- BEAR FAMILY RECORDS -
Sun Records Compact Disc Reissues
 
CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
 
The Sun Years 1956 - 1958 (BCB 15461) Roy Orbison
The Definitive Edition - Volume 1 (BCD 15460) Howlin' Wolf
Just Walkin' In The Rain (BCD 15523) The Prisonaires
The Definitive Edition - Volume 2 (BCD 15500) Howlin' Wolf
The Classic Recordings 1956 - 1960 (BCD 15444) (1-2) Billy Riley
Onie's Bop (BCD 15542) Onie Wheeler
The Classic Sun Recordings 1956 - 1959 (BCD 15525) Sonny Burgess
The Classic Sun Recordings 1956 - 1959 (BCD 15514) Warren Smith
The Be-Bop Boy (BCD 15524) Joe Hill Louis
Rockin' Daddy (BCD 15708) Eddie Bond
Rock Baby, Rock It 1955 - 1960 (BCD 15928) Johnny Carroll
Did You Tell Me (BCD 16220) Narvel Felts
Sun Gospel (BCD 16387) Various Artists
Let's Get Wild (BCD 16837) Rudy Grayzell
Only Believe... (BCD 16893) The Prisonaires
Sun Ballads (BCD 17213) (1-3) Various Artists
Sun Shines On Hank Williams (BCD 17504) Various Artists  
 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Most Sun tracks can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461 mono digital
ROY ORBIDON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958

Compact disc. Bear Family Special Product. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  Bear Family logo and catalog number on the disc left at center. On the back cover, Bear Family logo right on bottom. Catalog number in upper right. Contains the complete Roy Orbison's Sun recordings with 19 unissued or rare masters for the first time. Also included an 12-page booklet with liner notes and Orbison's complete session files by Colin Escott.
 
Producers
Sam C. Phillips and Jack Clement
Re-Issue Producer
Colin Escott
Mastered
Jorg Siemer
Photos
Jerry Huffman, The Showtime Music Archive
Thanks to
Dave Booth, and Bill Millar
 
For music (Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

Contains
1 - Ooby Dooby > Sun 242-A <
2 - Go! Go! Go!  > Sun 242-B <
3 - Rockhouse > Sun 251-B <
4 - You're My Baby  > Sun 251-A <
5 - Sweet And Easy To Love > Sun 265-A / Sun 353-A < 
7 - Chicken Hearted > Sun 284-B <
8 - I Like Love  > Sun 284-A < 
9 - Ooby Dooby (Alternate Take) (Not Originally Issued)
10 - Trying To Get To You (Undubbed) (Not Originally Issued)
11 - Domino (Undubbed) (Not Originally Issued)
12 - It's Too Late (Unubbed) (Not Originally Issued)
13 - You're Gonna Cry (Undubbed) (Not Originally Issued)
14 - This Kind Of Love (Undubbed) (Not Originally Issued)
15 - Mean Little Mama (Undubbed) (Not Originally Issued)
16 - I Never Knew (Undubbed) (Not Originally Issued)
17 - Problem Child (Undubbed) (Not Originally Issued)
18 - Fools Hall Of Fame (Not Originally Issued)
19 - The Cause Of It All (Not Originally Issued)
20 - A True Love Goodbye (Not Originally Issued)
21 - I Was A Fool (Ken Cook) > PI 3534-B < 
22 - Lovestruck (Not Originally Issued)
23 - You Tell Me (Not Originally Issued)
24 - I Give Up (Not Originally Issued)
25 - One More Time (Not Originally Issued)
26 - The Clown (Previously Unissued Alternative)
27 - Claudette (Vocal/Guitar Demo) (Not Originally Issued)
28 - Claudette (Vocal/Group Demo) (Not Originally Issued)
Original Sun Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.
 Roy Orbison's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 
 
ROY ORBISON - Born in Vernon, Texas, on April 23, 1936. His parents, Orbie Lee and Nadine, gave him a guitar for his sixth birthday and taught him the chords to "You Are My Sunshine". Orbie was an auto mechanic in Vernon, but during the war he moved the family to Fort Worth so he could find work in the defense plants. An outbreak of polio in Fort Worth during the war caused his parents to send Roy back to Vernon. After V-J Day they moved back to Vernon as well, soon moving on to the West Texas town of Wink, an oil-boom town close to the Mexican border where Roy grew up in a shotgun shack. His father worked for Olson Drilling, across the state line in Jal, New Mexico.

When he was thirteen Roy Orbison formed his first band, the Wink Westeners, and later renamed as the Teen Kings. His talent had never been in doubt: he had his own radio shows from the age of eight, and when he was ten years old he had played his first paying gig - a medicine show, where he sang the Cajun novelty "Jole Blon". After the Wink Westeners won a talent contest organized by the Pioneer Furniture company in Midland, Pioneer sponsored a weekly television show for them on KMID-TV.

"My first music was country", he recalled to David Booth. "I grew up with country music in Texas. When I was about six, I used to sing Bob Wills "Dusty Skies". Ernest Tubb used to advertise milk back in those days, singing off the back of a truck in Fort Worth when I was there". Hardly surprising that when Roy became a rock and roll singer and sought out the attire to accompany his new image, he drew his inspiration from the Hispanics rather than the blacks. Otherwise though, the music and culture of the Hispanics and even the poorwhites of West Texas barely influenced Orbison's style. There was conspicuously little southern-ness in his music.

The character of the Westeners' music can be judged by their name and the Roy Rogers bandanas they tied jauntily around their necks. "We played whatever was hot", recalls madolin player James Morrow. "Lefty Frizzell, Slim Whitman, Webb Pierce, we did all of their numbers. We also played a lot of Glenn Miller, style songs like "Stardust" and "Moonlight Serenade", which we adapted for string instruments".

Immediately in 1954 after graduation, Orbison worked in the oil fields, playing music at night; then he went to college at North Texas State, transferring to Odessa Junior College for his second year. Ever conscious of security, Roy Orbison studied geology, preparing to follow his father into the oil fields if all else failed.

While at North Texas State, Orbison visited the Big D Jamboree in Dallas. It was there that he saw Elvis Presley for the first time. "First thing", he recalled to Nick Kent, "he came out and spat out a piece of gum onto the stage. He was a punk kid. A weird-looking dude. I can't over-emphasize how shocking he looked and sounded to me that night. He did "Maybellene", and the kids started shouting. There was pandemonium 'cause the girls took a shine to him and the guys were getting jealous. Plus he told some real bad crude jokes. Dumb off-color humor. His diction was real coarse, like a truck driver's. But his energy was incredible and his instinct was just amazing".

One of Roy Orbison's contemporaries at North Texas State was Pat Boone, who had been raised in Nashville but had eloped to Texas with Red Foley's daughter, the one wild-ass move of his life. After a false start on Republic Records, Pat Boone resumed his recording career for Dot Records shortly after he arrived in Denton, and achieved immediate success with his insipid versions of the rhythm and blues hits of the day.

"All these people were doing what I wanted to do", recalled Orbison, "but it seemed as though I was in the wrong place at the right time. I wanted to get a diploma in case I didn't make it in the music business. In the end, though, I decided I didn't want to do anything halfway so I jumped into the music business".

It was Elvis Presley's sound that finally inspired Roy Orbison to contact Sun Records. In 1956 Orbison and his band the Teen Kings, recorded "Ooby Dooby" at their own expense at Norman Petty's studio in Clovis, New Mexico. It was the first record ever cut at the now famous recording studio. The release, On Je-Wel Records (JEW-EL 1001) was not successful. But on the insistence of Johnny Cash, Orbison sent Sam Phillips a copy of "Ooby Dooby". Sam Phillips liked the record and had Orbison re-record a slightly different version on his Sun label (SUN 242), with Carl Perkins on lead guitar. The flip-side of "Ooby Dooby" on the Je-Well label was "Trying To Get To You", which Elvis Presley recorded in 1955.

In 1958 the Everly Brothers recorded an Orbison composition titled "Claudette" named after Orbison's wife. (On June 7, 1965, his wife Claudette was killed in a motorcycle accident during a lakeside ride and was crushed by a truck. Then, in September of 1968, while Roy Orbison was touring in England, his two sons died in a fire at his home in Henderson, after playing with gasoline). Like Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison went to RCA Victor after leaving Sun Records, but he stayed with RCA for only one year (1958). Orbison departed Sun Records because Sam Phillips wouldn't let him record any ballads. He came into national prominence in 1960 with his first million-seller, "Only The Lonely", on Monument Records (Monument 421). That song and most of his hits were written with Joe Melson. Orbison was Elvis' chief rival from 1960 to 1964, charting a number of hits. Singer Bobby Goldsboro was once a member of Orbison's backup band, the Candymen. (Several members of the Candymen became the Atlanta Rhythm Section in the 1970s, while others joined B.J. Thomas' band Beverteeth).

In May and June 1963, Roy Orbison toured in England with an up-coming British group called the Beatles, making Orbison the only artist to have toured with both Elvis Presley and the Beatles. Elvis Presley greatly admired Orbison's singing. During one of his Las Vegas concerts, Elvis Presley introduced Roy Orbison in the audience and then sang a segment of Orbison's 1964 hit song "Its Over" (Monument 837) Roy Orbison was ignored by the Grammy Awards. He had to wait until 1981 before he received his first Grammy and that was for a duet with Emmylou Harris, "That Lovin' You Feelin' Again". Roy Orbison, Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, George Harrison, and Jeff Lynne recorded and toured as the Traveling Wilbury's in 1988. Roy Orbison composed and recorded several songs for the 1980 Elvis-related movie "The Living Legend".

When Roy Orbison lost his final about with heart disease, on December 6, 1988, Roy Orbison died of a heart attack in Henderson, Tennessee at the age of 42, an important slice of pop music history died with him. The fact that his fans included Bruce Springsteen, Elvis Costello and other apostles of the new age exemplifies the fact that his music had a truly ageless quality. He was the lonely boy out on the weekend without a date. His little pop operas, rife with subdued angst and heartbreak, bore remarkably little evidence of his grounding in southern music. They were indeed timeless and place-less in their appeal. However, unlike many of the true stylists who emerged with their sound fully formed, Roy Orbison was malleable and took almost a decade to find himself.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460 mono digital
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1
 
Compact disc. An Bear Family Special Products. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  Bear Family logo left from the center on the disc. On the back cover Bear Family logo left from the center, catalog number in upper right. For the first time, the complete Howlin' Wolf Chess/Sun recordings, many of them previously unissued complete with studio chatter, demos, false starts. Also included in the box, an inlay booklet biography with liner notes by Colin Escott. The inlay also features a detailed session file information by Colin Escott.
 
Producer
Sam C. Phillips
Re-Issue Producer
Colin Escott
Photos
Ernest C. Withers, Steve LaVere Collection
Mastered
Jorg Siemer
Thanks to
Dave Sax
 
For music (Chess/Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

Contains
1 - Oh Red (Take 1) (1989)
2 - My Last Affair (Take 1) (1989)
3 - Come Back Home (Take 1) (1989)
4 - California Boogie (1975)
5 - California Blues (1975)
6 - Loo-A-Here Baby (1978)
7 - Smile At Me (1978)
8 - My Baby Walked Off (1978)
9 - Drinkin' CV Wine (CV Wine Blues) (1975)
10 - My Troubles And Me (1975)
11 - Chocolate Drop (1978)
12 - Mr. Highway Man (Cadillac Daddy) (1975)
13 - Bluebird Blues (1978)
14 - Color And Kind (1989)
15 - (Everybody's) In The Mood (1978)
16 - Dorothy Mae (Number 2) (1989)
17 - I Got A Woman (Sweet Woman) (1978)
18 - Decoration Day Blues (1975)
19 - (Well) That's All Right (1975)
20 - How Many More Years (1989)
21 - Baby Ride With Me (Ridin' In The Moonlight) (1989)
Original Chess/Sun Recordings, licensed by Bellaphon Scallplatten
1-21 - Not Originally Issued
 Howlin' Wolf's Chess recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
HOWLIN' WOLF (CHESTER BURNETT) - Also known as "Big Foot, 'Bull Cow", born Chester Arthur Burnett had been a farmer, blues singer, and soldier by the time he first recorded. His adopted nickname, though far from original, fittem him with made-to-measure precision.

Born in West Point, Clay County, Mississippi, on June 10, 1910, Burnett developed a fondness for the music of the primordial Delta bluesman Charley Patton, who lived near the Burnett family after they moved to Ruleville, Mississippi. 

His father was Dock Burnett (He wasn't no blues singer, but he was a great country ballplayer) and his mother was Gertrude, he was one of 6 children and he frequently sang as a child in the Life Board Baptist Church in Aberdeen, Mississippi. He grew up listening to Charley Patton, Son House, Willie Brown, and the Jackson school of Tommy Johnson with its delicate falsetto moan, in the midst of a Mississippi blues tradition. 

In 1923, Burnett moved to the Young and Myers Plantation in Ruleville, Mississippi to work outside in music. In 1928 to 1930s he frequently worked on the local dances, suppers, Saturday-night hops, fish fries, juke joints and the street in the area of Drew, Cleveland, Penton, West Point, and Ruleville, Mississippi. In 1933, Burnett moved to the Nat Phillips Plantation in Twist, Arkansas to work outside of music, but he frequently worked in the local juke joints such as Will Weller's Place, Will Smith's Place, Vandy Cobb's Place as well as frolics and in the streets in Hughes, Arkansas. 

During the 1930s Burnett married Willie Brown's sister and his second wife was Lillie Handley until his death. Chester Burnett had 4 children. His half-sister, Mary, was married with Sonny Boy Williamson II (Alex Miller) circa 1937. His nickname "Howling Wolf" was given him as a child for his pranks (or) assumed pseudonym from John "Funny Papa" Smith's hit song of the same name during early 1930s. 

"My grandfather give me the name, 'fore he died, John Jones", recalled Howlin' Wolf. "He used to sit down and tell me tall stories about what the wolf would do, y'know, cos I was a bad boy. I was always in devilment. So he told me the story about what the wolf done to Little Red Riding Hood. Every time the girl'd ask him, 'Mr Wolf, what makes your teeth so big??' he said, 'What makes your eyes so red??' "The better I can see you, my dear". 

"And then they finally killed a wolf, and drove it up to the house, and I told 'em was a dog. He said, 'No, that's a wolf'. I said, 'What's a wolf do?'. He said, "Howl, y'know. Whoo-oo-oo'. So I got afraid of the wolf and every time I'd kill some of my mother's chickens she'd go "Whoo-oo-oo", and that scared me and made me mad. And that's how they called me Wolf, and I gets mad about this. So they just kept on calling me Wolf and so I got so I didn't care what they called me. But first I was afraid of the wolf, y'know". 

"I was three years old when they started calling me Wolf. You know how it is, when people find out you get mad about something they always slip that in. The Wolf, it upset me. I didn't know it was going to be a great name for me". 

Howlin' Wolf is influenced by Blind Lemon Jefferson, Tommy Johnson, Charley Patton, Sonny Boy Williamson II (Alex Miller) and he influenced artists as Woodrow Adams, Butterfield Blues Band, Cream, John Fogerty, Birmingham Jones, Floyd Jones, Little Wolf, John Littlejohn, the Rolling Stones, Sidney Semiens, Johnny Shines, The Tail Dragger (James Jones), Amos Wells Jr., Eric Clapton and The Yardbirds. 

Occasional he toured with Robert Johnson, Sonny Boy Williamson II (Alex Miller), with Texas Alexander and others working in juke joints through the states of Tennessee, Arkansas, and Mississippi from the mid-1930s. In 1938, Chester Burnett worked with Robert Jr. Lockwood, Baby Boy Warren and others on Beale Street and the Church Park (WC Handy Park) in Memphis, Tennessee. From 1939 to 1940, Burnett worked on Dooley Square in Tunica, Mississippi. 

After four years in the service, between 1941 and 1945, Burnett settled in Twist, Arkansas to work outside of music as a farmer. In 1946, he returned to continue farming near Penlon, Mississippi, and formed his own band to work in the juke joints of Lake Cummings, Mississippi. In 1948 before deciding to move to West Memphis, Arkansas. Soon after coming to West Memphis, Wolf secured steady work playing whorehouses, black baseball parks, and other spots that catered to country folk in search of a little diversion. The feral energy with which he sang added a new dimension to the traditional Delta blues upon which he based his style. Wolf landed a spot on KWEM in 1950. Monday through Saturday, he appeared between 4:45 and 5:00 p.m., lacing his blues with pitches for grain and fertilizer. In his fortieth year, he became a hot item among the rural blacks around Memphis. He worked with his own group in Jukes and toured with his own group barrelhouses, smallclubs through the South and appeared as disc jockey, singer, producer, and advertising salesman for KWEM-radio in West Memphis, Arkansas. 

"A disc jockey from West Memphis told me about Wolf's show", recalled Sam Phillips to Robert Palmer. "When I heard him, I said, 'This is for me. This is where the soul of man never dies". "Then the Wolf came to the studio and he was about six foot six, with the biggest feet I've ever seen on a human being. Big Foot Chester is one name they used to call him. He would sit there with those feet planted wide apart, playing nothing but the french harp and I tell you, the greatest sight you could see today would be Chester Burnett doing one of those sessions in my studio. God, what it would be worth to see the fervour in that man's face when he sang. His eyes would light up, you'd see the veins on his neck and, there was nothing on his mind but that song. He sang with his damn soul!". 

From 1951 to 1953, Chester Burnett recorded for Sam Phillip's, Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee were his recordings where released to Chess Records in Chicago, Illinois. A 1951 session with the Wolf playing harmonica as well as singing, guitarist Willie Johnson, drummer Willie Steel and on the b-side, Albert Williams or Ike Turner on piano, produced the single "Moanin' At Midnight"/"How Many More Years". This at least is how discographies usually chart this session, but harmonica player James Cotton, who was also to journey up to Chicago in the 1950s but who was at this time playing with the Wolf in Memphis, and was certainly present on later sessions, recalled in conversation with Paul Trynka being in on the Wolf's recording career from the start. 

Later Howlin' Wolf in Chicago, the Chess brothers tried to recreate the sound that Sam Phillips formulated, even to the point of re-recordings some of the unissued titles from Wolf's Memphis sessions. After a few missed cues, Wolf evolved a slightly modified sound in Chicago for Chess, and eventually brought Willie Johnson to join him. He became one of the seminal figures in postwar blues, which ensured that he spent his last years touring college campuses, where he looked strangely out of place amid a sea of freshly scrubbed, young white faces. 

Chester Burnett recorded for the RPM label in Memphis, in 1952 appeared on the weekly show on KXJK-radio in Forrest City, Arkansas and moved in 1952 to Chicago, Illinois to work as s single in the 708 Club and other bars and recorded for the Chess label. He worked at the Rock Bottom Club in Chicago in 1953, the Club Zanzibar in Chicago in 1953 to 1954, worked at the Silkhairs Club in West Memphis, Arkansas in circa 1954, at the Hippodrome Ballroom in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1956, Burnett moved back to Chicago and worked at the Sylvio's Lounge and formed his own band for working at the 708 Club in Chicago, worked at the Big Squeeze Club, Chicago in 1959, the Pepper's, Chicago in 1959, and toured with the American Blues Festival for working on concert dates through England and Europe from 1961 to 1964 (portions of his 1964 Musikhalle concert in Hamburg, West Germany are released on the Fontana label. He worked at the First International Jazz Festival in Washington, DC., in 1962 and worked frequently and appeared on the Big Bill Hill Show for radio WOPA in Oak Park, Illinois, and extensive residency at the Sylvio's Lounge in Chicago during 1963 to 1968. 

From 1963 to 1965, Burnett worked at the Copa Cabana Club, Chicago (portions released on the Chess label. In 1964 he appeared on the International Jazz Jamboree at the Philharmonic Hall in Warsaw, Poland, appeared at the Shinding TV-show for ABC-TV in 1965, worked at the Pepper's in Chicago and worked at the Club 47, Chicago in 1966, at the Newport Folk Festival, Newport, Rhode Island (portions shown in the film "Festival), appeared in Big John's Bar in Chicago, 1966, Cafe A-Go-Go in New York City, 1967, Mother Blues, Chicago in circa 1966, at the University of Chicago Folk Festival in 1968, and appeared on the TV-show "For Blacks Only" for the local TV-station in Chicago in 1968. 

In 1968 to 1969, Burnett appeared at the Club Key Largo, Chicago, and at the Mariposa Folk Festival in Toronto, Canada, at the Ash Grove in Los Angeles, the Scene in New York City, appeared on the local show for WNUR-FM-radio in Evanston, Illinois. In 1969, Chester Burnett toured in England and worked on club concert dates and recorded for the Chess label in London, England. 

Back in the United States, Burnett worked at the Electric Circus in New York City, toured on and worked on club dates on the West Coast, worked at the State University of New York in Buffalo, New Yersey, at the Ann Arbor Blues Festival in Ann Arbor, Michigan 1969 through 1970. He also appeared at the Aragon Ballroom in Chicago in 1969 and appeared at the Flamingo Lounge in Chicago during 1969, The Colonial Tavern in Chicago, The Riviera in Chicago, the Quiet Knight in Chicago, the Sutherland Hotel Lounge in Chicago, the Washington Blues Festival, Howard University, Washington, DC., during 1970. 

He frequently worked at the Cellar in Chicago, Big Duke's Blue Flame Lounge in Chicago during the early 1970s. In 1971, Howlin' Wolf appeared in the film "Wolf", worked at the Star Dust in Chicago, and the Hunter College in New York City in 1971. Appeared at the Notre Dame Blues Festival in South Bend, Indiana, at the Alice's Revisited in Chicago in 1972 (portion released for the Chess label). 

In 1972, Burnett appeared on the Ann Arbor Blues Festival in Ann Arbor, Michigan, at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada, at the Esquire Showbar in Montreal, Canada. In 1973, he also performed at the Joe Place's, Cambridge, Massachusetts, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, Municipal Auditorium, New Orleans, Max's Kansas City in New York City, at the Avery Fisher Hall in New York City. 

Through 1973 to 1975, he appeared and recorded for, El Mocambo Tavern in Toronto, Canada, recorded for Chess in Chicago, appeared and worked for Grendel's Lair in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the High Capparral in Chicago, the Pepper's Hideout in Chicago, Sandy's Concert Club in Boston, Massachusetts, the International Blues Festival in Louisville, Kentucky, at Easter Concert in Cocoa Beach in Florida, the Egress in Vancouver, Canada, the Urban Blues Festival, Auditorium Theater in Chicago, and recorded for the Chess label in London, England. 

From 1974 to 1975, Chester Burnett appeared and worked at the Concert Club in Montreal, Canada, the Richard's Club in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Sting in Chicago, with B.B. King at the International Amphitheater in Chicago, at the University of Chicago Circle Campus in Chicago, the New 1815 Club in Chicago, the Eddie Shaw's Place (old New 1815 Club) in Chicago all in 1975. Chester Burnett awarded honourary as Doctor of Arts degree from Columbia College in Chicago, Illinois in 1972, and he won the Montreux Festival Award for his album "Back Door Wolf" (Chess 50045) in 1975. 

In 1975 inactive in the music Chester Burnett entered Veterans Administration Hospital in Chicago, where he was operated on cancer. On January 10, 1976, Chester Burnett died of cancer at Hines, Illinois. Burnett is buried at the Oakridge Cemetery in Hillside, Illinois. 

Chester Burnett is one of the major shapers of the electrically amplified modern blues style that has been so dominant an influence on all popular music since his time. Howlin' Wolf's voice, dark, brooding, is vibrantly rich and immediately recognizable, and easily transcended the most banal material, and he is a true artist in every sense of the word. 

Talking later about Wolf to biographers James Segrest and Mark Hoffman, Sam Phillips said, ''He had such a soulful sound that even though his words were good blues words, he didn't have to say a sound. Like ''Moanin' At Midnight'', it was a everything just stopped. Time stopped. Everything stopped. All you heard was the Wolf''. Phillips often applied retrospective spin to his reminiscenses, but recently discovered correspondence from 1951 shows that Phillips truly saw the specialness in Wolf right away. He got it first.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15523 mono digital
THE PRISONAIRES - JUST WALKIN' IN THE RAIN
 
Compact disc boxed set. An Bear Family Special Products. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear. The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  Bear Family logo left from the center on the disc. On the back cover Bear Family logo at bottom, catalog number in upper right. For the first time, the complete Prisonaires' Sun recordings, many of them previously unissued complete with studio chatter. Also included in the boxed set, 26-page booklet biography with liner notes by Colin Escott. The booklet also features rare and previously unpublished photos and a detailed session file information by Colin Escott.
 
Producer
Sam C. Phillips (except 1-4)
Re-Issue Producer
Colin Escott
Disc Dubs
Rebecca Everett
Mastered
Bob Jones
Liner Notes
Colin Escott
Discography
Colin Escott
Artwork
Hoffmann Nienburg
 
Photos and Illustrations
Johnny Bragg, Colin Escott, Ebony Magazine,
Dave Booth, The Showtime Music Archive
 
For music (Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

Contains
1 - Just Walkin' In The Rain (1971) (Not Originally Issued)
2 - Baby Please (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
3 - Dreaming Of You (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
4 - That Chick's Too Young To Fry (1976) (Not Originally Issued)
5 - Just Walkin' In The Rain (1953) > Sun 186-B <
6 - Baby Please (1953) > Sun 186-A <
7 - Softly And Tenderly (1953) > Sun 189-B <
8 - My God Is Real (1953) > Sun 189-A <
9 - A Prisoner's Prayer (1953) > Sun 191-A <
10 - No More Tears (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
11 - I Know (1953) > Sun 191-B <
12 - No More Tears (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
13 - If I Were King (1976) (Not Originally Issued)
14 - I Wish (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
15 - Don't Say Tomorrow (1976) (Not Originally Issued)
16 - No More Tears (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
17 - What'll You Do Next (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
18 - There Is Love In You (1954) > Sun 207-A < 
19 - What'll You Do Next (1954) > Sun 207-B <
20 - Two Strangers (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
21 - What About Frank Clement (A Mighty Man) (1976) (Not Originally Issued)
22 - Friends Call Me A Fool (1990) (Not Originally Issued) (Not Originally Issued)
23 - Lucille, I Want You (1976) (Not Originally Issued)
24 - Surleen (1976) (Not Originally Issued)
25 - All Alone And Lonely (1986) (Not Originally Issued)
26 - Rockin' Horse (1976) (Not Originally Issued)
Original Sun Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.  
The Prisonaires' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
THE PRISONAIRES - Johnny Bragg, 27-years-old from Nashville, was the lead singer in the Prisonaires, and convicted on 6 counts of rape, and sentenced 594 years in prison. Other members of the group are, John Drue, 29 years-old from Lebanon, lead tenor vocal, sentenced 3 years for larceny; Marcel Sanders, 29-years-old from Chattanooga, bass vocal, sentenced 1 to 5 years for involuntary manslaughter.

And finally 30-year-old Williams Steward, baritone vocal and guitar who has been imprisoned since he was 17 years old, got to crying, his mother was crying, because he was sentenced 99 years for murder; and Edward Thurman, 36-years-old from Nashville, tenor vocal, also sentenced 99 years for murder.

The group was made up of inmates from the Tennessee State Penitentiary. They wrote and recorded for Sun Records. According to prison records, Johnny Bragg was a bastard kid, born in Nashville, Tennessee on January 18, 1926, and jailed on May 8, 1943 on six counts of rape. According to Bragg, he was born on May, 1929 (the earlier date is his brother's birth date, which he used because the City had no trace of his own birth), and the prison term was the result of a frame-up and terrible misunderstanding. "My troubles started when I was twelve years old", said Bragg cagily. "My friend was dating my girlfriend, we got to fighting, and she said I tried to rape her. While they had me, they put all these unsolved cases on me, told the peoples I was the one. Later some of them said they was wrong, and wanted to clear their consciences before they died. A lady goes to my church, and she shakes her head and says, 'We sure did you wrong, John'".

Once inside, Bragg joined a gospel group with Ed Thurman, William Steward, Clarence Moore and another whom Bragg recalls only as 'Sam'. They subsequently argued, and Bragg formed another group called the Prisonaires. He later brought in 36 year-old Thurman (99 years for murder) as manager, and 30 year-old Steward (99 years for murder) as music director. Guitarist Steward had a convict since his seventeenth birthday. They were joined in the early 1950s by John Drue (3 years for larceny), and Marcel Sanders (1 to 5 years for involuntary manslaughter). Incidentally, it appears as though Steward was not the same William Steward who recorded country blues for Sun. The William "Talking Boy" Steward tapes were recorded in 1951, and Bragg recalls that William Steward never played country blues.

It is unclear how the Prisonaires came to be heard outside the prison walls. A contemporary report stated that Joe Calloway of WSIX, Nashville, was at the prison for a newscast, heard the group and arranged for them to have a regular show on WSIX, and on the local black station, WSOK. Calloway's approach came as a wind of change was blowing through the prison. Previously known as 'Swafford's Graveyard' after the previous warden, the jail was now being managed by James Edwards, a friend of Governor Frank Clement, who wanted to prepare the inmates for their return to society.

According to Johnny Bragg, he had already made contact with the outside world - in particular with hillbilly singers, who would come to the penitentiary to buy songs. "Word go around there was a nigger who could write any kind of songs", said Bragg. "Hank Williams come out there, Roy Acuff, Ernest Tubb, Little Jimmie Dickens... they all come". Among the songs that Bragg claims to have sold was "Your Cheatin' Heart", and it is at least possible that Williams bought the genesis of the song from Bragg, as he bought other songs that he made uniquely his own. One of those who came to the prison looking for copyrights was Red Wortham, owner of Wortham Music.

Johnny Bragg says that Wortham came to buy songs from him; according to the 'Commercial Appeal' report, Wortham came to the prison to check out a hillbilly songwriter (possible Clarence "Two Hats" McKeel who later wrote songs for Hugh X. Lewis and others, and helped write the lead-sheet for "Just Walking In The Rain"), but was asked to listen to the Prisonaires.

Not regarding himself a judge of rhythm and blues acts, Wortham sent a tape of the Prisonaires made at WSIX to his cousin, Jim Bulleit. By that point, Bulleit had a long career in the Nashville music business - as a partner in Bullet Records, as manager of his own labels, and representative of others. Early in 1953 he bought himself a minority holding in Sun Records, and one of his first moves was to forward Wortham's tape to Sam Phillips with the recommendation that the group be signed. That tape is probably the one that contains earlier versions of "Just Walking In The Rain" and "Baby Please", together with the Louis Jordan tune "That Chick's Too Young To Fry". The songs were tapes over a WSIX radio show, "Youth On Parade", starring Pat Boone.

Johnny Bragg recalled that he had written "Just Walking In The Rain" (SUN 186) in conjunction with Robert Riley, an inmate who couldn't sing. They were walking to the prison laundry, when Bragg said, "Here we are walking in the rain. I wonder what the little girls are doing?". Riley said it sounded like a good song title, and they quickly worked up the song.

Bulleit evidently persuaded Phillips to record the group, while Wortham retained the music publishing rights. Sam Phillips released "Just Walking In The Rain" on July 8, 1953. On July 28, Jud Phillips went to Nashville to meet Bulleit and the Prisonaires. Jud had joined Sun a few months earlier, and was learning the fine art of record promotion and distribution. "They boys (Prisonaires) are getting from 10 to 25 letters a day from all over the country", wrote Jud. "They plan to bring all of them to you when they come over. They make me think of a bunch of baby birds. They are fine boys all of them. I get great joy out of helping people like that... I know you do too".

Phillips also got great joy from watching the orders roll in. Ebony magazine reported that "Just Walkin' In The Rain" sold almost a quarter of a million copies, and heaped praise on the Sun label. If Sam Phillips was able to press 50,000 of this song he was lucky, but the publicity was important to Sun.

The Prisonaires' lead singer, Johnny Bragg, told a number of reporters that Elvis Presley helped with the lyrics to "Just Walkin' In The Rain". Colin Escott and Martin Hawkins, in Good Rockin' Tonight, published in 1991, report Braggs' claim that Elvis Presley was in the studio when the Prisonaires recorded "Just Walkin' In The Rain". It is unlikely that Elvis Presley was hanging around Sun Records during the Prisonaires recording sessions. "It was hard to keep Elvis Presley from the studio", Marcus Van Story remembered. "He loved the Prisonaires gospel sound". Despite this, Bragg's claim remains unsubstantiated. "I don't remember Elvis watching the Prisonaires record", Ronald Smith commented. The Prisonaires were nevertheless an important influence upon both Elvis Presley and Sam Phillips. Elvis Presley was mesmerized by Bragg's vocals, and Sam Phillips was intrigued by the crossover sound the Prisonaires produced.

The group making personal appearances on day passes throughout the state, and - with considerable complication - outside the state. They were held up by warden James Edwards(*) and Governor Clement as shining examples of rehabilitation. "The hopes of tomorrow rather than the mistakes of yesterday", gushed Clement, who brought the group to the governor's mansion, and bought William Steward a new guitar. His enthusiasm earned him the unissued paean "What About Frank Clement (A Mighty, Mighty Man)", which had "Parole - Please" written all over it.

Sam Phillips found it impossible to continue the Prisonaires' success, however. As the follow-up record to "Just Walkin' In The Rain" Phillips selected "Softly And Tenderly" (SUN 189). Billboard reviewed this release enthusiastically, but it failed to sell in large numbers. Sun Records then released two more pop Prisonaires records before the group faded into obscurity. There remain a number of unreleased Prisonaires recording, years later, released by Bear Family Records in Germany.

Around early 1955, the group started breaking up. Drue and Sanders were released, followed by Steward and Thurman. Surprisingly, Thurman's release excited some controversy in the local press, "The people of Tennessee can only hope that the killers still behind bars are non singers", said the editorial in the Nashville Tennessean on April 29, 1955. Bragg re-formed the Prisonaires as the Marigolds with a new set of faces including Hal Hebb (Bobby Hebb's brother).

Unknown to Bragg, though, events were taking place that would help to secure his future once he got outside. In May 1954, Joe Johnson (later president of Challence Records, then working for Gene Autry's publishing company, Golden West Melodies) arranged for Autry to acquire the copyright of "Just Walking In The Rain" from Red Wortham, shortly after, Autry recorded a dismal version for Columbia, but Don Law, Columbia's head of country Artist and Repertoire, saw something in the song, and when he was in New York he ran into Mitch Miller who was scouting songs for a Johnny Ray session. Ray recorded "Just Walking In The Rain" on June 29, 1956 in his usual petulant style, and it provide to be his commercial rebirth after a year or two in the wilderness.

Johnny Bragg claims to have had a premonition of Ray's recording, but he had no premonition of the vast amount of money it would bring him. "The first cheque was for $1400", recalls Bragg, "and I told the warden to go ahead and put the cheque in the commissary so I could buy some candy and so on. I thought the amount was $14.00! The next cheque was for $7500". Johnny Bragg received and invitation to the Annual BMI Awards dinner in New York for December 3, 1956. The invitation specified that he could bring a guest, who - had he gone - would probably have been an armed guard.

By this point, Johnny Bragg was far less keen to sell compositions. He successfully pitched a few of his songs, including "Don't Bug Me Baby", recorded by Milton Allen for RCA in 1957 (and reissued on Bear Family BFX 15357). Ernie Young, owner of Ernie's record Mart and Excello/Nashboro Records, signed the Marigolds and they cut four singles, including "Two Stranger", first recorded by the Prisonaires at Sun. At roughly the same time, another unissued Prisonaires song, "Don't Say Tomorrow" was cut by the Hollyhocks on Nasco Records. Detail hounds may care to note that the Marigolds also cut an unreleased version of the song.

Johnny Bragg was finally released from prison in 1959, and he started recording for Decca Records in Nashville and writing for Tree Music. However, he was back behind bars again the following year for robbery and attempted murder, charges that Bragg asserts were setup. "A man whose name I can't say, said 'If that Bible totin' governor turns that nigger loose, I'll get him back inside even if I have to frame him", said Bragg darkly. "They charged me on three counts and finally got me on a charge of stealing $2.50 - and I had all kinds of money. It was pitiful". UPI reported that Johnny Bragg had indeed been indicted on harges of stealing $2.50, but that he had done so at gunpoint, whereupon two other white women identified him as the man who had tried to attack them. One of the charges finally stuck, and Johnny Bragg went back inside in May 1960.

A few months later, the Elvis Presley connection had its final postscript. Bragg was visited by Elvis Presley, who had just returned from West-Germany. "He asked repeatedly", said Bragg, "Did I need a lawyer, was there anything he could do for me". Needing help so bad he could taste it, Bragg nevertheless declined. "They said if I didn't take the case to the Supreme Court, they'd get me out in nine months", asserted Brag, "but I didn't get out in nine months, and that messed me up a little bit".

An article in the ''The Tennessean'' local press in Nashville reads: ELVIS VISITS PRISON. On March 8, 1961, route home to Memphis after Wednesday's visit to the State Legislature, singer-actor Elvis Presley stopped for approximately 45 minutes at the State Prison. He toured the various workshops, dining hall, and death-house, and talked briefly with song-writer Johnny Bragg, who is doing time for a parole violation. "It was Elvis' idea to drive by the penitentiary", one of his traveling companions - buddy-guard - said. "He has known Bragg from back when he was starting out as an entertainer; scrounging for a living".

According to Ann Ellington, daughter of Tennessee Governor Buford Ellington. ''One of the people that he (Elvis) wanted to meet while he was up at that particular time was a gentleman by the name of Johnny Bragg. Johnny was incarcerated at the Tennessee State Prison at that time. And John had a group called the Prisonaires, who sang a lot of gospel songs, incredibly talented people. And there were times when we had state functions at the state, at the Governor's residence, that we would have them come out and perform. And because of their mutual love of music, Elvis wanted to meet him. So my dad arranged for, Elvis and Joe and Alan to go out to the state prison and meet, have time with Johnny Bragg. And we drove out there and the warden at that time came out to meet the car. And we started to get out to get in, and the warden says, 'I'm sorry, but Ann can't come in'. And so Joe and Elvis went inside to meet with Johnny, and Alan, bless his heart, got the chore of sitting in the car with me while all of this was going on inside. Both of us would love to have heard the conversation, but we weren't allowed to do that''.

Upon his re-release seven years later, Johnny Bragg formed Elbejay Records in partnership with Raymond Ligon and Cyril Jackson, and recorded three singles for them. By his account, he forgave Red Wortham for cheating the Prisonaires out of publishing royalties on "Just Walking In The Rain", and brought him in as Artist and Repertoire manager at Elbejay Records.

Johnny Bragg's troubles didn't end upon his re-release, though. He was returned to prison for shoplifting, and released on parole (for the third time) following the death of his wife, leaving him a single parent. With his faith and his health still more-or-less, intact, though, he has done better than the other members of the Prisonaires. They all died in varying degrees of poverty or distress. The saddest case was that of William Steward who died of alcohol poisoning in a cheap motel room in Florida. Only Robert Riley manager to a more-or-less successful career in the music business. Before his death he became a contracted writer at Three Music and cranked out country-soul songs for Nashville-based labels such as Dial, Todd and Sound Stage Seven.

The Prisonaires gained their moment of fame as a novelty act, but, as his music proves convincingly, their work transcends more novelty appeal. Johnny Bragg had a stilling lead tenor that ranks alongside that of his idol, Bill Kenny of the Inkspots. The music they cut for Sun Records was quite unlike anything else on the label - sophisticated and urbane, largely lacking the raw edge that Sam Phillips cherished. Certainly, there were some performances that missed the mark, but there's also "Just Walking In The Rain", a classic by any criterion.

There is fierce pride in Johnny Bragg - evident in the way he spits out the world "Penitentiary". There is also darkness within him, which he laid aside to produce some hauntingly beautiful music.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500 mono digital
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2
 
Compact disc. An Bear Family Special Products. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  Bear Family logo left from the center on the disc. On the back cover Bear Family logo left from the center, catalog number in upper right. The Howlin' Wolf Chess/Sun recordings, many of them previously unissued from acetate demos, complete with studio chatter. Also included in the box, an 8-page booklet biography with liner notes by Colin Escott. The booklet also features a detailed. Session file information by Colin Escott.
 
Producer
Sam C. Phillips
Re-Issue Producers
Colin Escott and Dave Sax
Mastered
Jorg Siemer
Disc Tape Transfer
Mark Wilder and Richard Weize
Liner Note
Jim Dickinson
Illustrations
Colin Escott
Artwork
Hoffmann Nienburg
 
For music (Chess/Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

Contains
1 - Baby Ride With Me
2 - How Many More Years (1990) > Chess 1479-B <
3 - Moanin' At Midnight (1951) > Chess 1479-A < 
4 - Howlin' Wolf Boogie (1951) > Chess 1497-A < 
5 - The Wolf Is At Your Door (1952) > Chess 1497-B <
6 - Mr. Highway Man (1952) > Chess 1510-B <
7 - Getting Old And Grey (1952) > Chess 1510-A <
8 - Worried All The Time (1952) > Chess 1515-B <
9 - Saddle My Pony (1952) > Chess 1515-A <
10 - Oh Red (Take 3) (1953) > Chess 1528-A <
11 - My Last Affair (Take 2)  > Chess 1528-B < 
12 - Come Back Home (Take 2) (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
13 - Dorothy Mae (1978) (Not Originally Issued)
14 - Oh Red (Take 2) (1989) (Not Originally Issued)
15 - Come Back Home (Take 3) (1978) (Not Originally Issued)
16 - How Many More Years (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
17 - How Many More Years (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
18 - Baby Ride With Me (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
19 - Baby Ride With Me (1990) (Not Originally Issued)
Original Chess/Sun Recordings
 
Acetates courtesy of Marion Keisker MacInnes (1, 16-19)
Original 78rpm discs of courtesy of Dave Sax and Cilla Huggins
Original Chess and Phillips licensed from Teldec Record Service (2-11)
 
Most of the repertoire on this collection was dubbed from acetate or disc source resulting in an unavoidable level of surface noise. Many of the original master tapes have been lost.
  Howlin' Wolf's Chess recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
HOWLIN' WOLF (CHESTER BURNETT) - Also known as "Big Foot, 'Bull Cow", born Chester Arthur Burnett had been a farmer, blues singer, and soldier by the time he first recorded. His adopted nickname, though far from original, fittem him with made-to-measure precision.

Born in West Point, Clay County, Mississippi, on June 10, 1910, Burnett developed a fondness for the music of the primordial Delta bluesman Charley Patton, who lived near the Burnett family after they moved to Ruleville, Mississippi. 

His father was Dock Burnett (He wasn't no blues singer, but he was a great country ballplayer) and his mother was Gertrude, he was one of 6 children and he frequently sang as a child in the Life Board Baptist Church in Aberdeen, Mississippi. He grew up listening to Charley Patton, Son House, Willie Brown, and the Jackson school of Tommy Johnson with its delicate falsetto moan, in the midst of a Mississippi blues tradition. 

In 1923, Burnett moved to the Young and Myers Plantation in Ruleville, Mississippi to work outside in music. In 1928 to 1930s he frequently worked on the local dances, suppers, Saturday-night hops, fish fries, juke joints and the street in the area of Drew, Cleveland, Penton, West Point, and Ruleville, Mississippi. In 1933, Burnett moved to the Nat Phillips Plantation in Twist, Arkansas to work outside of music, but he frequently worked in the local juke joints such as Will Weller's Place, Will Smith's Place, Vandy Cobb's Place as well as frolics and in the streets in Hughes, Arkansas. 

During the 1930s Burnett married Willie Brown's sister and his second wife was Lillie Handley until his death. Chester Burnett had 4 children. His half-sister, Mary, was married with Sonny Boy Williamson II (Alex Miller) circa 1937. His nickname "Howling Wolf" was given him as a child for his pranks (or) assumed pseudonym from John "Funny Papa" Smith's hit song of the same name during early 1930s. 

"My grandfather give me the name, 'fore he died, John Jones", recalled Howlin' Wolf. "He used to sit down and tell me tall stories about what the wolf would do, y'know, cos I was a bad boy. I was always in devilment. So he told me the story about what the wolf done to Little Red Riding Hood. Every time the girl'd ask him, 'Mr Wolf, what makes your teeth so big??' he said, 'What makes your eyes so red??' "The better I can see you, my dear". 

"And then they finally killed a wolf, and drove it up to the house, and I told 'em was a dog. He said, 'No, that's a wolf'. I said, 'What's a wolf do?'. He said, "Howl, y'know. Whoo-oo-oo'. So I got afraid of the wolf and every time I'd kill some of my mother's chickens she'd go "Whoo-oo-oo", and that scared me and made me mad. And that's how they called me Wolf, and I gets mad about this. So they just kept on calling me Wolf and so I got so I didn't care what they called me. But first I was afraid of the wolf, y'know". 

"I was three years old when they started calling me Wolf. You know how it is, when people find out you get mad about something they always slip that in. The Wolf, it upset me. I didn't know it was going to be a great name for me". 

Howlin' Wolf is influenced by Blind Lemon Jefferson, Tommy Johnson, Charley Patton, Sonny Boy Williamson II (Alex Miller) and he influenced artists as Woodrow Adams, Butterfield Blues Band, Cream, John Fogerty, Birmingham Jones, Floyd Jones, Little Wolf, John Littlejohn, the Rolling Stones, Sidney Semiens, Johnny Shines, The Tail Dragger (James Jones), Amos Wells Jr., Eric Clapton and The Yardbirds. 

Occasional he toured with Robert Johnson, Sonny Boy Williamson II (Alex Miller), with Texas Alexander and others working in juke joints through the states of Tennessee, Arkansas, and Mississippi from the mid-1930s. In 1938, Chester Burnett worked with Robert Jr. Lockwood, Baby Boy Warren and others on Beale Street and the Church Park (WC Handy Park) in Memphis, Tennessee. From 1939 to 1940, Burnett worked on Dooley Square in Tunica, Mississippi. 

After four years in the service, between 1941 and 1945, Burnett settled in Twist, Arkansas to work outside of music as a farmer. In 1946, he returned to continue farming near Penlon, Mississippi, and formed his own band to work in the juke joints of Lake Cummings, Mississippi. In 1948 before deciding to move to West Memphis, Arkansas. Soon after coming to West Memphis, Wolf secured steady work playing whorehouses, black baseball parks, and other spots that catered to country folk in search of a little diversion. The feral energy with which he sang added a new dimension to the traditional Delta blues upon which he based his style. Wolf landed a spot on KWEM in 1950. Monday through Saturday, he appeared between 4:45 and 5:00 p.m., lacing his blues with pitches for grain and fertilizer. In his fortieth year, he became a hot item among the rural blacks around Memphis. He worked with his own group in Jukes and toured with his own group barrelhouses, smallclubs through the South and appeared as disc jockey, singer, producer, and advertising salesman for KWEM-radio in West Memphis, Arkansas. 

"A disc jockey from West Memphis told me about Wolf's show", recalled Sam Phillips to Robert Palmer. "When I heard him, I said, 'This is for me. This is where the soul of man never dies". "Then the Wolf came to the studio and he was about six foot six, with the biggest feet I've ever seen on a human being. Big Foot Chester is one name they used to call him. He would sit there with those feet planted wide apart, playing nothing but the french harp and I tell you, the greatest sight you could see today would be Chester Burnett doing one of those sessions in my studio. God, what it would be worth to see the fervour in that man's face when he sang. His eyes would light up, you'd see the veins on his neck and, there was nothing on his mind but that song. He sang with his damn soul!". 

From 1951 to 1953, Chester Burnett recorded for Sam Phillip's, Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee were his recordings where released to Chess Records in Chicago, Illinois. A 1951 session with the Wolf playing harmonica as well as singing, guitarist Willie Johnson, drummer Willie Steel and on the b-side, Albert Williams or Ike Turner on piano, produced the single "Moanin' At Midnight"/"How Many More Years". This at least is how discographies usually chart this session, but harmonica player James Cotton, who was also to journey up to Chicago in the 1950s but who was at this time playing with the Wolf in Memphis, and was certainly present on later sessions, recalled in conversation with Paul Trynka being in on the Wolf's recording career from the start. 

Later Howlin' Wolf in Chicago, the Chess brothers tried to recreate the sound that Sam Phillips formulated, even to the point of re-recordings some of the unissued titles from Wolf's Memphis sessions. After a few missed cues, Wolf evolved a slightly modified sound in Chicago for Chess, and eventually brought Willie Johnson to join him. He became one of the seminal figures in postwar blues, which ensured that he spent his last years touring college campuses, where he looked strangely out of place amid a sea of freshly scrubbed, young white faces. 

Chester Burnett recorded for the RPM label in Memphis, in 1952 appeared on the weekly show on KXJK-radio in Forrest City, Arkansas and moved in 1952 to Chicago, Illinois to work as s single in the 708 Club and other bars and recorded for the Chess label. He worked at the Rock Bottom Club in Chicago in 1953, the Club Zanzibar in Chicago in 1953 to 1954, worked at the Silkhairs Club in West Memphis, Arkansas in circa 1954, at the Hippodrome Ballroom in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1956, Burnett moved back to Chicago and worked at the Sylvio's Lounge and formed his own band for working at the 708 Club in Chicago, worked at the Big Squeeze Club, Chicago in 1959, the Pepper's, Chicago in 1959, and toured with the American Blues Festival for working on concert dates through England and Europe from 1961 to 1964 (portions of his 1964 Musikhalle concert in Hamburg, West Germany are released on the Fontana label. He worked at the First International Jazz Festival in Washington, DC., in 1962 and worked frequently and appeared on the Big Bill Hill Show for radio WOPA in Oak Park, Illinois, and extensive residency at the Sylvio's Lounge in Chicago during 1963 to 1968. 

From 1963 to 1965, Burnett worked at the Copa Cabana Club, Chicago (portions released on the Chess label. In 1964 he appeared on the International Jazz Jamboree at the Philharmonic Hall in Warsaw, Poland, appeared at the Shinding TV-show for ABC-TV in 1965, worked at the Pepper's in Chicago and worked at the Club 47, Chicago in 1966, at the Newport Folk Festival, Newport, Rhode Island (portions shown in the film "Festival), appeared in Big John's Bar in Chicago, 1966, Cafe A-Go-Go in New York City, 1967, Mother Blues, Chicago in circa 1966, at the University of Chicago Folk Festival in 1968, and appeared on the TV-show "For Blacks Only" for the local TV-station in Chicago in 1968. 

In 1968 to 1969, Burnett appeared at the Club Key Largo, Chicago, and at the Mariposa Folk Festival in Toronto, Canada, at the Ash Grove in Los Angeles, the Scene in New York City, appeared on the local show for WNUR-FM-radio in Evanston, Illinois. In 1969, Chester Burnett toured in England and worked on club concert dates and recorded for the Chess label in London, England. 

Back in the United States, Burnett worked at the Electric Circus in New York City, toured on and worked on club dates on the West Coast, worked at the State University of New York in Buffalo, New Yersey, at the Ann Arbor Blues Festival in Ann Arbor, Michigan 1969 through 1970. He also appeared at the Aragon Ballroom in Chicago in 1969 and appeared at the Flamingo Lounge in Chicago during 1969, The Colonial Tavern in Chicago, The Riviera in Chicago, the Quiet Knight in Chicago, the Sutherland Hotel Lounge in Chicago, the Washington Blues Festival, Howard University, Washington, DC., during 1970. 

He frequently worked at the Cellar in Chicago, Big Duke's Blue Flame Lounge in Chicago during the early 1970s. In 1971, Howlin' Wolf appeared in the film "Wolf", worked at the Star Dust in Chicago, and the Hunter College in New York City in 1971. Appeared at the Notre Dame Blues Festival in South Bend, Indiana, at the Alice's Revisited in Chicago in 1972 (portion released for the Chess label). 

In 1972, Burnett appeared on the Ann Arbor Blues Festival in Ann Arbor, Michigan, at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada, at the Esquire Showbar in Montreal, Canada. In 1973, he also performed at the Joe Place's, Cambridge, Massachusetts, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, Municipal Auditorium, New Orleans, Max's Kansas City in New York City, at the Avery Fisher Hall in New York City. 

Through 1973 to 1975, he appeared and recorded for, El Mocambo Tavern in Toronto, Canada, recorded for Chess in Chicago, appeared and worked for Grendel's Lair in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the High Capparral in Chicago, the Pepper's Hideout in Chicago, Sandy's Concert Club in Boston, Massachusetts, the International Blues Festival in Louisville, Kentucky, at Easter Concert in Cocoa Beach in Florida, the Egress in Vancouver, Canada, the Urban Blues Festival, Auditorium Theater in Chicago, and recorded for the Chess label in London, England. 

From 1974 to 1975, Chester Burnett appeared and worked at the Concert Club in Montreal, Canada, the Richard's Club in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Sting in Chicago, with B.B. King at the International Amphitheater in Chicago, at the University of Chicago Circle Campus in Chicago, the New 1815 Club in Chicago, the Eddie Shaw's Place (old New 1815 Club) in Chicago all in 1975. Chester Burnett awarded honourary as Doctor of Arts degree from Columbia College in Chicago, Illinois in 1972, and he won the Montreux Festival Award for his album "Back Door Wolf" (Chess 50045) in 1975. 

In 1975 inactive in the music Chester Burnett entered Veterans Administration Hospital in Chicago, where he was operated on cancer. On January 10, 1976, Chester Burnett died of cancer at Hines, Illinois. Burnett is buried at the Oakridge Cemetery in Hillside, Illinois. 

Chester Burnett is one of the major shapers of the electrically amplified modern blues style that has been so dominant an influence on all popular music since his time. Howlin' Wolf's voice, dark, brooding, is vibrantly rich and immediately recognizable, and easily transcended the most banal material, and he is a true artist in every sense of the word. 

Talking later about Wolf to biographers James Segrest and Mark Hoffman, Sam Phillips said, ''He had such a soulful sound that even though his words were good blues words, he didn't have to say a sound. Like ''Moanin' At Midnight'', it was a everything just stopped. Time stopped. Everything stopped. All you heard was the Wolf''. Phillips often applied retrospective spin to his reminiscenses, but recently discovered correspondence from 1951 shows that Phillips truly saw the specialness in Wolf right away. He got it first. 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444 (1-2) mono digital
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960
 
2 compact disc set. An Bear Family Special Products. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  Bear Family logo and catalog number left from the center on the disc. On the front cover photo, Billy Riley performed at the Ellis Auditorium in Memphis. On the back cover Bear Family logo at bottom left on bottom. Catalog number below center.
 
For the first time, the complete Billy Riley's Sun recordings, many of them previously unissued complete with studio chatter, demos, false starts. Also included in the boxed set, 40-page booklet biography, with liner notes by Rob Bowman, Ross Johnson, and Colin Escott. The booklet also features photos and a detailed session file information by Colin Escott.
 
Producers
Ernie Barton, Owen Bradley, Jack Clement, Bill Justis,
Sam C. Phillips, Billy Riley
Re-Issue Producer
Colin Escott
Photos
Colin Escott, Dave Booth, The Showtime Music Archive, Billy Riley,
Tommie Wix, Roland Janes, Martin Hawkins, and
Richard Weize Collection
Liner Notes
Rob Bowman, Ross Johnson
Digital Mastering
Bob Jones
Special thanks to
Jimmy M. Van Eaton, Edwin Howard, Roland Janes,
Bill Millar, Billy Riley, Hans-Peter Zdrenka
 
For music (Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

Disc 1 Contains
1 - Rock With Me Baby (1956) > Sun 245-B <
2 - Trouble Bound (1956) > Sun 245-A <
3 - Flying Saucer Rock And Roll (1957) > Sun 260-A <
4 - I Want You Baby (1957) > Sun 260-B <
5 - Red Hot (1957) > Sun 277-A <
6 - Pearly Lee (1957) > Sun 277-A <
7 - Wouldn't You Know (1958) > Sun 289-B <
8 - Baby Please Don't Go (1958) > Sun 289-A <
9 - Rockin' On The Moon (1958)
10 - Is That All To The Ball (1958)
11 - Itchy (1958) > Sun304-A <
12 - Thunderbird (1958) > Sun 304-B <
13 - Down By The Riverside 1959) > Sun 313-B <
14 - No Name Girl (1959) > Sun 313-A <
15 - Come Back Baby (One More Time) (1959) > Sun 322-A <
16 - Got The Water Boilin (1959) > Sun 322-B <
17 - Open The Door Richard (Ernie Barton) (1959) > PI 3541-A <
18 - Dark Muddy Bottom (1960)
19 - Repossession Blues (1960)
20 - That's What I Want To Do (1960)
21 - Too Much Woman For Me (1960)
Dubs off discs: CD 1, tracks 1,2,20 and 21
Original Sun Recordings

Disc 2 Contains
1 - Flying Saucer Rock And Roll (1990) 
2 - I Want You (1990) 
3 - She's My Baby (Red Hot) (1987)
4 - Pearly Lee (1990)
5 - She's My Baby (Red Hot) (1974)
6 - Pearly Lee (1990)
7 - Red Hot (1990)
8 - Rock With Me Baby (1971)
9 - Wouldn't You (1985)
10 - That's Right (1975)
11 - Searchin' (1974)
12 - Chatter & College Man (1985)
13 - Your Cash Ain't Nothin' But Trash (1985)
14 - Down By The Riverside (1990)
15 - Swanee River Rock (1974)
16 - Betty And Dupree (1974)
17 - Let's Talk About Us (1974)
18 - Got The Water Boiling (1990)
19 - Saturday Night Fish Fry (1985)
20 - Folsom Prison Blues (1985)
21 - Billy's Blues (1985)
22 - Dark Muddy Bottom (1985)
23 - When A Man Gets The Blues (1985)
24 - Sweet William (1964)
25 - Red Hot (1988)
26 - Mud Island (1988)
27 - My Baby's Got Love (1988)
28 - That's What I Want To Do (1988)
Original Sun, Rita, and Brunswick Recordings 
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.  
Billy Riley's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
BILLY RILEY - Billy Lee Riley only had six records issued under his own name on Sun Records. Sparse as his output may haven been, in rockabilly annals he remains a titan. His recordings of "Flyin' Saucer Rock And Roll" and "Red Hot" are by themselves sufficient to ensure his immortality. The other recordings, both issued and unissued, are evidence of a man with catholic taste and talents versatile enough to match them.

Riley a product of Irish and Cherokee ancestry, born on October 5, 1933 in Pocohontas, Arkansas although the family moved often throughout the rural Mid-South. "Back when I was a kid growing up, we lived on a plantation with mostly black people on it.

Every Saturday and every Sunday you could usually find a little group of dudes under the trees playing blues. A white guy, Tommy Hamblin, who came from a family of string musicians, taught me how to play three or four chords on the guitar. We started playing with the black musicians, being the blues with them. He and I man, we were black as the rest of' em".

Billy Riley had bought a Sears-Roebuck Silvertone guitar at the age of nine from his girlfriend. "She had lost interest in the instrument after it had been sprayed by the termite control people. So I bought it off her, refinished it and learned how to play it". By that time he had already mastered the harmonica, an instrument that his father had taught him.

The family grew up in what can only described as abject poverty. "We lived in a tent. A big ol' Army tent. My dad put a floor in it and built walls around it. Then he built two log cabin rooms adjoining, kitchen and dining room". Billy Riley dropped out of school at age of 10 and started working to help support the family. In common with every other family in the vicinity, the Riley's owned neither records nor a phonograph. Electricity was uncommon in rural areas at that time but battery radios were available and very popular. Riley fondly recalls listening to and being influenced by Hank Williams and Lefty Frizzell via the radio in the late 1940s. However, he heard no blues on the radio as the advent of black radio programming was still a few years distant.

One of the seasonal highlights for the Rileys and neighboring families was the traveling tent shows. The cost was 25c. "We wouldn't see them if they were too far away", Riley recalled, "cause we had no car. About the only way we could get to any place was to walk or find a ride".

Halfway through his thirteenth year, Billy Riley's family left the plantation in Arkansas and headed southeast to Tupelo, Mississippi bringing their tent with them. Riley's father was working as a painter but after a year with work at a premium the family pulled up roots again and headed back to Arkansas - this time to Osceola. While in Tupelo though, Riley had made his first public appearance, performing live on radio station WELO.

In 1948 Billy Riley tried to enlist in the armed services. Only 15 years of age, he was rejected. By 1949 the family had moved back to Pocohontas although his sister stayed in Osceola. Riley tried again to enlist and with his sister signing the necessary papers attesting that he was 18 (Riley had no birth certificate), he became an employee of Uncle Sam.

For Riley, the Army was just a way out of grinding rural poverty although he eventualy saw some benefits: "While I was in the service I got more interested in music because I won some talent shows at the service club". Playing in these talent shows, singing hard country music along the lines defined by Hank Williams, Lefty Frizzell and Hank Thompson, Riley first performed in a full band context. He was even offered a position in Special Services but surprisingly turned it down due to stage fright. During his hitch in the service, he made his first private recordings including the Hank Williams weeper "My Son Calls Another Man Daddy".

It is unclear exactly how long Billy Riley spent in the service. He recalled to Bill Millar that he returned briefly to civilian life and then re-enlisted for three years. In any event, Riley probably found himself back in civilian duds around 1953 or 1954.

Music was now much more than a hobby and upon discharge he joined a couple of country   bands that worked in and around Jonesboro, Arkansas, C.D. Tennyson and the Happy Valley   Boys and the KBTM Ranch Boys. While supporting himself and his first wife with a day job in   a shoe factory, Billy Riley could be heard regularly on three local radio stations, KBMT and   KNEX in Jonesboro and KRLA in Paragould.
 
Both the bands with whom Riley worked taped   their shows on Sunday for broadcast during the week. At the same time, Riley together with   the bassist and the bassist's wife from the KBTM Ranch Boys rose early in the morning to   perform live on a gospel show.
 
Not making a lot of money in the shoe factory or with his music, Riley was talked into   moving to Memphis by his brother-in-law. Together they opened a restaurant and Riley   briefly forsook music. After the restaurant failed, Billy Riley worked as a meat cutter and   than as a truck driver for Industrial Coverall. "That's when my mind was on music. When I   wrecked that truck I was singing 'Trouble Bound'. I worked there until I wrecked two trucks".
 
Riley joined Slim Wallace's Dixie Ramblers. Wallace was a local truck driver who played bass   in a band which also featured Jack Clement, then attending Memphis State University.   Wallace and Clement got the notion to start a record label, Fernwood Records, named after   the street upon which Wallace lived. The studio was a primitive affair, literally situated in his   garage.
 
The Dixie Ramblers consisted of Roland "Slim" Wallace, Jack Clement, Billy Riley, Wayne   McGinnis and Ramon Maupin, they played straightahead hard country music, mostly on the   weekends. Its interesting to note Riley's first playing experience - at least on guitar - was   with black blues musicians on the plantation where he lived with his parents. yet, up to this   point in his semi-pro career, he had only publicly played country music. As with many other future rockabillies he never reaslized that he had an option. He was white, therefore if he   wanted to play music, he played country. That was simply what white Southern musicians   did. Riley explained: "After hearing Elvis and seeing what was happening, a lot of us guys got   away from the country stuff. We wanted to get with what was happening. When it was new   it was something completely different from what anybody had ever done. It was something   that fit me because it sounded black. It was still country but it had that black feel and that  was what I wanted. It was something I was brought up on".
 
After Billy Riley had played a couple of months with the Dixie Ramblers, Jack Clement had   the idea that the first release on Fernwood should be by Billy Riley. Surprisingly in view of   Riley's growing infatuation with the new music, the Dizie Ramblers first attempted a country   song, a Riley original entitled "Think Before You Go". At that point the group consisted of   Riley, Wallace, Bob Deckelman on steel guitar and a fiddle player.
 
They recorded two songs, "Trouble Bound" and "Think Before You Go". in a primitive studio   Clement had built in Wallace's garage. Clement took the masters to Sam Phillips, who   responded to the eerie, bluesy intensity of "Trouble Bound" and offered a job to Clement and   a contract to Riley. Sam Phillips counseled against releasing the countrified "Think Before   You Go", so Riley concocted a rockabilly novelty, "Rock With Me Baby", that he recorded at  the WMPS studio in Memphis. Purchasing the masters from Fernwood, Sam Phillips issued   Riley's debut single in May 1956.
 
With a record on the market, Riley needed to put a band together, Clement was too busy at   Sun to be playing clubs and Bernero had always been temporary. That left only guitarist   Roland Janes. Riley and Janes had met a teenage drummer, J.M. Van Eaton, when Van Eaton   had been down at Sun with another group. He was quickly drafted into the fold, as was   upright bassist Marvin Pepper. By the end of 1956, Riley's group had been co-opted as the   house band at Sun Records. 
 
After a four year involvement with Sun, Riley decided to quit again, Jack Clement and Bill   Justis had been dismissed in early 1959. Both started their own labels. Riley did some work   for Justis, cutting an instrumental record pseudonymously for Jaro/Top Rank under the   name "Spitfires". By this point he had reunited with Roland Janes and they held down a   steady gig at the Starlight Club in Memphis. It was there that they came up with the idea for Rita Records settled in the old Sun studio. 
 
One of the first moves was to bring Harold Dorman to the label. Dorman had been languished   around town since 1856, trying to hustle a deal for himself and his writing partner Wiley   Gann. Riley and Janes took Dorman and Gann to the Hi studio, paid Jack Clement to handle   the board and emerged with "Mountain Of Love" which became a nationwide hit in 1960.
 
Rita Records was a short-lived venture and Riley's involvement in it was even shorter.   Commercially, none of Riley's records had much impact. Sam Phillips has more than once   lamented this fact, stating that he does not understanding why Riley never broke through.   To Riley though, its simple: "Jerry Lee and Sam got too this, what happened to me".
 
Through the 1960s and 1970s, Riley persevered in the music business. He recorded under   his own name and a host of pseudonyms including the Megatrons, the Rockin' Stockings and   Sandy & the Sandstones. The list of labels for whom he recorded is even longer. He even   achieved a small breakthrough on the Entrance label in 1972 with the Chips Moman   produced "I Got A Thing About You Baby" that later Elvis covered. Immediately preceding his   deal with Entrance, Riley had returned to the re-born Sun label owned by Shelby Singleton   in Nashville, launching it in fine style with "Kay". Both "Kay" and "Red Hot" were, in their   way, definitive performances but the gulf between them highlighted Riley's real problem: he   lacked an identifiable style. With all the talent in the world, Riley would not stick in one   groove long enough to reap the rewards. His versatility was his greatest asset and his  greatest-drawback.
 
Since 1983 Billy Riley has refused to gig, recorded little and released nothing. If the right   offer under the right conditions came along he would probably give it one last go-round. In   the meantime, he supports himself as a contractor, rarely dwelling upon his impressive, if   less than successful, past.
 
All of us involved with this project revere Billy Riley for his music. When Joyce met Billy on   April 11, 1975, she knew nothing about Billy's music or Sun Records. She fell in love with a   hard-working man who was raising two daughters, ages 3 and 6, by himself. Only later did   Joyce discover the music featured here. Joyce and Billy were married just about two weeks   after they met, on April 26, 1975. Joyce was still with Billy 34 years later when he died of   colon cancer on August 2, 2009. The final years of Billy's life were a medical  and, consequently, a financial nightmare.
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542 mono digital
ONIE WHEELER - ONIE'S BOP
 
Compact disc. An Bear Family Special Product. Red label. 3 Bear Family logo's left and right from center. Catalog number on the disc left at center. On the back cover, Bear Family logo left at bottom. Catalog number in upper right. Contains Onie Wheeler's Okeh, Columbia, and Sun recordings, many of them previously unissued. Also included in the box, 22-page booklet biography with liner notes by Colin Escott. The booklet also features previously unpublished photos and a detailed session file information by Richard Weize and Colin Escott.
 
Producer 
Don Law (Columbia), Jack Clement and Bill Justis (Sun)
Re-Issued Producers
Richard Weize and Colin Escott
Photos and Illustrations
The Wheeler Family, R. Andreas, A.J. Nelson,
Charlie Terrell, Colin Escott
Mastering
Duncan Cowell
Liner Notes
Colin Escott
Discography
Ricjard Weize (Columbia)
Colin Escott (Sun)
Thanks to
Jean and Karen Wheeler, A.J. Nelson, Charlie Terrell,
Nick Shaffran, Big Al Turner
 
For music (Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

Contains
1 - Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox (1959) > Sun 315-A <
2 - Tell'em Off (Master) (1959) > Sun 315-B <
3 - I Wanna Hold My Baby (1956)
4 - Onie's Bob (1956)
5 - A Booger Gonna Getcha (1956)
6 - Going Back To The City (1956)
7 - Long Gone (1986)
8 - Steppin' Out (1957)
9 - I'll Love You For A Lifetime (1986)
10 - A Begger For Your Love (1956)
11 - Walkin' Shoes (Take 2) (1986)
12 - That's All (1986)
13 - Cut It Our (1955)
14 - That's What I Like (1955)
15 - She Wiggled And Gliggled (1955)
16 - I'm Satisfied With My Dreams (1955)
17 - No, I Don't Guess I Will (1956)
18 - Would You Like To Wear A Grown (1954)
19 - I Saw Mother With God Last Night (1954)
20 - My Home Is Not A Home At All (1955)
21 - Little Mama (1954)
22 - Hazel (1986)
23 - Closing Time (1954)
24 - I Tried And I Tried (1956)
25 - I'll Swear You Don't Love Me (1954)
26 - Love Me Like You Used To Do (1954)
27 - When We All Get There (1953)
28 - Mother Prays Loud In Her Sleep (1953)
29 - A Million Years In Glory (1953)
30 - Run 'Em Off (1953)
31 - Bonaparte's Retreat (1986) 
1, 2, 11, 12, 31 Original Sun Recordings
3-10, 13-30 Original Columbia Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.
Onie Wheeler's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
ONIE WHEELER – Born Onie Daniel Wheeler on November 10, 1921 in Senath, Missouri. Onie Wheeler had one minor hit, "John's Been Shucking My Corn", which peaked at number 53 on the country charts in 1973.

But there was much more to Onie than that solitary hit. A career that began in the mid-1940s and ended tragically in 1984. In between there was some great music. One of thirteen kids, Wheeler worked on the family farm until he went into the service in 1940.

He played a harmonica and guitar around the house, but never considered music as a career option until his discharge in 1945, when entertainment seemed a livelier option than farming. His favourites were the Delmore Brothers and Ernest Tubb.

An accident while he was in the Army meant that the harmonica became Onie's major instrument, he had injured the index finger on his left hand and could only play guitar in open tunings. In 1946 he married Betty Jean Crowe; their oldest child, Karen (1947), went on to achieve some success as a country singer in the 1970s.

Wheeler did radio shows in Missouri, Arkansas, Kentucky and Michigan, but didn't give up his day job until 1952, when he settled back in Missouri and started a band with drummer Ernest Thompson and the Nelson brothers, Doyal and A.J., both guitar players. In August 1953, they signed with OKeh/Columbia Records in Nashville and had their first recording session at the end of that month, under the supervision of Don Law. The session included two of Wheeler's best-known songs, "Run 'Em Off" and "Mother Prays Loud In Her Sleep". Both were covered by other Columbia artists: "Run 'Em Off" by Lefty Frizzell (number 8 country hit in February 1954) and "Mother Prays Loud" by Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs.

After five singles on OKeh, Onie's releases were moved to the parent Columbia label in April 1955. In that year, Onie went out on tour with Elvis Presley and other Sun artists. His Columbia contract was extended for two years in August. The amusing "Onie's Bop", recorded in April 1956, was Wheeler's first attempt to come to terms with the new rockabilly music. His last Columbia single appeared in May 1957, "Goin' Back To the City", another rockabillyflavoured number, recorded with the Nashville A-team.

By the time the Columbia deal ended in August 1957, Onie and the Nelson brothers were playing on package shows with the Memphis rockabillies, Jerry Lee Lewis, Billy Riley, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash. It was only natural that Sun would become his next label. Onie's opinion of Sun was that it was a "bush-league operation" in terms of recording, but he gave them "Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox", one of his best songs. Recorded in late 1957, it was unaccountably held back until February 1959. By that time, musical tastes had changed considerably and the record (Sun 315) never stood a commercial chance, excellent as it was.

Perhaps Sam Phillips was too busy trying to salvage something from the ruins of Jerry Lee Lewis's career. Two other up-tempo Sun cuts, "That's All" and "Walking Shoes", were held in the can until 1986, when they were saved from oblivion by Bear Family Records. According to Colin Escott, the tempo on these two songs was too fast for Onie to feel comfortable. His heart (and strength) lay in slow country numbers and his rockabilly numbers for Sun and Columbia lack conviction, in Escott's opinion.

For the remainder of his career, Onie Wheeler flitted in and out of the music business. Between 1960 and 1966 he recorded for a variety of labels, had a slot on George Jones's package show for two years and worked with Roy Acuff. He did not record again until 1971. "John's Been Shucking My Corn" was initially released on Old Windmill Records in late 1971, and re-released a year later on Royal American. Onie's only hit brought in a few show dates, but he couldn't find a follow-up. During the late 1970s and early 1980s he owned and operated a guitar repair shop. He was operated on for an aneurysm in January 1984, but started to work again a few months later. While performing at Jimmie Snow's Grand Ole Gospel radio show at the Grand Ole Opry on May 26, 1984 in Nashville, he collapsed on stage and died of a massive heart attack.

Onie Wheeler was a true original, with an immediately recognizable voice, but he never achieved much recognition, in spite of his many talents. A mixture of stubborness, uncommercial attitude and sheer bad luck may explain why he never really made it. According to Charlie Terrell, Onie's songwriting was "too far ahead of its time. His best material was written ten years too soon. He could have been as big as Tom T. Hall later became''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525 mono digital
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959
 
2 compact disc boxed set. An Bear Family Special Product. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  Bear Family logo left from the center on the disc. On the back cover Bear Family logo left at bottom. Catalog number in upper right. Contains the complete Sun recordings, many of them previously unissued complete with studio chatter, demos, false starts. Also included in the boxed set, 32-page booklet biography with liner notes by Colin Escott. The booklet also features previously unpublished photos and a detailed session file information by Colin Escott.
 
A cursory listen to some of Sonny Burgess's records suggests a life lived close to the edge - nights spent playing gin mills followed by drunken chases down dirt roads, firing off bottle rockets and puking over the neighbour's car at dawn. In person, though, Burgess is a somewhat shy and self-effacing family man. The occasional comment will hint at more turbulent waters but he hasn't lived the life one might anticipate from some of his lyrics, which is just as well, otherwise there might not be a Sonny Burgess to talk to.

When Sun's crop of rockabilly singers forsook the shaking music they usually reverted back to their first love - country music. Sonny Burgess was the exception. His passion was rhythm and blues. He had a true rhythm and blues voice like a tenor in full cry. It was short on subtlety and delicate shadings - but a magnificent rock and roll instrument. Soon after he quit the music business, Burgess took a salesman's job in a store, and still talks with enthusiasm of an old black guy who used to bring in his guitar, and play loping Jimmy Reed riffs. Sonny would sit and jam with him. Perhaps a blues album is the great Sonny Burgess album that has yet to be made 

Producers
Sam C. Phillips and Jack Clement
Re-Issue Producer
Colin Escott
Photos and Illustrations
Bo Berglind, Sonny Burgess, Colin Escott
The Showtime Music Archive
Mastering
Duncan Cowell
Disc Dub
Mark Wilder
Biography
Colin Escott
Thanks to
Sonny Burgess, Jack Nance
Artwork
Hoffmann Nienburg
 
For music (Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

Disc 1 Contains
1 - We Wanna Boogie (1956) > Sun 247-B <
2 - Red Headed Woman (1956) > Sun 247-A <
3 - The Prisoner's Song (1988)
4 - We Wanne Boogie (Alternate Take 3) (1991)
5 - Red Headed Woman (Alternate Take 2) (1988)
6 - The Prisoner's Song (Alternate Take 2) (1991)
7 - All Night Long (1988)
8 - Life's Too Short To Live (1988)
9 - Restless (1957) > Sun 263-B <
10 - Ain't Got A Thing (1957) > Sun 263-A <
11 - Daddy Blues (AlternateTake 2) (1988)
12 - Fannie Brow (Alternate Take 2) (1991)
13 - Ain't Gonna Do It (Alternate Take 1) (1971)
14 - Daddy's Blues (Alternate Take 1) (1978)
15 - Fanny Brown (Alternate Take 1) (1971)
16 - You (1978)
17 - One Broken Heart (1991)
18 - Ain't (Alternate Take 2) (1980)
19 - Hand Me Down My Walking Cane (1975)
20 - Please Listen To Me (Undubbed Recording) (1988)
 
21 - Gone (1980)
22 - Please Listen To Me (Overdubbed Recording) (1985)
23 - My Babe (1988)
24 My Bucket's Got A Hole In It (Undebbed Recording) (1991)
25 - Sweet Misery (Undubbed Master) (1988)
26 - Whatcha' Gonna Do (1991)
27 - My Bucket's Got A Hole In It (Alternate Take) (1988)
Original Sun Recordings

Disc 2 Contains
1 - My Bucket's Got A Hole In It (1957) > Sun 285-B <
2 - Sweet Misery (1957) > Sun 285-B < 
3 - Oh Mama (1985)
4 - Truckin' Down The Avenue (1978)
5 - So Glad You're Mine (1988)
6 - Whatcha' Gonna Do (1991)
7 - Feelin' Good (1978)
8 - So Glad You're Mine (1978)
9 - One Night (1978)
10 - Always Will (1988)
11 - Little Town Baby (1975)
12 - You're Not The One For Me (1978)
13 - Mr. Blues (1978)
14 - Find My Baby For Me (1978)
15 - Tomorrow Nigh (1978)
16 - Tomorrow Never Comes (1980)
17 - Skinny Ginny (1988)
18 - So Soon (1978)
19 - Mama Loochie (1) (1980)
20 - Mama Loochie (2) (1988)
21 - Itchy (1958) > Sun 304-A <
22 - Thunderbird (1958) > Sun 304-B <
23 - A Kiss Goodbye (1960) > PI 3551-A <
24 - Sadie's Back In Town (1960) > PI 3551-B < 
25 - Smoochin' Jill (1988)
26 - A Kiss Goodbye (1975)
27 - My Baby Loves Me (1991)
Original Sun Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.
 Sonny Burgess' Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > You-Tube >
 
SONNY BURGESS - When Sun's crop of rockabilly singers forsook the shaking music they unusually reverted back to their first love, country music. Sonny Burgess was the exception. His passion was rhythm and blues. He had a true rhythm and blues voice like a tenor sax in full cry. It was short on subtlety and delicate shadings - but a magnificent rock and roll instrument. Soon after he quit the music business, Burgess took a salesman's job in a store, and still talks with enthusiasm of an old black guy who used to bring in his guitar, and play loping Jimmy Reed riffs. Sonny would sit and jam with him. Perhaps a blues album is the great Sonny Burgess album that has yet to be made.
 
Born near Newport, Arkansas on May 28, 1931, Albert "Sonny" Burgess grew up on a farm, and developed his musical tastes listening to the Grand Old Opry and the Memphis country stations, taking in rhythm and blues from WLAC in Nashville and WDIA in Memphis along the way. Sonny did his hitch the Army, and returned to Newport with the thought of a career in baseball, or failing that, farming. He worked for a spell in a box factory, and slowly put together a semi-pro band that went under several names and through several incarnations, eventually calling themselves the Moonlighters. He was back working on the farm when, as he put it, "farming started interfering with my music". In an early version of the group, Sonny was the guitarist, Paul Whaley handled the vocals in a Hank Thompson style, Kern Kennedy played piano, Russ Smith was on drums, Johnny Ray Hubbard played bass, and Bob Armstrong handled the accordion.
 
After Whaley went back to California, Sonny Burgess took over the vocals, and Armstrong eventually quit. There was no shortage of venues because Newport in Jackson County permitted liquor to be sold but was surrounded by dry counties; hence a number of nightclubs out of proportion with Newport's population.
 
They played local nightspots like the Silver Moon, Bob King's and Mike's club. They often played at King's on Friday night; Saturday night belonged to Punky Coldwell, a saxophonist who led a racially mixed jazz dance band.
 
On December 19, 1955, Sonny Burgess and the Moonlighters played in Swifton, Arkansas, with Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash. After a few years at Sun Records, in 1959, Sonny Burgess joined in Conways Twitty's band, and Bobby Crafford took over the Pacers, his band at Sun. Burgess stayed with Twitty until the move to Oklahoma City, when Twitty decided to re-cast himself as a born again hillbilly. Sonny returned to Newport, Arkansas, took a day job for a while before resuming his career as a professional musician with the Kings IV (subsequently the Kings V). He played clubs in and around Newport, and on Sundays he and his group would drive to Memphis to check out the rhythm and blues bands at Sunbeam Mitchell's Paradise Club.
 
"There was us and maybe a table of college kids", remembered Sonny Burgess, "and the rest of the room would be blacks. Willie Mitchell, Bowlegs Miller and the musicians made us feel real welcome, but then toward the end the racial thing got real tense and we stopped going. We never saw rhythm and blues bands in the 1950s - and that was the only chance we got to see the real good rhythm and blues acts". It was not until 1970 that Sonny Burgess gave up music as his primary source of income.
 
The are a raft of reasons why Sonny Burgess never made it. Part of the problem may have been that he was never tempted to leave Newport. Nashville never crossed his mind; Memphis and Los Angeles did, but he stayed put with his 'little town baby'. Part of the problem may have been that he was too raw - his natural sound shaded too close to rhythm and blues. There was also a measure of sheer bad luck. If a disc jockey in a trend-setting market had picked up on one of his singles for Sun and spun it relentlessly, Sonny could have had a hit. As it was, he accepted the verdict of the marketplace with relatively good grace and became a salesman. Interviewed in 1971 he could see no place for himself in the then current music scene.
 
However, fifteen years later, Burgess became one of the founding members of the Sun Rhythm Section band with whom he has toured far and wide and enjoyed some lately come acclaim. The long hiatus from the business ensured that Sonny Burgess had not burned himself out. His music still sports the contagious quality that we find on his career.
 
Despite the fact that Sonny Burgess dislikes all but a few of his Sun recordings, it is upon them that his reputation rests. Sam Phillips' enthusiasm for him was well placed. Sonny did not owe an obvious stylistic debt to anyone and he captured the freewheeling spirit of early rock and roll. It is a truism (perhaps never truer): They simply do not make records like this any more.
 
In 1999, Sonny Burgess was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame of Europe. In 1998, the Smithsonian Institute made a video called ''Rockin' On The River'' that brought Burgess and the Legendary Pacers together again. In addition to Kennedy, the group now included Bobby Crafford, Jim Aldridge, Fred Douglas, J. C. Caughron, and Charles Watson II. They made two album-length recordings in the late 1990s, ''They Came From The South And Still Rockin And Rollin''. In 2002, they were inducted into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame in Jackson, Tennessee. In 2005, they performed at numerous events in Arkansas, Texas, and Tennessee and toured Europe.
 
Between performances, Sonny Burgess and his wife live in Newport, where he has spent most of his life. He currently hosts a radio show, We Wanna Boogie, for KASU in Jonesboro (Craighead County). Burgess was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Music degree from Arkansas State University in Jonesboro on May 7, 2011. He made an album with Dave Alvin of the Blasters in 1992 that featured an unrecorded Springsteen song. He's out there for the right reasons: he loves it. There's no escaping the fact that Sonny's entire career has been predicated by those few singles he made at Sun. His feelings about the label are understandably mixed. His original singles didn't sell, and Sun's licensees have issued material that he considers unworthy. It still comes down to just three or four singles. Forty years ago, they brought two pallid Englishmen to Newport, Arkansas, they still take Sonny Burgess wherever wants to go.
 
Burgess had two brothers and three sisters. He married Joann Adams in 1956 and they had two sons, Peyton and John. In July 2017, Burgess suffered a fall at his home. He died the following month on August 18, 2017 in a Little Rock, Arkansas hospital, at the age of 88.
 

 - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15514 mono digital
WARREN SMITH - THE CLASSIC RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959
 
Compact disc. An Bear Family Special Products. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  Bear Family logo left from the center on the disc. On the back cover Bear Family logo at bottom, catalog number in upper right. For the first time, the completeWarren Smith Sun recordings, many of them previously unissued complete with studio chatter, demos, false starts. Also included in the box, 32-page booklet biography, with liner notes by Colin Escott. The booklet also features rare and previously unpublished photos and a detailed session file information by Colin Escott. On the front cover photo Warren Smith performed at the Ellis Auditorium in Memphis, Tennessee.
 
The irony of being voted among the Most Promising New Artists of 1960 was probably not lost on Warren Smith, who had been beating his head against the wall, trying to get a decent break for the previous five years. He chose a mythic place to start and - for a while - it looked as though Smith would follow some of his illustrious label-mates and become a household name. He had the looks, the talent, the will to succeed and was indisputably in the right place at the right time. However, for most of his affiliation with Sun Records, Warren Smith 's career represented more promise than fulfillment.
 
Producers
Sam C. Phillips and Jack Clement
Re-Issue Producer
Colin Escott
Photos and Illustrations
Colin Escott, Al Hopson, Now Dig This,
Michael Ochs Archive, 
The Showtime Music Archices
Doris Waggoner
Mastering
Bob Jones
Biography
Colin Escott
Artwork
Hoffmann Nienburg
Thanks to
Al Hopson, Stan Kesler, Jimmy Lott, Jean Smit,
Marcus Van Story and Doris Waggoner
 
For music (Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

Contains
1 - Rock "N" Roll Ruby (1) (1956) > Sun 239-A <
2 - I'd Rather Be Safe Than Sorry (1956) > Sun 239-B <
3 - Rock "N" Roll Ruby (2) (1956)
4 - Black Jack David (1956) > Sun 250-A <
5 - Ubangi Stomp (1956) > Sun 250-B < 
6 - The Darkest Cloud (1986)
7 - So Long I'm Gone (1986)
8 - So Long I'm Gone (1986)
9 - Who Took My Bab (1978)
10 - I Couldn't Take The Chance (1986)
11 - So Long I'm Gone (1957) > Sun 268-A <
12 - Miss Froggie (1957)  > Sun 268-B <
13 - Red Cadillac And A Black Mustache (1972)
14 - Stop The World (1985)
15 - I Fell In Love (1957) > Sun286-B <
16 - Got Love If You Want It (1957) > Sun 286-A <
17 - Old Lonesome Feeling (Incomplete) (1992)
18 - Tell Me Who (1978)
19 - Tonight Will Be The Last Night (1978)
20 - Dear John (1976)
21 - Hank Snow Medley (1992)
22 - Do I Love You (1978)
23 - Uranium Rock (1988)
24 - Goodbye Mr. Love (1986)
25 - Uranium Rock (1972)
26 - Sweet, Sweet Girl (1992) 
27 - Goodbye Mr. Love (1959) > Sun 314-A <
28 - Sweet, Sweet Girl (1969) > Sun 314-B <
29 - Dear John (1992)
30 - I Like Kind Of Love (1978)
31 - My Hanging Day (1992)
Original Sun Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.
Warren Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
WARREN SMITH - Smith was born in Humphreys County, Mississippi near Yazoo City on February 7, 1933, as his birth date, although hospital records would indicate that he lopped a year off his age. His parents, Ioda and Willie Warren Smith, divorced when he was young; his mother stayed in the Louise -Greenwood area and his father went to Lexington, Mississippi to work as a truck driver. Smith was brought up by his grandparents near the toen of Louise, Mississippi, where they farmed and operated a small country store.
 
After a spell as a machinist, Smith went into the Air Force in 1950. Stationed in San Antonio, Texas he took up the guitar to while away the evenings. By the time of his discharge, Smith was fairly determined to make a career out of music.
 
It certainly represented a more attractive option than most of the others open to a poor white Mississippi boy with little formal education. With music on his mind, Warren Smith headed for the bright of Memphis and the brighter lights of West Memphis, Arkansas.
 
Soon after he arrived, Warren Smith went to the Cotton Club. Stan Kesler, who was playing in a band norminally led by Clyde Leoppard remembered Smith's arrival: "Warren came in and auditioned for us. I saw a lot of potential and brought him over to Sam Phillips together with the rest of the Snearly Ranch Boys. Sam thought he was real good too and asked me to work up some material. I'd already written "I'd Rather Be Safe Than Sorry" when Sam called and said that Johnny Cash had brought in "Rock And Roll Ruby". We went over and recorded with Warren and it was supposed to be a co-op deal because we'd discovered him and supported him".
 
Stan Kesler refutes the story propagated by Smith in his last years that he was discovered by Johnny Cash and Sam Phillips at the Cotton Club, although it is entirely possible that Cash and Phillips visited the club to see Smith perform after he had already been signed a contract and he was already a star on the Sun label.
 
In 1957 Warren Smith married Doris Gannon from Holly Grove, Arkansas. They had met the preceding year in Memphis where she was working as a telephone operator. When he drove by, resplendant in his white suit, she thought he was Elvis Presley and was surprised to learn that the performer of "Rock And Roll Ruby" was not black, as she had surmised. At that time, Smith was living in the Holiday Towers apartment block although he and Doris, when Smith career was quit at Sun Records, eventually moved back to his mother's house in Greenwood, Mississippi. From there, Smith and his family went to Jackson, Mississippi before finally deciding to try their luck in California when the Sun contract expired. The band had gone their separate ways and Warren was working as a single around Jackson when he moved. They settled in Sherman Oaks, near Johnny Cash who moved to Van Nuys a few moths earlier.
 
Smith cut three singles for the new Warner Brothers label. But not until he aligned himself with the newly formed country division of Liberty Records in 1960 did Warren Smith find both a style with which he could sell records and a company willing to make a sustained commitment to him. Between 1960 and 1964 he scored a series of hits in the country charts that were refreshingly free of the choruses and overproduction that were beginning to plague Nashville.
 
Surprisingly, Sam Phillips did not reach back into the vaults after Smith started scoring consistently with Liberty. He had mixed feelings about his protege: "He was probably the best pure singer for country music I've ever heard", he remembers. "He had a pure country voice and an innate feel for a country ballad. With that music he was as good as anyone I've heard before or since. 'So Long I'm Gone" was just a wonderful country record".
 
"Warren had a lot of emotional problems, though. I don't think he ever got on dope or anything, but he was the kind of character that needed to be loved a lot. He needed recognition more than the average person... A lot of people didn't like Warren, and he perceived that. And if they didn't, in essence it was his fault in a lot of cases. He was a difficult personality, but just interesting enough that I liked him a whole lot".
 
Sam Phillips was apparently unaware of Smith's problems with prescription drugs, a dependency that would come to hamper his career in the years ahead. But Warren's contemporaries agree that Sam Phillips assessment of his psyche is accurate. Unfortunately for Warren Smith, his affiliation with Sun never resulted in the kind of success he had envisioned for himself. His rancor subsided for a while when it seemed as though the country music world was falling into his lap, but it eventually resurfaced as Smith pondered the inexplicable loss of success.
 
Warren Smith entered a sad personal and professional downslide. There were a few more short-lived label affiliations, a jail term for stealing drugs, and a succession of mundane day jobs. When the rockabilly revival craze hit Europe in the late 1970s, Warren Smith was called upon to tour overseas and record again in the rockabilly style, but he couldn't harness the reflected glory from his Sun years to build a new career. Warren Smith died in Longview, Texas, on January 30, 1980, of a heart attack.
 
Warren Smith was not a major influence upon Elvis Presley, but his style and energetic rockabilly records were a subtle reminder to Elvis Presley that he would have to continue his rockabilly direction with a high degree of professionalism.
 
"I came out of the Air Force in 1950", recalled Warren Smith, "and moved to Memphis where I worked in some of the bars around town for a while. I heard that Clyde Leophard was looking for entertainers so I went and auditioned for him and was hired. Clyde put me to work at a place called the Cotton Club in West Memphis, Arkansas. I ended up working there for over a year. Anyhow, one night Sam Phillips and Johnny Cash came in, I think Carl Perkins had told them that there was a singer over at the Cotton Club they might be interested in. Anyhow, I was playing straight country music then and I hadn't any releases on the market at the time. Sam and Johnny invited me back to their table, and Johnny said he had a song called "Rock And Roll Ruby". "He asked me to come over to the Sam Phillips studio, and give it a try. I think that was a Sunday night if I'm not mistaken. Well I was over there bright and early in the morning. I mean, I was there before they were even open! Well, I waited around for a while and finally Sam, Johnny and Carl Perkins along with a couple other musicians came in the studio. I was nervous as heck! You know how that goes! I mean Elvis Presley had been at Sun, and Sun was a heck of a good label at that particular time", recalled Warren.
 
"Johnny brought out "Rock and Roll Rubby" and gave me an idea how he wanted it done, and just like magic all the boys started clickin together, so I fell into it and started singing along with the band. Yea, we worked it up prety good! Well, when we finished they said come on back tomorrow and we'll cut it. I decided on Clyde Leoppards bunch of guys to accompany me, as I had been working with them a year or so and we all knew each other pretty well. We got to the studio the next day, cut the record and it came off a pretty good sized rock hit.
 
"Rock And Roll Ruby" started hitting in the South pretty good then and Bob Neal who was Elvis' manager, booked me for personal appearances, so I had to get a band together to travel with. Well, Marcus Van Story happened to be one of the guys I chose. He's a great bass man and he stayed with me the duration that I was on Sun Records, five years. I got Al Hopson and a few others and we were all set. That reminds me, there was a story going around about who actually wrote "Rock And Roll Ruby". Well, I found out a little later on that Johnny Cash bought it from George Jones! I bumped into George after I left Sun and was cutting records for Liberty, so naturally I started traveling with the country group. Yea, I was booked on shows with I guess everybody who was on the Grand Old Opry at one time or another. Anyway, I bumped into George when we were playing down in Texas, we were on his bus and he said that he wrote "Rock And Roll Ruby" and sold it for $40,00. I said Aww come on now, and he said, 'No I really did!'. Well, as time went on I began to talk to other people and they said George wrote it and Johnny bought it from him. That's what I heard! I wasn't there so I can't say for sure, but that's what I heard".
 
In April 1977, Warren Smith arrived in Britain to play a rockabilly show with Jack Scott, Charlie Feathers and Buddy Knox. Smith was completely overcome by the reception he received and was invited back the following November with fellow Sun artist Ray Smith. Again, the shows went well and a rejuvenated Smith was scheduled to return in April 1981.
 
Unfortunately this tour never materialised as on the last day of January 30, 1981, Smith was admitted to hospital in Longview, Texas with chest pains. Before the day was over, he suffered a massive heart attack and died. He was 47.
 

 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524 mono digital
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
Compact disc set. An Bear Family Special Product. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  Bear Family logo left from the center on the disc. On the back cover Bear Family logo left at bottom, catalog number in upper right. Contains Joe Hill Louis, Walter Horton, and Mose Vinson's Sun recordings, many of them previously unissued. Also included in the box, 24-page booklet biography with liner notes by Stephen C. LaVere. The booklet also features unpublished photos and a detailed session file information by Dave Sax, Steve LaVere, and Colin Escott.
 
Joe Hill Louis was an exceptionally gifted, totally self-taught musician, playing harmonica, guitar and drums to accompany his vocals of original, as well as uniquely arranged traditional blues stanzas. His time and meter, as well as his playing and singing, were also of an unusually personal nature, and resulted in the creation of a framework on which he molded a statement completely his own. There was no one quite like him, and needless to say , probably never will be again.
 
Producer
Sam C. Phillips
Re-Issue Producer
Dave Sax and Colin Escott
Photos and Illustrations
Steve LaVere, Colin Escott, Brian Smith
Mastering
Bob Jones
Liner Notes
Steve LaVere
Discography
Dave Sax, Steve LaVere with Colin Escott
Artwork
Hoffmann Nienburg

For music (Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
 
Contains
1 - She Treats Me Mean And Evil (1952)
2 - Dorothy Mae (1952) > Checker 763-A <
3 - Sweetest Gal In Town (Take 1) (1992)
4 - Keep Your Arms Around Me (1969)
5 - Got A New Woman (1969)
6 - I'm A Poor Boy (1969)
7 - In The Mood (Walter Horton) (1972)
8 - West Winds Are Blowing (Take 1) (Walter Horton) (1987)
9 - Little Walter's Boogie (Take 1) (Walter Horton) (1990)
10 - We All Got To Go (Sometime) (Take 2) (Walter Horton) (1992)
11 - We All Gotta Go Sometime (1992)
12 - Little Walter's Boogie (Walter Horton) (1992)
13 - Tiger Man  (Mose Vinson) (1969)
14 - 44 Blues (Take 3) (Mose Vinson) (1992)
15 - My Love Has Gone (Take 1) (Mose Vinson) (1992)
16 - Mistreatin' Boogie (Mose Vinson) (1987)
17 - My Love Has Gone (Take 3) (Mose Vinson) (1992)
18 - Worry You Off My Mind (Take 2) (Mose Vinson) (1992)
19 - Reap What You Sow (Mose Vinson) (1987)
20 - Walter's Instrumental (Walter Horton) (1970)
21 - Hydramatic Woman (1969)
22 - Tiger Man (1969)
23 - Keep Your Arms Around Me (1992)
24 - She Comes To See Me Sometime (Take 3) (1953) > Sun 178-B < 
25 - We All Gotta Go Sometime (Take 2) (1953) > Sun 178-A <
26 - Shine Boy (1987)
Original Sun Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.
 Joe Hill Louis' Modern/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
JOE HILL LOUIS - Also known as "Chicago Sunny Boy", "Johnny Lewis", "Little Joe", Joe was born Lester (or possibly Leslie) Hill, September 23, 1921, one of four children (3 boys and a girl) in Froggy Bottom, out from Grant's Corner, near where Whitehaven, Tennessee is now, just a few miles south of Memphis, and lived there until about a year after his mother died. His father was Robert Hill and his mother was Mary Wilson. Joe Hill Louis learned some harmonica and the guitar from Will Shade in his youth in the early 1930s.
 
At the age of 14, after frequent beating by his step-mother, he ran away from home to work outside the music with frequent work in streets and dives in Robinsonville, Mississippi area from circa 1935, and fell in with Billy and Drew Canale, the younger members of a well-to-do Memphis family.
 
The Canales cook welcomed the responsibility of looking after the young lad and he continued to live with and work for the Canales in one household position after another for the rest of his short life. Early in his lifelong stay with the Canales he was put up to fighting a local ruffian named "Prince Henry" and came out the better, a victory which inspired the Canale boys to name him after the then heavyweight champ. Hence the moniker which was to serve him well and stick with him to the end.
 
Joe Hill Louis' natural musical aptitude was first manifest itself upon the jew's harp, which eventually was replaced by the harmonica, his primary and dominant instrument. The guitar and drums were added in the course of time but not without a great deal of ear-shattering displeasure from the Canales and their friends. At first, of course, his manipulation of the three was very uncoordinated, but he eventually got it all together to the amazement of his friends and the consternation of would-be accompanying guitarists and drummers. Rufus Thomas, the well-known record star and disc jockey reported that Joe was envied by many local musicians for his ability to earn the same amount of money that it would have taken three or four other musicians of singular talents to make. Joe could make all that money by himself; he didn't need anyone else.
 
Joe Hill Louis worked outside the music at the Peabody Hotel in Memphis, Tennessee in the late 1930s and frequently worked with Eddie Taylor, Willie Borum, Will Shade, Lockhart Hill and others in gambling houses, the streets in Memphis and West Memphis, Arkansas area and frequently worked as one man band in Memphis, Tennessee. He also frequently hoboed through the Tennessee, Arkansas and Mississippi on working in dances, suppers, ballgame intermissions in the late 1940s into the early 1950s. He recorded for Columbia Records in New York City in 1949.
 
He through his appearances on street corners and in Handy Park in Memphis and in juke joints and roadhouses in the surrounding countryside, Joe Hill Louis became a popular entertainer in the mod-south area in the late 1940s and it eventually opened the doors of WDIA-Memphis, the local black radio station, for a 15-minute show for a patent medicine called Pepti-con (from B.B. King) on which he was known as the Pep-ti-con Boy. This appellation was later replaced by "The Be-Bop Boy", as indicated by the accompanying photograph.
 
He through, by an informal union, Joe is reported to have a son named Leslie Hill who was living in Chicago, Joe Hill Louis married his only wife, the former Dorothy "Ruthy" Mae Pearson, on July 25, 1952 and the following year their son was born. Named Robert, he later took Louis as a surname for himself and took name "Joe Louis" in honour of the boxing champion. His brother was Lockhart Hill and was also an great musician. Despite Dorothy's statement that they lived together until Joe died, the marriage may not have been one of constant satisfaction for Joe, for he was soon back with the Canales, who always had a need for a chauffeur or a houseboy, or a bartender at their frequent gatherings. He also worked intermittently for Drew in his vending machine business, packing pennies in cigarette packages by day and playing music in the countryside juke joints and roadhouses at night.
 
Drew Canale, who was to become Tennessee state senator from Shelby County (Memphis and its environs) (1966-1970), was dabbling in recording in the late 1940s and claimed to have been the first to record Joe, a session which, if ever issued, has yet to be identified. Surprisingly, it was Columbia Records, that was the first to release recordings by Joe Hill Louis.
 
Over a period of more than three years, between March 31, 1952 and September 9, 1953, Joe Hill Louis recorded a number of sessions for Sam Phillips, alone and with accompanists, which reached release on Modern and Checker as well as on his own labels The Phillips and Sun Records. Sometimes during the mid-1950s, Drew Canale produced a rather curious solitary release on his own Vendor record label. The vocal was credited to Les Vendor Keyboards and contained a spoken introduction by Canal, who later confirmed that the artist was indeed Joe Hill Louis. Made exclusively for use in Canale's own jukebox and vending machine distribution business, no more than a couple of copies are known to exist today. It was reissued from the original stampers for collectors in the mid-1970s on the Mimisa label. Canale recorded him again, however, but by that time, Joe Hill's recording career included sessions for Meteor, Big Town, Ace, Rockin' and House Of Sound and among them are some remarkable records, the Rockin' sides being especially notable. However, this later session for Canale is believed to be Joe Hill Louis' last. A number of attempts, different approaches, were made on a single tune, ironically entitled "late date" and though most of the session still exists on tape, it remains unissued to this day. Joe Louis worked for the Blue Light Club in Memphis; the Brown Jug in West Memphis; the Tennessee House in West Memphis, Arkansas in the early 1950s; recorded for the Rockin' label in Memphis, Tennessee in 1952; recorded with Walter Horton for the Checker label in Chicago in 1952; recorded with Billy Love for the Sun label in Memphis, Tennessee; recorded for Meteor label in Chicago in 1953; recorded for Bigtown label in Memphis, Tennessee in 1954; recorded for the Ace label in West Memphis, Arkansas circa 1954; recorded for the House Of Sound label in Memphis, Tennessee in 1957.
 
Joe Hill Louis had a great sense of humor and was definitely a ladies' man. He had a different woman for every day in the week. His Sunday gal was Dorothy Houston who said Joe would take her to nice quiet places: church, nice restaurants, quiet bars. He wouldn't take her to gigs as he said they were rough places where the men didn't respect the woman. Perhaps for one of these 'dailies' Joe was doing yardwork when he badly cut his thumb and it became infected with fertilizer. Eventually he contracted tetanus infection with which he collapsed a few days later in his car on Beale Street, beyond help. He was taken to John Gaston Hospital in Memphis, where he died August 5, 1957, loved by his friends and fellow musicians, mourned by many women, and admired much too belatedly by the music public around the world. Joe Hill Louis is buried at the Ford Chapel Cemetery in West Junction, Tennessee. From the late forties until 1956, Joe Hill Louis was among the most popular figures in Memphis and the rural areas of Tennessee, Arkansas and Mississippi.
 

 - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708 (1-2) mono digital
EDDIE BOND - ROCKIN' DADDY
 
2 Compact disc set. An Bear Family Special Product. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  Bear Family logo left from the center on the disc. On the back cover Bear Family logo at bottom, catalog number in upper right. Contains Eddie Bond's complete Ekko and Sun recordings, many of them previously unissued with studio chatter. Also included in the boxed set, 18-page booklet biography, with liner notes by Howard Cockburn. The booklet also features previously unpublished photos and a detailed session file information by Howard Cockburn, Colin Escott and Richard Weize.
 
Producers
Red Matthews, Dee Kilpatrick, Pappy Daily, Jack Clement,
Len Rossi, Eddie Bond
Re-Issue Producer
Richard Weize
Tape Research
Colin Escott
Mastering
Duncan Cowell
Biography
Howard Cockburn
Discography
Howard Cockburn, Colin Escott,
Richard Weize
Photos and Illustrations
R.A. Andreas, Colin Esott, The Showtime Archive (Toronto),
Dave Travis
Artwork
Hoffmann Nienburg
Thanks to
Eddie Bond, Trevor Cajiao, Dave Travis
 
Disc 1 Contains
1 - Double Duty Lovin' (1955)
2 - Talking Off The Wall (1955)
3 - Love Makes A Fool (Everyday) (1955)
4 - Your Eyes (1955)
5 - I Got A Woman (1956)
6 - Rockin' Daddy (1956)
7 - Slip, Slip Slippin' In (1956)
8 - Baby, Baby, Baby (What Am I Gonna Do) (1956)
9 - Flip, Flop Mama (1956)
10 - Boppin' Bonnie (1956)
11 - You're Part Of Me (1957)
12 - King On Your Throne (1993)
13 - They Say We're Too Young (1957)
14 - Backslidin' (1957)
15 - Love, Love, Love (1957)
16 - Loving' You, Lovin' You (1957)
17 - Hershet Bar (1957)
18 - One Step Close To You (1960)
19 - Show Me (Without Sax) (1978)
20 - Broke My Guitar (1978)
21 - This Old Heart Of Mine (1975)
22 - Show Me (With Sax) (1978)
1-4 Original Ekko Recordings
5-18 Original Mercury Recordings
19-22 Original Sun Recordings

Disc 2 Contains
1 - One More Memory (1993)
2 - I Can't Quit (1975)
3 - My Bucket's Got A Hole In It (1993)
4 - Back Home In Indiana (Instrumental) (1993)
5 - They'll Never Take Her Love From Me (1993)
6 - The Day I Found You (1991)
7 - Standing In The Window (1991)
8 - Back Street Affair (1972)
9 - Our Secret Rendezvous (1993)
10 - Your Eyes (1993)
11 - Double Duty Lovin' (1975)
12 - I'd Just Be Fool Enough (1993)
13 - You Nearly Lose Your Mind (1993)
14 - I Thought I Heard You Call My Name (1993)
15 - Big Boss Man (1993)
16 - Rockin' Daddy (1975)
17 - In My Solitude (1993)
18 - Most Of All I Want To See Jesus (1966)
19 - Where Could I Go But To The Lord (1966)
20 - Satisfied (1966)
21 - Where They Ring Those Golden Bells (1966)
22 - If We Never Meet Again (1966)
23 - Will I Be Lost Or Will I Be Saved (1966)
24 - Just A Closer Walk With Thee (1966)
25 - Pass Me Not, Oh Gentle Saviour
26 - I Saw The Light (1966)
27 - Letter To God (1966)
28 - Precious Memories (1966)
29 - Hallelujah Way (1966)
1-29 Original Sun/Phillips Intenational Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.
Eddie Bond's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
EDDIE BOND - Country and rockabilly singer, disc jockey, promotor, radio and televisionstation impresario, song-writer, charity worker and law enforcement officer, all parts of themulti-faceted person that is Eddie Bond. For over forty years now he been completelyimmersed in the southern musical culture that spawned the likes of Elvis Presley, JohnnyCash, Roy Orbison et all. Whether he is performing in Memphis, Tennessee, Drew, Mississippior prudhoe, Tyne and Wear, England, Eddie Bond continues to be a living embodiment of thetraditional sounds of country and authentic rockabilly music.
 
Born in Methodist Hospital, Memphis, on July 1, 1923, Eddie James Bond grew up in anessential non-musical family, which still provided some encouragement to the young memberof the family who, at the age of eight, had put together enough nickels and dimes to buy hisfirst guitar. His initial interest had been aroused by listening to Roy Acuff and Ernest Tubbwho, at the time, the early 40s, were widely heard on the radio and records; his early experience of performing developed through his teenage years as he gigged around the beerjoints of Memphis.
 
On leaving school in 1950, he held down a variety of jobs including furniture factory worker,paint sprayer and, a job common amongst Memphis rockabillies, truck driver. After aneighteen month stint in the Navy, Bond returned to work in paint, this time selling notsprying. The time had now moved on to 1952 and the formation of his band the Stomperstook place over the ensuing months. Well-known members would be Reggie Young, John Hughey, Jimmy Smith and Johnny Fine. Earlier incarnations of the band had included RonaldSmith, Enio Hopkins, Curtis Lee Alderson and future Musical Warriot for Charlie Feathers,Jody Chastain there led to occasional work with Elvis Presley.
 
The rounds of the South and Southwest were made taking in Tucson, Arizona, Birmingham,Alabama and Dexter, Missouri, where Eddie and the Stompers together with Roy Orbison andthe Teen Kings and Narvel Felts with Jerry Mercer's Rhythm and Blues Boys played on top ofa concession stand at the local drive-in a typical for the priode 1954-1956.
 
Following failed auditions at Sun Records and Meteor, Eddie secured a recording deal withEkko Records which, although an Los Angeles company, had a Memphis office which waslocated at 36 North Cleveland. Although not certain. Eddie now believes the Ekko sessionwas held at a Murray Nash Associates-connected studio in Nashville. No fabulous sales wereachieved but they formed the basis for the next session which saw Eddie move further towards the big-time and a major label deal for Mercury Records.
 
Other developments during this time including appearances on the Louisiana Hayridealongside Johnny Horton, Elvis Presley and Sonny James, and further touring alongside CarlPerkins, Johnny Cash, Harold Jenkins (later to become Conway Twitty), and CharlieFeathers.
 
Concurrently a move to develop links with radio were set up when the Eddie Bond Show wastransmitted on KWEM, beginning a relationship with the airwaves that continues today. Sonow touring was joined by broadcasting as well as recording in the continually broadening ofthe Bond career. At the same time Eddie signed with Bob Neal's Stars Inc., then looking afterthe interests of Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash with Warren Smith and Roy Orbison soon to beadded to the ranks.
 
Four sessions were recorded for Mercury Records, the first of which he poses a mystery.Held at WMPS in Memphis, and produced by Mercury artists and repertoire man, DeeKilpatrick, four songs were recorded but only two were issued on Mercury. Nashville was the location of the next session that produced Bond's strongest rockabillyperformances used by Mercury on two singles in June and September of 1956, which soldwell enough for Mercury to organise two more sessions held in Houston, Texas in 1957.
 
Following the Mercury deal, Eddie began label-hopping through the South, particularlyaround Memphis. First stop was 706 Union Avenue in Memphis, where Jack Clementproduced three titles.
 
None were issued at the time having to wait for the rockabilly revivaland subsequent glut of compilations released in the 1970s and 1980s. There followed aplethora of recordings for "D", Stomper Time, Wildcat, MCCR, Decca (through his friend WebbPierce), and United Southern Artists. All were basically country releases.
 
Early 1962 saw Eddie back in Memphis recording at the 639 Madison Avenue or re nearlythirty sides were recorded for Sun during January and February, and gospel items wereeventually used on an album in 1963. Although not strictly recorded by Sun or PhillipsInternational, these recordings were all bought in and have been embraced as Sun tracks asa result of the Phillips International album release.
 
Further stopping-off places on the label circuit included Memphis, Pen (leased on Decca),Diplomat, Millionaire, Goldwax, Memphis, MCCR and Tab, which took Eddie to the end of thesixties during which time he had expanded his radio operations and achieved great successby increasing his listening audience noticeably to the extent that a 64% share was achievedand a plaque presented to him by Billboard to honour the achievement.
 
The Tap recordings of 1969 inaugurated the Buford Pusser Years, when Eddie was involved inwriting and recording about the dubious character of Sheriff Pusser who became a southernhero when Hollywood portrayed him in the film Walkin' Tall. Bond later admitted to havingmixed feelings on the subject but there was a certain fame that was achieved through theassociation. Many country fans were first introduced to the exploits of Buford Pusser through the recordings of Eddie Bond. In the wake of his meetings and ventures with Pusser, theoffice of Chief of Police in Finger, Tennessee, was achieved by Eddie Bond. Coincidentally,Finger was the birthplace of Buford Pusser himself!
 
The following years saw more country sessions on Tap in the States and, following the firstUnited Kingdom visit in 1982, rockabilly recordings were issued on Rockhouse Records inHolland produced by Dave Travis, whose band always supports Bond on tour, as was the casein 1982, 1985 and 1992.
 
The retrospective of his associations with Ekko, Mercury, Sun and Phillips International,documents his genesis as a country and rockabilly singer, a role perfected over his longcareer in the recording and broadcasting industry.
 
One of the first clubs that Eddie Bond hired Elvis Presley to play was at the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Hall in nearby Hernando, Mississippi, rural town, half an hour from Memphis. Hernando was home to a long, white VFW building with a huge parking lot, one often used by moonshine whisky drinkers. It was located on the outskirts of town and, according to Bond, "drew a hell of a crowd".
 
Saturday night dances were a tradition, and people of all ages showed up for the music. The young men dressed up and the girls had on their finest dresses. At intermission time, theparking lot was filled with refreshment seekers. "Elvis Presley was nervous that hot summer night in Hernando", Edythm Peeler, a local resident recalled. "He wore a pair of faded blue jeans and a plaid jacket. We had no idea who he was". "They surrounded him at the intermission. He sure was a good-looking boy. Now that I recall, I also liked his singing". Comments like these were repeated by a number of other Hernando residents, all of whom had found memories of the night Elvis Presley performed in their little white VFW Hall. Elvis' appearance with the band provided some insights into his future career. When Elvis Presley arrived in Hernando and got out of his car, he was horrified at the dance site. "Elvis' hand't played any country honky-tonks", Eddie Bond recalled. "He was stunned by the drinking in the parking lot". Moonshine whisky was in abundance and it was not unusual for a gun to fire followed by a rebel yell. The VFW dance was a place where the farmer, the small businessman, and local workers could let loose. Young girls, not so young women with big breasts, and the traditional-looking army couple crowded the dance floor. To Elvis Presley, it was a strange environment to sing romantic ballads. Elvis Presley told Eddie Bond that he would convert the crowd to his kind of music. Bond had no idea what Elvis Presley meant. When Elvis performed Guy Mitchell's 1950 classic "The Roving Kind" and Johnny Ray's 1951 hit "The Little White Cloud That Cried", it was clear that he selected songs the locals liked. "I saw those tunes on the jukebox inside the hall. I knew those folks would like those songs", he told Eddie Bond.
 
During his performances, Elvis Presley sang two sets of songs. No one was really sure why Elvis repeated his songs, considering how many he knew. The reason was simply. He used these small shows to perfect his delivery of a particular tune. Since he favoured pop ballads, no one really cared if Elvis sang a song more than once - he was able to work the girls into a frenzy with anything he sang. What it amounted to, though, was that long before Elvis became the first rock and roll superstar, he was consciously practising the act that would take him to the pinnacle of show business success.
 
Through it all, the consensus is that Eddie Bond made more friends than enemies. In the late 1990s, he moved east to Bolivar, Tennessee where he opened a store and a club that he was anxious to mention was not a nightclub. Morbidly obese, Bond moved to an assisted living facility for a time.
 
On Wednesday morning, March 20, 2013, Eddie Bond died from complications of Alzheimer's disease and dementia at his home in Bolivar, Tennessee, at the age of 79.
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© April 16, 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15928 mono digital
JOHNNY CARROLL - ROCK BABY, ROCK IT 1955 – 1960

Johnny Carroll's 1956 recording of "Wild Wild Women'', with its lean rockabilly arrangement and exciting  vocal performance that owes little debt to Elvis Presley, is one of the greatest early rock and roll singles.  Unfortunately, the record wasn't a hit and Carroll bounced from label to label without much success, making  a little rockabilly and several Gene Vincent-style rockers along the way. Rock Baby Rock It: 1955-1960 is a  complete summary of Carroll's early career, beginning with a generous helping of hot but rough demos made  in 1955 and continuing through his complete recordings for Decca, Warner Bros., and Sun Records. The  collection wraps up with a novelty single recorded by his backing band, the Spinners; a pair of indie label  waxings; and the four songs Carroll performed in the 1957 film ''Rock, Baby, Rock It''. The half-dozen Decca  recordings, including "Wild Wild Women'', are the essential cuts and have been anthologized elsewhere, but  exemplary rockers are scattered throughout the track list. It is a shame that Decca didn't record Carroll more,  but the work he did in those two days has given him a reputation among rockabilly aficionados that has only  grown. 
 
Producers
Various
Re-Issue Producers
Bob Jones and Richard Weize
Disc/Metalpart Transfer
Bob Jones
Tape Research
Dave Travis
Mastering
Bob Jones
Biography
Bill Millar
Discography
Adam Komorowski and Richard Weize
Photos and Illustrations
R.A. Andreas, Gaby Maag, Dave Travis
Artwork
Sven T. Uhrman
Thanks to
Colin Escott, Adam Komorowski,
Judy Lindsey, Ian Wallis
 
For music (Sun standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

Contains
1 - Hearts Of Stone (1989)
2 - Why Cry (1989)
3 - Love Is A Merry-Go-Round (1989)
4 - Stingy Thing (1989)
5 - Crazy Little Mama )1989)
6 - Sexy Ways (1989)
7 - Cut Out (1989)
8 - You Two-Timed Me Two Times Too Often (1985)
9 - You Made Me Love You (1985)
10 - Hot Rock (1957)
11 - Rock 'N' Roll Ruby (1956)
12 - Wild Wild Women (1956)
13 - Corrine, Corrina (1956)
14 - Crazy, Crazy Lovin' (1957)
15 - Tryin' To Get To You (1956)
16 - That's The Way I Love (1958) > PI 3520-A <
17 - I'll Wait (1958) > PI 3520-B <
18 - Rock Baby, Rock It (Sun 603) Bootleg (1979)
19 - You Made Me Love You (Sun 603) Bootleg (1979)
20 - The Swing (1959)
21 - Bandstand Doll (1959)
22 - Sugar (1959)
23 - Lost Without You (1959)
24 - Rag Mop (1959)
25 - Little Otis (1959)
26 - Trudy (1960)
27 - Run Come See (1960)
28 - The Sally Ann (1960)
29 - Run Come See (1960)
30 - Crazy Crazy Lovin (1957)
31 - Wild Wild Women (1957)
32 - Rockin' Maybelle (1957)
33 - Sugar Baby (1957)
 
(10-15) Original Decca, (20-25) Warner Bros., Duchess, WA and (16-19) Sun Recordings
Johnny Carroll's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
JOHNNY CARROLL – Born John Lewis Carrell on October 23, 1937 in Cleburne, Texas. Johnny Carroll grew up in Godley, Texas, a very small town, some 400 people, near Cleburne. As a youngster he listened to country music on the radio and got himself a guitar to practice on. When he was 10 years old his mother had taught him enough for him to appear over Cleburne's KCLA on Saturday mornings. He was later introduced to rhythm and blues by a cousin who was co-owner of a jukebox company and handed down 78's of Joe Turner and others.
 
During his school days he and his school fellows were very much into coloured music and groups such as the Clovers and the Charms (of "Heart Of Stone" fame). At 15, Johnny organized his first band, the Texas Moonlighters; they had their own show on Cleburne's KCLA radio. In 1955, the band won first prize in a talent contest, and enrolled second prize winner guitarist Jay Salem in the band along the way. They opened for Ferlin Husky and were spotted by Jack "Tiger" Goldman, owner of the Top Ten Recording Studio in Dallas.
 
The band cut several demos there, among them "Why Cry", "You Two-Timed Me One Time Too Often" and "Crazy Crazy Lovin". A deal was arranged with Decca's Nashville division on the strength of the latter, and a two-day session was organized there on April 25 and 26, 1956 for Johnny, without his band. The backing group was composed of well-known session men, with Grady Martin on lead guitar. They cut the fantastic "Crazy Crazy Lovin", "Trying To Get To You", "Rock And Roll Ruby", "Hot Rock", "Corrine, Corrina", and "Wild Wild Women" that make up the three magical Johnny Carroll Decca 45s. Two of these were also released in the UK, on Brunswick, but there were few sales on either side of the Atlantic.
 
Nevertheless, this is rockabilly at its most intense, and these six sides alone assure Carroll's place in musical history. To promote Johnny, Tiger persuaded Sonny Friedman to shoot a quickie rock 'n' roll movie, "Rock Baby Rock It", featuring 4 songs by Johnny Carroll and appearances by Rosco Gordon and others. Johnny was subsequently dropped from the Decca roster and in 1957 found himself accompanied by no less than Elvis' musicians, Scotty Moore and Bill Black (who had left Elvis following a dispute over salary).
 
It was Bill who introduced Johnny to Sam Phillips who bought a couple of demos Johnny had recorded in Forth Worth, Texas on June 23, 1957. Sam issued "That's The Way I Love" b/w "I'll Wait" as one of the five first (simultaneous) releases on Phillips International, leaving "Rock Baby Rock It" and "You Made Me Love You" unreleased. Of these five records, "Raunchy" by Bill Justis turned out to be the hit and Phillips concentrated all his promotion on that disc, leaving Johnny's record out in the cold. His career at Sun was over before it had even begun.
 
In 1958, Johnny got himself a new manager, Ed E. McLemore, who ran an agency in Dallas that booked Gene Vincent, Jimmy Bowen, Buddy Knox and Sonny James. Johnny finally met Gene Vincent and they went on to become very close friends. Johnny wrote "Maybe", recorded by Gene in the autumn of 1958 for his "Sounds Like" LP. They both used more or less the same band at the time, and it is not surprising that the sides recorded by Johnny bore a strong resemblance to Gene Vincent's sound. The demos were sent to Warner Bros in New York who released "Bandstand Doll" b/w "The Swing" which sold quite well and became Johnny's biggest seller. Sadly, the second single "Sugar" b/w "Lost Without You" didn't follow the same path and sank without a trace. The third WB single, "Rag Mop"/ "Little Otis", produced by Grady Martin, contained two instrumentals (with a few vocal interjections), by Johnny's group, The Spinners. When this didn't sell either, Warner dropped Carroll and his band. The hard life on the road paid its dues and Johnny quit touring in 1959, though he had two more singles released in 1960 and 1962, two different versions of "Run Come See" for two small labels.
 
During the 1960s, Carroll's recording career lay dormant. Johnny worked as a booker and fixer at a Fort Worth nightclub owned by Bill Sellers, until good old Ronny Weiser persuaded him to cut a Gene Vincent tribute, "Black Leather Rebel"/"Be Bop A Lula" for his Rollin' Rock label in 1974. "Black Leather Rebel" is also known under the title "Gene Vincent Rock". A Rollin' Rock LP, "Texabilly" was recorded in 1977 and released in 1978. Johnny then teamed up with model and singer Judy Lindsey and went back to making music full-time. They played the night clubs in Texas and have been appearing regularly in Europe in the 1980s. They recorded for the Gipsy label, issuing numerous singles and an LP.
 
Johnny has always been a great and appreciated performer until his untimely death (of liver failure) on February 18, 1995 in Dallas, Texas.
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220 mono digital
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME
 
Compact disc. An Bear Family Special Products. Black disc. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters Sun with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  On the back cover Bear Family logo left at bottom. Catalog number in upper right.

Contains 1-10 original Sun recordings and demos many of them previously unissued complete with studio chatter; 11-24 original Mercury recordings, and 32-34 original MGM recordings.  Also included in the box, 20-page booklet biography, rare photo's and liner notes by Narvel Felts, and Howard Cockburn. The 1957-1960 discography by Narvel Felts, Howard Cockburn, and Richard Weize.
 
Producers
Jack Clement, David Carroll, Bob McCloud, Art Talmadge,
Walt Maynatd, Jim Vienneau
Re-Issued Producer
Trevor Caliao, Howard Cockburn
Disc Transfer
Bob Jones
Mastering
Bob Jones
Biography
Narvel Felts, Howard Cockburn
Discography
Howard Cockburn, Narvel Felts, Rochard Weize
Photos and Illustrations
R.A. Abdreas, Trevor Cajiap, Howard Cockburn, Narvel Felts
Artwork
Sven T. Uhrmann

Contains
1 - Did You Tell Me (You Don't Care) (1981) 2:22
2 - My Babe (1976) 1:50
3 - Cry Baby Cry (1995) 1:51
4 - Tour Touch (1997) 2:32
5 - Foolish Thoughts (1985) 1:38
6 - Kiss-A-Me Baby (1981) 2:02
7 - Lonesome Feeling (1997) 2:28
8 - Lonely River ((1985) 2:07
9 - A Fool In Paradise (1975) 2:29
10 - A Teen's Way (1995) 2:28
11 - Kiss-A-Me Baby (1957) 1:50
12 - A Fool In Paradise (1987) 2:04
13 - Cry Baby Cry (1957) 2:01
14 - Your Touch (1987) 2:35
15 - Foolish Thoughts (1957) 1"47
16 - Lonely River (1987) 2:02
17 - A Teen's Way (1987) 2:06
18 - I'm Headin' Home (1987) 2:07
19 - Lonesome Feeling (1957) 2:35
20 - Little Girl Step This Way (1958) 2:07
21 - Your First Broken Heart (1987) 2:06
22 - Vada Lou (1958) 2:05
23 - Dream World (1957) 2:28
24 - Rocket Ride (1957) 2:24
25 - Three Thousand Miles (1959) 1:56
26 - Cutie Baby (1959) 1:51
27 - Honey Love (1959) 2:04
28 - Genavee (1959) 2:40
29 - Tony (1959) 2:38
30 - Darling Sue (1959) 1:59
31 - Cindy Lou (1959) 2:07
32 - Why Don't You Love Me (1987) 1:56
33 - Come Back Baby (1987) 2:40
34 - Remember Me(I'm The One Who Loves You) (1987) 2:49
1-10 Original Sun Recordings
11-24 Original Mercury Recordings
32-34 Original MGM Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.
Narvel Felts' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

NARVEL FELTS - Composer, rockabilly and rock and roll singer. Born on November 11, 1938 on a farm in Keiser, Arkansas, Narvel Felts was thirteen years old who still lived in Arkansas and he traded an BB gun for a beat up Gene Autry guitar that was held together with a Prince Albert tobacco can and some bailing wire. A year later, Felts was fourteen, he moved to Missouri and pickin' cotton and ordered a new guitar from Sears & Roebuck for $15.98. The teenaged Albert Narvel Felts had moved with his parents to Powe, Missouri in 1953 and he went to school in Bernie.

In 1956, when he was seventeen he entered the high school talent contest at Bernie, Missouri, and sing "Baby, Let's Play House" and when they wanted an encore there was a new song by Carl Perkins, called "Blue Suede Shoes".

Narvel Felts played at the KDEX radio in Dexter, Missouri on the Saturday afternoon radio shows, and played gigs at night in the Four way Inn nightclub in Dudley, Missouri. A music store owner, Calvin Richardson, had become Narvel's manager, and in 1956, Narvel Felts performed in Jerry Mercer's band a lot of the local clubs in southeast Missouri, north-east Arkansas and some gigs in Illinois and played a package show in mid-1956 with Roy Orbison. During December of 1956, Felts worked with Jerry Mercer and played with Roy Orbison and Eddie Bond at Dexter, Missouri and within a couple of weeks, Calvin Richardon arranged an audition with Sun Records in Memphis and formed the band called Narvel Felts and The Rockers. The rockets were Leon Barnett on lead guitar; J.W. Grubbs on bass; Bob Taylor on drums, and Jerry Tuttle who doubled on steel guitar and saxophone.

Before Sun could get anything organized, a man with connections to Mercury heard the Rockets playing in St. Louis and a partner who booked Narvel into theaters and in March 1957 Narvel Felts was playing the Fox Theatre in St. Louis and then he auditioned for Mercury Records. Narvel saw several releases on Mercury but real success did not come until 1959 when he signed with Hi Records. In 1958 Narvel Felts did recorded at RCA Studio B in Nashville in October 1957 featuring Jerry Tuttle on saxophone. In late 1958 Conway Twitty recommended Felts for the club circuit in Canada and on January 5,1959 Felts opened with Conway Twitty the Flamingo Club in Hamilton, Ontario, and played Pop Warner's in Malden, Missouri on the Saturday nights.

In 1960, Felts signed with Pink Records in New York, and it was the second Pink release that started it all for Felts, the rhythm and blues ballad ''Honey Love'', that became a minor seller in both the country and pop markets. Big enough to lead Felts to record again for Mercury, MGM, RCA and he signed for a series of sessions for Roland Janes featured on the Bear Family release Memphis Days. His big national hits came along in the seventies when "Drift Away" was recorded by Cinnamon in 1973. It was Felts' thirtieth single.

A string of hits followed ''Drift Away'' and when his contract was picked up by ABC Dot, Narvel scored even better, his 1975 single ''Reconsider Me'' placing at number 2 on the country charts. Narvel Felts pioneering contribution to the genre has been recognized by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. Back in 1962 he had married to the former Loretta Stan field. Two children resulted from the marriage, but Felts lost his only son, Narve lJr. (known as Bub) in 1995. At one time, Bub played drums for his father. One of his albums is dedicated to his son.

For a time the hits kept on coming but the last top 20 country hit, ''Everlasting Love'', came in 1979, the last chart entry in 1988. Narvel Felts continued to play shows both a home and in Europe and he has become a member of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. He currently resides in Malden, Missouri. where he continues to perform on occasion.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 2000 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16387 mono digital
SUN GOSPEL
 
Compact disc. An Bear Family Special Products. Black disc. Yellow label. Have circle of musical notes and staff around the entire label, with excepted of the bar wherein "Memphis, Tennessee" appear.  The letters SUN with sun rays pressed in light brown at the top of the label.  On the back cover Bear Family logo left at bottom. Catalog number in upper left. 
 
Without Sun Records, the face of popular music, indeed popular culture, would be markedly different. Record collectors know Sun Records as the birthplace of rockabilly, and a source of valuable early 1950s blues, country and rhythm and blues records. But gospel music?
 
Not surprisingly, no one has singled out this segment of Sun Records for systematic attention until now. Despite the fact that Sun made its home in a hotbed of gospel music activity, relatively little of it was recorded by label-owner Sam Phillips. He had his reasons. Phillips learned early on that it was difficult to promote and sell gospel records unless that was your only business. "It certainly wasn't intentional neglect," Phillips explained years later. "But you have to compromise. There's no telling what I could and should have done with gospel music from the Memphis area. I'm ashamed to say I barely touched the surface''.
 
This collection examines, for the first time, just what that ''surface'' looks like. Although not very extensive, it has a surprisingly rich texture. Gleaned from a;relatively brief period (1950-1962), this is a cross section o the gospel recordings that lie within the Sun tape archives. There is some wonderful music here in a truly dazzling array of styles. The most obvious differences are racial, stemming from a segregated southern society. But race does not tell the whole story. Men and women, white and black, urban and rural, alone and in groups are all here for a common purpose: to praise the Lord and testify to their faith. And in the process, to see their names on a yellow Sun label. Here, together for the first time, are their stories and their music, and Sam Phillips himself narrating ''Would Anybody Care''. Also included in the box an 36-page booklet biography with liner notes by Hank Davis. 
 
Producers
Sam C. Phillips and others
Re-Issue Producer
Hank Davis
Tape Research
Hank Davis and Scott Parker
Tape/Disc Transfer
Don Powell, Tom Ruff
Mastering
Asja Ehrke
Compilation
Hank Davis and Scott Parker
Biographies and Track Notes
Hank Davis
Photos and Illustrations
R.A. Andreas, Hank Davis, Colin Escott, Terence Peach,
Dean and Jud Phillips, Mike Smythe
Artwork
Wolfgang Taubenauer
Thanks to
Peter Guralnick, Martin Hawkins, Kip Lornell, Bill O'Neal,
Jay Orr, Don Powell, Ronnie Pugh, Dave Sax,
Mike Smythe, Charles Wolfe

Contains
1 - Just A Little Talk With Jesus (The Million Dollar Quartet) (1992) 3:55
2 - Softly And Tenderly (The Prisonaires) (1953) 2:30 > Sun 189-B <
3 - Troublesome Waters (Howard Seratt) (1953) 2:58 > Sun 198-A <
4 - Just A Closer Walk With Thee (Eddie Bond) (1962) 2:48
5 - Sermon (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1989) 1:00
6 - I'm Working On A Building (Unknown Male Quartet) (1985) 2:13
7 - I Was There When It Happened (Johnny Cash) (1957) 2:14
8 - When The Saints Go Marching In (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1958) 2:07
9 - Until I Pray For You (Rudi Richardson) (2000) 2:14
10 - Big Man (Charlie Rich) (1998) 2:46
11 - Rainbow Of Love (Evans Family Singers) (2000) 2:10
12 - Gospel Train (Jones Brothers) (1980) 2:16
13 - All My Sins Been Taken Away (Sonny Burgess) (1975) 1:46
14 - Round-Up In Glory (Sun Spot Quartet) (1953) 2:55
15 - House Of God (Unknown Female Trio) (2000) 2:59
16 - Lord Lead Me Home (George Klein) (2000) 1:11
17 - Forgive Me Lord (Southern Jubilee Singers) (1980) 2:58
18 - Nobody's Looking Back (Wally Fowler) (2000) 2:00
19 - Where Can I Go? (Bother James Anderson) (2000) 3:11
20 - Will I Be Lost (Eddie Bond) (1962) 2:40
21 - There's A Man In Jerusalem (Southern Jubilee Singers) (1977) 2:21
22 - Can't Find Time To Pay (Cast King & The Millers Sisters) (1986) 2:52
23 - Night Train To Memphis (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1969) 2:07
24 - I Need Jesus (Song Fellows) (2000) 2:03
25 - My God Is Real (The Prisonaires) (1953) 2:29 > Sun 189-A <
26 - When I Walk On Streets Of Gold (Evans Family Singers) (2000) 1:52
27 - Gonna Make Myself At Home (Wally Fowler) (2000) 2:54
28 - Amazing Grace (Jones Brothers) (1980) 3:27
29 - My Heart Is A Chapel (Mary Johnson) (2000) 1:55
30 - Where Shall I Be? (The Brewsteraires) (1951) 2:43
31 - Jesus Means All To Me (Howard Serail) (1953) 2:11 > St. Francis 100-B <
32 - Would Anybody Care? (Sam Phillips) (2000) 2:23
Original Sun Recordings
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.
 
For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837 mono digital
RUDY GRAYZELL - LET'S GET WILD

''Let's Get Wild'' is the first comprehensive anthology of one of the original legendary rockabilly stars, Rudy Grayzell. It includes the previously unissued complete version of ''Let's Get Wild'', plus four other unreleased recordings. The original version of ''Duck Tail'' is now widely regarded a rockabilly classic. Rudy's Grayzell's story is told in the liner notes of the accompanying 52 page booklet by Colin Escott and a complete discography session notes by Andrew Brown and Richard Weize. This superb 32 track set includes his complete recordings for the Abbott, Capitol, Starday, Sun, and Award labels.
 
Producers
Fabor Robinson, Ken Nelson, Pappy Daily, and others
Re-Issue Producer
Stefan Kohne
Mastering
Christian Zwarg
Disc Transfer
Christian Zwarg
Biography
Colin Escott
Discography
Andrew Brown and Richard Weize
Photos and Illustrations
R.A. Andreas, Andrew Brown, Nico Feuerback, Rudy Grayzell,
Klaus Kettner, Diethold Leu, Billy Miller, Norton Records,
Big Al Turner
Photo Scan
Andrew Brown, Andreas Merck,
Horst Zimmerman
Artwork
Rettrograph.de
Thanks to
Rudy Grayzell, Andrew Brown
Tom Ingram

Contains
1 - Let's Get Wild (Complete Version) (2010) 2:48
2 - I Love You So (1957) 2:09
3 - You're Gone (1956) 2:00
4 - Duck Tail (1956) 2:32
5 - Jag Ga Lee Ga (1956) 2:17
6 - You Hurt Me So (1956) 2:56
7 - Please Big Mama (1955) 3:03
8 - Yes Daddy Yes (2010) 2:28
9 - There's Gonna Be A Ball (1954) 2:48
10 - You Better Believe It (1954) 2:19
11 - Ca-razy! (1954) 2:37
12 - My Spirit Is Willing (1955) 2:41
13 - Hearts Made Of Stone (1954) 2:58
14 - Be Mine Forever (2010) 3:02
15 - Judy (Take 2) (2010) 2:08
16 - Remember When (1996) 2:03
17 - Judy (Take 3) (2010) 2:08
18 - I Won't Be The Fool (1997) 2:02
19 - Judy (Sun Master) (1957) 2:04 > Sun 290-A <
20 - I Think Of You (Sun Master) (1957) 2:32 > Sun 290-B <
21 - You'll Be Mine (1959) 2:31
22 - It Ain't My Baby (And I Ain't Gonna Rock It) (1954) 2:41
23 - The Moon Is Up (1956) 3:01
24 - Ocean Paradise (1954) 2:46
25 - Bonita Chiquita (1953) 2:32
26 - I'm Gone Again (1953) 2:56
27 - The Heart That Once Was Mine (1953) 2:40
28 - Looking At The Moon And Wishing On A Star (1953) 2:53
29 - Day By Day (1956) 2:18
30 - Should I Ever Love Again (1997) 2:33
31 - Jag-Ga-Lee-Ga (2010) 2:14
32 - F.B.I. Story (1959) 3:05
Original Starday Recordings
Original Award Recordings
Original Abbott Recordings
15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 Original Sun Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc. 
Rudy Grazell's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
RUDY GRAYZELL - Born Rudolfo Jiminez on June 8, 1933 in Saspamco, Texas, just south of San Antonio, Rudolfo Jiminez was of Spanish ancestry on his father's side and Italian on his mother's. As a youngster he was exposed to a wide range of music, pop, country, rhythm and blues and Mexican music.
 
His Hispanic hertage melted into his early grounding in country music and his love of rhythm and blues to create a sound that one reviewer likened to Roy Orbison on a three-day drunk in Tijuana.
 
His father worked for a pipeline company, and Rudy grew up in San Antonio listening to Hispanic music blasting in from south of the border and country music blasting in from all around. He loved it all, but he especially loved Ernest Tubb on the Grand Ole Opry.
 
''I liked this chick named Norma'', he told Dan Davidson, ''but she liked some guy who played guitar and that just tore me up. So I had my folks buy me a guitar and I learned to play it''.
 
Aged seventeen, he assembled a combo called the Silver Buckles and they played the clubs and bars. ''They allowed you to play in clubs if you were underage'', he explained. ''You just couldn't drink. We did all the songs that were popular. Lefty Frizzell, Webb Pierce, Faron Young, Floyd Tillman''. At South San Antonio High School (known locally as South San), it was compulsory to pass algebra in order to graduate, so Rudy aced the subject by dating the math teacher. From that point he left school, music was his sole meal ticket. For someone with no charted hits, that's beyong improbable.
 
Band members came and went. Sometimes, Rudy led his own band; sometimes he played with Eddy Dugosh's Ah-Ha Playboys or Johnny Olenn; sometimes, they worked with him. Dugosh has faded from view, but Olenn had a log career ahead of him in music, film, and lounges. Doug Sahm probably fits into the story around this point. Rudy says that Sahm was eleven, (which would by 1952 and 1953) when Rudy showed up at his high school and told the teacher that he was Sahm's uncle and needed to take him out of school. No one seemed to question how a short Hispanic guy could be a lanky German kid's uncle. Sahm was proficient on steel guitar, electric guitar, and fiddle, but played steel for Rudy.
 
Doug remembered that Rudy was still in school as well, which seems unlikely. In Sahm's unfocused recollections, he remembered playing steel guitar for Hank Williams in September 1952 on what would be the hillbilly king's last birthday... the last of twenty-nine. Hank celebrated his birthday at The Barn, a club booked and co-owned by Charlie Walker, a San Antonio disc jockey and recording artist. Walker was a pivotal figure in Rudy Grayzell's career, so it all eems to fit together somehow.
 
As of mid-1953, Rudolfo was an Abbott recording artist. Abbott's owner, Fabor Robison, changed his name to Rudy Grayzell, figuring that the country market wasn't ready for someone called Jiminez. Rudy's first Abbott single, "Looking At the Moon And Wishing On A Star" was clearly inspired by the recent hit "Don't Let the Stars Get In Your Eyes". It was covered by Skeets McDonald and Charline Arthur and even saw a belated United Kingdom release, on London HL 8094, in November 1954. After two more singles on Abbott, Rudy either quit the label or was dropped after one year.
 
Charlie Walker then landed Grayzell a contract with Capitol, where Ken Nelson produced his recordings and he was billed as "Rudy Gray". "Hearts Of Stone", the first Capitol single, was a cover of a number by the Jewels from Los Angeles, but Rudy's version was outsold by the Fontane Sisters (number 1 pop) and the Charms (number 1 rhythm and blues, number 15 pop). His flip-side, "There's Gonna Be A Ball", was hillbilly with rhythm and blues overtones. By this time Grayzell had changed the name of his band to the Texas Kool Kats. Two further Capitol singles went nowhere and in early 1956 Rudy signed with Starday, run by Pappy Daily in Houston.
 
It was here that he cut his best rockers. "Duck Tail"/"You're Gone" was an excellent rockabilly two-sided, but a cover of "Duck Tail" by Joe Clay for RCA's Vik label stole much of its thunder. The fourth Starday single, "Let's Get Wild", released in mid-1957, had Grayzell almost going over the top, but it was probably too wild for most radio stations and didn't get much airplay.
 
On three of the four Starday singles, Rudy was credited as Rudy "Tutti" Grayzell. He says that the nickname came from Elvis Presley, who called him "Rudy Tutti", but, like several other tall stories from Grayzell, this has to be taken with a grain of salt.
 
His next stop was at Sun Records in Memphis and again, Charlie Walker was the intermediary. As a rule, Sam Phillips didn't record artists who had already recorded for other labels, but he made an exception for Rudy (and also for Onie Wheeler around the same time). There was one session spread over two days in October 1957, arranged by Bill Justis, which resulted in the single "Judy"/"I Think Of You" (Sun 290), plus two slow numbers that now see the light of day for the first time on the Bear Family Record label.
 
It was probably in 1958 that Grayzell moved to San Jose, California, and signed with Award Records. His first recording there was an unreleased cover of Wynona Carr's "Should I Ever Love Again". A 1959 session yielded the novelty "The F.B.I. Story", credited to "Rudy Grayzell and his Thunderbirds, accompanied by the Sparkles". It was his last record for several decades.
 
By 1960, former Sun recording artist Rudy Grayzell was in Las Vegas at the Fremont Hotel, and insists that Wayne Newton was his supporting act. He stayed eighteen months before heading to Seattle when the World's Fair was there. It was the same story for years. Booking agents would see him and offer him an extended gig somewhere, and he'd go. He was even back in San Antonio for a while. For the last thirty or more years, Rudy has been based in Portland, Oregon. It might have been Eddy Dugosh who got him to Portland. One of Dugosh's former band members, Frank Wood, said that Dugosh's Redtoppers moved from Redding, California to Portland in 1959 to take up a residency at Elmo's Supper Club, and so it's likely that Rudy replaced Dugosh at Elmo's. Photos of Dugosh, Johnny Olenn, and Rudy Grayzell from that time show neatly turned out guys in check jackets and bow ties, so it's pretty clear that rockabilly had given way to supper club music.
 
Slowly, though, Rudy Grayzell reclaimed his unruly rockabilly roots. An undated review from a Portland newspaper said Rudy's then-regular gig at the Jolly Rogers club: ''A compact, barrel-chested man with a mop of wavy brown hair and a wide, friendly grin. Rudy never failed to take the place by storm. He sang a lot of poorly-chosen covers, mainstream country stuff or maudlin ballads mostly, but when the mood would strike him he'd let loose with one of his own badass compositions, ''Let's Get Wild'', ''Duck Tail'', or ''Judy''. He’d plant his feet wide like he was getting ready for a stiff wind, square his shoulders and squint into the ether. As he sang, he'd rock back and forth and the veins would stand out in his neck. He could still really let it all hang out. The Jolly Rogers' owner, and old fellow with a ten gallon stomach and a yen for endless Seven-and-Sevens en menthol lights, once climbed up onto the bar and did an impromptu boogaloo during a particularly fiery rendition of ''Let's Get Wild''. During breaks Rudy would cruise the room, talking to all the regulars, shaking hands with an iron grip. He was old school show biz''.
 
For many years, recording sessions were few and far between, but in 1987 Rudy Grayzell's comeback began with a session for Sundial. In 1990, he began appearing in Europe and became a familiar face at festivals. Audiences encountered the same manic energy that impressed the reviewer in Portland ten years earlier and the kids in Texas twenty-five years before that. In 1991, he recorded for Billy Miller and Miriam Linna's Norton Records and in 1998 he recorded for Sideburn. He announced that he planned to open a club that would serve Tutti Tacos, but the first Tutti Taco has yet to be served. Lately, Rudy Grayzell has been working with the husband-and-wife team of Victoria and Rider McDowell. Victoria was a schoolteacher in Carmel, California when (shades of Fabor Robison) she concocted a dissolvable tablet called Airborne designed to boost the body's immune system, thereby preventing colds and flu. Without proof that Airborne prevented anything, she eventually had to pay the Federal Trade Commission a fine of $23.3 million and settle another class action suit for $6.5 million. Her husband, Rider, had been an investigative reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, and developed a stage show featuring Rudy Grayzell. Anyone near Monterey this fall should check out Zombie Voodoo Scream Party. Rudy plays an evil Elvis clone, Teddy Corn. It's a new millennium, but the weirdness continues.
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893 mono digital
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE...
 
Compact disc. 1 digipac, with comprehensive booklet, 28 tracks. This exciting CD reveals a completely unknown chapter in the already implausible, though true, story of the Prisonaires, the prison inmates from Nashville who got onto Sun Records in Memphis in 1953 and whose best song, ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'', became an international pop hit for Johnny Ray.
 
In this CD, eleven astonishing songs from an unissued concert recorded at the Tennessee State Penitentiary, featuring several Prisonaires members never heard until now! Fascinating spoken introductions to the songs by second tenor Alfred Brooks, and a message from the penitentiary warden Lynn Bomar! Six alternative versions of songs recorded for Sun Records. All eleven vocal group tracks by The Solotones and the Marigolds (renamed versions of the Prisonaires led by Johnny Bragg). A comprehensive booklet by Sun Records expert Martin Hawkins containing many new interviews and insights into the story of the Prisonaires, one of the first rhythm and blues vocal groups to record and have hits in the South. It explains the background to the unissued recordings, and contains many rare and fascinating photos and illustrations. The new Prisonaires titles reveal an even wider range of vocal harmonies and musical abilities, influences and styles than the Sun recordings. The Prisonaires rock with ''Caldonia'' and ''Bony Moronie'', they sing sincere versions of ''Suppertime'' and ''Gentle Hands'', they reprise their best-known songs including ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'', and they make fun with ''The Boastin' Texan'' and other titles.
 
This CD and hear the Prisonaires as never before; you'll have completed your Prisonaires collection; and you'll have the complete story of the Marigolds/Solotones. This CD is one of three discs telling the complete story of the Prisonaires and of their lead singer, Johnny Bragg.
 
Producers
Red Wortham, Sam C. Phillips, Ernie Young
Re-Issue Producer
Martin Hawkins
Disc Transfer
Christian Zwarg
Tape Research and Comparison
Martin Hawkins
Mastering
Christian Zwarg
Biography
Martin Hawkins
Photos and Illustrations
R.A. Andreas, Colin Escott,
The Showtime Music Archive (Toronto)
Photo Scans
Andreas Merck
Photo Restoration
Este
Artwork
Retrograph.de
Thanks tp
John Tefteler for the unissied live conceret.
Special Thanks to
Bill Millar

Contains
The Prisonaires
1 - When The Saints Go Marching In (2011) 3:11
2 - In The Garden (2011) 1:56
3 - Bony Moronie (2011) 2:42
4 - Suppertime (2011) 3:58
5 - Caldonia (2011) 3:07
6 - Gentle Hands (2011) 3:17
7 - Just Walkin' In The Rain (2011) 3:36
8 - The Boastin' Texan (2011) 2"19
9 - Message From Prison Warden Lynn Bomar (2011) 1:08
10 - A Prisoner's Prayer (2011) 3:22
11 - Only Believe (2011) 2:55
12 - Senor Siskin (20110 1:52 
Live Recordings Probably 1961 Various Dates at
The Tennessee State Penitentiary, Nashville, Tennessee. Producer Unknown

The Marigolds
13 - Rollin' Stone (1955) 2:53
14 - Why Don't You (1953) 2:48
15 - Don't Say Tomorrow (1995) 2:50
16 - Rollin' Stone (Alternate Take)  (1996) 2:58
Original Excello Recordings

The Solotones
17 - Front Page Blues (1955) 2:39
18 - Pork And Beans (1955) 2:52
19 - Two Strangers (1955) 2:37
20 - Love You, Love You, Love You (1955) 2:53
21 - Juke Box Rock And  Roll (1956) 2":32
22 - It's You Darling, It's You (1956) 2:37
Original Excello Recordings

The Prisonaires
23 - Baby Please (2011) 2:43
24 - What'll You Do Next (2011) 1:35
25 - There Is Love In You (2011) 2:53
26 - Rockin' Horse (2011) 2:28
27 - Two Strangers (2011) 2:47
28 - Lucy You Know I Want You (1979) 2:37
Original Sun Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc. 
The Prisonaires' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© April 26, 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17213 (1-3) mono digital
SUN BALLADS 1953 - 1962 - VARIOUS ARTISTS
 
3 CD digipac. The first-ever in-depth look at the ballad side of the Sun Records legacy. Surveys a 10-year period from the earliest blues and hillbilly days to the golden age of rockabilly and into the early 1960s. Contains 78 tracks featuring Sun's best-known artists, as well as obscure and rarely reissued artists and titles. Contains in-depth historical material and detailed track-by-track commentaries.

A must-have for all music historians, as well as die-hard Sun fans and collectors. Sun Records earned its widespread fame as the Memphis-based birthplace of rock and roll pioneers like Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Billy Riley, as well as icons of American music such as Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Charlie Rich. Sun was also home to blues legends like Howlin' Wolf, B. B. King, Rufus Thomas, Jr. and Rosco Gordon. Label owner Sam Phillips truly did it all with his little Memphis label, and built a legend in the process.

Although Sun is best known for rockers and rockin' music, it turns out that even rockers had their mellow moments. Sun managed to record a surprising number of them and built a very effective library of ballads as well. This side of Sun's legacy has never been examined in depth, until now. Sun Ballads surveys a 10 year period of Sun's history from the earliest blues and hillbilly days to the golden era of rockabilly and beyond, into the early 1960s. This collection combines some of Sun's best known recording pioneers with a few truly obscure artists and rarely reissued titles; it contains a lavishly illustrated book with detailed track by track commentary by Sun historian Hank Davis. This 3-CD set is an unprecedented treasure trove for Sun fans and collectors.
 
Producers
Sam C. Phillips, Jack Clement, Bill Cantrell, Quinton Claunch
Re-Issue Producer
Hank Davis
Mastering
Jurgen Crasser
Liner Notes
Hank Davis
Photos and Illustrations
R.A. Abdreas, Colin Escott, Hank Davis, 
The Showtime Music Archive (Toronto)
Tape Comparisons
Hank Davis
Photo Scans
Andreas Merck
Photo Restoration
Este
Artwork
Retrograph.de
Thanks to
Scott Parker, Kat Bergwron,
Len Brown

Disc 1 Contains
1 - Walking In The Rain (1953) 2:21 (Thomas, Rufus) > Sun 181-B <
2 - Just Walking In The Rain (1953) 2:47 (The Prisonaires) > Sun 186-B < 
3 - Beggin' My Baby (Little Milton) (1953) 2:30 > Sun 194-A < 
4 - I've Been Deceived (Charlie Feathers) (1955) 2:44 > Flip 503-A <
5 - Old Brother Jack (Bonnie Turner) (1976) 2:15 (Not Originally Issued)
6 - Seems Like A Million Years (Willie Nix) (1953) 2:44 > Sun 179-B <
7 - No Teasin' Around (Billy Emerson) (1954) 3:02 > Sun 195-A <
8 - Turn Around Carl Perkins) (1955) 3:01 > Flip 501-B <
9 - There Is Love In You (The Prisonaires) (1954) 2:54 > Sun 207-A <
10 - Before Long (Jimmy & Walter) (1953) 2:59 > Sun 180-B <
11 - The House Of Sin (Slim Rhodes Band) (1955) 2:44 > Sun 225-A <
12 - Sitting By My Window (The Five Tinos) (1955) 3:27 > Sun 222-B <
13 - Daydreams Come True (Maggie Sue Wimberly) (1955) 2:57 > Sun 229-A <
14 - I Forgot To Remember To Forget (Elvis Presley) (1955) 2:31 > Sun 223-B <
15 - No Greater Love (Billy Emerson) (1955) 2:56  > Sun 219-B < 
16 - My Treasure (Johnny Cash) (1961) 2:17 > Sun 363-B <
17 - You Can Tell Me (The Miller Sisters) (1956) 2:40 > Sun 230-B <
18 - Bad Girl (Slim Rhodes Band) (1956) 2:28 > Sun 238-B <
19 - Wedding Gown Of White (Charlie Feathers) (1955) 3:09 > Sun 231-B <
20 - Sure To Fall (Carl Perkins Brothers Band) (1956) 2:34 Sun 235 Unissued
21 - No More, No More (Jimmy Haggett) (1955) 2:26 > Sun 236-A <
22 - I'd Rather Be Safe Than Sorry (Warren Smith) (1956) 2:59 > Sun 239-B <
23 - A Fool For Loving You (Jack Earls) (1956) 2:45 > Sun 240-B < 
24 - I Walk The Line (Johnny Cash) (1956) 2:46 > Sun 241-B <
25 - Finders Keepers (The Miller Sisters) (1956) 2:55 > Sun 255-B <
26 - No Matter Who's To Blame (Barbara Pittman) (1956) 3:11 > Sun 253-B < 
Original Sun Recordings

Disc 2 Contains
1 - Take And Give (Slim Rhodes Band) (1956) 2:23 > Sun 256-A <
2 - I'll Wait Forever (Glenn Honeycutt) (1957) 2:39 > Sun 264-B <
3 - Only You (Carl Perkins) (1958) 3:21 SLP-1225 
4 - Don't Make Me Go (Johnny Cash) (1957) 2:29 > Sun 266-A <
5 - Restless (Sonny Burgess) 1957) 2:40 > Sun 263-B < 
6 - Fool's Hall Of Fame (Roy Orbison) (1974) 2:28 (Not Originally Issued)
7 - Just In Time (Harold Jenkins) (1975) 2:46 (Not Originally Issued)
8 - That Depends On You (Jimmy Williams) (1957) 2:22 > Sun 270-B <
9 - Two Young Fools In Love (Barbara Pittman) (1957) 2:25 > PI 3518-A <
10 - Foolish Heart (Ray Harris) (1957) 2:11 > Sun 272-B <
11 - I'm Lonesome (Ernie Chaffin) (1957) 2:46 > Sun 275-A <
12 - It All Depends (Jerr Lee Lewis) (1958) 2:59 EPA 108
13 - Easy To Love (Mack Self) (1957) 2:47  > Sun 273-B <
14 - More Than Yesterday (Edwin Bruce) (1957) 2:37  > Sun 276-B < 
15 - Forever Yours (Carl Perkins) (1957) 2:38  > Sun 274-A < 
16 - Your Cheating Heart (Mary Johnson) (2002) 1:27 (Not Originally Issued)
17 - Give My Love To Rose (Johnny Cash) (1957) 2:45 > Sun 279-B <
18 - It Only Hurts For A Little While (The Miller Sisters) (1989) 2:38 (Not Originally Issued)
19 - I Fell In Love (Warren Smith) (1957) 2:41 > Sun 286-B <
20 - Love Is A Stranger (The Sunrays) (1958) 3:01 > Sun 293-A <  
21 - Trying To Get To You (Roy Orbison) (1989) 2:42 (Not Originally Issued)
22 - You Win Again (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1957) 2:56 > Sun 281-B <
23 - I Was A Fool (Ken Cook) (1958) 2:26 > PI 3534-B <
24 - I'm Getting Better All The Time (Demo) (1989) 1:36 (Barbara Pittman) (Not Originally Issued)
25 - Sweet Misery (Sonny Burgess) (1957) 2:09 > Sun 285-B <
26 - Ain't It A Shame (Charlie Rich) (1998) 2:22 (Not Originally Issued)
Original Sun Recordings

Disc 3 Contains
1 - One More Time (Billy Riley) (1959) 2:16 > Sun 322-A <
2 - Port Of Lonely Hearts (Johnny Cash) (1960) 2:35 > Sun 347-A <
3 - Part Of My Life (Edwin Bruce) (1958) 2:15 > Sun 292-B <
4 - I'll Make It All Up To You (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1958) 3:05 > Sun 303-B <
5 - Breeze (Vernon Taylor) (1958) 2:08 > Sun 310-A <   
6 - Goodbye Mr. Love (Warren Smith) (1959) 2:40 > Sun 314-A <
7 - Apple Blossom Time (Undubbed) (Charlie Rich) (1970) 2:53 (Not Originally Issued)
8 - Sail Away (Ray Smith) (1959) 2:28 > Sun 319-A < 
9 - The Miracle Of You (Hannah Fay) (2002) 2:38 (Not Originally Issued)
10 - Please Don't Ever Leave Me (Ernie Chaffin) (1959) 2:21 > Sun 320-A <  
11 - Why, Why, Why (Ray Smith) (1958) 2:20 > Sun 308-A < 
12 - I'm Bluer Than Anyone Can Be (Carl Mann) (1960) 2:21 PLP 1960 
13 - To Tell The Truth (Bobbie & The Boys) (1959) 2:12 > PI 3543-B <
14 - How's My Ex Treating You (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1962) 2:38 > SUN 379-B <
15 - River Of No Return (Mary Johnson) (2002) 3:38 (Not Originally Issued)
16 - How Well I Know (Rayburn Anthony) (1962) 2:11 > Sun 373-A < 
17 - Ain't Got Nothin' But The Blues (Mikki Wilcox) (2002) 2:57 (Not Originally Issued)
18 - Stay (Alternate Take) (Charlie Rich) (1989) 2:11 (Not Originally Issued)
19 - Cheaters Never Win (Bobbie Jean) (1960) 2:01 > Sun-342-A <
20 - I Can't Forget You (Undubbed Version) (Carl Mann) (1993) 2:34 (Not Originally Issued)
21 - Is It Too Late (Tracy Pendarvis) (1960) 2:10 > Sun 335-B <
22 - I'll Wait Forever (Anita Wood) (1961) 3:02 > Sun 361-A < 
23 - Fools Like Me (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1958) 2:53 > Sun 296-B <
24 - The Quiet Look (Thomas Wayne) (1962) 2:12 > PI 3577-B <
25 - Who Will The Next Fool Be (Charlie Rich) (1961) 2:23 > PI 3566-A < 
26 - I Know What It Means (Mikki Wilcox) (2002) 2:26 (Not Originally Issued)
Original Sun Recordings
 
© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc.
 
For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube <  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© (2019) Bear Family (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17504 mono digital
SUN SHINES ON HANK WILLIAMS

''Sun Shines On Hank Williams'' is a 26 track compilation celebrating the songs of the country music legend through recordings made by artists at Sun Records. From Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis to lesser-known artists from the label's history, these vintage recordings from the 1950s and 1960s marry iconic songs with the unmistakable sound of Sun.

With its simple premise, the album soon draws the listener into the world of Sun Records, but things are not that straightforward. The eclectic nature of the compilation is a surprise, a pleasant one. Each artist brings his or her own interpretation of the song, making it an interesting listening experience. There may be several versions of the same compositions included, but none sound identical to one another. Much to the surprise of this reviewer, genres vary from country to rock and roll, jazz, blues and soul; showing the unexpected, varied nature of Sun Studios' output. For those that have only heard the music of Sun's ''million dollar quartet'' (Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis and Johnny Cash), this is a step towards discovering what else Sam Phillips and Jack Clement produced during this period. While Lewis (6) and Cash (5) are represented thoroughly on the collection, some of their other big stars are notably absent because of not having recorded Williams’ songs during their Sun period. While it is sad not to see more major names, it is the rarities and lesser-known artists that make this compilation special.

This set attempts to give fans something different, and it has succeeded. The care and attention to detail is apparent. There are eight previously unreleased masters, including tracks by Sonny Burgess, Cliff Gleaves, Jeb Stuart, Annette McGee, Hank Davis, David Wilkins, Carl McVoy and Ernie Barton; most being rejected demos that have remained unheard until now. Written material includes a warning about the lower audio quality on some recordings, but much work has gone into making them sound remarkable for their age.

Many of the included recordings are alternative versions, originally unissued tracks and undubbed recordings; the latter removing commercial overdubs to reveal what they heard during the song session. This may turn off some who want a single mix of a song, but it is a unique selling point for the collection. Most Johnny Cash fans might already have the released version of ''I Could Never Be Ashamed Of You'', complete with added choral elements. Attempting to give the bare bones of a track is refreshing, and are right for this set. There are also tracks where candid studio chatter remains in the track, a fascinating historical document. Hearing Jerry Lee Lewis jokingly takes credit for his tongue-in-cheek take on ''I Can’t Help It'' (called You Can’t Help it) is a highlight.

The liner notes are an interesting delve into the included artists, many of which may be unfamiliar to a wider audience. Sun historian Hank Davis, who has an unreleased track on the album, has done an excellent job on compiling the information together. There are some fascinating stories contained within the booklet, including the mystery of the whereabouts of singer Annette McGee. It also includes several rare images from the time.

by Jamie Dyer

 Producers
Sam C. Phillips and Jack Clement
Re-Issue Producers
Hank Davis, Richard Weize
Tape Research
Hank Davis, Phyllis Hill, Richard Weize
Tape Comparison
Hank Davis
Mastering
Christian Zwarg
Line Notes
Hank Davis
Photos and Illustrations
Bear Family Archive
Photo Restoration
Sven T. Uhrmann
Artwork
Retrograph.de
Thanks to
Roy Forbes, Martin Hawkins, Jim Stewart,
and Scott Parker

Contains

1 - Hey Good Looking (Previously Unissued Alternate Take) Ernie Barton
2 - Cold Cold Heart > Sun 364-A < Jerry Lee Lewis)
3 - My Buckets Got A Hole In It (Previously Unissued Alternate Take) Sonny Burgess
4 - I Could Never Be Ashamed Of You (Undubbed Alternate Take) Johnny Cash
5 - Your Cheating Heart (Previously Unissued Alternate Take) Cliff Gleaves
6 - Long Gone Lonesome Blues (Original Unissued) Jerry Lee Lewis
7 - Cold Cold Heart > PI 3527-B < Barbara Pittman
8 - I Can’t Help It (Previously Unissued) Jeb Stuart
9 - You Win Again (Previously Unissued) Johnny Cash
10 - Dear John (Original Unissued) Warren Smith
11 - Your Cheating Heart (Previously Unissued Demo) Annette McGee
12 - Jambalaya (LP 1230) Jerry Lee Lewis
13 - Half As Much (Previously Unissued Demo) Hank Davis
14 - Hey Good Looking (Previously Unissued) Johnny Cash
15 - You Win Again (Previously Unissued) David Wilkins
16 - You Can’t Help It (Original Unissued) Jerry Lee Lewis
17 - I Heard That Lonesome Whistle Blow (Alternate Take) Johnny Cash
18 - My Bucket’s Got A Hole In It > Sun 285-A < Sonny Burgess
19 - Your Cheatin’ Heart (Original Unissued Demo) Jeanie Green
20 - You Win Again > Sun 281-B < Jerry Lee Lewis
21 - There’ll Be No Teardrops Tonight (Previously Unissued) Carl McVoy
22 - I Can’t Help It (Original Unissued Alternate Take) Johnny Cash
23 - Take These Chains From My Heart (Original Unissued) Carl Mann
24 - Setting The Woods On Fire (Original Unissued) Jerry Lee Lewis
25 - I Saw The Light (LP 1980) Eddie Bond
26 - Hey Good Lookin' (Original Unissued Alternate Take) Johnny Cash
Original Sun Recordings

© Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc. 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Most Sun tracks can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
 > YouTube < 
 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©