CONTAINS
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1951 SESSIONS 11
November 1, 1951 to November 30, 1951

Studio Session for Bobby Bland, November 1951 / Modern Records
Studio Session for Doctor Ross, November 29, 1951 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Billy Love, October/November 1951 / Chess Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
MRS/Chess/Modern recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 1951

Howlin' Wolf's "Moanin' At Midnight" enters the rhythm and blues charts at number 10 but quickly disappears, and a follow-up, "Cryin' At Daybreak" b/w "Passin' By Blues" (RPM 340) is rush-released. During the same month, Wolf receives a sizable cash advance from Chess Records.

Lester Bihari (who will later move to Memphis, where he will found Meteor Records) rejoins brothers Joe, Jules, and Saul as New York sales and promo man for RPM/Modern Records.

Sam Phillips recorded Doctor Ross for the first time and sends the dubs to Chess Records in Chicago.

NOVEMBER 1, 1951 THURSDAY

Cole Porter, co-author of ''Don't Fence Me In'', is released from Doctors Hospital in New York after a stay of nearly four weeks in which he underwent repeated shock therapy for emotional problems.

NOVEMBER 5, 1951 MONDAY

Martha Carson recorded her signature song, ''Satisfied'', at the Castle Studio in Nashville's Tulane Hotel. The gospel tune never makes national country charts, but it helps her gain membership in the Grand Ole Opry.

Songwriter Archie Jordan is born in Augusta, Georgia. He writes the Ronnie Milsap ballads ''Let's Take The Long Way Around The World'' and ''It Was Almost Like A Song'', plus hits for Sylvia, Charlie Rich and Barbara Mandrell.

NOVEMBER 9, 1951 FRIDAY

MGM released the first Hank Williams album, ''Hank Williams Sings''.

NOVEMBER 11, 1951 SUNDAY

Pop singer Paul Cowsill is born in Portsmouth, Virginia. He becomes one of seven members of the family group The Cowsills, who gain a trio of pop hits in the 1960s. One of them, ''Indian Lake'', is remade as a country hit by Freddy Weller.

NOVEMBER 12, 1951 MONDAY

Decca released Ernest Tubb's ''Driftwood On The River''.

NOVEMBER 13, 1951 TUESDAY

Ernest Tubb recorded ''Somebody's Stolen My Honey'' at Nashville's Castle Studio.

NOVEMBER 14, 1951 WEDNESDAY

Marty Robbins has his first recording session for Columbia Records at Hollywood's Radio Recorders. He recorded his debut single, ''Love Me Or Leave Me Alone''.

Ernest Tubb and Red Foley recorded ''Too Old To Cut The Mustard'' at the Castle Studio during an evening session in Nashville.

Hank Williams makes his first national TV appearance, on CBS-TV's ''The Perry Como Show'', performing ''Hey, Good Lookin'''.

NOVEMBER 15, 1951 THURSDAY

''Pals Of The Golden West'' debuts in theaters, with Roy Rogers and Dale Evans tackling a smuggling ring on the Mexican border.

Actress Beverly DÁngelo is born in Columbus, Ohio. She plays Patsy Cline in the 1980 movie ''Coal Miner's Daughter'', earning a Country Music Association award when the soundtrack is named Album of the Year.

NOVEMBER 16, 1951 FRIDAY

George Jones joins the Marines.

Columbia released Lefty Frizzell's double-sided hit ''Give Me More, More, More (Of Your Kisses)'' backed by ''How Long Will It Take (To Stop Loving You)''.

NOVEMBER 17, 1951 SATURDAY

Eva Overstake Foley, the wife of Red Foley, commits suicide in Nashville after discovering her husband is having an affair with TV personality Sally Sweet.

Jimmy heap holds his first Capitol recording session in Austin, Texas. He earns the only hit of his career during his time with the label.

NOVEMBER 18, 1951 SUNDAY

Boy Hawdy drummer Hugh Wright is born in Keokuk, Iowa. The band develops three hits, ''A Cowboy's Born With A Broken Heart'', ''They Don't Make 'Em Like That Anymore'' and ''She'd Give Anything'' before disbanding in 1996.

NOVEMBER 20, 1951 TUESDAY

''Valley Of Fire'' debuts in movie theaters, starring Gene Autry and Pat Buttram. Autry plays a mayor in a southwestern town where outlaws try to hijack a train full of women who are, in essence, mail-order brides.

NOVEMBER 22, 1951 THURSDAY

The Four Guys' Laddie Cain is born in Houston. The group earns Grand Ole Opry membership in 1967.

NOVEMBER 23, 1951 FRIDAY

MGM released Hank Williams' ''Baby, We're Really In Love''.

NOVEMBER 28, 1951 WEDNESDAY

Bessie Lee Mauldin is granted a divorce from Nelson Gann. She is already romantically involved with Bill Monroe, whose 1959 hit ''Gotta Travel On'' will feature her on bass.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Ike Turner struck up a relationship with Joe Bihari, who set him up as a talent scout, providing a car and a new suit so he could scour the Memphis and Mississippi Delta for blues and rhythm and blues talent. Ike, the black man could open the doors for the ''out of towner'' Jewish white guy that would be otherwise closed. Ike would round up the talent, set a series of dates and Joe Bihari would drive in and record at a whole array of venues throughout the Delta and Memphis.

The first session of these sessions to produce a single was with Robert Bland (soon to be blues superstar Bobby ''Blue'' Bland) recorded at band-leader. Tuff Green's house in Memphis. ''Dry Up, Baby'' is the sort of chaotic rocker that Howlin' Wolf might have cut, while the reverse of Modern 848 is a slow moaning blues with Bobby demonstrating his vocal prowess.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BOBBY BLUE BLAND
FOR MODERN RECORDS 1951

TUFF GREEN'S HOUSE
1293 QUINN AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE NOVEMBER 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER

01 – ''CRYING ALL NIGHT'' – B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1735 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date November 1951
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Modern 848-A < mono
CRYING ALL NIGHT / DRY UP, BABY
Reissued: - 2010 Jasmine Records (CD) 500/200rpm JASCD 564-2 mono
BOBBY BLAND - IT'S MY LIFE, BABY

02 – ''DRY UP, BABY'' – B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1736 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date November 1951
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Modern 848-B < mono
DRY UP, BABY / CRYING ALL NIGHT
Reissued: - 2010 Jasmine Records (CD) 500/200rpm JASCD 564-3 mono
BOBBY BLAND - IT'S MY LIFE, BABY

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Bobby Bland - Vocal
Ike Turner - Piano
Matt Murphy - Guitar
Unknown - Saxophones
Possibly Richard ''Tuff'' Green - Bass
Earl Forest - Drums, Band Vocals, Handclaps

For Biography of Bobby Bland see: > The Sun Biographies <
Bobby Bland's MRS/Modern recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 1951

Courtesy of Sam Phillips' developing relationship with Chess Records in Chicago, the good Doctor Ross and his small band were able to treat the wider public to the hypnotic one-chord style that cured all ills. Ross was just out of the Army and came into the Memphis Recording Service as a singer and harp player accompanied by his Jump and Jive Boyd; guitarist Wiley Gatlin and Robert Moore aka Mook who used a broom to make a percussive sound. Ross would soon develop the ability to pay rhythm guitar, harmonica, and drums simultaneously, but he and his boys already had the formula down pat. It ain't Gershwin or Charlie Parker but it sure is hard to resist. Can you imagine how Sam must have felt the first time he listened to this music coming through the speakers in his tiny studio? Probably much the same as when Joe Hill Louis began to play, because in some respects they were quite similar. One possibility is that Sam Phillips feared he might lose Louis to Modern in the fall-out from ''Rocket 88'' and saw the Doctor as a replacement. This in fact happened; Modern recorded a session or two with Joe Hill Louis away from Phillips studio before dropping him.

NOVEMBER 1951

With the war in Korea looming, Isaiah Doctor Ross was required to join the Army again for a year starting on October 2, 1950 and ending in November 1951. He served this time in Fort Worth, Texas, suffering a delay in his career at an important moment. By the time he was back in Memphis near the end of 1951 he found people he'd known down in Mississippi or in West Memphis had started to make records and big reputations – men like B.B. King, Howlin' Wolf, and Ike Turner with Jackie Brenston.

As soon as he could, he reconnected with WDIA and he became a paid up member of the musicians union at this time. He told Barry Lee Pearson: ''B.B. King took me around there and I got my union card and everything. And I paid for my band boys. That was Wiley, Mook, and Reuben Martin. Wiley played the guitar and I blowed the harmonica and sang. Mook had him a broom and get him a rough piece of wood on the floor and he's take the straw part and have it up and the naked part at the bottom. And he'd just stroke that. And Reuben Martin played washboard with a spoon and fork. And so everybody fell for us''.

Ross also lost no time in connecting with Sam Phillips' Memphis Recording Service. Jacob Ross, his brother, had apparently been to see Phillips on his behalf while Isaiah was back in the Army. Ross told Chris Baird, ''Sam Phillips said, 'Well bring your brother in'. One day my brother carried me there and I met Sam Phillips and he had a little old recording studio, just plain props and pasteboard up against the wall for to make some sound. He said he would like us to record for him one evening, so me and Wiley and a couple more boys went up there to play. He listened to us and then he took the phone off the hook and called Chess Records. He was a scout then, for Leonard Chess. He said, 'These guys are the beat I've heard around here'. And he had us to play and we played ''Country Clown'' and the other side was ''Doctor Ross Boogie'', so we put that out and it came on the Chess label''.

The card measures approximately 2.25 x 4" with round edges. Dr. Ross's full name, Issiah Ross, his written on the card in black felt tip marker - it is unlikely the signature of Doctor Ross, but probably written in by whoever issued him the card. It shows normal wear (considering that it was probably carried around in Doctor Ross' back pocket for a year) but is in overall good condition. At the time that Doctor Ross was issued this card, he was only 24 years old and had not yet signed his first recording contract. A year later Ross would join the Army. In 1952 he would release his first single with Sam Phillip's legendary Sun Records label.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR DOCTOR ROSS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: THURSDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Doctor Ross first recording session took place on November 29, 1951 with Ross playing harmonica and singing, Wiley Gatlin on guitar, and Robert Moore on broom. Ross told Norman Darwen, ''Mook used to drag the broom, yeah he could drag that, he could make it sound better than any drums''. Six songs from the session have survived. Sam Phillips was impressed by Ross's little group and their fascinating mix of catchy rhythms and authentic blues. He probably didn't know or care that Ross's original tunes were drawn from his years on the juke joint circuit and from listening to records.

01(1) - "COUNTRY CLOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November 29, 1951
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rom CDSUNBOX 7-1-17 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
Reissued: March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-1-13 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Doctor Ross' recording debut shows the profound influence that John Lee "Sonny Boy" Williamson had on the harmonica players of the next generation. The performance is something of a hybrid, since it combines elements of Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas in its construction. The song is Ross' version of Lil' Son Jackson's "Bad Whiskey, Bad Woman", recorded in Houston, Texas three years previously and issued on Gold Star 642. This first take begins with a long harmonica solo, whereas the issued version has a four-bar introduction before the first verse. Sam Phillips noted Ross's guitarist as 'Wiley Gallatin' but no one of that name appears to have been living around that time, and Ross later confirmed that he was really Wiley (or Wylie) Gatlin. Ross, Gatlin and Rober Moore aka Mook had played together for some years on Arkansas radio stations either side of Ross's stints in the Army and they'd found themselves a slot on WDIA where A.C. Mooha Williams dubbed Ross the Medical Director of the Royal Amalgamated Association of Chitlin' Eaters of America.

01(2) - "COUNTRY CLOWN" - B.M.I. 2:54
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F 1012 - Take 2 Master
Recorded: - November 29, 1951
Released: - March 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1504-A < mono
COUNTRY CLOWN / DR. ROSS BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-17 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

02 - "DOCTOR ROSS BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F 1013 Master 
Recorded: - November 29, 1951
Released: - March 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1504-B < mono
DR. ROSS BOOGIE / COUNTRY CLOWN
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-18 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

''Doctor Ross Boogie'' is the template for many of Doctor Ross' later Sun recordings. The guitarist's amplifier makes a rather muddy jumble of his boogie phrases, but his presence is almost incidental to Ross' exuberant vocal and his harmonica playing. The song's obvious derivation from Pinetop's "Boogie Woogie" is made plain by Ross' spoken (or half-shouted) instructions to his imaginary audience "When I tell you to that thing/try your best to break your leg". He prefaces a harmonica solo with the comment, "Now play it cool", and proceeds to play with anything but reticence.

03 - "CAT SQUIRREL" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November 29, 1951
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-20 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
Reissued: March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-1-14 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

On ''Cat Squirrel'', this intriguingly named track, Dr. Ross moves away from his usual incessant one-chord boogie. This is shaped after Robert Petway's ''Catfish Blues'', recently revived by Bobo Thomas on the flip side of Elmore James' ''Dust My Broom''. Muddy waters' revival of the song as ''Rollin' Stone'' was still on jukeboxes as well. The Doctor recorded ''Cat Squirrel'' several more times in later years, and the version for Fortune was especially fine, arguably better than this.

In 1966, Cream featured ''Cat Squirrel'' (retitled ''Cat's Squirrel'' and credited to Trad. Arr. S. Splurge) on the flip side of their first single, ''Wrapping Paper''. True, Clapton's solos were pretty spectacular, but the song's energy, not to mention its signature riff, came straight from the Doc. Soon after, Jethro Tull covered Cream's cover. Cream certainly didn't hear this recording, which went unreleased until Krazy Kat bootlegged it in 1985, but they might have heard Ross play it on the 1965 Folk Blues festival. If so, they should have realized that he needed the money more than they did.

04(1) - "LITTLE SOLDIER BOY" - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November 29, 1951
Released: - 1972
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (LP) 33rpm Arhoolie 1065 mono
HIS FIRST RECORDINGS
Reissued: - January 5, 1992 Arhoolie Records (CD) 500/200rpm Arhoolie 371 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - BOOGIE DISEASE

04(2) - "LITTLE SOLDIER BOY" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November 29, 1951
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-19 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
Reissued: - 2013 JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239B-2-4 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953-1956

The second of two takes, this version is slightly faster than the previous take and features the prominent foot-tapping also present on "Country Clown". Those with a mania for classification could argue endlessly over which musician is providing pedestrian assistance or whether a third party, like Willie Johnson, might have wandered into the studio to help. The song refers to Ross' two bouts of Army service, from which he'd recently been demobbed. Having served in the Philippines and the Southwest Pacific, he got out in 1948 but was recalled two years later. In his own words: "He kept on playing/he would say/Everything's going to be alright after awhile'/and he would keep a smile on his face/pointing his finger and blowing his harmonica/all of the girls loved Doctor Ross".

05(1) - "SHAKE A MY HAND" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November 29, 1951
Released: - 1972
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (LP) 33rpm Arhoolie 1065 mono
HIS FIRST RECORDINGS
Reissued: - January 5, 1992 Arhoolie Records (CD) 500/200rpm Arhoolie 371 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - BOOGIE DISEASE

05(2) - "SHAKE A MY HAND" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November 29, 1951 - Alternate Take
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Arhoolie Internet iTunes MP3-10 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - BOOGIE DISEASE
Reissued: - 2013 JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-1-26 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953 - 1956

06 – ''THAT'S ALRIGHT (GOIN' BACK SOUTH*'' - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November 29, 1951
Released: - January 5, 1992
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (CD) 500/200rpm Arhoolie 371 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - BOOGIE DISEASE
Reissued: - 2013 JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-1-12 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953 - 1956

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Isaiah Ross – Vocal, Harmonica & Footstomping
Wiley Gatlin - Guitar & Vocal*
Robert Moore (aka Mook) - Broom

Wiley Gatlin was recorded as a cotton farmer on the Wilson Plantation north east of Dundee in Tunica County at the time. According to Doctor Ross, ''the best picker you ever saw''. Robert Moore, was a man Doctor Ross called ''Mook'', who played a string bass and also used a broom to make a percussion sound.

Note: Doctor Ross recorded other versions of these songs at this session. Note 2: Doctor Ross also played on ''That's Alright (Goin' Back South)'' sung at this session by Wiley Gatlin.

In almost total contrast, Doctor Ross's final offering at the session was an engaging if strange attempt to marry some familiar lines about a mistreating woman (from the likes of Sonny Boy Williamson's 1946 recordings of ''Shake The Boogie'') with Moohah Williams local catchphrase: ''come on and shake-a my hand''. WDIA jockey A.C. Williams had the ''Wheelin' On Beale'' show. He had still been a biology teacher at Manassas High School when he started at WDIA in 1949, but he soon became the first full time black employee of the station, working on promotion and organisation of events as well as hosting shows.

He set up the Teen Town Singers group that changed personnel each year to include the best talent from all seven of the local black High Schools. When singer Faye Adams had a number 1 rhythm and blues hit on Herald in the summer of 1953 with another song called ''Shake A My Hand'', Moohah got together with WDIA's David Mattis to write a comical song about the perils of hand-shaking. Issued that November on Starmaker Records, Moohah's ''All Shook Out'' was an answer song in the vein of Rufus Thomas's ''Bear Cat'', a recent number 1 in Memphis.

The song may also have had secondary reference to the gladhanding that went on during the annual WDIA Goodwill Revue. Although Moohah played all kinds of black music in his shows, he took the name ''Mr Blues'' for one show and ran mock elections for the preservation of good country blues; he awarded Doctor Ross the presidency of the Royal Amalgamated Association of Chitterling Eaters of America for his musical efforts.

For Biography of Doctor Ross see: > The Sun Biographies <
Doctor Ross' MRS/Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 1951

Up to the time Rosco Gordon first recorded ''Booted'', Billy Love had recorded just one song for Sam Phillips but around November 2, 1951 he recorded three more songs, two of which became his first record on Chess under his own name. Perhaps featuring the same band as on the Juiced session, ''Drop Top'' was another stormer, an undisguised attempt to follow in the slipstream of ''Rocket 88''. Billy's going to breeze around town keeping cool in his fantasy convertible and he doesn't care who knows it. He boogies into this track singing after the style of a Roy Brown before giving way to a crashing guitar solo from Calvin Newborn and a matching sax solo. The other side of the record was to be ''You're Gonna Cry'', a mid-paced Niles about the perils of getting too high and mighty. There is a throaty sax solo twin an unidentified player and good understated support from guitar and drums, possibly the Newborns again. The third title recorded at this time was ''Ain't No More'' hut the tape or acetate of this has never been found. Phillips paid Love an advance c l $70 on the disc on November 2, and loaned him $15 on December 11, when he noted that Chess has masters on ''Ain't No More'', ''You're Gonna Cry'' and ''Drop Top". However the disc was not issued immediately and some months later on March 16, 1952 Phillips noted that he had sent another master of ''Drop Top'' to Chess. The disc was finally issued as Chess 1508 on April 1, 1952. The record seems to hive been given little promotional support by Chess and it did not show up significantly on regional sales charts.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY LOVE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: POSSIBLY OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "DROP TOP" – B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F 1014 Master
Recorded: - Possibly October/November 1951
Released: - April 1, 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1508-A < mono
DROP TOP / YOU'RE GONNA CRY
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-20 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

"Rocket 88", of course, inspired a great many sequels - a fair number of which emanated from Sam Phillips' studio, notably "My Real Gone Rocket", "T-Model Boogie", "Mr. Highway Man", "Ridin' The Boogie". Billy Love's song is a delightful eulogy to the long-gone, gas-guzzlin' convertibles of the early 1950s: a routine eight-to-the-bar boogie, driven along by Billy's rock-solid, dependable left hand and hugely confident vocal, the automobile evolves into a metaphor for nookie halfway through. Sam Phillips' later comments notwithstanding, Love appears to have possessed considerable talent, and clearly should have gone on to become a major player - and whilst his dept to Roy Brown is readily evident here, he remains his own man.

02 - "YOU'RE GONNA CRY" – B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F 1015 Master
Recorded: - Possibly October/November 1951
Released: - April 1, 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1508-B < mono
YOU'RE GONNA CRY / DROP TOP
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-21 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

''You're Gonna Cry'', a mid-paced blues about the perils of getting too high and mighty was the song backed ''Drop Top'' on Chess. There is a throaty sax solo, probably from Charles Walker, and good understated support from Calvin and Phineas Newborn, Sr, on guitar and drums. Phillips paid Love an advance of $70 on the disc on November 2, 1951 and loaned him $15 on December 11 when he noted that ''Chess has masters on ''Ain't No More'', ''You're Gonna Cry'' and ''Drop Top''. However the disc was not issued immediately and some months later on March 16, 1952 Phillips noted that he had sent another master of ''Drop Top'' to Chess. The disc was finally issued in April, but appears to have been given little promotional support and did not show up significantly on regional sales charts.

Apparently from the same session as ''Drop Top'' and ''You're Gonna Cry'', Sam Phillips shows that ''It Ain't No More'' was sent to Chess along with the other two titles. There was a delay of some months before a record was issued and in that time Chess decided to go for the other titles. At one point, Chess asked for another copy of the ''Drop Top'' master and somewhere along the line the tape of ''It Ain't No More'' was lost but, here an acetate copy from Steve LaVere who had kept it for over forty years. If it were not for the greater saleability of the ''Drop Top'' lyric, this recording would have been a real contender for release. It is a storming performance, from Love's opening piano chord and the pushing drumbeat of Phineas Newborn through the unison riffing of sax and guitar and on to the superior guitar solo from Carlvin Newborn. The song itself consists of Love telling his girl the reasons why she's got to pack everything and go and perhaps this downbeat message being delivered at such a rocking tempo weighed against the track when Chess 1508 was being planned.

03 - "AIN'T NO MORE" – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Possibly November 1951
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-15 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Over the river in West Memphis, Arkansas there were other clubs and bars, like the Sixteenth Street grill where Sonny Boy Williamson, Willie Love and B. B. King played, the Be-Bop Hall, and also the Cotton Club that catered to a white audience.

Together Memphis and West Memphis provided a living to touring pianists like Roosevelt Sykes, Ivory Joe Hunter, or Fats Domino, to the pianists in local bands such as those led by Tuff Green or Bill Harvey, to the solo pianists and itinerant performers - Memphis keyboard legends like 'Struction' and 'Dishrag' - and to budding youngsters just starting out to learn. And then there was Phineas Newborn junior who played in a family band with his father Phineas, a well-known drummer, and his brother Calvin, a guitarist.

The Newborns came from around Jackson, Mississippi, originally but Phineas senior moved to Memphis in about 1930. His son joined him in the Tuff Green band in the mid-1940s and spent summers on the road with the popular Saunders King band when aged just 16. In 1948 the Newborn family show band was resident at Morris Berger's Plantation Inn in West Memphis, moving over the bridge to the Flamingo Room at Hernando and Beale in the early 1950s.

By the mid-1950s Phineas was being feted by jazz aficionados in New York and Los Angeles, and he remains a legendary name in jazz. Writing about musicians from Memphis in Rhythm Oil, Stanley Booth quoted one contemporary Memphis pianist saying that Phineas Newborn "had a boogie-woogie left hand, a bebop right hand, and this ... third hand." That's what pianist Billy Love was competing with when he was growing up.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Love - Vocal and Piano
Charles Walker - Saxophone
Calvin Newborn - Guitar
Phineas Newborn Sr – Drums

For Biography of Billy Love see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy Love's MRS/Chess recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 30, 1951 FRIDAY

Ernest Tubb recorded ''Missing In Action'' during an afternoon session at Nashville's Castle Studio in the Tulane Hotel.

Columbia released Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs ''Tis Sweet To Be Remembered''.

Guitarist Gordon Payne is born. He becomes a longtime member of Waylon Jennings' band, playing on ''I Ain't Living Long Like This'', ''I've Always Been Crazy'' and ''Luckenbach, Texas (Back To The Basics Of Love)''.

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
MRS/Chess/Modern recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©