CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1951 Sun Schedule <

1951 SESSIONS 12
December 1, 1951 to December 31, 1951

Studio Session for Bob Price, December 2, 1951 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Rosco Gordon, December 3, 1951 / RPM Records
Studio Session for Rosco Gordon & Bobby Bland, December 4, 1951 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Harmonica Frank Floyd, December 1951 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Gospel Tones, December 10, 1951
Studio Session for Jackie Brenston, December 15, 1951 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Howlin' Wolf, December 18, 1951 / Chess Records
Studio Session for The Southern Jubilee Singers, December 19, 1951 / Chess Records
Studio Session for L.B. Lawson & James Scott Jr., Probably 1951
Studio Session for J.C. Cole, Probably 1951/1952
Studio Session for Arbee Stidham, Unknown Date(s) 1951/1952

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
MRS/Chess/RPM/Modern recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 1951

The Chess version of Howlin' Wolf's "Moanin' At Midnight" (Chess 1479) enters the rhythm and blues charts at number 10. The Biharis file a claim against Chess Records, but the latter claim that they have a prior contract filed by Sam Phillips with the negro local of the AFM in Memphis. Sam Phillips cuts a second session on Wolf for Chess Records.

Chess release Rosco Gordon's "Booted" b/w ''Love You Till The Day I Die'' (Chess 1487). The Biharis arrange to cut another version with Roso and their version of ''Booted'' which is released on RPM 344. They also file a further suit against Chess, but again find that the latter have a prior contract on the song filed with the AFM.

At this stage, Chess Records and the are also in dispute over John Lee Hooker.

Sam Phillips records a second session on Rosco Gordon for Chess Records, but only a duet with Bobby Bland is issued. The session also includes Rosco's belated answer-disc to "Rocket 88", the "T-Model Boogie".

Sam Phillips recorded another country artist, Bob Price, for Chess Records.

Chess Records release a disc by the Spiritual Stars ''Good Religion'' b/w ''I'll Search Heaven'' (Chess 1485) probably recorded by Phillips, along with a second disc by the Evangelist Gospel Singers of Alabama ''Walk The Light'' b/w ''Never Grown Old'' (Chess1486).

DECEMBER 1, 1951 SATURDAY

Slim Whitman recorded ''Indian Love Call'' at the KWHK Studio in Shreveport, Louisiana. The song was introduced in the 1930s by Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy in the movie ''Rose Mari.

DECEMBER 2, 1951 SUNDAY

The Randolph Scott western ''Man In The Saddle'' debuts in movie theaters, with Tennessee Ernie Ford singing the title song.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Sam Phillips records another country artist for Chess Records, Bob Price. Phillips' mid-1950s venture into country music was largely conducted in partnership with the A&R team of Quinton Claunch and Bill Cantrell, but it seems as if Claunch was there first. He appeared at Phillips' door with Bob Price, and was certainly not joking when he said that Price had an unusual voice. Price and Harmonica Frank marked Chess Records' inauspicious debut into the country market. Both were a long way from mainstream but, unfortunately, this outing has none of the period charm of Frank Floyd, nor the searing hillbilly passion of Phillips' later efforts. In fact it has not weathered the years at all well although Roy Cooper's dancing guitar fills are quite pleasant and Price's vocal has its moments. If Price was aiming for the pop-country mix of Eddy Arnold-George Morgan-Red Foley, he came up with an almost comically inept parody. He had previously recorded for Decca in 1949 together with Eddie Hill, suggesting that he may have been part of the same troup, although Claunch recalled that Price rarely sang except at home. Billboard, though reported in March 1952 that Price was on the point of joining the live on-air staff of KWEM, West Memphis, so perhaps he got around more than Claunch believed.

STUDIO SESSION FOR BOB PRICE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: SUNDAY DECEMBER 2, 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR QUINTON CLAUNCH

Sometime during the fall of 1951, a childhood friend of Quinton Claunch named Price Twitty came to Memphis to play a few country music gigs. In a strange reversal of the Harold Jenkins story, Twitty rejected his surname for the stage name Bop Price. Claunch recalls that Price sang very little and "mainly in the bath", yet Price was no novice and had pursued an intermittent career in country music, recording for Decca in on August 22, 1949. Bop Price had what Claunch characterizes as, "an unusual voice, and his own way of phrasing a song that was his main claim to fame". In November 1951, Claunch called Sam Phillips and took price down to the studio at 706 Union Avenue. This was to the Claunch's first venture as a record producer.

Although somewhat lightweight, Bob Price's unusual phrasing impressed Sam Phillips sufficiently to call a recording session. Claunch recalls that before the session be, Price and guitarist Paul Buskirk recorded a demo of "How Can It Be" at WLAY radio studio in Muscle Shoals. Moving back to Memphis for the proper session, Claunch found that the additional session players Sam had brought in were not capable of making the sounds he intended the world to hear and he was somewhat dissatisfied with the outcome.

Nevertheless, Sam Phillips was involved at the time with leasing country material to the newly established Chess label country series, and he was able to sell "How Can It Be" and "Sticks And Stones" for release on Chess 1495 in March 1952.

01 - "HOW CAN IT BE" – B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Quinton Claunch-Bob Price
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F-1002 Master
Recorded: - December 2, 1951
Released: - March 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1495-A < mono
HOW CAN IT ME / STICKS AND STONES
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-2-9 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-27 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

02 - "STICKS AND STONES" – B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Bob Price
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F-1003 Master 
Recorded: - December 2, 1951
Released: - March 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1495-B < mono
STICKS AND STONES / HOW CAN IT ME
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-2-10 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-28 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Stick And Stones'', this uptempo side has a folky, almost nursery rhyme, quality enhanced by the instrumental break which sounds like a musical box. Hank Thompson was doing well with songs like this (''Humpty Dumpty Heart'', ''Whoa Sailor'', etc) but Thompson at least had visibility in the western half of the country. Released to little acclaim in January 1952, this single represented the beginning and end of Chess's involvement in hillbilly music until they allied themselves with Stan Lewis in Shreveport. However, shortly after this record was released, Billboard announced that Leonard Chess was heading south to secure more country talent. Perhaps the dismal sales of this outing convinced Chess to stay clear of the country market until Lewis started providing him with saleable product. Note that the master tape from this session was recorded over. Only the very last cut on the tape, a fragment of ''Why So Blue''? remains from the original tape.

03 - "WHY SO BLUE"
Composer: - Bob Price
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Snatch
Recorded: - December 2, 1951
Released: - Sun Unissued

04 - "DONATIN' MY TIME"
Composer: - Bob Price
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - December 2, 1951
Released: - Sun Unissued

Two other songs had been recorded by Sam Phillips. A snatch of "Why So Blues" remains on tape, but "Donatin' My Time" appears to have been recorded over along with the master tape of the two issued items. The inconspicuous sales of Chess 1495 compared unfavourably with the good sales on rhythm and blues recordings from Phillips' studio, and this may have put Sam Phillips off country music for a while. It would be another two years before Claunch came to Sam again with a song to resurrect his recording career.

"Bob Price made some things for Chess Records in my studio", recalled Sam Phillips. "His real name was Price Twitty. He was a young man from down in Tishomingo, Mississippi. But he did not have the blue feel in the music. We didn't do too much with Bob". Price was simply not quirky enough, not even for this ready-made new hillbilly marked, and Sam Phillips doubted that there was a bluesy bone in his body. The results in any case were satisfying to no one, including Leonard Chess, who suspended his brief country music experiment shortly thereafter.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bob Price - Vocal
Quinton Claunch - Guitar
Roy Cooper - Guitar
Harold Buskirk - Bass
Dexter Johnson - Mandolin
Bob Smith – Piano
Unknown - Fiddle

 For Biography of Bob Price see: > The Sun Biographies <
Bob Price's Chess recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 3, 1951 MONDAY

Studio sessions for Rosco Gordon at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.

Hank Williams is sued for copyright infringement, charged with stealing the melody for ''Cold, Cold Heart'' from the T. Texas Tyler recording ''You'll Still Be In My Heart''.

The Maddox Brothers & Rose sign with Columbia Records.

DECEMBER 4, 1951 TUESDAY

Studio sessions for Rosco Gordon and Bobby Bland at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.

Guitarist Gary Rossington is born in Jacksonville, Florida. In his teens, he becomes a founding member of Lynyrd Skynyrd, whose ''Sweet Home Alabama'' receives billing in a Country Music Foundation book among country's 500 all-time greatest singles.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROSCO GORDON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICES FOR RPM RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: PROBABLY MONDAY DECEMBER 3, 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "BOOTED" - B.M.I. - 3:09
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1744 Master
Recorded: - December 3, 1951
Released: - January 1952
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 344-A < mono
BOOTED / COLD COLD WINTER
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-8 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS

02 - "COLD COLD WINTER" - B.M.I. - 3:12
Composer: - Rosco Gordon-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1745 Master
Recorded: - December 3, 1951
Released: - January 1952
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 344-B < mono
COLD COLD WINTER / BOOTED
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-9 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS

03 - "WHAT YOU GOT ON YOUR MIND" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Rosco Gordon-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publisher
Matrix number: - 1842 Master
Recorded: - December 3, 1951
Released: - September 6, 1952
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 365-A < mono
WHAT YOU GOT ON YOUR MIND / TWO KIND OF WOMEN
Reissued: - November 24, 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm Ace CDCHD 694-14 mono
ROSCO GORDON - BOOTED - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS

04 - "TWO KIND OF WOMEN" - B.M.I. - 3:02
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Modern Music Publisher
Matrix number: - 1867 Master 
Recorded: - December 3, 1951
Released: - September 6, 1952
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 365-B < mono
TWO KIND OF WOMEN / WHAT YOU GOT ON YOUR MIND
Reissued: - November 24, 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm Ace CDCHD 694-13 mono
ROSCO GORDON - BOOTED - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS

05 - "GONNA LET YOU OUT''
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 3, 1951

06 - "THAT'S AGAINST THE RULE''
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 3, 1951

07 - "TELL DADDY, BABY''
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 3, 1951

This session was recorded for Chess Records but the masters were not dispatched pending the outcome of the legal wrangling surrounding Gordon. The titles were later offered to RPM/Modern.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Willie Sims - Saxophone
Willie Wilkes - Saxophone
John Murry Daley - Drums
More Details Unknown

For Biography of Rosco Gordon see: > The Sun Biographies <
Rosco Gordon's RPM/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROSCO GORDON & BOBBY BLUE BAND
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICES FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: TUESDAY DECEMBER 4, 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "LETTER FROM A TRENCH IN KOREA*/***" - 1 – B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - U 7398 Master
Recorded: - December 4, 1951
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm Duke 106-B > Chess 1489-B < mono
LETTER FROM A TRENCH IN KOREA / CRYING
Reissued: - July 5, 2013 Salt & Pepper Records (MP3) Internet Sample-3 mono
LOVE YOU TILL THE DAY I DIE - EARLY SINGLES 1951 - 1956

02 - ''CRYING'' - 1 - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - U 7397 Master
Recorded: - December 4, 1951
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm Duke 106 89-A > Chess 1489-A < mono
CRYING / LETTER FROM A TRENCH IN KOREA
Reissued: - July 5, 2013 Salt & Pepper Records (MP3) Internet Sample-2 mono
LOVE YOU TILL THE DAY I DIE - EARLY SINGLES 1951 - 1956

03(1) - "T-MODEL BOOGIE" – B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Lion Publishers
Matrix number: - None - Alternate to Original Issue Duke 106
Recorded: - December 4, 1951
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Duke Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Duke 106-A < mono
T-MODEL BOOGIE /
Reissued: - 1990 Charly (CD) 500/200rpm Instant INS 503 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 1 - SUNRISE

03(2) - "T-MODEL BOOGIE" – 1 - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Lion Publishers
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 4, 1951
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30133-3 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-22 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Rosco Gordon recorded at least three versions of this, two for Sam Phillips (the other take first appeared on CR 30101) and a speeded-up version for Duke Records, with automobile noises spliced into the intro and outro. The song is patently another "Rocket 88" spinoff, but has an engaging spirit of its own - although things begin to fall apart rhythmically during the third verse after Rosco attempts to cram a couple of gratuitous extra beats into the mix. The tenor sax player suddenly springs to life during his solo, exhibiting a surly blues tone - his sustained note during the last verse being particularly effective.

03(3) - "T-MODEL BOOGIE" – 2 - B.M.I.
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Lion Publishers
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 4, 1951
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30101-A-3 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 1 - CATALYST

04 - "NATIVE CHANT***" - 1
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 4, 1951

05 - "DR BLUES**" - 2
Composer: - "Dr. Blues" Maxwell
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 4, 1951
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30133-4 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal* and Piano
Bobby Bland - Second Vocal***
"Dr Blues" Maxwell - Vocal**
Willie Sims - Saxophone
Willie Wilkes - Saxophone
John Murry Daley - Drums

For Biographies of Rosco Gordon and Robert Bland see: > The Sun Biographies <
Duke/Chess recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 1951

Business started picking up a little in December 1951. Sometime around the beginning of the month Sam Phillips recorded harmonica Frank Floyd, a grizzled white medicine-show veteran in his forties who sang and played the harmonica without making use of either his hands or a harmonica rack, simply rolling the harmonica around in his mouth and then rolling it back to the side again as he declaimed the lyrics of his blues and humorous entertainments in a parched, self-amused voice. He had been captivated by Frank when they met, and first recorded him on July 15, 1951, signing him immediately to a management contract. He was not by any stretch of the imagination a great artist, but he was a compelling one, a true original, of the sort that Sam Phillips had always been drawn to. According to Sam Phillips, ''Frank Floyd was a beautiful hobo. He was short, fat, very abstract, and you looked at him and you really didn't know what he was thinking, what he was going to say or sing next. He had the greatest mind of his own, I think hobos by nature have to have that, and that fascinated me from the beginning. And then he had some of these old rhymes and tales and stuff that he had embellished, and some of them were so old, God, I guess they were old when my father was a kid''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Frank Floyd was called back into the studio and recorded "Howlin' Tomcat" and "She Done Moved" this time, two blues staples, for which there would be no reason to have any commercial expectation. Harmonica Frank just tickled him. He was difficult to marked, Sam realized, not just because of the peculiarity of his sound but because he was primarily a visual act. With that harmonica in his mouth as he sang, he was more of a novelty act than any of the other singers Sam had recorded, but Sam was convinced there was a place for him, if you could just find the right kind of setting to present him in. He was ''a very fascinating character'', said Sam. And, as Sam was always quick to point out, ''You don't throw away any good characters''.

The masters were shipped to Chess on December 13, 1951 and the record was released in January 1952. From that point, Frank's career took a downturn. His second Chess single sank without a trace and his steady gig with Eddie Hill ended when Hill left WMC for the brighter lights at WSM, Nashville, in February 1952.

STUDIO SESSION FOR HARMONICA FRANK FLOYD
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE DECEMBER 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER

 01(1) - "HOWLIN' TOMCAT" – 1 - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Frank Floyd
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - 1504-A Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1951
Released: - January 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1494-A > mono
HOWLIN' TOMCAT / SHE DONE MOVED
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-2-4 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-22 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Howlin' Tomcat'' is not so much a blues as a loving parody of a blues, and an anachronism even in 1951. It is true that folk blues were still selling in 1951 but this is much more folk than blues. It seemed to belong in either the 1930s or the ersatz folk blues revival of the 1960s but barely at any point in between. If it had a direct antecedent, it was Bo Carter's 1931 recording of ''Howlin' Tom Cat Blues'', but that assumes Frank collected blues 78s, and it's a pretty fair assumption that he didn't. He must surely have heard Carter or someone else perform it, though. Perhaps Frank's animal noises gave Phillips a sense of deja vu in 1953 when he was grafting similar noises onto Rufus Thomas's first hits.

01(2) - "HOWLIN' TOMCAT" – 2 - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Frank Floyd
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Puritan Records (LP) 33rpm Puritan 3003 mono
HARMONICA FRANK THE GREAT ORIGINAL RECORDINGS 1951-1958
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-2-6 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-24 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

The alternate of ''Howlin' Tomcat'' was basically similar to the issued version and, aside from a couple of minor vocal flufs, it was a serious candidate for shipping to Chess. In fact, in the days before tape, Sam Phillips may well have recorded a second version in order to have a safety master in case the version he shipped was damaged during shipping or plating. This may be a lone survivor of those safety masters.

03 - "SHE DONE MOVED" – B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Frank Floyd
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - 1504-B Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1951
Released: - January 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1494-B < mono
SHE DONE MOVED / HOWLIN' TOMCAT
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-2-5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-23 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''She Done Moved'', a straight blues rendering without even a harmonica. Nevertheless, there are still flashes of Frank's wonderfully idiosyncratic phrasing together with some playful touches in the phrasing where his vocal crosses bar lines. As with his other blues, Frank makes no effort to sound like anyone but himself. He absorbed the vernacular of the blues and made it his own. This song comes from the same deep well as Lonnie Johnson's ''Kansas City Blues'', but there are lines like ''she got eyes like a lighthouse on the sea'' that leave you wondering where Frank heard them.

04 - ''CHRISTMAS TIME AGAIN''
Composer: - Frank Floyd
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost
Recorded: - Probably December 1951

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Harmonica Frank Floyd - Vocal, Guitar and Harmonica

The Chess recordings are still shrouded in mystery. It is possible that "Step It Up And Go" was hastily placed on Frank's first single because it was starting to become a small hit for Big Jeff and the Radio Playboys on Dot Records. More surprising, the original coupling of "Swamp Root" and "Goin' Away Walkin'" was repromoted in August 1952, one year after release. Copies were serviced to both country and pop disc jockey's. Another cut destined for Chess, "Christmas Time Again", has never been found.

Chess Records had found a place for Frank Floyd in any case in their new hillbilly series, inaugurated the previous summer with fanciful claims for Frank's first single (it was, ''just as great if not greater'' in its field, Leonard Chess announced to the trades, than ''Rocket 88'', and the label took out an ad for its ''Folk Smash!!'').

 For Biography of Harmonica Frank see: > The Sun Biographies <
Harmonica Frank's Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 7, 1951 FRIDAY

While returning from California, while they filmed the movie ''Rough, Tough West'', Pee Wee King and His Golden West Cowboys' airplane comes up missing, and the media erroneously reports that the singer has died.

DECEMBER 8, 1951 SATURDAY

Rosco Gordon's ''Saddled The Cow'' enters the local charts in New Orleans, Louisiana.

''They're At It Again Chess-Modern Square Off Over To Rhythm & Blues Artists: Chicago. The ongoing hassle between the Chess brothers of the Chess/Aristocrat plattery here and the brothers Bihari, of the Modern/RPM firms, Hollywood, has erupted anew. Original flare-up between the diskery fraters started about three months ago, when both were battling over who owned the contract to Jackie (''Rocket 88'') Brenston.

Current brouhaha involves two artists, Johnny Lee Hooker and Rosco Gordon. Phil Chess notified the trade press that Gordon, who has a pressing of ''Booted'' out on both Chess and Modern, is a contracted artist of Chess Records. The Chess exclusive to Gordon was okayed by the American Federation of Musicians (AFM) approximately two months ago, and Gordon sliced his disking for Chess about a week after the contract was signed in Memphis.

In Hooker's case, both Modern and Chess have versions out on ''Louise'' backed by ''Ground Hog Blues''. Chess said that the union investigated the release of the Chess recording of the two tunes and notified the union that they purchased the controversial Hooker master from Joe Battle, owner of Joe's Record Shop in Detroit, a year ago.

Union long has had a ruling that an artist cannot re-cut the same tune unless a five-year period exists between the first and second cutting. Union has made an exception several times, where an artist has received they okay of the firm for which he first cut the tune.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR GOSPEL TONES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY DECEMBER 10, 1951
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

Sam Phillips recorded the Gospel Tones, but as much as he loved the old-time black gospel sound, he couldn't sell it to anyone.

No Details

01 – ''NOAH''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 10, 1951

02 – ''GET AWAY JORDAN''
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: Public Domain
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 10, 1951

03 – ''ROCK MY SOUL''
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: Public Domain
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 10, 1951

04 – ''MOTHERLESS CHILDREN''
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: Public Domain
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 10, 1951

05 – ''LORD BE NEAR ME, HEAR ME''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 10, 1951

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Cicero Lewis – Vocal and leader
Unknown Personnel

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 10, 1951 MONDAY

Pee Wee King recorded ''Silver And Gold'' at Chicago RCA Studio A.

Johnny Rodriguez is born in Sabinal, Texas. He becomes country's first mainstream star of Hispanic descent, emerging out of Tom T. Hall's band in 1972. He recorded numerous songs in Spanglish, with a line of hits that stretches from 1972-1983.

Decca released the Ernest Tubb and Red Foley duet ''Too Old To Cut The Mustard''.

DECEMBER 11, 1951 TUESDAY

Hank Williams recorded ''Honky Tonk Blues'' and ''I'm Sorry For You, My Friend'' during a midday session in Nashville at the Castle Studio. It marks his last recording date before dissolving the Drifting Cowboys.

Hank Thompson recorded ''The Wild Side Of Life'' and ''Waiting In The Lobby Of Your Heart'' during the evening at the Capitol Studios on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.

DECEMBER 13, 1951 THURSDAY

Hank Williams undergoes surgery at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville for fuse two vertebrae in his back.

DECEMBER 14, 1951 FRIDAY

Mercury released Flatt & Scruggs ''Roll In My Sweet Baby's Arms''. The bluegrass is later made into a country hit by Buck Owens.

DECEMBER 15, 1951 SATURDAY

''Chess Claims Wolf In Modern Dispute: Chicago . The revolving battle between the Chess brothers, of Chess-Aristocrat here, and the Bihari clan of Moderm-RPM waxeries has broken out again over yet another artist's contract. Latest round was touched off when Phil and Leonard Chess staked a claim on Howlin' Wolf, who has cut sides for both the Biharis and Chess, with the latter fraters claiming him exclusively this week.

The Wolf, otherwise known as Chester Burnett, a farmer from West Memphis, Arkansas, was signed into Local 208, the Negro chapter of the American Federation of Musicians genre, and duked a musician's recording pact with Chess. Currently Howlin' Wolf has ''How Many More Years'' on Chess listed among the top ten on the rhythm and blues charts.

Only a week ago the two flatteries were squaring off in a still unresolved dispute involving two other artist pacts belonging to John Lee Hooker and Rosco Gordon.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JACKIE BRENSTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

PROBABLY MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: SATURDAY DECEMBER 15, 1951
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

In mid-December, Chess sought to follow up on the success of "Rocket 88" by bringing Jackie Brenston to Chicago to record his own session. Much was obviously expected, as the singer and baritone saxophonist laid down no fewer than 8 sides. But just four were released, and the sales of Chess 1496 and 1532 must not have been up to expectations. Chess 1496 has shown up in quite a few collections; 1532, which would be Brenston's last release on Chess, is less often seen. The full band personnel for the session is not known, but two Memphis stalwarts were on hand: Phineas Newborn Jr. at the piano and his brother Calvin Newborn on guitar.

Calvin is also credited as the composer on "Starvation'', a solid jazz instrumental. The band was rounded out with an alto sax, a tenor sax, bass, drums, and guest singer Edna McRaney, who appeared on ''Eighty Eight Boogie" and "Lovin' Time Blues" as well as "Hi, Ho Baby".

Note: The session may have been recorded for Chess in Chicago but Brenston was under personal contract to Sam Phillips and Phillips notebook shows at least from the session(s) at December 15, as having been recorded by him at the Memphis Recording Service.

01 – ''HI HO BABY''* – B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Carl Germany
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - U 7405 Master
Recorded: - December 15, 1951
Released: - January 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1496-A < mono
HI HO BABY / LEO THE LOUSE
Reissued: 1984 P-Vine Records (LP) 33rpm PLP 6027-2-1 mono
JACKIE BRENSTON AND HIS DELTA CATS – ROCKET 88

02 – ''TELL TROUBLES GOODBYE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 7406 - None – Chess Unissued
Recorded: - December 15, 1951

03 – ''BLUES GOT ME AGAIN'' – B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Jackie Brenston
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - U 7407 Master 
Recorded: - December 15, 1951
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1532-A < mono
BLUES GOT ME AGAIN / STARVATION BLUES
Reissued: 1984 P-Vine Records (LP) 33rpm PLP 6027-2-7 mono
JACKIE BRENSTON AND HIS DELTA CATS – ROCKET 88

04 – ''YOU WON'T BE COMING BACK'' - 2:49
Composer: - Newborn
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 7408 – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 15, 1951
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - P-Vine Records (LP) 33rpm PLP 6027-2-5 mono
JACKIE BRENSTON AND HIS DELTA CATS – ROCKET 88
Reissued: - October 22, 2007 Rev-Ola Bandstand MP3-16 mono
THE MISTREATER

05 – ''EIGHTY EIGHT BOOGIE''* - 2:29
Composer: - Newborn
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 7408 – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 15, 1951
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - P-Vine Records (LP) 33rpm PLP 6027-2-4 mono
JACKIE BRENSTON AND HIS DELTA CATS – ROCKET 88
Reissued: - October 22, 2007 Rev-Ola Bandstand MP3-17 mono
THE MISTREATER

06 – ''LOVING TIME BLUES''* - 3:06
Composer: - Newborn
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 7410 – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 15, 1951
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - P-Vine Records (LP) 33rpm PLP 6027-2-2 mono
JACKIE BRENSTON AND HIS DELTA CATS – ROCKET 88
Reissued: - October 22, 2007 Rev-Ola Bandstand MP3-18 mono
THE MISTREATER

07 – ''LEO THE LOUSE'' – B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Onah Spencer-Randolph
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - U 7411 Master
Recorded: - December 15, 1951
Released: - January 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1496-B < mono
LEO THE LOUSE / HI HO BABY
Reissued: - October 22, 2007 Rev-Ola Bandstand MP3-8 mono
THE MISTREATER

08 – ''STARVATION BLUES'' – B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Calvin Newborn
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - U 7412 Master
Recorded: - December 15, 1951
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1532-A < mono
STARVATION BLUES / BLUES GOT ME AGAIN
Reissued: - October 22, 2007 Rev-Ola Bandstand MP3-10 mono
THE MISTREATER

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jackie Brenston – Vocal - Saxophone
Edna McRaney - Vocal*
Phineas Newborn Jr. - Piano
Calvin Newborn - Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Jackie Brenston and Edna McRaney see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jackie Brenston and Edna McRaney's Chess recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 16, 1951 SUNDAY

Cynthia Dunn is born in Nashville. She becomes Steve Earle's second wife in 1977.

DECEMBER 18, 1951 TUESDAY

Studio session with Howlin' Wolf at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

It was Sam Phillips' mid-December session with Howlin' Wolf, as blistering, if not as cataclysmic, as the first, that once again established the high ground for all of his recording ventures.

STUDIO SESSION FOR HOWLIN' WOLF
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: TUESDAY DECEMBER 18, 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER

MOST OF THE REPERTOIRE ON THIS SESSION WAS
DUBBED FROM ACETATE OR DISC SOURCE
MANY OF THE ORIGINAL MASTER TAPES HAVE BEEN LOST

Once again, there was something almost unearthly, or at the very least altogether unpredictable, about the music. Wolf cut four or five titles with any number of different variations. There was a boogie and a blues, each with the theme of moving to California, Beverly Hills in particular, to, ''prepare for myself in my older days''.

There was a slow blues ''Howlin' Wolf Boogie'' in which for the first time on record (but by no means the last) Wolf explicitly expanded upon his larger-than-life persona (''They call me the Howlin' Wolf, darling, you found me howling at your door''), while ''Look-A-Here Baby'' told an extemporized tale of thwarted courtship (''So sweet to meet a girl like you, darlin', what might be your name?'/ She said, 'None of your business, you don't understand' / 'Well, okay''').

There was a variety of themes and musical approaches, but each number, with the sole exception of ''Howlin' Wolf Boogie'', suggested underlying themes of abandonment, betrayal, and a desperate desire for some form of security.

01 - "HOWLIN' WOLF BOOGIE" – B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Burton Limited - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - F 1005 Master
Master and originally titled "House Rockin' Boogie" on log sheet.
Recorded: - December 18, 1951
Released: - January 14, 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1497-A < mono
HOWLIN' WOLF BOOGIE / THE WOLF IS AT YOUR DOOR
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-4 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2

02(1) - "CALIFORNIA BLUES"* – B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 18, 1951
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-A-2 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-5 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1

02(2) - "CALIFORNIA BOOGIE"* – B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 18, 1951
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-A-3 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-4 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1

03 - "LOOK-A-HERE BABY"* – B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Also titled "Color And Kind" but should not be
confused with another of that title (see April 17, 1952 session.
Recorded: - December 18, 1951
Released: - September 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30134-14 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS – HOWLIN' WOLF
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-6 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1

04 - "THE WOLF IS AT YOUR DOOR" – B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Burton Limited - Arc Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - F 1004 Master
Recorded: - December 18, 1951
Released: - January 14, 1952
Issued as "Howlin' For My Baby" original titled on log sheet.
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1497-B < mono
THE WOLF IS AT YOUR DOOR / HOWLIN' WOLF BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-5 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2

05 - "SMILE AT ME" – B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 18, 1951
Released: - September 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30134-2 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS – HOWLIN' WOLF
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-7 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1

Wolf by now felt thoroughly at ease in the studio. He would just sit there, his feet stretched out in front of him, massive, inscrutable, rocking in his chair. According to Sam Phillips, ''He gave the appearance of being totally unconcerned, but his surroundings meant so much to him. Once he felt at home, there was no way for Wolf to be anything other than himself. Once you broke that barrier, you had all he had to offer. I knew even at that time it went beyond the point of black and white. I just didn't know where to go with what I had''.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Howlin' Wolf - Vocal and Harmonica
Willie Johnson - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Willie Steele - Drums
Unknown - Tenor Sax
Possible Albert Williams – Piano*

Sam Phillips was convinced that there was going to be a future to figure it out in. Almost in spite of themselves, the Bihari brothers and Leonard Chess, not to mention the breathtaking artistry of the Wolf and its indisputable popular success, had shown him the way. The acceptance of the records (Wolf's Muddy waters', B.B. King's rapidly rising national hit), the growing commercial impact of the raw gutbucket blues, along with Hank Williams' almost equally raw expression of undisguised emotion in the country field, told the story of the public's hunger for something unaccommodated, something real.

For Biography of Howlin' Wolf see: > The Sun Biographies <
Howlin' Wolf's Chess recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE SOUTHERN JUBILEE SINGERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 19, 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER

These classic quartet recording, recorded in December 1951, tell us something about the kind of black gospel music that surrounded the Memphis Recording Service in the early 1950s while Sam Phillips tried to eke out a living. Phillips recorded four sides with this quartet and probably expected some kind of payday to result. After all, he had succeeded in selling two similar sides by the Brewsteraires to Chess Records just three months ago. But Phillips was unable to catch gospel lightning in a bottle a second time.

01 - "FORGIVE ME LORD" – B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Ford
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 19, 1951
Released: - 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16387-17 mono
SUN GOSPEL
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-20 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Nevertheless, this was a powerful, emotionally charged performance, even if a bit subtle for the marketplace. From the opening line of ''Forgive Me Lord'' ("Sinful days are now behind me") there is a compelling quality to the recording. The sustained chords behind the lead vocal are kept in meter by the bass notes which seem to throb through them. When the lead sings "You know I promise" the quartet hits the kind of gloriously churchy 1-7 chord that Ray Charles built his early career around. The emotionally taut style of this arrangement has been all but lost to modern gospel music in a sea of electric guitars, organs, and intrusive drumming.

02 - "THERE'S A MAN IN JERUSALEM" – B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Joseph Johnson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 19, 1951
Released: - September 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Charly 30126-B-8 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 11 - MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-19 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

''There's A Man In Jerusalem'' this track was probably the most commercial of the four sides Phillips recorded by The Southern Jubilees. It builds power and intensity as it moves along. In fact, so engaging is the performance that it is easy to overlook the fact that the song is virtually free of lyrics. The group simply repeats the lines "There's a man in Jerusalem / They call him the mighty king" to a simple 16-bar chord progression. In many ways, the performance draws its power from the work of bass Eddie Henderson. Initially he sings words along with the group. Then he begins to sing notes, weaving around the lead singer and backup chanting.

Ultimately, he sings the part of a string bass. Even a capella groups who did not imitate the sound of musical instruments were not averse to having their "basser" simulate the part of a stringed instrument.

Students of black gospel music may view this wordless version by the Southern Jubilees with some interest. The previous year saw a version by the Trumpeteers recorded in New York and issued on Score. In 1952, the year following this recording, the Swan Silvertones saw their version of the song issued on Specialty 844. Both of these recording featured a full set of lyrics. In fact, the Trumpeteers' version is one of the most lyrically complex songs in their repertoire, including some memorable images of the sky opening up over Jerusalem and a voice thundering down telling everyone ''That's my son and I'm mighty well proud of him''. For whatever reason, the Southern Jubilees chose the minimalist approach when it came time to perform the song for Sam Phillips microphone.

03 - "HE NEVER LEFT ME ALONE" – B.M.I. - 3:04
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 19, 1951
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-21 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
Reissued: - April 1, 2012 Vintage Masters Inc. iTunes Internet 30 mono
SOUTHERN GOSPEL - ULTIMATE INSPIRATIONAL
SONGS OF OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS

The ''He Never Left Me Alone'' owes much to the formula gospel pieces of the day. During the first reading, the lyric is worked through in a free-meter style, while the lead wrings it for every bit of emotion. From then on, It's a strictly metered performance in tidy 16 bar units. The backing is unusually formal, almost approximating a military march tempo as the group chants ''He never left me never''. The piece ends on a sustained chord that blends into the characteristic 1-7 gospel quartet ending. Although this is the least adventurous of our sampling of Jubilees' Sun work is still registers.

As with ''There's A Man In Jerusalem'', the Southern Jubilees were covering a record of fairly recent vintage; in this case, the Spirit of Memphis's King recordings from December 1949. The Jubilees offer quite a striking re-imagination, though. The fee-meter ad lib opening seems to be their own, and for once at least the Spirit of Memphis had the more formalized arrangement.

04(1) - "BLESSED BE THE NAME" – B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 19, 1951
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - P-Vine Special (LP) 33rpm PLP-386-A-6 mono
SOUTHBOUND GOSPEL TRAIN
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-22 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Of the four songs that the Singing Southern Jubilees, recorded for Sam Phillips in 1951, ''Blessed Be The Name'' was the final one to be issued. It first appeared on a Sun reissue for Charly Records in 1989. The quartet was a major force in Memphis gospel singing in the 1940s and 1950s. This spectacular track tells you everything you need to know about a cappella gospel jubilee singing from the era. When this kind of music faded from favor, the musical world, not simply the world of gospel singing, lost something very special. The track also tells you something about the importance of lyrics. They're sometimes overrated, especially when the musical part of a performance is solid. Take the present case: there are no lyrics here. Or more precisely, there are no lyrics beyond the title. It is simply repeated for the duration of the song. Listeners are often surprised to learn that. They haven't noticed it, and they certainly felt the lack.

04(2) - "BLESSED BE THE NAME" – B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 19, 1951
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - P-Vine Special (LP) 33rpm PLP-386-A-7 mono
SOUTHBOUND GOSPEL TRAIN

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Southern Jubilee Singer consisting of
Jose Lee Smith - Lead Vocal
Lavorne Smith - Lead Vocal
Dan Taylor - Tenor Vocal
James Sanders - Baritone Vocal
Eddie Henderson - Bass Vocal

Probably recorded here on this session:

05 - "COULDN'T HEAR NOBODY PRAYING" – B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 19, 1951
Released: - 1995
First appearance: Document Records Internet iTunes MP3-23 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - BLACK VOCAL GROUPS

06 - "LISTEN TO THE LAMB" – B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 19, 1951
Released: - 1995
First appearance: Document Records Internet iTunes MP3-24 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - BLACK VOCAL GROUPS

For Biography of Southern Jubilee Singers see: > The Sun Biographies <
Souther Jubilee Singers' Chess recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 22, 1951 SATURDAY

Gene Nobles was one of the most powerful rhythm and blues disc jockeys in the country. His night-time show on WLAC virtually blanketed the eastern United States. Sam and Becky Phillips have obviously sent him a gift, and Nobles in his reply expresses surprise that Sam is able to sell masters to both Chess and RPM. He wouldn't be able to for much longer, tough.

J.T. Ward, Owner
F.C. Sowell, Manager

WLAC
Nashville 3, Tennessee 50,000 WATS * 1510 ON THE DIAL
Columbia Broadcasting System
Dec 22, 1951

Hi Phillipses (both of you)

Just want to say thanks for the Xmas gift, and hope you get a lot of hit records during 1952.

Never ever saw a lighter like the one you sent before. What won't they think of next. But the guys who think up things will have to get up early in the morning, before they beat the Memphis Recording Company. How in the Hell do you get two companies to put out your releases. That is something.

Thanks again for the gift, and a lot of luck to you both.

Sincerely,
Gene Nobles

WLAC RADIO - Founded in 1926, located at Dickerson Pike Highway 11 / 31W, Nashville radio station WLAC is one of the top-ranked AM stations in its home city and among the best known in the South. Billboard Broadcasting Corporation is its owner, having purchased it from the Life and Casualty Insurance Company in 1978.

The station serves a population of about 486,000 and is on the air 24 hours every day. A network affiliate of the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), WLAC-AM today broadcasts primarily all-talk programming.

From the mid-1940s through the early 1970s, however, WLAC radio was known widely for its rhythm and blues programming. It became known as "blues radio" as its nighttime disc jockeys (such like further owner of Sun Records, Sam Phillips) almost exclusively played black music - blues, rhythm and blues, and soul.

While the station 50,000 watts of power brought listeners from most parts of the country, the majority of the audience listened from the South. Many were blacks, and the disc jockeys catered to their preferences, at the same time influencing the musical tastes of the region, the nation, and both white and black artists whose music - rock and roll - would eventually dominate the popular music world.

In the mid-1940s Gene Nobles began playing black music when requested by students at Tennessee State and Fisk universities. Randy Wood, who owned an appliance store in Gallatin, Tennessee, then decided to try selling by radio the records he had hoped in vain to sell to his store customers. On February 17, 1947 Nobles advertised records by Eddy Arnold, Nat King Cole, Johnny Mercer, and Ella Mae Morse, and Randy's Record Mart soon became the largest mail-order record store in the world. Radio station WLAC flourished, luring advertisers as well as listeners.

The station's most popular feature during this era was disc jockey John Richbourg and his 1:00 to 3:00 a.m. blues show. He became known as "John R" and the "granddaddy of soul". Because he promoted their music and often was the first to play their records or to prerelease a record to test the market, he became a favorite of the black artists. If he liked a record that was not immediately popular, he played it persistently until it became a hit. Such was the case with Otis Redding's "These Arms Of Mine", an example of Richbourg's assertion that he and his WLAC radio colleagues did not just play hits - "We made hits". Richbourg broadcast his last show on WLAC radio on August 1, 1973 and died in 1986.

On WLAC's blues disc jockeys, Bill "Hoss" Allen was the only one still with the station after rock and roll pushed rhythm and blues out of the programming. He broadcast a late-night, black gospel show in the mid-1980s, when the station had turned otherwise to an all talk format.

Remembered for its music, its disc jockeys, and its advertisements for sponsors such as Red Top Baby Chicks ("50 percent guaranteed to be alive at the time of delivery"), White Rose Petroleum Jelly, and Royal Crown Hair Dressing, the blues era at radio station WLAC entertained a generation of listeners who probably numbered between 8 and 12 million at its peak. Although programs like "Garden Gate", featuring "The Old Dirt Dobber" Tom Williams, and a talk show conducted by Nashville media personality Ruth Ann Leach have been very successful, WLAC radio made its biggest impact during the years when the catch phrase "This is John R. comin' at ya from way sown in Dixie" could regularly be heard.

DECEMBER 24, 1951 MONDAY

Decca released Ernest Tubb's ''Missing In Action''.

Hank Williams is released from Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville 11 days after having fusion surgery.

DECEMBER 25, 1951 TUSDAY

Merle Haggard spends Christmas in the Bakersfield Juvenile Hall for truancy. His mother shows up during the day with a holiday gift, a Martin guitar. Haggard runs away during the early part of 1952, and ends up in a reformatory in Whittier, California.

DECEMBER 26, 1951 WEDNESDAY

Neil Young's family sets out from Toronto for New Smyrna Beach, Florida, spending five months in the sun while the six-year-old recovers from polio.

DECEMBER 28, 1951 FRIDAY

Ferlin Husky, using the alias Terry Preston, holds his first recording session for Capitol, a business relationship that lasts for more than two decades.

DECEMBER 29, 1951 SATURDAY

Audrey Williams moves out of the house after, she says Hank Williams attacked her.

Pop singer Yvonne Elliman is born in Honolulu, Hawaii. Best known for singing ''If Can't Have You'' for the ''Saturday Night Fever'' soundtrack, she also back up Eric Clapton on his minor country hit ''Lay Down Sally''.

DECEMBER 30, 1951 SUNDAY

''The Roy Rogers Show'' debuts on NBC. The series features Rogers, wife Dale Evans and sidekick Pat Brady, plus the couple horses, Trigger and Buttermilk, and dog Bullet. Rogers and Evans sign each episode with their theme song, ''Happy Trails''.

Hank Williams is forced to cancel shows in Washington, D.C., and Baltimore after back surgery. Audrey Williams still performs at the shows, but as she leaves the house with her thing, Hank shoots four shots at her.

DECEMBER 31, 1951 MONDAY

Aurosmith bass player Tom Hamilton is born in Colorado Springs. The group scores a pop hit with ''I Don't Want To Miss a Thing'' in 1988. Mark Chesnutt turns it into a country success just a few months later.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LATGE B. LAWSON & JAMES SCOTT JR.
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE PROBABLY 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: PROBABLY 1951/1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The Blues Rockers had been played together for three or four years in Mississippi before their one session at Union Avenue and they had a distinctive style based on the twin guitars of James Scott Jr. and Charles McClelland.

01 - "CAN'T LOVE ME AND MY MONEY TOO" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - L.B. Lawson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1951/1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-23 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Nothing much is known about L.B. Lawson, who sings in deep measured tones on this cacophonous boogie, and is dramatically countered by the coruscating guitar lines of James Scott Jr. Drummer Robert Fox is strangely subdued throughout, and so the rhythm is rather dictated by Charles McClelland on rhythm guitar who evinces an assurance which, one imagines, comes from playing regularly in the same tight combo.

02 - "FLYPAPER BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - James Scott Jr.
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1951/1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 29-14 mono
THE SUN ARCHIVES VOLUME 1 - BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-24 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

In the main, the artists that Sam Phillips recorded had at least some elements of sophistication about them: however, there were exceptions, and these tracks recorded by Lawson and James Scott Jr's Blues Rockers make three. This is juke joint music at its ragged, rugged best: Scott's lead guitar lines are almost primitive in their simplicity, whilst the vibrato on Charles McClelland's amplifier helps to double the rhythm that Robert Fox's drums do little more than sketch. Its tempting to hear elements of "Boogie Chillen" in amongst the interplay - hardly surprising since he grew up with John Lee Hooker. But this is generic boogie music, a juke joint workout that's got aerobics licked.

03 - "GOT MY CALL CARD" - B.M.I. - 3:24
Composer: - L.B. Lawson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1951/1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 29-15 mono
THE SUN ARCHIVES VOLUME 1 - BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-25 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

The Korean Was was still providing material for future M.A.S.H. scripts when this session took place, so its hardly surprising that L.B. Lawson should have got his 'questionary'. "Yes, my brother's gone to the Army and they're tryin' to get me too". The lyrics also refer to a chilling new dimension that hovered over this war with 'Communism': "You know, I had a friend 'cross the water/he was so dear to me/now that Atom Bomb done exploded/so he done disappeared, don't you see".

The funereal tempo poses problems for drummer Fox, who compensates by making sundry excursions around his limited kit. The interaction between the guitars is notable for the way in which Scott constructs lines that double the rhythm that McClelland doggedly maps out. On ''Scott's Boogie'' some nice lead guitar work fronts this otherwise ordinary 12-bar boogie. A perfect flip side to an unreleased single. The two guitars play sweetly off each other, but once again the drummer is mixed further back than you would think possible in that tiny studio.

The piece didn't have a theme or a signature lick, and it timed out around two-and-a-half minutes but you get the feeling that in clubs it would have gone on until someone in the band needed a leak or a smoke. Scott told a couple of interviewers that the tune was their theme, and the Sun Recording was tested on the radio.

04 - "SCOTT'S BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - James Scott Jr.
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1951/1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 29-16 mono
THE SUN ARCHIVES VOLUME 1 - BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-26 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

The relative facility with which James Scott Jr. plays here suggests that this might have been a part piece, the one that was guaranteed to get everyone up and dancing. Both McClelland and Fox seem to know their parts here too, although the latter's drumkit has once again been relegated a distant comer of the studio, so that all we hear of him is his bass drum and hi-hat. Once again, the musicians' enthusiasm sets them off like a snowball rolling down a hill, but everyone arrives at the bottom, happy and unhurt.

05 - "MISSING IN ACTION"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably 1951/1952
Released: - Unissued

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Latge B. Lawson - Vocal
James Scott Jr. - Guitar
Charles McClelland - Guitar
Robert Fox - Drums or Tub Bass

For Biography of Lawson and Scott see: > The Sun Biographies <
Latge Lawson and James Scott's recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR J.C. COLE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE PROBABLY 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: PROBABLY 1951/1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - ''IDA MAE'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None- Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1951/1952
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-10-5 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

There was a guitarist named J.C. Cole who reportedly accompanied Forrest City Joe on a session for Aristocrat in 1948. On that record, he keeps time on the bass strings much as the singer does on this recording. Soon after that session, John Lee Hooker broke big-time, and his influence looms large here. So large, in fact, that Cole has more or less ripped this original from Hooker's Modern record of ''Sally Mae''. Hooker didn't inspire many imitators (most of them turned out to be Hooker himself), but Cole has clearly got Hooker down: mumbling in unison with bass strings runs, twisting and turning vocal notes, singing non-rhyming stanzas as if they rhymed, and playing almost modally. Accomplished perhaps but by no means original.

02 - ''SOUTHSIDE BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None- Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1951/1952
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-10-6 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Unless we're missing something, this is about as original as J.C. Cole ever was. He's going to move to the South Side (presumably Chicago) and if he doesn't find hippeness there, he'll ramble the world somewhere. The shadow of John Lee Hooker again looms rage, but the song might be his own. In creating and sustaining the mood, Cole worries styllables as Hooker famously did. Playing slowly while sustaining tension is an art in itself, and Cole has pretty much mastered it.

03 - ''MOVE ME NO MORE'' - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None- Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1951/1952
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-10-7 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

And John Lee Hooker, of course, had a ''you don't move me no more... found me a new love'' stomp blues that he recorded several times in his career. What's interesting in Cole's version is that he says ''she rocks, she rolls'' repeatedly. After the Dominoes recorded ''Sixty Minute Man'' in 1951 with ''I'll rock 'em, roll 'em all night long'', rock and roll entered the lexicon of rhythm and blues. By the time Phillips got into the business, a blues song that tried to make it on mood alone without a hook was a tough sell. Few of Hooker's many recordings were hits, and his hits usually had hooks. His discursive, free-form blues found favor with collectors years later, but didn't sell sufficient quantities to chart back in the day. J.C. Cole tries to make ''She rocks, she rolls'' into a hook, but misses the mark. This is a recording that makes it on rhythm and atmosphere, and in the world of early Fifties commercial blues, that wasn't enough.

04 - ''NO RIGHT BLUES (DEEP BLUE SEA BLUES)'' - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None- Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1951/1952
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-10-8 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

On ''No Right Blues (Deep Blue Sea Blues), here, Cole switches gears, reaching back to Tommy McClennan's 1941 recording of ''Deep Blue Sea Blues''. He starts slowly before speeding up as only a solo act can do. The signature lick is intact, and, of McClennan's four stanzas, Cole parrots three before adapting the famous ''two trains running'' verse from Muddy Waters' 1951 hit ''Still A Fool''. By the finale, Cole is playing at almost double the tempo he started. ''Still A Fool'' and ''Deep Blue Sea Blues'' were both cousins of Robert Petway's ''Catfish Blues'', as of course was Muddy's ''Rollin' Stone''. McClennan and Petway were friends and musical partners, so the ''Catfish Blues'' lick could have originated with either or neither of them. Cole, though, most certainly had McClennan's record because he imitates the tiniest inflection, right down to calling himself ''Tommy'' or ''Tony'' in the ''husband just now left'' verse. Accomplished plagiarism is about the best one can say of J.C. Cole.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
J.C. Cole - Vocal & Guitar

For Biography of J.C. Cole see: > The Sun Biographies <
J.C. Cole's recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on >YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ARBEE STIDHAM
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1951/1952

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1951/1952
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

UNKNOWN TITLES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Arbee Stidham - Vocal & Guitar
Solomon Hardy – Tenor Saxophone
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
MRS/Chess/RPM/Modern recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©