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1951 SESSIONS 9
September 1, 1951 to September 30, 1951

Studio Session for The Brewsteraires, September 26, 1951 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Howlin' Wolf, September 1951 / RPM Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
MRS/Chess/RPM recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
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SEPTEMBER 1951

The Biharis announce that they have signed Howlin' Wolf, and the first RPM single "Mornin' At Midnight" b/w ''Riding In The Moonlight'' (RPM 333) is released. "Mornin'" may have been a misprint on the label, or it may have been a deliberate misspelling because Sam Phillips had already registered "Moanin' At Midnight" with the AFM. Under AFM regulations at that time, the same song could not be re-recorded for another record label for five years.

"Rocket 88" finally drops off the rhythm and blues charts after an 18-week run. Brenston has now relocated in Chicago and is touring the West Coast, playing a stint at the Elks Club in Hollywood.

The classic science-fiction film “The Day the Earth Stood Still” debuted during September of 1951 in New York. The film told the story of an alien and his robot who traveled to Earth to deliver an important message to humankind. “The Day the Earth Stood Still” was praised by critics and considered to be one of the best movies to be released that year. It was directed by Robert Wise who is also known for directing popular films like 1961’s “West Side Story” and 1965’s “The Sound of Music.” In 1995 the film was chosen for preservation by the Library of Congress.

SEPTEMBER 1, 1951 SATURDAY

Hank Williams purchases a farm in Williamson County, Tennessee.

Lefty Frizzell's ''Always Later (With Your Kisses)'' ascent to number 1 in Billboard magazine.

SEPTEMBER 3, 1951 MONDAY

''Moanin' At Midnight'' backed with ''How Many More Years'' (Chess 1479) by Howlin' Wolf came out at the end of August 1951 and hit almost immediately on the regional charts. ''Under separate cover I am sending you the number by the Howlin' Wolf that I told you about'' Sam Phillips wrote to his old colleague WLAC disc jockey Gene Nobles on this day. ''It was released in Memphis last Friday and is already the biggest number in town...no bulls, it is, according to Buster Williams, owned distributor Music sales. 'Moanin' At Midnight' is the side, I know I'm partial but it is the most different record I ever heard''. didn't doubt for a moment that both sides were masterpieces, and both made the national rhythm and blues charts, with ''How Many More Years'' reaching number 4. But it was ''Moanin' At Midnight'' on which Sam bestowed his ultimate accolade, ''the most different record I ever heard''. Of all the superlatives that he could, and often did, bestow, this was the greatest in his multifarious vocabulary. To Sam Phillips if you weren't doing something different, you simply weren't doing anything at all.

SEPTEMBER 5, 1951 WEDNESDAY

Drummer Jamie Oldaker is born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. A part of Eric Clapton's band for much of the 1970s and 1980s, he joins The Tractors, whose 1994 hit ''Baby Likes To Rock It'' makes them the first country act to earn a gold debut album with touring.

SEPTEMBER 6, 1951 THURSDAY

Five-year-old Neil Young is discharged from a Toronto hospital after six-weeks stay with polio. As andult, he writes the country hit ''Are You Ready For The Country'' and ''Love Is A Rose''.

SEPTEMBER 9, 1951 SUNDAY

''Dukes Of Hazzard'' star Tom Wopat is born in Lodi, Wisconsin. He writes earl Thomas Conley's ''Shadow Of A Doubt'', becomes a temporary host of TNN's ''Prime Time Country'', and co-stars opposite Reba McEntire when she appears in Broadway's ''Annie Get Your Gun''.

Bass player and record producer Buddy Killen moves to Nashville from Florence, Alabama. He goes on to direct hits for Exile, T.G. Sheppard and Ronnie McDowell, among others.

SEPTEMBER 14, 1951 FRIDAY

MGM released Hank Williams' ''Lonesome Whistle'' and ''Crazy Heart''.

SEPTEMBER 15, 1951 SATURDAY

Rosco Gordon's second RPM single "Saddled The Cow (And Milked The Horse)" b/w "Ouch! Pretty Baby" (RPM 334) enters the Billboard National Rhythm and Blues chart and peaks at number 9 in a five-week stay.

SEPTEMBER 17, 1951 MONDAY

Hank Williams' Hadacol-sponsored tour, with comedians Bob Hope, Minnie Pearl, Milton Berle, Jack Benny and Jimmy Durante, comes to a screeching halt one month early when Hadacol is sold.

SEPTEMBER 19, 1951 WEDNESDAY

Record producer Daniel Lanois is born in Hull, Quebec. Noted for his work with such rock artists as U2, Peter Gabriel and Bob Dylan, he also oversees session for Emmylou Harris and Willie Nelson.

SEPTEMBER 21, 1951 FRIDAY

Cowboy Copas recorded ''Tis Sweet To Be Remembered'' in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Red Foley recorded ''Alabama Jubilee'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

Hawkshaw Hawkins recorded ''Slow Poke'' in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Columbia released Carl Smith's ''Let Old Mother Nature Have Her Way''.

SEPTEMBER 22, 1951 SATURDAY

Lefty Frizzell headlines one of country music's first stadium shows, at Griffith Park in Washington, D.C. The lineup also features Ernest Tubb, Flatt & Scruggs, Moon Mullican, Carl Smith and the Duke of Paducah, drawing 14,000 fans.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1951 MONDAY

Dinah Washington recorded a hit jazz of Hank Williams' ''Gold, Cold Heart'' in New York City.

SEPTEMBER 25, 1951 TUESDAY

Bluegrass bass player Bessie Lee Mauldin and Nelson Gann are separated. Later in the decade, she appears on ''Gotta Travel On'' by Bill Monroe.

SEPTEMBER 26, 1951 WEDNESDAY

Red Foley recorded ''Midnight'', partially penned by Chet Atkins, at the Castle Studio in Nashville's Tulane Hotel.

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STUDIO SESSION FOR THE BREWSTERAIRES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Reverend Brewster was a kingpin of the Memphis gospel scene. The quartet bearing his name was formerly known as the Mt. Pisgah Gospel Singers and dates back to 1943. The Brewsteraires that appear on this recording they performed widely on Memphis stage and radio. In fact, Reverend Brewster had his own program on WHBQ, further evidence that he was the man in black gospel in Memphis.

It is likely that Reverend Brewster had already employed the service of The Memphis Recording Service for special events at his church and their relationship simply evolved from there. In any case, arrangements were made for Sam Phillips to record.

The hymn ''Where Shall I Be'' was an old one, written by African American hymnodist Charles P. Jones back in 1899, and first recorded, as far as we can tell, by the Missouri-Pacific Diamond Jubilee Quartet in 1927.

01 - "WHERE SHALL I BE (WHEN THAT FIRST TRUMPET SOUNDS)" – B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Charles P. Jones
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F 1008 Master
Recorded: - September 26, 1951
Released: - April 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1502-A < mono
WHERE SHALL I BE / WINGS FOR MY SOUL
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-17 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Compared to its original flipside, ''Wings For My Soul'' is a far conventional, less adventurous performance. Again, the roots of 1960s soul music are plainly in evidence here, especially during the final segment. In all respects, this is a solid, tense gospel quartet performance. Both the lead and vocal support are intense and although the arrangement features no rhythmic changes or vocal simulations of musical instruments, it remains memorable.

02 - "(THE LORD GAVE ME) WINGS FOR MY SOUL'' – B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Reverend W.H. Brewster
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F 1009 Master
Recorded: - September 26, 1951
Released: - April 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1502-B < mono
WINGS FOR MY SOUL / WHERE SHALL I BE
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-18 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Following the session, Sam Phillips sent samples of four tracks to the Chess Brothers in Chicago, who accepted two titles for release on Chess 1502. This track reveals everything you need to know about the power, passion and musically of a capella black gospel from its golden age.

The first time through, the quartet offers an emotional free-meter reading rich in the kind of mannerisms that soul singers would be taking to the bank in ten years. The second time through, the syncopation kicks in and a really brilliant and varied arrangement ensues. The vocal trumpet solo is an unexpected pleasure, borrowing from a well established tradition regularly employed by secular groups such as The Mills Brothers and Four Vagabonds.

Prior to their recordings for Sam Phillips, The Brewsteraires had recorded for Gotham. Following their lone Chess single, they went on to record for Dot, while enjoying their own regular show over WDIA in Memphis.

03 - "IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - September 26, 1951

03 - "MORE OF JESUS, LESS OF ME'' – B.M.I. - 3:10
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 26, 1951
Released: - February 2013
First appearance: - Dotted Eighth Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
WHAT WOULD JESUS DO? - CLASSIC GOSPEL FOR EASTER
Reissued: April 4, 2002 JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm 77154 mono
MEMPHIS MARRELS - MEMPHIS GOSPEL 1927 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Brewsteraires consisting of:
Solomon Ouston – Lead Tenor
Odell Rice - Baritone
Nathaniel Peck - Tenor
Henry Reed - Bass

For Biography of The Brewsteraires see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Brewsteraires' Chess recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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Dr. Brewster is one of the foremost song writers of the day, having written, "somewhere between 200 and 500," by his own estimation.

WILLIAM HERBERT BREWSTER - (born on July 2, 1897 in Somerville, Tennessee and died on October 14, 1987 in Memphis, Tennessee) was an influential African American Baptist minister, composer, dramatist, singer, poet and community leader. A 1922 graduate of Roger Williams College in Nashville, Tennessee, Brewster settled in Memphis in the 1920s; he served as the pastor of the East Trigg Avenue Baptist Church in South Memphis from 1930 until his death in 1987.

The Brewsteraires were well-known and originally formed in 1943, they were known as the Mt. Pisgah Gospel Singers before Reverence Brewster took them under his wing.

Brewster was a prolific songwriter and his radio show ''Old Camp Meeting Of The Air'' broadcast over WHBQ, meant certain exposure in the mid-South gospel market. In addition to their sides for Sam Phillips the Brewsteraires recorded some memorable work for Dot in Gallatin, Tennessee and for Gotham in Philadelphia. Later the Brewsteraires broadcast regularly over WDIA. In other words, they were a Memphis institution. In 1 1981 interview with Doug Seroff, Nathaniel Peck indicated that most of the group's material was arranged by either or Reverence Brewster.

His lasting fame, however, is through his musical composition. Among his more than 200 published songs are the gospel standards "Move On Up A Little Higher" (Mahalia Jackson's first hit in 1948) and "Surely, God Is Able" (a 1950 hit for The Ward Singers). These songs hold the distinction of being the first million-selling black gospel records. Other Brewster songs that were hits included "Lord I've Tried" (The Soul Stirrers), "I'll Go" (Queen C. Anderson), "I'm Climbing Higher And Higher" (Marion Williams), and a favorite of African-American gospel choirs, "The Old Landmark," among many others.

Though there are several available recordings of Reverent Brewster's gospel groups The Brewster Singers and The Brewsteraires, there are only two vocal recordings of Reverent Brewster himself. Both recordings credited to "Rev. W.H. Brewster And His Camp Meeting Of The Air" appeared on the Gotham single "Give Me That Old Time Religion"/"So Glad I've Got Good Religion". Each song features a narration by Rev. Brewster followed by vocals.

Brewster was also the composer of more than fifteen gospel music dramas, including From Auction Block to Glory (1941) which was the first nationally-staged African American religious drama that featured gospel songs written specifically for the production. He was honored by the Smithsonian Institution in 1982 for his music when it presented his musical drama Sowing in Tears, Reaping In Joy.

Apart from his vast legacy in the genre of black gospel music, Brewster also had a formative influence on a young Elvis Presley. Elvis occasionally attended services at East Trigg Avenue Baptist Church and listened to Brewster's sermons which were broadcast on Sunday nights on the "Camp Meeting Of The Air" over Memphis radio station WHBQ. According to Presley biographer Peter Guralnick, "Dr. Brewster constantly preached on the theme that a better day was coming, one in which all men could walk as brothers, while across Memphis Sam Phillips listened on his radio every Sunday without fail''.

In February 2007, the Memphis City Schools named a new school in the Binghampton community in Brewster's honor as the Dr. William Herbert Brewster Elementary School. Dr. Brewster is buried in the New Park Cemetery in Memphis.

AND AGAIN - THE BREWSTERAIRES – Although they recorded little, the Brewsteraires were one of the most influential local gospel quartets because their patron was the influential Baptist minister, Dr. William Brewster, a preacher, community leader and composer of many well-known gospel songs.

Members of Brewster's church were formed into a number of choirs and gospel quartets over the years, of which the Brewster Singers and the Brewsteraires were foremost. Brewster' main protege was Queen C. Anderson, who took the lead in singing many of Brewster's new gospel songs.

In 1950 and 1951, the Gotham label of Philadelphia recorded four discs credited variously to the Brewster Singers led by Queen C. Anderson, the Reverent Brewster himself narrating Camp Meeting introductions to songs like ''Give Me That Old Time Religion'', and the Brewstenaires of Memphis singing ''When Shall I See Him Face To Face''.

Sam Phillips has said that he listened to Brewster and his groups on the radio frequently and by 1951 when he was looking for music to record for Chess Records, the Brewsteraires would have been a natural choice.

When they recorded for Sam Phillips in September 1951 the Brewsteraires comprised lead tenor Solomon Ouston, Nathaniel Peck, second tenor, Odell Rice, baritone, and Henry Reed, bass singer. Their ''Where Shall I Be When The First Trumpet Sounds'' was released on Chess but Phillips did not call them back for further sessions, possibly because the Chicago-based label found the group had limited appeal beyond the mid- South. The Brewsteraires were recorded on a dozen acetates by radio WDIA in the following year and they remained on Memphis radio for many years. Both B.B. King and Elvis Presley admitted to attending Brewster's church to listen to his singers. After Chess, the Brewsteraires only other commercial recording was a single made in Memphis in 1972 for Sariron Records shortly before the quartet broke up.

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Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR HOWLIN' WOLF
FOR RPM RECORDS 1951

KWEM RADIO STUDIO,
231 BROADWAY STREET, WEST MEMPHIS, ARKANSAS
RPM SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SEPTEMBER 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - IKE TURNER
RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Coincidentally, Modern Records owners, the Bihari brothers from Los Angeles, had been leasing recordings from Sam Phillips and were mightly displeased that Jackie Brenston ''Rocket 88'' hit had been placed with Chess rather than them. They were also wrangling with the Chess brothers over Howlin' Wolfs' contract.

Sam Phillips could understand it. Leonard Chess was clearly preoccupied with building his own label, not with feathering Sam Phillips' nest. The Bihari brothers meanwhile had flung down yet another gauntlet, coming into Memphis just two weeks before Wolf's Chess sides began to chart and recording first Howlin' Wolf, then B.B. King with a portable Magnecord tape recorder. Their first release on Wolf, cut at the radio station in West Memphis where Ike Turner worked, was ''Baby Ride With Me'', one of the two songs Sam Phillips had been working on with him from the start. It was retitled ''Riding In The Moonlight'', Turner there again, hammering the keys, and had been effectively realized in the studio, as Wolf brought all of his energy to the performance, overriding any sonic defects in the recording.

01 - ''RIDING IN THE MOONLIGHT'' - B.M.I. - 3:04
Composer: - Chester Burnett-J.L. Sanders
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1674 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date September 1951
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm RPM 333 mono
RIDING IN THE MOONLIGHT / MOANIN' AT MIDNIGHT
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-8 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

02 - "DOG ME AROUND'' – B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Chester Burnett-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date September 1951
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Crown Records (LP) 33rpm CLP-5240-8 mono
HOWLING WOLF SINGS THE BLUES
Reissued: - 1991 Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm Virgin 86295-4 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF - HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

03 - "MORNING AT MIDNIGHT" – B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Carl Germany-Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Arc Music Incorporated - Charly International
Matrix number: - MM 1677 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date September 1951
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm RPM 333 mono
MOANIN' AT MIDNIGHT / RIDING IN THE MOONLIGHT
Reissued: 1991 Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm Virgin 86295-5 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF - HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

The other side was far less effective, a copy of Wolf's crashing masterpiece labeled ''Morning (as opposed to ''Moanin''') At Midnight'', with the introductory moan barely audible and, despite Wolf, the overall sound not even close to matching the magisterial effect of the original. In keeping with Modern's continuing appeal to the union over the legitimacy of Chess' signing of Jackie Brenston, the label announced through the agency of its owners, the Bihari brothers, that it had ''inked a term disk contract with Howlin' Wolf, Memphis blues warbler'', on exactly the same grounds.

04 - "KEEP WHAT YOU GOT'' – B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date September 1951
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Crown Records (LP) 33rpm CLP-5240-7 mono
HOWLING WOLF SINGS THE BLUES
Reissued: - 1991 Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm Virgin 86295-3 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF - HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

NOTES: ''Moanin' At Midnight'' is listed as ''Morning At Midnight'' on all original singles release.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Howlin' Wolf - Vocal & Harmonica
Ike Turner - Piano
Willie Johnson - Guitar
Tommy Bankhead - Guitar
Willie Steele - Drums

For Biography of Howlin' Wolf see: > The Sun Biographies <
Howlin' Wolf's Chess recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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1951

KWEM studios were located at 231 Broadway Street in West Memphis, Arkansas, in the west side of the Merchants and Planters Bank Building, now the Regions Bank building. In 1954 a second studio was added at 64 Flicker Street in Memphis, Tennessee. The tower and transmitter were south of the viaduct between the Harahan Bridge and the U.S. Engineers Office. KWEM was a daytime station with 1,000 watts on 990 kilocycles.

George Mooney, sportscaster for the Razorback Network, was the manager. Other staff members were Bill Trotter, commercial manager; Frank Keegan, program director; Vernon Dillaplain, chief engineer; Erie Cutrer, salesman; Bill Garrett, announcer; Hal Hill, announcer; Douglas Clark, announcer; Johnny Kenlo, announcer; James Klaser, in charge of production; Betty Dabbs, receptionist; Jean Mooney, traffic director; and Ed Beck, engineer.

Later, Franklin Page of Little Rock was added as an announcer. Officers of KWEM included, J. O. Johnson, president; J. W. Rich, vice-president; J. C. McCaa, secretary; Melvin Dacus, director; and John Cooper, director. KWEM was later sold, and in 1960 would officially become KWAM.

KWEM Radio featured live music performance in the years from 1947 to 1955, a pay to play method generating revenue for radio stations who could not make enough money from conventional advertising sponsors and the spinning of records. Unknown artists who appeared on KWEM during the late 1940s and early 1950s were B.B. King, Howlin’ Wolf, Ike Turner, Scotty Moore, Stan Kesler, Warren Smith, Paul Burlison and Joe Hill Louis. All of these artists performed live on KWEM, and for many it was their first radio exposure. Listening to KWEM Radio would inspire another young West Memphis area youth, Albert King, to learn to play and he appeared to support his band at the T-99 Club in Oceola, Arkansas. He would launch his career and become a major influence on Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Howlin’ Wolf, Hubert Sumlin, Pat Hare, James Cotton and Junior Parker honed their skills at KWEM and ignited the Chicago Blues scene.

Joe Hill Louis began his music career with his own show in 1949. He would record for Sam Phillips in the early 1950s. Louis moved to WDIA in the early 1950s and replaced B.B. King as the ''Pepticon Boy''. Louis would also become a Sun Records recording artist and session musician.

Sonny Boy Williamson II had become the most well known musician in the Mississippi Delta while appearing on the King Biscuit Radio Program on KFFA in Helena, Arkansas. Williamson arrived in West Memphis in 1949 and launched his own live daily KWEM program, sponsored by Hadacol Elixir. While at KWEM, Williamson worked with Howlin’ Wolf, B.B. King, Junior Parker, and James Cotton, bring his friends from around the delta to perform on his program. These included Elmore James, Houston Stackhouse, Robert Nighthawk (King Biscuit regulars) and Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup. B.B. King made his first radio appearance anywhere at KWEM in 1949, appearing on Williamson’s show.

Elvis Presley's first radio appearance was on KWEM in 1953, performing first with Johnny Burnette and the Rock & Roll Trio, and then with a country group, the Shelby Follin Band. Paul Burlison, guitarist for the Johnny Burnette Trio, had been performing on KWEM since 1949 and played with Howlin’ Wolf.

Johnny Cash’s first radio appearance when he arrived in Memphis was at KWEM. He had his own weekly show with bandmembers Luther Perkins, and Marshall Grant. Ike Turner recorded Howlin’ Wolf in the KWEM studios in 1951. Scotty Moore and Bill Black both made an appearance on KWEM in 1954. Johnny Cash recorded a demo of a song he wrote, ''Rock 'N' Roll Ruby'' in the KWEM studios. The song was recorded by Warren Smith for Sun Records after Cash and Sam Phillips appeared at the Cotton Club and offered Smith's band the chance to record the song. Junior Parker had his own show on KWEM in 1953, before leaving and recording for Chess Records in 1954. James Cotton also had a programme on KWEM until around 1954, when he joined Muddy Waters as his harmonicist. Cotton also recorded for Chess Records. Eddie Bond also played on KWEM, whilst his guitarist, Reggie Young, grew up around Blytheville, Arkansas. KWEM’s station manager, Dick Stuart, became Carl Perkins’ manager. Stuart’s brother-in-law, Charlie Feathers, also appeared on the radio station. KWEM is listed on the National Historic Buildings applications for Sun Studios and Graceland, as having been a major influence on Presley, and the Memphis area in the development and birth of rock and roll, along with WDIA.

SEPTEMBER 28, 1951 FRIDAY

George Jones is jailed for the second time in five weeks for failure to make support payments to his wife, Dorothy.

Photo above: Abe Scharff (left) presents a key to Chris Roulhac (second Right) in ceremonies dedicating an addition to Abe Scharff Branch of the YMCA at 254 South Lauderdale on September 29, 1951. Looking on were Earle Whittington (second left), YMCA general secretary and T. Walker Lewis (right), president of the Metropolitan YMCA Board. Mr. Scharff is a board member of Metropolitan YMCA and Roulhac is branch executive secretary.

SEPTEMBER 29, 1951 SATURDAY

Porter Wagoner moves from his hometown, West Plains, Missouri, to Springfield, just 100 miles away, to take a job performing on KWTO Radio.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1951 SUNDAY

Porter Wagoner makes his debut on KWTO Radio in Springfield, Missouri, where his instant popularity earns him a raise from $35 weekly to $70.

The Weavers, ''He'll Have To Go'' songwriter Joe Allison and Foy Willing and The Riders Of The Purple Sage are featured in the movie debut of ''Disc Jockey'', a musical that also stars Tommy Dorsey, Herb Jeffries and Sarah Vaughan.

Gene Autry plays a doctor in the lawless West with the debut of the movie ''The Hills Of Utah'', featuring his performance of ''Peter Cottontail''. Pat Buttram returns to the screen as Autry's sidekick.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
MRS/Chess/RPM recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©