into the gospel music business. Of course that would mean the history of American popular culture as we know it would never have been written. Maybe that's too steep a price to pay. But one way or the other, he would have known, as you do, that this is really a hell of a record.

02 - ''GOOD RELIGION'' - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: U 7374 Master
Recorded: Probably 1951
Released: 1951
First appearance: Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1485-A < mono
GOOD RELIGION / I'LL SEARCH HEAVEN
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-10-23 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Spiritual Stars
Unidentified Group Members

For Biography of The Spiritual Stars see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Spiritual Stars recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1951

"Rocket 88" tops the Rhythm & Blues charts.

Sam Phillips quits his two other jobs (i.e. WREC and Hotel Peabody).

Sam Phillips records his first session with white Folk and Blues artist Harmonica Frank Floyd. He sends the dubs to Chess Records.

Sam Phillips record his final session with B.B. King.

The first commercial computer to be created in the U.S., the UNIVAC (Universal Automatic Computer), was dedicated for use at the U.S. Census Bureau during June of 1951. The computer was designed by Presper Eckert and John Mauchly and was created by the Remington Rand company. Eckert and Mauchly had also created the first general-purpose computer (ENIAC) in 1946. The data-processing machine had 5,000 vacuum tubes, weighed about 16,000 pounds, and measured 14.5 by 7.5 by 9 feet in size. UNIVAC was an improved version of ENIAC and the first successful commercial computer created for civilian use. It could do about 1,000 calculations in a second, improving the efficiency of the Census Bureau.

JUNE 1951

Studio session with Walter Horton at The Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.

MID-1951

By the middle of 1951, however, pianist and future Sun recording star, Roy Hall had again made his way to Detroit where he briefly formed a new group named The Eagles, recording for Detroit's Citation Records.

JUNE 1, 1951 FRIDAY

Lefty Frizzell recorded eight Jimmie Rodgers songs at the Jim Back Studio in Dallas, Texas, including ''Travellin' Blues''.

The World War II movie ''Fighting Coast Guards'' opens in theaters with music by The Sons Of The Pioneers.

JUNE 3, 1951 SUNDAY

Louisville, Kentucky, celebrates Pee Wee King Day.

Lula Grace Wood, the future Jan Howard, welcomes her third son, David Bryan Wood, in Greeley, Colorado.

Elvis Presley walked over to the 1132 Kansas Avenue to take a look at the building. He then went home and called Whitehall 8-1652, and asked if they were hiring. A day later, on June 3, 1951, Elvis Presley filled out an employment application and was hired to work from 7:00 a.m. to 3:20 p.m at Precision Tool Corporation, located at 1132 Kansas Avenue, across McLemore Avenue.

JUNE 4, 1951 MONDAY

Decca released Red Foley's ''(There'll Be) Peace In The Valley (For Me)''.

JUNE 6, 1951 WEDNESDAY

Songwriter Jon Vezner is born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He authors such hits as ''Then What?'' by Clay Walker, ''If I Didn't Love You'' by Steve Wariner and ''Where've You Been'' by his wife, Kathy Mattea.

JUNE 8, 1951 FRIDAY

Tony Rice is born in Danville, Virginia. A highly admired bluegrass guitarist, he joins J.D. Crowe and The New South in the 1970s, where his bandmates for a short time include Rocky Skaggs and dobro ace Jerry Douglas.

Carl Smith recorded ''(When You Feel Like You're In Love) Don't Just Stand There'' in the afternoon at the Tulane Hotel's Castle Studio in Nashville.

JUNE 9, 1951 SATURDAY

''Rocket 88'' hit number 1 on the Billboard Rhythm and Blues charts and stayed there well into July. By the end of August it would sell over one hundred thousand copies. In the ads that Chess Records took out in the trade magazines the sky was clearly the limit. ''Climbing to the Top'', proclaimed the girl in the bathing suit, who sat astride a crudely drawn version of the same rocket on which a fully clothed, giddily excited young married couple was perched in the original Oldsmobile ad for ''a driver's dream come true''. But for all of the promise that the ''Hottest Little Label in the Country'' held out for their sensational new act, the seeds for the band's dissolution were already planted and well under way.

Basically, what it came down to in the view of everyone except the principal figure himself was that Jackie Brenston had gotten the big head. Ike Turner was still seething that Jackie's names had gone on the record when everyone knew it was Ike's band. But it wasn't just Ike, who might have been volatile under the best of circumstances. Raymond Hill, the sixteen-year-old lead saxophonist, was sufficiently irked that he commandeered the band and played gigs around the Delta as Raymond Hill and His Delta Cats, on occasion featuring ''Jackie Brimson'', while the real Jackie Brenston was out on his own. According to Ike's admittedly imperfect recollection, the only date the original band played together following the record's release was the triumphant Handy Theatre performance on April 7 and 8, and while that may not have been the literal truth, it didn't miss the mark by much. In fact, when Leonard Chess pressed Sam Phillips for a follow-up by the band, it proved so impossible to get Jackie and the Kings of Rhythm back in the studio at the same time that, with Leonard's permission, Sam picked out a ''Rocket''-styled number written by versatile pianist Billy Love and recorded Billy playing and singing it with an all-star Memphis contingent behind him. He then purchased both song(''Juiced'') and performance from its author and gave it to the record company to put out under Jackie's name.

For the first time, Sam Phillips felt like his star was truly in the ascendancy. Chess rush-released two more of his recordings in this new hard-driving ''swing boogie'' style, including a gruff-voiced novelty item ''Night Workin' Blues'' backed with ''Why Did You DeeGee?'' (Chess 1466) by Rufus Thomas, the WDIA disc jockey who had hosted the Handy Theatre show. The Biharis, too, suddenly seemed more receptive, as Sam completed an animated B.B. King session, this time showcasing B.B.'s own lead guitar, delivered another unclassifiable number by Rosco Gordon and sent in sides by eccentric blues drummer Willie Nix and harmonica wizard Walter Horton in the gutbucket blues style that he himself personally favored. Perhaps almost as significant, a western swing outfit from Chester, Pennsylvania, called Bill Haley and the Saddlemen put out a cover version of ''Rocket 88'', and while Sam didn't think much of Haley's version, it didn't come close in his view to matching the intensity or drive of the original, the very fact of its popularity with a white audience went a long way toward proving a point that he found himself returning to again and again in conversation with Leonard Chess and the Bihari brothers; this music didn't have to be limited to an audience of a certain complexion, this music wasn't restricted to any one segment of the population, this was a music that, by its very nature, potentially had universal appeal.

JUNE 10, 1951 SUNDAY

''Casa Manana'', a musical about an entrepreneur opening a Mexican restaurant, appears in theaters. Spade Cooley provides the band.

JUNE 12, 1951 TUESDAY

The Weavers recorded the pop hit ''Kisses Sweeter Than Wine''. Six years later, it's revived as a pop and country crossover hit by Jimmie Rodgers.

JUNE 15, 1951 FRIDAY

Ernest Tubb recorded the Ray Price-written ''Hey La La'' during an evening session at Nashville's Castle Studio.

JUNE 16, 1951 SATURDAY

Hank and Audrey Williams hold grand opening for a new clothing store, Hank & Audrey's Corral, at 724 Commerce Street in downtown Nashville. Lefty Frizzell is on hand for the activities.

JUNE 17, 1951 SUNDAY

Pop singer Lenny LeBlanc is born in Leominster, Massachusetts. As a member of the duo LeBlanc & Carr, he's part of the 1977 hit ''Falling''. He also writes Sawyer Brown's 1996 country hit ''Treat Her Right''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WALTER ''MUMBLES'' HORTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICES FOR RPM/MODERN RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE JUNE 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Sam Phillips got Walter Horton back to the studio in June 1951. This time he had assembled a new set of musicians with a meatier, electric sound, and the four sides cut on this date were underpinned by Calvin Newborn's amplified guitar, which almost dominated by Phineas Newborn Jr. and Willie Nix may be the drummer. From this session the Biharis issued ''Back Gal'' and Jumpin' Blues'' on their subsidiary label RPM (338).

The remaining unreleased Horton sides didn't see the light of day until 1969 and the early 1970s when they were issued on collections on Kent and Polydor, although bad remastering didn't do the sides justice.

01 - ''BLACK GAL'' - B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Sonny Boy Williamson
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1619 Master
Recorded: June 1951
Released: - Fall 1951
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 338-A < mono
BLACK GAL / JUMPIN' BLUES
Reissued 1973 Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-13 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT

02 - ''HARD HEARTED WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Tristan Music Limited
Matrix number: - MM 1620 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: June 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-14 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHD 252-3 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

03 - ''JUMPIN' BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Walter Horton-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1621 Master - > RPM 324-338 Series <
Recorded: June 1951
Released: - Fall 1951
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 338-B < mono
JUMPIN' BLUES / BLACK GAL
Reissued: - 1973 Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-15 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT

04 - ''GO LONG WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - MM 1622 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: June 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-16 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHD 252-4 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

Mistakenly retitled ''So Long Woman'' on the Polydor LP

After a disagreement with Modern, Sam Phillips continued recording Walter Horton for his own Sun label with Jack Kelly and Jimmy DeBerry. In 1953 he released the magnificent ''Easy'' (Sun 180). However by this time Horton had left Memphis for good and relocated in Chicago where he started a new career working and recording in the bands of Johnny Shines, Jimmy Rogers, and Muddy Waters.

Horton subsequently recorded solo sides for United and Cobra, and by the 1960s he was acting as a regular sideman for dozens of dates with Johnny Young, Big Mama Thornton, Johnny Shines, and Robert Nighthawk. He also appeared on a string of albums under his own name for Argo, Decca, Red Lightning, Sire, Delta and Alligator and through the 1960s and 1970s he was a frequent visitor to European shores, appearing with the American Folk Blues Festival and with the Chicago Blues All Stars. He died in Chicago on December 8, 1981.

Name (Or. No of Instruments)
Walter Horton – Vocal and Harmonica
Calvin Newborn – Guitar
Phineas Newborn – Piano
Possibly Willie Nix - Drums

When Modern Records received outside masters, they would assign their own MM matrix numbers en-bloc, so these do not always accurately refer to the original sessions when they were recorded.

For Biography of Walter Horton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Walter Horton's recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JIM LOCKHART
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICES FOR RPM/MODERN RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY JUNE 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Jim Lockhart, the mysterious Memphis cohort of Joe Hill Louis and Walter Horton, makes his first appearance on wax with ''Boogie Woogie Boogie (Baby)''. This previously unreleased master was cut by Sam Phillips about the same time as the Walter Horton, Joe Hill Louis, and B.B. King sides. Lockhart plays an amplified acoustic guitar which produces an eerie gutbucket sound. He is accompanied by an unknown washboard player and percussionist hitting spoons, or a cowbell - could it be members of a Memphis jug band? These Lockhart masters were perhaps too down-home for release by the Biharis at the time.

Lockhart cut about 3 sides on this session, although the remaining tracks were so badly damaged that they could not be used on this session and CD collection.

01 - ''BOOGIE WOOGIE BOOGIE (BABY)'' - B.M.I. - 5:43
Composer: - Jim Lockhart
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: None - Nor Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 1951
Released: 1988
First appearance: Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCH 252-14 mono
WALTER HORTON - MOUTH HARP MAESTRO
Reissued: - 2003 P-Vine Records (CD) 500/200rpm P-Vine 3058 mono
JUKE JOINT BLUES 1950S - 1960S

02 - ''EMPTY HOUSE BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:14
Composer: - Jim Lockhart
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: None - Nor Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 1951
Released: - January 2, 2013
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 1003-12 mono
THE MODERN DOWNHOME BLUES SESSIONS VOLUME 3 - MEMPHIS ON DOWN

Lockhart apparently hung out at Handy Park with Jack Kelly, Walter Horton, and Joe Hill Louis. Dewey Corley recalls in Bengt Olsson's ''Memphis Blues'', ''In the late 1940s, I played with Joe Hill Louis and Lockhart for a dance in Arkansas; right after that we played for some white people in east Memphis''. Also Willie Borum recalled in 1969, ''I saw Lockhart the other day, he works catching dogs down around Beale now, they said he was Joe Hill's brother, but I don't know. At least they were close as brothers''.

Name (Or. No of Instruments)
Jim Lockhart - Vocal & Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Jim Lockhart see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jim Lockhart's recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ALFRED ''BLUES KING'' HARRIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICES FOR RPM/MODERN RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY JUNE 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

This tracks are by the equally enigmatic Alfred ''Blues King'' Harris who was probably recorded by the Biharis on one of their first trips to Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee in 1950 or 1951.

01 - ''SUFFICIENT CLOTHES'' - B.M.I. - 3:54
Composer: - Alfred Harris
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 1951
Released: - 1988
First appearance: Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCH 252-15 mono
WALTER HORTON - MOUTH HARP MAESTRO
Reissued: - January 2, 2013 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 1003-13 mono
THE MODERN DOWNHOME BLUES SESSIONS VOLUME 3 - MEMPHIS ON DOWN

''Miss Darling'' first appeared in 1969 on Kent LP 9004, credited to Johnny Harris. However, the original 78rpm lacquer was unmarked except for the titles written on its sleeve. On the flip it revealed ''Sufficient Clothes'' which was marred by a surge in level halfway through the performance, but with Bob Jones' technical assistance, the imperfection was corrected.

02 - ''MISS DARLING'' - B.M.I. - 4:12
Composer: - Alfred Harris
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 1951
Released: - 1988
First appearance: Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCH 252-16 mono
WALTER HORTON - MOUTH HARP MAESTRO
Reissued: - January 2, 2013 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 1003-14 mono
THE MODERN DOWNHOME BLUES SESSIONS VOLUME 3 - MEMPHIS ON DOWN

Alfred Harris also recorded in Chicago, as Harmonica Blues King for Ebony and had previously travelled from Memphis with James Bannister where the duo recorded for United in 1954. These sides have recently been released on Delmark's Pearl label on an LP entitled ''Harmonica Blues Kings'' together with Walter Horton's States sides.

The Memphis postwar blues story is gradually emerging and its fascinating puzzle is fitting together. Shortly we will be taking a look into the amazing Little Rock and Helena sessions produced by the Biharis on their trail-blazing field trips during the early fifties.

Name (Or. No of Instruments)
Alfred Harris - Vocal & Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Alfred Harris see: > The Sun Biographies <
Alfred Harris' recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Two takes of "She's A Mean Woman", convincingly spotlight B.B. the blues singer, with a noticeable nod to the melismatic innovations of Roy Brown - whose openthroated delivery also echoes through two renditions of B.B's rocking ''Hard Workin' Woman".

Why the Biharis chose to bury both takes of the driving "Pray For You" is anyone's guess - punchy horns push the proceeding hard (Richard Sanders probably handles the sax solo), and B.B's stinging solo attractively complements his roaring vocal.

STUDIO SESSION FOR B.B. KINGS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICES FOR RPM RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: MONDAY JUNE 18, 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Sam Phillips recorded his final session with B.B. King.

01(1) - "SHE'S A MEAN WOMAN" – B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Riley B. King-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1604 - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 18, 1951
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-2-7 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

01(2) - "SHE'S A MEAN WOMAN" – B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Riley B. King-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1604 Master Take 2
Recorded: - June 18, 1951
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 330-A < mono
SHE'S A MEAN WOMAN / HARD WORKIN' WOMAN
Reissued: - 2002 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-2-8 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

02(1) - "HARD WORKIN' WOMAN'' – B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Riley B. King-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1605 Master Take 1
Recorded: - June 18, 1951
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 330-B < mono
HARD WORKIN' WOMAN / SHE'S A MEAN WOMAN
Reissued: - 2002 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-2-9 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

02(2) - "HARD WORKIN' WOMAN" – B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1605 - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 18, 1951
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-2-10 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

03(1) - "PRAY FOR YOU" – B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Riley B. King
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1606-2- Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 18, 1951
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-2-11 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

03(2) - "PRAY FOR YOU" – B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Riley B. King
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1606-2- Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 18, 1951
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-2-12 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

04(1) - "DARLING I LOVE YOU"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - MM 1607 - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 18, 1951
Released: - Sun Unissued

04(2) - "DARLING I LOVE YOU"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - MM 1607 - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 18, 1951
Released: - Sun Unissued

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Riley B. King - Vocal and Guitar
Richard Sanders - Tenor sax
Johnny Ace - Piano
Earl Forrest - Drums
More details unknown

Memphis could hold B.B. King no longer. His vital recordings of the 1950s and the early 1960s for the Bihari brothers, that inaugurated an open-ended regal reign, are fully revealed in his Ace box set, "The Vintage Years.

For Biography of B.B. King see: > The Sun Biographies <
B.B. King's RPM recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 20 , 1951 WEDNESDAY

''Silver Canyou'' appears in American theaters, with Gene Autry playing a Union scout during the Civil War. Also on the bill, the reliable Pat Buttram.

JUNE 22, 1951 THURSDAY

MGM released Hank Williams ''Hey, Good Lookin'''.

JUNE 26, 1951 TUESDAY

The Yale Bowl in New Haven, Connecticut, present Cole Porter Night, honoring a Yale grad who had become a leading voice for Broadway, and wrote the country hit ''Don't Fence Me In''. Porter, who is ill, does not attend.

JUNE 28, 1951 THURSDAY

Steel guitarist Lloyd Maines is born in Lubbock, Texas. The father of Natalie Maines, he plays on many of The Dixie Chicks' hits, including ''Long Time Gone'', ''Ready To Run'' and ''Wide Open Spaces''.

To protect his business interest, Sam Phillips signed both Ike Turner and Jackie Brenston to what amounted to personal service contracts and, for the $910 he had advanced Jackie already, obtained ownership of Jackie's hit song. Just how little either Sam or Leonard Chess understood of the music business at this point can be gleaned from the fact that neither one had a publishing company, and Sam never gained anything from his ownership of the song. In fact, unbeknownst to him (and without, Chess had already given the publishing to its lawyer in exchange for services rendered, and he in turn had sold it to Hill and Range, among the most prominent of the upstart young BMI song publishers who had taken advantage of the boom in ''race'' and ''hillbilly'' recordings after the war. The personal services contracts with Ike Turner and Jackie Brenston, as well as with the pianist Phineas Newborn Jr. and most likely others, too, were couched in identically optimistic language and painted a rosy future in which Sam would receive 5 percent of each artist's gross income (''including any and all remuneration for personal appearances, stage engagements, recording contracts, etc'') in return for his exclusive guidance, advice, and recording services. Marion Keisker witnessed the agreements, and Phillips breathed a quiet sigh of relief at having finally figured out how to make an honest living without having to start a record company of his own, which he was determined not to do, in what he had long since found to be a very ''dirty'' business.

But if this plan could ever have had a chance of working, by now it was too late. The runaway success of ''Rocket 88'' had finally touched a nerve with the Bihari brothers. At first they seem to have treated Sam's giving the record to Chess as just another harmless eccentricity by this undoubtedly eccentric, and no less naive, maverick studio owner in Memphis. They had continued to do business with Sam well past the time that the record hit number 1. They had accepted the Rosco Gordon and raw blues sides that Sam had sent them for future release. But then at the end of July, the extent of his financial betrayal seems finally to have hit them, as they announced in the trades, in the cold, unemotional language of commercial enterprise, just what they intended to do about it.

JUNE 1951

Unfortunately, Sam Phillips involvement with King ended after a session on June 18, 1951, the casualty of a dispute between the Biharis and Phillips over ''Rocket 88'', a song that Sam Phillips had placed with Chess Records.

After that point Saul Bihari came to Memphis and recorded King on a portable Magnecord at the YMCA or Tuff Green's house. It was probably September 1952, during one of those makeshift session, that King cut ''Three O'Clock Blues''', the song that established him in the rhythm and blues market and got him out of Memphis. (See May 27, 1951 session).

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