CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS 4
April 1, 1958 to April 30, 1958

Studio Session for Jimmy Pritchett, Probably April 1958 / Crystal Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bond, April 2, 1958 / Sun Records
Overdub Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, April 4 and/or April 8, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Cliff Thomas, April 5, 12, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, April 8, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, April 9, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Confederates, April 9, 1958 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

APRIL 1958

The Brussels World’s Fair, also known as Expo 58, begins during April of 1958 in Belgium. This was the first major World’s Fair to be organized after the end of World War II with the previous World’s Fairs taking place in New York during 1939 and 1940. The site chosen for Expo 58 spanned about 490 acres and was the same site of the 1935 Brussels International Expo. It featured several pavilions that showcased science, arts, architecture, engineering, and various countries along with their cultures and accomplishments. The main attraction of the fair was the unusually shaped “Atomium” building. The 1958 Brussels World’s Fair saw over 41 million visitors before it concluded during October.

APRIL 1, 1958 TUESDAY

The Louvin Brothers recorded ''My Baby's Gone'' in Nashville.

''Dear Oakie'' singer Doye O'Dell has a guest role in the ABC western ''Sugarfoot''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JIMMY PRITCHETT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CRYSTAL RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
CRYSTAL SESSION: PROBABLY APRIL 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - STAN KESLER

Recorded in the spring of 1958 with ''Nothing On My Mind'' on the flip, ''That's The Way I Feel'' is one of those feel good rockabilly boppers that became synonymous with Memphis. The band is believed to be the Clyde Leopard band, a staple of the local Memphis scene who among others gave a start to Warren Smith. Another legend of the Memphis crowd, Stan Kesler was hell bent on recording his new discovery Jimmy Pritchett but soon ran into problems with the equipment at the WHBQ studio. He called his old pal Sam Phillips who let them use his Sun Studios on Union. Kesler certainly knew his was around that soundboard and he produced a cracker.

Drummer Jimmy van Eaton is outstanding and dominates the backing like he does on so many Memphis recordings, whilst. Smokey Joe Baugh takes a flight into the stratosphere for his piano solo. When the song kicks off in Jerry Lee Lewis style you half expect the Killer to start singing.

However, it's our man Jimmy, whose vocals have a great energy to them with the perfect combination of enthusiasm and control.

The song was released on Stan Kesler's short lived Crystal label in Memphis, while Pritchett's career was even shorter. Pityfully, this was his only release. He probably came on the rockabilly scene two years too late to have ruffled Sam's hair, a shame because he seemed to have the exuberant voice that was made for rockabilly. Johnny Burnette cut a calmed down version for Liberty Records.

01(1) - "THAT'S THE WAY I FEEL" - B.M.I. - 0:26
Composer: - Smith-Hyde
Publisher: - Crystal Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date April 1958
Released: - May 29, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-8-29 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

01(2) - "THAT'S THE WAY I FEEL" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Smith-Hyde
Publisher: - Crystal Music
Matrix number: - C 107
Recorded: - Unknown Date April 1958
Released: - May 1958
First appearance: - Crystal Records (S) 45rpm standard single Crystal 503 A mono
THAT'S THE WAY I FEEL / NOTHING ON MY MIND
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-18 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

02(1) - "NOTHING ON MY MIND*" - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Maupin
Publisher: - Crystal Music
Matrix number: - C 106
Recorded: - Unknown Date April 1958
Released: - May 1958
First appearance: - Crystal Records (S) 45rpm standard single Crystal 503 B mono
NOTHING ON MY MIND / THAT'S THE WAY I FEEL
Reissued: - 1983 Sunrock Sweden (LP) 33rpm Sunrock 831 mono
ROCK 'N' ROLL JAMBOREE - VOLUME 2

02(2) - "NOTHING ON MY MIND*" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Maupin
Publisher: - Crystal Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date April 1958
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Disky Memphis (CD) 500/200rpm Memphis 04-16 mono
THE ULTIMATE MEMPHIS ROCKABILLY COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Pritchett - Vocal and Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Smokey Joe Baugh - Piano
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Hank Byers – Guitar

''That's The Way I Feel'' was the recognition tune of the famous rock and roll program ''Let's Go Rock And Roll'', with Albert Vis behind the mic, which was broadcast every Tuesday on Radio Capelle (105.3 FM) in the Netherlands.

For Biography of Jimmy Pritchett see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jimmy Ptitchett's Sun/Crystal recordings can be heard on his playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BOND
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY APRIL 2, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01(1) - "THIS OLD HEART OF MINE" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Eddie Bond
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 2, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1035 mono
SUNSET SPECIAL
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1-21 mono
EDDIE BOND - ROCKIN' DADDY

02(1) - "SHOW ME" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Eddie Bond
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 2, 1958
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1-19 mono
EDDIE BOND - ROCKIN' DADDY

02(2) - "SHOW ME" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Eddie Bond
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - April 2, 1958
Released: - Sun Unissued

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bond - Vocal and Rhythm Guitar
Reggie Young – Lead Guitar
Ellis Mize – Bass
Johnny Fine – Drums
Jimmy Smith – Piano
Johnny Ace Cannon – Tenor Saxophone
Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Eddie Bond see: > The Sun Biographies <
Eddie Bond's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

APRIL 3, 1958 THURSDAY

''Don't Fence Me In'' songwriter Cole Porter has his right leg amputated mid-thigh at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York. Porter never writes a song again.

Bass player and songwriter Carl Goff Jr. is born. A member of Toby Keith's road band, he co-writes Keith's hits ''Upstairs Downtown'' and ''You Ain't Much Fun''.

APRIL 5, 1958 SATURDAY

The Everly Brothers kick off an 80-day ''Greatest Show Of Stars'' tour in Norfolk, Virginia, with Paul Anka, Sam Cooke and Frankie Avalon.

Jerry Lee Lewis, The Everly Brothers, Paul Anka and The Shirelles appear on ABC's half-hour music feature ''The Dick Clark Show''.

APRIL 6, 1958 SUNDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis sets fire to one of two pianos on stage during a show at the Public Hall, located at 500 Lakeside Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio. Touring with him, Buddy Holly and Chuck Berry.

''I turned 21 in prison doin' life without parole...'' Merle Haggard isn't incarcerated permanently, but he is behind bars at San Quentin as he reaches the legal age, a date he brands indelibly when he writes the country classic ''Mama Tried''.

APRIL 7, 1958 MONDAY

Wanda Jackson recorded her pop hit ''Let's Have A Party'' at the Capitol Recording Studios in Los Angeles, with Buck Owens on guitar. The session also features a version of ''Happy, Happy Birthday'', a future Ronnie Milsap hit.

Decca released Bobby Helms' ''Jacqueline''.

APRIL 8, 1958 TUESDAY

Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, and Don Gibson appear at the Birmingham Guard Armory for the WVOK Dixie Jamdoree. Admission $ 1.50, for children 50 cents.

Before a show in Columbus, Ohio, Jerry Lee Lewis and Chuck Berry exchange barbs. The Killer's father, Elmo pulls a knife and threatens Berry.

The story is that Elmo, a volatile man who had gone to prison for bootlegging when Jerry Lee was a little boy, always maintained a deep-seated love of family as well as a real musical talent of his own, but he could make his son seem positively shy. ''Mr. Elmo'', said Roland Janes, ''always said what he thought and backed up what he said. He was a fine guy, strictly Louisiana all the way, but he kept on getting us in trouble''. One time he pulled a knife on some members of Sam Taylors rhythm and blues orchestra, after a dispute in which racial slurs were undoubtedly exchanged. But most dramatic of all was a confrontation with Chuck Berry on this day in which racial epithets were once more bandied about. The way, the dispute arose over a parking space, or, more precisely, Berry's angry complaints that his car had been blocked in by Jerry Lee's in the alley adjacent to the stage entrance of the theater they were playing. Chuck and Elmo kept mumbling and looking for a fight. Elmo run after Chuck for two or three blocks, saying, '' You know what we do with cats like you down in Ferriday? We chop the heads off them and throw it in a Blue Hole (Lake).

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

(OVERDUB) STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: OVERDUB SESSION FRIDAY APRIL 4
AND/OR TUESDAY APRIL 8, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS

1(3d) - "GOODNIGHT IRENE" - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Huddie Ledbetter-John Lomax
Publisher: - Traditional
Matrix number: - None - Overdubbed EP Master
Recorded: - April 4 and/or 8, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA 108-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-5 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

2(d) - "WHEN THE SAINTS GO MARCHIN' IN" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Carlin Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Overdubbed EP Master
Recorded: - April 4 and/or 8, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA 110-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-6 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

3(1d) - "MATCHBOX" - B.M.I. - 1:41
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Overdubbed EP Master
Recorded: - April 4 and/or 8, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA 110-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-7 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

4(1) - "IT ALL DEPENDS" - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Billy Mize
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternative Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - April 4 and/or 8, 1958
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-18-7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

4(1) - "IT ALL DEPENDS" - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Billy Mize
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Overdubbed EP Master
Recorded: - April 4 and/or 8, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA 108-B2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-8 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Note: More than one overdub was made of each title but the unissued overdub attempts are not listed because they're irrelevant; the same basic raw takes of each title were variously overdubbed.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ed Bruce - Vocal
Vernon Drane - Vocal
Charlie Rich - Vocal
Lee Holt - Vocal
Bobby Thompson - Vocal
Bob Strong - Vocal
Alice Rumple - Vocal

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CLIFF THOMAS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: APRIL 5, 12, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

01 - ''SORRY I LIED''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - April 5, 1958

02 - ''DANCE ON LITTLE GIRL''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - April 12, 1958

03 - ''LEAVE IT TO ME''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - April 12, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Cliff Thomas - Vocal & Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Billy Weir - Drums
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Cliff Thomas see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

APRIL 1958

Sam Phillips has always been eager to celebrate the artist he recorded at Sun, but rarely have his generous evaluations of their talent been so well justified as in the case of Charlie Rich. ''I don't think I ever recorded anyone who was better as a singer, writer, and player than Charlie Rich'', he has said (1992), and indeed Rich's talent was unique among Sun artists. ''It is all so effortless'', Phillips marvels even, ''the way he moves from rock to country to blues and jazz''.

Rich was the most musically eclectic of all the artists who recorded at Sun, a distinction that was both a blessing and a curse. In Rich, Phillips had an artist who could turn in a blues-drenched version of ''Don't Put No Headstone On My Grave'' in one breath, and in the next offer something as crassly commercial as ''Popcorn Polly''.

He could bring a little joy to the drunks at the Sharecropper Club with his gin-soaked ballads, and yet be out on a package show the following week peddling ''Lonely Weekends'' to the teens and preteens. Sun never quite knew what to do with Rich; in the studio, Phillips let him play what he wanted, hoping to find something he could release when he listened to the playbacks the following day.

APRIL 1958

If Jerry Lee Lewis was a born performer, Charlie Rich was a born recluse, forced to the stage by commercial need. In part, that necessity stemmed from Lewis's downfall. At the dawn of 1958, Rich was a staff writer for Knox and Hi-Lo Music, drawing a salary against future royalties and making just enough from songwriting and nightclub dates to avoid going back to the farm. But with Cash gone and Lewis apparently ruined, Rich finally recorded his own tunes. After a couple of false starts he found his groove. And was a wonderful groove it was.

APRIL 1958

In April 1958 Sun employee Barbara Barnes made her next big-city excursion with Jud Phillips, this time to the convention of the Music Operators of America. This was the organization that represented jukeboxes and other coin-operated entertainment devices. The introduction to Chicago began with that anthill of an airline terminal, O'Hare Field. Jud had instructed to take a taxi to the Morrison Hotel, which appeared very tall and grandiose, also teeming with people as they arrived.

This trip turned out to be entirely different from the one to New York, where they were on to go every minute, meeting their contacts. Here Jud Phillips stationed himself in the bar let the disc jockeys, distributors, and fellow manufactures come to him. A couple of women of no particular function in the record industry came by, too. Barbara didn't try to match him drink for drink and played a very passive role as he entertained his many acquaintances with his never-ending gab. Some of the labels had scheduled meetings with their distributors, but Sun hadn't done that, and they didn't have a hospitality suite. Jud said Roulette had a big reception room with a roulette wheel in it, and other shenanigans were said to be going on. Roulette's owner, Morris Levy, was a reputed mobster who owned the nightclub Bridland.

The meetings were geared to the business matters concerning people who owned and operated jukeboxes and other coin machines, so many of the concerns they brought up were only indirectly relevant to the business and they didn't attend. Sun didn't sell directly to jukebox operators, though they did do business with a few so-called ''one-stops'' that carried a variety of lines where jukebox operators could select new records for their machines.

Barbara Barnes read in Billboard later that one of the topics discussed in the meetings was public relations. ''Many public officials have a bad opinion of the music-machine industry'', one speaker was quoted as saying, adding that the members should get to know their local law enforcement officials, as well as important politicians. The Kefauver Commission, headed by the Tennessee Senator Estes Kefauver, early in the 1950s had reported that the coin-machine industry was largely dominated by the underworld in the big cities of the East and Great Lakes regions, so ''bad opinion'' was indeed an understatement. Before Barbara and Jud left Memphis to go to the convention, Bill Justis had told Barbara Barnes to beware in Chicago, quipping that, when these guys met, each one brought ''two big bottles, two blonds, and two bodyguards''.

The operators were also worried that 1958 would be a lean year because of the recession the United States economy had fallen into. Sun sales had been good so far, but Jud Phillips reported that some of the other manufactures said business was soft. The trend would catch up with us before long. The MOA organization also discussed the fear that the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) was going to levy taxes on each jukebox play. They asserted that the organization was so rich and powerful that they could hire lawyers who would silence any MOA objections to their proposed assessments.

Barbara had known of ASCAP through her college broadcasting courses and because she became friends with an ASCAP auditor, Marvin Brown, who was going through the logs of KALB radio when she worked at their TV affiliate in Alexandrio, Louisiana. ASCAP collected royalties for the publishers and composers each time one of their licensed songs was played live or in broadcasts. Having ASCAP collect jukebox royalties was a threat to the profits of all jukebox owners, but it was rumored that the biggest concern was that underworld operators would lose their system of using cash receipts to launder money that could then be used for illegal activities.

Sun Records had no connection with ASCAP because Sun went through Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI). This group had been formed because ASCAP, as a traditional Tin Pan Alley licensing agency, was reluctant to admit the hillbilly, blues, and rhythm and blues music publishers. Sun had several publishing subsidiaries through BMI that brought in consistent royalties.

The exhibits featured the most innovative sound equipment, and in 1958, everything was about stereo. The technology had just been introduced for records to be pressed in this multi-track format. This development caused consternation among the jukebox owners, who were facing a switch from monophonic to stereo that might be costly. They didn't discuss how the newly marketed transistor radios would cut into their business, but they should have been worried about that, too.

Barbara stayed only two days and thus didn't get to look in on the very last event of the convention, which was listen as a Ladies Hospitality Suite open house at 7:00 p.m. This was a nod to members who had brought their wives. It was assumed that there were not any ladies working in this industry. Jud Phillips stayed behind to visit radio and TV stations in the Chicago area while Barbara flew back to Memphis, flush with the excitement of being in the midst of some big players in a big industry.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

If ever a musician deserved attention for more than his hits records, it was Charlie Rich. To several generations of casual listeners, Charlie was nothing more than the Silver Fox, the guy who sang ''Behind Closed Doors'' and ''The Most Beautiful Girl''. The tunnel vision of pop culture has done a profound disservice to Charlie Rich. He was much, much more than those records.

Even listeners who remember his earlier work like ..Mohair Sam'' and ''Lonely Weekends'' rarely see the full picture Charlie Rich was a true original in a field that pays lip service to originality but doesn't know what to do with it.

An irrepressible eclectic in a business that is enslaved to musical categories. A singer, songwriter, musician in a field that prefers you to be just one thing so everyone else can earn a living.

Worse yet, Charlie Rich was a profoundly shy man with virtually no desire for stardom. He was thrust into a spotlight he feared and distrusted. A quiet, intense man pushed nearly beyond the limits of his endurance to severe substance abuse. A performer so talented and good looking that nobody could stand to leave him alone. A press agent's dream and a promoter's nightmare. Charlie was a gentle giant who would rather spend quiet time with his family and play anonymous gigs in smokey clubs than endure the scrutiny and demands of a hit record and a concert tour.

Charlie Rich began a career that spanned more than three decades at the legendary Sun label in Memphis, recording for Sam Phillips. Without question, Rich's earliest work is his most interesting. It is also the rawest, least disciplined and most revealing. Rich was never more prolific as a songwriter than during his formative years at Sun. There is nothing in his later career that wasn't foreshadowed in some manner at Sun. Unfortunately, however, there is much in these earliest recordings that was lost or remained undeveloped in Rich's later work.

The most early sessions of Charlie Rich contains demos. Some have been issued before, although many exist only on rare or out-of-print LPs. Others appear here for the first time. These demos are undoubtedly the least polished recordings but, in many ways, his most rewarding. Bear in mind that none of them was ever intended for release. During his earliest period Charlie was almost always searching musically. He was taking chances, playing in styles that were alien to him. Some of these experiments were surprisingly successful. Others were expendable failures. Some were Abandoned, nearly on the spot. Others gave rise to patterns, songs, even instrumental riffs that would surface later in his career. Most of the facts of Charlie's life have already been documented. Some of this material is worth reexamining, especially in the context of his Sun days. Perhaps most interesting are the memories of and reactions to Charlie by the person closest to him during the Sun years. Nearly 50 years later, these impressions remained vivid to colleagues like guitarist Roland Janes, drummer Jimmy M. Van Eaton, saxman Martin Willis, vocalist Barbara Pittman, and drummer and manager Harold Murchison.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY APRIL 8, 1958
PRODUCER - BILL JUSTIS AND/OR CHARLIE RICH
RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "FOR LOVING YOU" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost
Recorded: - April 8, 1958

02 - "I LOVE NO ONE BUT YOU" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 8, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-20 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

This demo offers a look at Charlie's early struggles with writing country music. It ain't half bad. A bunch of the signature chord changes that would appear in later work are here. But what stands out is how catchy that descending five note melody is. Listen to this two or three times and try not to hum that simple tune.

03 - "IT HURT ME SO" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 8, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-5 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

This was Charlie Rich's demo of the song that Jerry Lee Lewis recorded for his seventh Sun single. Actually Charlie contributed both the song and the piano work to Jerry Lee's release, leaving the Killer free to concentrate on his singing. Listening to their versions side by side is quite revealing. Without question, Charlie mines a stronger blues vein here than Jerry - which is doubly impressive considering that Charlie was not offering a finished performance for release, but merely a look at the song for another artist to evaluate and learn.

04 - "DONNA LEE" - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Charlie Parker-Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 8, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-34 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

05(1) - "NEVER MIND LITTLE GIRL" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - April 8, 1958

05(2) - "NEVER MIND LITTLE GIRL" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - April 8, 1958

06 - "THANKS A LOT" - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 8, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-27 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

07 - "TIME'S A WASTIN" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 8, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-19 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

A classic it ain't, but still... This is one of Charlie's early attempts at rock and roll and, once again, he just wasn't on top of the medium yet. That "too long fixing you hair" line is just not the kind of thing Chuck Berry would have worried about. Yet when Charlie stops singing here and starts playing, he tears off a surprisingly inspired bit of boogie piano.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano

For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

APRIL 9, 1958 WEDNESDAY

The singles Sun 290 Rudy Grayzell's ''Judy'' b/w ''I Think Of You''; Sun 291 "Ten Years" b/w ''Your Lover Boy'' by Jack Clement; Sun 292 Edwin Bruce ''Sweet Woman'' b/w ''Part Of My Life''; Sun 293 The Sun Rays ''Love Is A Stranger'' b/w ''The Lonely Hours''; Sun 294 Magel Priesman ''I Feel So Blue'' b/w ''Memories Of You'' all issued.

"Guess Things Happen That Way" b/w ''Come In Stranger'' (Sun 295) by Johnny Cash is released. It becomes a country and pop hit.

"High School Confidential" b/w ''Fools Like Me'' (Sun 296) by Jerry Lee Lewis is released and is featured in a movie of the same title.

The singles, Sun 297 Dickey Lee and The Collegiates ''Fool, Fool, Fool b/w ''Dreamy Nights''; Sun 298 Ray Smith's, ''So Young'' b/w ''Right Behind You Baby'';Sun 299 Gene Simmons ''Drinkin' Wine'' b/w ''I Done Told You'' released.

APRIL 9, 1958

Jack Clement and Barbara Barnes were getting to be buddies, and she especially enjoyed those times they would sit in the Sun studio together and Jack would sing and play the guitar for her. He had written a great song many songs, and he was gradually introducing Barbara to most of them. The one she liked best was ''The Best Guitar Picker In Shelby County'', which had the lines ''I would sit there by the hour / Picking Wildwood Flower'', describing how he labored to achieve his goal of proficiency and recognition as a guitar player. One particular day, Jack stuck his head in the office and said, ''B.B, come out here. I have a new song I want you to hear''. She liked it. It was not a novelty like so many of Jack's songs, nor a ballad. It was sort of a weeper, ''Guess Things Happen That Way'', but philosophical not maudlin. Jack had written this lament about love gone wrong for Johnny Cash.

''When is he coming in?'' Barbara ask Jack. ''This week. That's why I wrote it''. If Cash liked it, if Jack got a good cut, and if Sam agreed, this would be a nice follow-up for ''Teenage Queen''. ''I was excited, because I had been preoccupied with this person. Johnny Cash, and his music since last summer, writing about him, touting his records, and yet I'd never seen him'', said Barbara. ''It was early April of 1958 when he finally drove up in a 1956 Lincoln. He had cut ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen'' the previous December, and even though it was still charting in the trades, it was time for a follow-up'', she said.

Johnny Cash had been touring almost constantly in the United States and Canada, responding to the evergrowing demand for his act on live shows. His charisma and ability to relate to the audience were growing as he gained confidence, and his increased following was resulting in great record sales for Sun. Teenagers flocked to his shows, despite the serious demeanor that made him seem older that he actually was. Parents didn't hate him, because unlike Elvis and some others, Johnny wasn't considered a moral threat, his beat was not inflammatory, and his concerts didn't turn into pandemonium.

Soon after Johnny arrived for the session, he was joined by the Tennessee two, his backing band. Marshall Grant was his slightly chubby bass player, and the taller, rail-thin Luther Perkins was his lead guitarist. Something about Luther was amusing, just to look at him, and he was often the butt of jokes both in the studio and on stage. According to Jack Clement, Luther always played just the same, never any better and never any worse, with limited musical facility and a total lack of confidence. When he got nervous in a session, he would mess up at a critical time, and sometimes they had to do take after take. Yet, he was an essential part of the Cash sound, with his individualistic guitar licks. Marshall Grant had remarked that he and Luther were so bad they were good. Cash teased that he hired them in the early days because they were auto mechanics and could keep his old Dodge running while going from one show to the next. Jimmy Wilson deigned to come down from his den over Mrs. Taylor's restaurant to play piano, and J.M. Van Eaton rounded out the band for this session.

Barbara paused in the control room off and on throughout the session, as they cut Jack's tune, ''Guess Things Happen That Way''. It was not going to have the thump-thump country sound that Sam had produced, it was more lyrical and pop sounding. The proposed B side was a little more typical of the Cash sound, ''Come In Stranger''. Johnny said he had written this one on the road, thinking of what his wife Vivian always said to greet him when he made it home. The session lasted several hours, with the musicians trying out various tunes. Among a bunch of false starts, they ended up with what Jack thought would be at least two good possibilities for the next release and maybe a couple more.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

In April 1958 Cash was back in the studio and recorded three songs. Jack Clement's ''Guess Things Happen That Way'', his own composition ''Come In Stranger'' and the Don Gibson hit ''Oh, Lonesome Me''.

When issued as a single ''Guess Things Happen That Way'' was overdubbed with a vocal chorus but here we get to listen to a couple of alternate takes that feature a different vocal backing style, as well as the original undubbed master.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY APRIL 9, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

OVERDUB SESSION: MAY 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

By this time Johnny Cash went back into the studio it was apparent that he and Sun would come to a parting of the ways. "I had been out to Cash's house", recalled Sam Phillips, "because I had been hearing rumors. I looked Johnny straight in the eye and I said, 'John, I understand that you've signed an option to go to another label at the expiration of your contract with Sun. I want you to look me straight in the eye and tell me, have you or have you not?. I knew when he opened his mouth he was lying. The only damn lie that Johnny Cash ever told me that I was aware of. That hurt. That hurt!".

It was doubly galling to Phillips because his old friend Bob Neal had been a party to what Phillips considered double-dealing. Knowing that Cash was due to depart, Sam Phillips ensured that the marked would not lack new Cash product on Sun for some years. "I got an order from Sam Phillips", Cash told Bill Flanagan. "It was a letter that I would go into the studio on such and such a day and record a certain number of songs.

That really rankled me and I refused to do it. Then Jack Clement called me and said, 'My job is on the line. I'm supposed to produce you. I think you have to do it. You owe Sam some sessions'. I said, 'I'm not going to sing anything I don't like'. He said, 'Come in, We'll go over songs and find ones you like'. So, I liked the songs but what I hated was that they overdubbed the vocal group on some of them. I hated that sound".

ohnny Cash refused to supply new material for the sessions. He was keeping the best for his first sessions at Columbia because he had been promised a better royalty rate as a composer. So it was left to Jack Clement, Bill Justis, and Charlie Rich (who had just been signed as a contracted writer) to fill the breach. It was Jack Clement who contributed the best song, "Guess Things Happen That Way". It had a fine streak of fatalism at its core, and the arrangement was both tasteful and restrained. Released on April 9, it had sold an astonishing 300,000 copies by June, becoming Cash's biggest hit on Sun Records. It monopolized the number 1 spot in the country charts and reached number 11 in the pop listing.

But there was little rejoicing at Sun. It was now obvious that Johnny Cash was departing, as he appeared at the studio on a regular basis during May and July to work off his commitment to the label. In addition, the news of Jerry Lee Lewis' marriage to an underage cousin had broken, and "Guess Things Happen That Way", rising up the charts, met Lewis' "High School Confidential" as it plunged precipitously downward.

01(1) - "GUESS THINGS HAPPEN THAT WAY" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 9, 1958
Released: - March 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 103 mono
THE SUN YEARS - JOGNNY CASH
Reissued: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-2-27 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

Talking about the follow-up to ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen'' Jack Clement said, "I wanted to do a follow-up but I wasn't thinking about Johnny Cash again when I wrote ''Guess Things Happen That Way'' I was thinking more like Dean Martin or somebody. My role model for that song was ''Memories Are Made Of This'' and I heard the song as a sort of rumba rhythm. Anyway Johnny Cash came in and did it his way and I loved it. Then we got a vocal group in there. We had this barbershop quartet named The Confederates and a girl singer. And Wally, the bass singer, started singing'ba-do ba-do, ba-do ba-do' and I said let's do that. So we did it and I wasn't sure if Johnny Cash was gonna like that. So I hurried up and got the record pressed before he got back to town, but I think he liked it. I think Sam even liked that one'

01(2) - "GUESS THINGS HAPPEN THAT WAY" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Vocal Overdub - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 19, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-19 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

During April and May 1958 Johnny cash was working off his commitment to Sun in preparation for his move to Columbia Records. He was holding back all of his new songs because he would be getting a better rate from Columbia and this gave Sun Records' little army songwriters a golden opportunity. ''I was in the studio when Cash recorded ''Guess Things Happen That Way'', said Edwin Bruce. ''I was sitting in the control room and Jack Clement said, 'We need a bridge or last verse' so I wrote one on the spot. I never thought about saying, 'Hey, what about giving me a share'. A manifestation of the innocence of youth''.

01(3) - "GUESS THINGS HAPPEN THAT WAY" - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Vocal Overdub - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 19, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-20 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

With Columbia Records tarrying, Johnny Cash rode out his Sun contract in style with this grade A 45. Music designation at the time could be added and some industry pundits were pigeonholing the artist as a folk singer. Pop country' might have been nearer the mark considering the way in which producer Jack Clement crafted the arrangement. Above all, the golden tones of Cash's vocal had become instantly recognisable giving a comfort value to each of his eagerly awaited releases.

01(4) - "GUESS THINGS HAPPEN THAT WAY" - B.M.I. - 1:47
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 304 - Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - April 9, 1958
Released: - April 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 295-A < mono
GUESS THINGS HAPPEN THAT WAY / COME IN STRANGER
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

This was a landmark record for Johnny Cash. It was also his last major hit for Sun Records, although the releases kept coming for quite some time. Sun 295 was a brilliant two-sided release. On "Guess Things Happen That Way", Jack Clement provided Cash with a potent piece of material, and a clever arrangement. Its even possible to forgive most of the postsession sweetening. The chorus is less strident here. For once, it also has a more 'masculine' sound, which may have contributed to the overall effect. It still seems gratuitous for anyone to have to soften Luther's single note guitar runs by singing over them, but the net effect was a massive hit for Cash, in both the pop and country fields.

02(1) - "COME IN STRANGER" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - April 9, 1958
Released: - Sun Unissued

02(2) - "COME IN STRANGER" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - April 9, 1958
Released: - Sun Unissued

02(3) - "COME IN STRANGER" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - April 9, 1958
Released: - Sun Unissued

02(4) - "COME IN STRANGER" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 9, 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30104-B-5 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 4 - COTTON CITY COUNTRY
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-17 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

02(5) - "COME IN STRANGER" - B.M.I. - 1:38
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 305 - Master
Recorded: - April 9, 1958
Released: - April 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 295-B < mono
COME IN STRANGER / GUESS THINGS HAPPEN THAT WAY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

If there were any hard feelings among the purists, they were more than assuaged by this flipside "Come In Stranger". Johnny Cash is at his minimalist best here. Despite its seemingly happy subject matter, this still manages to retain a dark, brooding feel that has not been diluted by unnecessary instrumental or vocal work. The sound of the original Tennessee Two has been fleshed out by a piano and drum but, beyond that, Jack Clement knew enough to keep his hands off things. Or maybe he was shrewd enough to to produce any competition for the air play that would otherwise accrue to his composition on the flipside. At only 1:38 in length, "Come In Stranger" was likely to please Sun and Cash fans, but not dilute the commercial success of Jack Clement's composer/producer work.

03(1) - "OH, LONESOME ME" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Don Gibson
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 9, 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 103 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-2-29 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 – 1958

"Oh, Lonesome Me" is presented here below without the overdubbed piano and vocal chorus that were added for the single.

03(2) - "OH, LONESOME ME" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Don Gibson
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 427 - Overdubbed Master Take 1
Recorded: - April 9, 1958
Released: - December 10, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 355-A < mono
OH, LONESOME ME / LIFE GOES ON
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

One listen to the undubbed version of this knockoff reveals how essential overdubbing was to the final release. For one thing, nobody seemed to know the chords. This isn't exactly a Thelonious Monk composition, but the chord sequence in the release seems to have eluded our humble pickers. For another thing, there is Luther's solo. Lordy, Lord. What to do about that? The correct answer, the "only" answer to both problems was to embalm the bed track with a very assertive piano and chorus. Obviously, it worked. This song provided Cash with his last hit on the old Sun label, spending nine weeks on the charts in early 1961.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

Overdubbed Session May 1958
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

"Ballad Of A Teenage Queen" and "Guess Things Happen That Way" became Cash's biggest hits on Sun Records. Shifting well over 300,000 copies each within a few months of release both songs hit the top spot on the country charts also reached the pop charts.

During the lunch break during the day of the session, practically the whole staff and musicians descended upon Taylor's Restaurant. Barbara Barnes ended up at a booth alone with Johnny Cash. Her intention was to compliment him when she said, ''I think it was great what you did with that Gordon Jenkins number''.

''He knew at once that I was referring to his adaptation of ''Folsom Prison Blues''. Borrowing and mutations were common in traditional music, so my question was not meant to be an accusation. Still, he sputtered and became very defensive, saying. ''I told Sam about that''. Barbara happened to know ''Crescent City Blues'', the prototype of ''Folsom Prison Blues'', because her friend Jack Christian had sent her the relatively obscure LP, ''Seven Dreams'', a song sequence by Gordon Jenkins with a narrative line involving a train ride across the country and its stop in a small town where a young woman felt trapped. When she heard ''Folsom Prison Blues'', she realized he had used the same melody and made only minor changes in the lyrics. The rub was that this song was copyrighted, not one of those traditional ballads that attract variations. Barbara wondered if Sam realized that listing Cash as writer of ''Folsom Prison Blues'' was exposing him to another suit like the one by Don Robey concerning ''Bear Cat'', but she didn't say anything. Publishing had nothing to do with her job. But she liked the Cash version, just thought it would have been better if somehow the origins had been given credit. Barbara said, ''My introducing this subject caused uneasiness in our conversation, practically ended it that day, and I regretted that I had missed this chance to get to know Johnny Cash better''.

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

APRIL 9, 1958

When Sam Phillips arrived in the late afternoon this day, Sam pronounced ''Guess Things Happen That Day'' a hit. ''That's s stone, man, a rolling stone'', he exclaimed. ''This damn record is flat commercial. That like ''I don't like it / But I guess things happen that way'' sticks in your brain''. Jack Clement relieved, because Sam didn't liked ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen'' and had been reluctant to release it.

Sam also liked ''Come In Stranger'', so they had the next release. Sam's prediction was accurate, because ''Guess Things Happen That Way'' stayed on the charts twenty-four weeks, including eight weeks number 1. In the publication for the record, termed it a two-sided hit because ''Come In Stranger'' was having a good run on the country charts, climbing to number 6 in the nation.

In view of this success, they were happy invested a bit in a very nice sleeve with a pensive-looking Johnny Cash, all in black, sitting on a stool and smoking a cigarette. The photograph and sleeve design had the stark quality that was so often present in Johnny's work. This would be his fourth number 1 record, and pointed out in the notes on the back of the sleeve, written by Barbara Barnes, that disc jockeys, juke box operators, and music fans who picked Johnny Cash the most promising new country artists of 1956 have not been disappointed in their choice. Concerning the remainder of the session, Sam didn't find anything else to be enthusiastic about. Johnny had recorded ''Oh, Lonesome Me'', but Sam didn't think he'd put it out because Don Gibson already had a hit on that number.

APRIL 1958

The success of ''Guess Things Happen That Way'' had been generated by many factors. Billboard and Cash Box had carried great reviews, and Barbara Barnes had stayed on the phone constantly just after release with Sun's distributors, who were ordering and re-ordering like mad. Jud Phillips was able to line up some more national TV guest spots for Johnny Cash. Jack Clement contributed to giving Cash his first big ''middle of the road'' record, not so country as ''I Walk The Line'' and not as sappy as ''Teenage Queen''. It placed higher than ever on the pop charts, number 11, and again was the number 1 record on the country charts.

Even that took place soon afterwards made a wonder just what Johnny Cash expected of his record label. As they were celebrating the triumph of the new release, Sam heard a rumor that Cash had been approached by a major label. He asked Johnny if he was leaving Sun, and he denied it. Still, Sam believed his sources and was apprehensive that Johnny Cash would sign with Columbia when his Sun contract expired in August.

Johnny Cash and his band went on the road immediately after Sam talked with him, and Sam sent Jud Phillips after him. According to Barbara Barnes, ''I with Jud the morning he arrived in North Dakota on Johnny's coattails. I said, ''What's it like in North Dakota''. Jud replied, ''This place is deserted. When you get out of the airplane you look around and say, 'Where's everybody''? Then he told me of plans to locate Johnny at the venue where he was playing and try to talk him into not leaving Sun Records. Jud had a very diplomatic, persuasive was about him, maybe partly due to his previous service as a chaplain in the Marine Corps. He could be a little smoother than Sam sometimes, and he was authorized to offer Johnny a better royalty and more promotion support than he was already receiving. But it was too late. Johnny admitted to Jud that, when he and Carl Perkins had gone to the West Coast the past November, Don Law had offered both of them Columbia contracts when their Sun obligations were over. Jud called both me and Sam to deliver the news''.

For Johnny Cash, the attraction was not only a guaranteed $50,000 royalty the first year, but the chance to record the gospel album he had been itching to do. His royalty rate went from 3 to 5 percent of 90 percent of sales, and Columbia stressed they could give him greater possibilities for movies and TV. Word got around that he had a new manager, Stu Carnall, and perhaps this person had influenced Johnny with dreams of bigger things to come. At one point, Billboard reported that he was having a screen test.

Jack Clement thought pride had something to do with Cash's leaving. Even though most of Sun's artists were pals and supported each other in varying degrees, they were also competitive with each other. Jack Clement said Johnny's feelings were ruffled because San had bought Carl Perkins a Cadillac for his million-seller, Sun's first, but not for him. Johnny also believed Sam cared more for Jerry Lee Lewis and rock and roll than Johnny's country sound. Personal feelings could have influenced Johnny, and Sam certainly took Cash's leaving personally. The record business and Sun at this moment didn't seem too stable.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE CONFEDERATES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY APRIL 9, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

The Confederates were a barbershop quartet that performed in the 1950s and 1960s. The group formed in September 1953 at a SPEBSQSA chapter meeting in Memphis, Tennessee. The Confederates took first place in the 1956 SPEBSQSA International Quartet Championship after finishing second the year before. They were notable not only for their championship-caliber harmonies, but also for performing in Confederate officer uniforms. The group stopped performing in 1969.

01 - "12TH STREET RAG''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - April 9, 1958

02 - "CRADLE DAYS''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - April 9, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Confederates consisting of
George Evans - Tenor
Dave LaBonte - Lead
Bill "Buz" Busby – Baritone
Wally Singleton - Bass

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

APRIL 9, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Bobby Darin recorded ''Splish Splash'' at the ATCO Studio in New York. It becomes his breakthrough pop single and his lobe country hit.

APRIL 12, 1958 SATURDAY

Don Gibson joins the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Faron Young appears on ABC-TV's ''Country Music Jubilee'', hosted by Red Foley

APRIL 13, 1958 SUNDAY

Pop-and-country singer Margaret Whiting marries movie equipment manufacturer John Moore at a private residence in the tony Bel-Air section of Los Angeles.

APRIL 14, 1958 MONDAY

Don Gibson's ''Oh Lonesome Me'' claims the top spot on the Billboard country chart.

APRIL 15, 1958 TUESDAY

Roni Stoneman, of The Stoneman Family, has her second child, Becky Cox.

Hank Thompson recorded ''I've Run Out Of Tomorrow'' in a midday session at the Capitol Recording Studio in Hollywood.

Buddy Holly's guitar is stolen from a Kiel Auditorium dressing room in St. Louis, Missouri. Touring with him, Jerry Lee Lewis and Chuck Berry.

APRIL 16, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Little Jimmy Dickens recorded ''(I Got) A Hole In My Pocket'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville. It becomes a hit 31 years later for Ricky Van Shelton.

The movie ''Country Music Holiday'' debuts in theaters. The picture's cast includes Faron Young, Zsa Zsa Gabor, June Carter, Ferlin Husky, Rod Brasfield, Jerry Byrd and The Jordanaires.

APRIL 17, 1958 THURSDAY

Hand Thompson recorded ''Squaws Along The Yukon'' in the evening at the Capitol Tower in Hollywood.

APRIL 21, 1958 MONDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''Wear My Ring Around Your Neck'' backed with ''Doncha' Think It's Time'' (RCA Victor 47-7240).

George Jones recorded ''Treasure Of Love'' in Nashville.

APRIL 22, 1958

Jerry Lee Lewis performed for the Alan Freed's Big Beat Show at the Waterloo Hippodrome in Waterloo, Iowa. Other performers are Frankie Lymon, The Chantels, Chuck Berry, The Crickets, The Pasterls, Jo Ann Campbell, and Screamin' Jay Hawkins, and of course Alan Freed's Big Rockin' Coral Record Band with Sam ''the Man'' Taylor.,

APRIL 24, 1958 THURSDAY

Faron Young recorded ''Alone With You'', written by Roy Drusky, and ''Every Time I'm Kissing You'' at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

APRIL 26, 1958 SATURDAY

''Country Music Jubilee'' host Red Foley welcomes Patsy Cline and Porter Wagoner to the ABC show.

APRIL 27, 1958 SUNDAY

The Everly Brothers render ''All I Have To Do Is Dream'' live from New York as guests on CBS-TV's ''The Ed Sullivan Show''.

APRIL 28, 1958 MONDAY

Jim Reeves make a guest appearance on ABC-TV's ''The Lawrence Welk Show''.

Ricky Nelson recorded ''Poor Little Fool'' in Los Angeles. It represents his first session with The Jordanaires.

APRIL 30, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''Jealousy'' during an afternoon session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

Justin and Bea Tubb have a daughter, Leah-Lisa Tubb.

Don Gibson recorded ''Give Myself A Party'' during an afternoon session at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©