CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1957 Sun Schedule <

1957 SESSIONS 12
December 1, 1957 to December 31, 1957

Studio Session for Onie Wheeler, November 11, 22 / December 6, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, Probably Late 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, December 6, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, December 11, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Roy Hall, December 12, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, End 1957/Early 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Vincent Duling, Probably 1957/1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Hunky Dory (Chester McDowell), Probably 1957/1958 (1) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Hunky Dory (Chester McDowell), Probably 1957/1958 (2) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Wink Martindale, Unknown Date 1957/1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Annette McGee, Unknown Date 1957/1958 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Onie Wheeler was steppin' out with some of the most unregenerate rockabillies to walk the planet. Starting in March this year, Bob Neal had booked Onie Wheeler and the Nelson Brothers onto his Stars Incorporated, 1916 Sterick Boulevard, Memphis, Tennessee, package shows with Jerry Lee Lewis, Billy Riley, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash.

By the end of 1957, Onie was pretty tight with the Memphis crowd and went to Sun to cut a record that November. Onie's opinion of Sun was that it was a bush-league operation in terms of recording, but he gave them "Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox", one of his best songs - and best performances. It didn't lack novelty appeal, but was unaccountably held back until February 1959. Unlike most records with a novelty slant, though, it had enough solid musicality to sustain listening.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ONIE WHEELER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY TO FRIDAY NOVEMBER 11, 22, 1957 DECEMBER 06, 1957
SESSION HOURS: FRIDAY NOVEMBER 22, 1957 - 11:00 TO 04:30
SESSION HOURS: FRIDAY DECEMBER 6, 1957 - 12:00 TO 03:30
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS

Two other cuts, "That's All" and "Walkin' Shoes" were cut from pretty standard rockabilly cloth circa 1957, but the tempo was too fast for Onie to feel comfortable. In fact, Onie told Martin Hawkins that even the tempo on "Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox" was twice as fast as he would have liked.

The undubbed track of ''Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox'' reveals that Onie Wheeler overdubbed his harmonica part during both the solo and the fadeout. The little duet on the fade is particularly nice. Onie's vocal is also a sheer delight (even his pre-song count-off is entertaining). The song is essentially a joyous piece of nonsense, taken for a ride by Onie and the stalwart Sun backup trio.

01(1) - "JUMP RIGHT OUT OF THIS JUKEBOX" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master
With Count-In - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November/December 1957
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-31 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

The master of ''Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox'' was held back for almost one and a half years before it finally saw the light of day. perhaps it had been considered to be too countrified for 1957. Despite his misgivings about the unprofessional atmosphere at Sun, this recording really showcases Onie's idiosyncratic style. The March 2, 1959 issue of Billboard rated the song with two stars and said that it had ''fair prospects''. Their review may have been commercially astute but failed to notice the distinctive and charmingly hybrid sound produced by Onie and Sun.

01(2) - "JUMP RIGHT OUT OF THIS JUKEBOX"* - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 344 - Master
Recorded: - November/December 1957
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 315-A < mono
JUMP RIGHT OUT OF THIS JUKEBOX / TELL 'EM OFF
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

This is a perfect Sun record. Deep voiced, bluesy, echoes countryish rockabilly. What Sun fan could ask fore more? The trouble is, this classic mid-1950s record was released in February 1959. It missed the peak market by nearly three years.

Mind you. none of this was Onie Wheeler’s fault. Wheeler cut these sides in late 1957 when they were a little closer to the mainstream. In fact, Onie had been cutting Sun-sounding records since 1953. The only trouble was they were being issued by Columbia, who viewed his music as lying somewhere between quaint and enigmatic. Onie's music is wonderfully represented in a 31 track compilation titled Onie's Bop (Bear Family BCD 15542), a collection that makes a case for Wheeler as a true original. While it would be comforting to say that he finally found his niche at Sun, the truth is that Onie didn't enjoy his experience at 706 Union, finding it too chaotic and disorganized for his taste. "Unprofessional" was the word he used. Nevertheless, Onie's unusual voice and style seem ideally suited to the classic Sun sound of these sides. His harp, heard in support of Roy Acuff for many years, is a nice tough here as well. A trouper to the last, Onie died on stage at the Opry house in 1984.

02 - "TELL 'EM OFF"* - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 345 - Master
Recorded: - November 11, 1957
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 315-B < mono
TELL 'EM OFF / JUMP RIGHT OUT OF THIS JUKEBOX
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

His one Sun outing, "Tell 'Em Off" was held back to over a year, by which time the veteran singer was working at a shoe factory in his home state of Missouri. Fortunately the respite turned out to be temporary, proving that you couldn't keep a man down who had a voice like s spilled barrell of tar. His distinctive vocal is enhanced by the slapback echo which also fattens up the echoey low string guitar figure.

03 - "WALKIN' SHOES" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 6, 1957
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1030-6 mono
ROLLIN' ROCKIN' COUNTRY STYLE - SUN RECORDS
Reissued: - 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-32 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Having Memphis agent Bob Neal as his representative, Onie often shared the bill with local rock and roll acts and although "Walkin' Shoes" never secured a place in the catalogue, this was the closest his got to the genre. Once again, Onie lays into some straight ahead 1950s country rock. The charm of his mid-tempo recording has been replaced by a driving sound. The rhythm section of Stan Kesler on bass, Jimmy Wilson on piano and Jimmy Van Eaton on drums is outstanding but it is the guitar of Roland Janes rather than Onie's harmonica that grabs the solo honours. In the vocal department, Onie's little flashes of falsetto are especially effective.

''Bonaparte's Retreat'' is an oddity. Onie's harp finally gets its workout on this old warhorse, but there's a new wrinkle. The song is in a major key, a secret that no-one seems to have shared with the guitar player. Or, it is possible that he is well aware of it but chooses to play in the style that Sid Manker used to such good effect on ''Raunchy''. It features an abundance of flatted thirds that blur the tonality between major and minor.

There is an unquestionable amount of instrumental tension here, pushed even further by the incessant rhythm but, ultimately, the track suffers from a lack of variety. It begins to sound more like a tape loop than a jam session. It is a pity that someone did not dig into the chord changes and take a good solo.

04 - "BONAPARTE'S RETREAT"* - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Pee Wee King-Redd Steward
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November/December 1957
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1030-15 mono
ROLLIN' ROCKIN' COUNTRY STYLE - SUN RECORDS
Reissued: - 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-36 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''That's All'' is a conventional stop-rhythm rocker that bears a marked similarity to the previous cut. On this occasion, the pianist sits it out and Roland Janes takes two wonderful little solos. One works in a few more flashes of falsetto but this was essential a skimpy piece of material that ends up sounding better than it should have.

05 - "THAT'S ALL" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November/December 1957
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1030-7 mono
ROLLIN' ROCKIN' COUNTRY STYLE
Reissued: - 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-33 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

06 - "I'LL LOVE YOU FOR A LIFE TIME" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - November/December 1957
Released: - Sun Unissued

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Onie Wheeler - Vocal
Onie Wheeler overdubbed Harmonica* Unknown Date
Sid Manker or Roland Janes - Guitar
Cliff Acred or Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
* Smokey Joe Baugh - Drums

"I didn't play with Onie on Sun", recalled Onie's friend and guitarist A.J. Nelson. "Onie did that one himself with their own studio musicians. See, Onie would work with our trio for a while, then he would break off and do things by himself, then come back again. So Sun was one of those things he did by himself. I think he was living in St. Louis at the time. I heard Sam Phillips pay Onie a nice compliment. Sam was talking to someone and Onie walked up and Sam reached up and put his arm around Onie's shoulder, and said 'This man right here, if I could have had him ten years ago, he would have been the biggest star going'".

"But Onie was a simple man. He wouldn't have changed his style. If you wanted him to do a session one way, like a producer might, you might as well forget it. Onie wouldn't do it. Sam did that with Elvis, got him to do it his way. He couldn't with Onie, by the time he got to him. But he thought he might have been able to if he had got to him ten years sooner".

For Biography of Onie Wheeler see: > The Sun Biographies <
Onie Wheeler's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 1957

Jerry Lee Lewis' "Great Balls Of Fire" was sitting atop most national charts. With Elvis Presley halfway into the Army, Lewis was just about the hottest phenomenon in pop music. During that same Christmas season, though so different from the one that had preceded it, Jerry Lee Lewis also sowed the seeds of his own destruction.

As the year drew to a close, he sneaked off to Hernando, Mississippi, with a marriage license in his glove compartment; he was on his way to marry his thirteen-year-old cousin, Myra Gale Brown, daughter of J.W. Brown. It was not even common knowledge to Jerry's family for a while, but within six months it would put a ten-year roadblock in his career.

"Balled Of A Teenage Queen" b/w ''Big River'' (Sun 283) by Johnny Cash is released and changes the direction of Cash's career toward a wider popular market.

The singles Sun 284, Roy Orbison's ''Chicken-Hearted'' b/w ''I Like Love''; Sun 285 Sonny Burgess ''My Bucket's Got A Hole In It'' b/w ''Sweet Misery'' released.

"I've Got Love If You Want It" b/w ''I Fell In Love'' (Sun 286) by Warren Smith is released.

"Glad All Over" b/w ''Lend My Your Comb'' (Sun 287) marks the final Sun release by Carl Perkins.

It is reported at the year end, that the independent record companies such as Sun have together cornered 70% of the singles market in the USA.

Sam Cooke's first solo record after leaving the Soul Stirrers, "You Send Me", hits number 1 on the Top 100 Single chart.

''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen'' and ''Big River'' were paired up for single release in December 1957 and would give Cash his first number one hit on the country charts. Billboard had nothing but praise for his new single and this undoubtedly helped the to reach the top spot, ''This is the most poppish try for Cash in a while, 'Teenage Queen' tells a cute story that can appeal to teens, and the artist's approach is highly active. Flip 'Big River, has more of a traditional country and western flavour, but the rhythmic presentation can also appeal in pop marts. A dual-market contender".

Roy Orbison's single ''Chicken-Hearted''/''I Like Love'' released by Sun Records.

DECEMBER 1957

Former Sun artist Ray Harris launches Hi Records in partnership with former Sun session musicians/songwriters/producers Quinton Claunch and Bill Cantrell. Cecil Scaife, who later joins Sun, is the label's only employee, operating from a rented house on Poplar Avenue. The capital comes from Joe Cuoghi at Poplar Tunes record store, and some silent partners. The first single, reviewed December 9, is Carl McVoy's ''Tootsie'' b/w ''You Are My Sunshine'', (Hi 2001) subsequently leased to Phillips International, and re-released in April 1958. With the money from Sam Phillips, the partners install a recording studio in an abandoned movie theater on 1329 South Lauderdale Avenue in Memphis.

DECEMBER 1, 1957 SUNDAY

Singer/songwriter Kim Richey is born in Zanesville, Ohio. Her credits include Radney Foster's ''Nobody Wins'' and Trisha Yearwood's ''Believe Me Baby (I Lied)''.

Buddy Holly makes his TV debut on ''The Ed Sullivan Show'', singing ''That'll Be The Day''. Sam Cooke sings ''You Send Me'' on the same program, while Bobby Helms delivers ''My Special Angel''.

The last installment of ''The Nat King Cole Show'' airs on NBC-TV. The show has trouble attracting advertisers, fearful of associating with a black host. Cole had two singles on an early version of the country chart in 1944.

DECEMBER 2, 1957 MONDAY

Decca released Bobby helms' Christmas single ''Jingle Bell Rock''.

''Jailhouse Rock'' gives Elvis Presley a number 1 country single in Billboard magazine.

DECEMBER 3, 1957 TUESDAY

Don Gibson recorded ''I Can't Stop Loving You'' and ''Oh Lonesome Me'' in a morning session at RCA Studio B. in Nashville.

DECEMBER 4, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Johnnie and Jack recorded ''Stop The World (And Let Me Off)''.

DECEMBER 5, 1957 THURSDAY

Patsy Cline and host Red Foley duet on the ABC series ''Country Music Jubilee''.

FALL 1957

Sun recording artist Edwin Bruce at Memphis State University majoring in speech and drama. After the Christmas break he returned in January to Sun and recorded a number of titles. The sessions yielded ''Sweet Woman'' b/w ''Part Of My Life'', released in April 1958.

DECEMBER 1957

The United States’ first attempt at launching a satellite with the Vanguard TV3 rocket was made during December of 1957. The launch took place at Cape Canaveral and it was unsuccessful as the rocket exploded only a few seconds after launch, destroying the rocket and damaging the satellite and surrounding area. By the time of the attempted launch of the Vanguard TV3, the Soviet Union had already successfully launched two Sputnik satellites and the United States was feeling the pressure to catch up during the early days of the Space Race. This made the failure particularly devastating and more humiliating to those working on the launch. The United States did not successfully launch their own satellite until January of 1958 with Explorer 1.

DECEMBER 5, 1957 THURSDAY

The Diamonds introduce a new dance called "the Stroll'' on "American Bandstand" kids form two lines while a couple strolls down the middle, becomes the first dance with rock.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY LATE 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

''PINK PEDAL PUSHERS''
Recorded over two sessions (Probably 1956/Probably Late 1957)

Although it is tempting to categorize ''Pink Pedal Pushers'' with ''Blue Suede Shoes'' and ''Put Your Cat Clothes On'' as Carl's apparel-oriented songs, we think it doesn't along with those other two. ''Blue Suede Shoes'' is abut someone's devotion to his own shoes and ''Cat Clothes'' consists of Carl's getting his woman dressed up fancy 'causes they;re going out dancing. ''Pink Pedal Pushers'', on the other hand, is actually about fashion. In the right clothes, it says, you'll be good-looking, desirable, and popular. Mark Twain said, ''clothes make the man''. We can safely extend that to women and high school is where that becomes about as important an idea as it's ever likely to. So this song belongs with Joe Bennett & the Sparkletones' ''Black Slacks'' (BCD 15972) a top 20 hit in 1957 and the following year's ''Short Shorts'' by the Royal Teens (which reached number 3) and ''Tight Capris'' by Jody Reynolds (flip side of the big hit, ''Endless Sleep''. Pedal pushers and capris, by tie way, were much alike - tight calf- length pants that were popular with the younger set.

Maybe the most obvious lyrical connection to ''Pink Pedal Pushers'' occurs in Gene Vinent's classic track “”Be Bop A Lula''. Admiring Ms. Lula's clothing, Vincent sings ''She's the girl in the red blue jeans/ She's the queen of all the teens''. In Perkins' case, he too is ready to extend the crown to his well-dressed girl. ''Her pink pedal pushers made her the queen of them all'' Royalty was quite easy to come by in Teen Land in the 1950s.

A humorous aside: Carl wrote this song before shopping malls had become a commonplace part of life. Today's teenagers might have thought he'd said ''made her the queen of the mall'' instead of ''made her the queen of them all'', and still thought it made perfect sense. It's yet one more reminder that the world has changed in the past half century.

It's hard not to hear all song as Carl trying to pander to the target teenage market in the hopes that the kids will put him back on the charts. Here's a 25-year-old man (with a wife, a receding hairline and three young kids) telling 16-year-old girls how terrific they look in tight pants. At least, he doesn't sing it with an audible leer.

Fortunately for us, Carl didn't fully degrade himself or his music to the point where he would sound like he was actually part of the world he was hoping to connect with. All that ''oo-wop-a-doo'' scat singing was not what the kids were doing. Carl adopts a vocal style played perhaps for laughs or perhaps for drama - pay attention to his vocal intonation on the line, ''the older folks said she kinda favors her mom''. He sings off the beat a great deal as well, adding to the sense that he's somewhere between singing and narrating a story. This grown-up vocal performance is altogether inconsistent with the subject matter of the song. He's on the outside looking in, and telling the story to the people who are on the inside. It's quite odd.

Also odd is the chord progression in the verses. Carl walk-down chord progression in the first two lines of each verse is not what the kids were rocking to, by and large. That walk-down maneuver was more common in minor-key songs. Examples include Ruth Brown's number 10 rhythm and blues hit ''Sweet Baby Of Mine'' from 1956, the Ventures' ''Walk, Don't Run'' was number 2 in 1960 and Ray Charles' hit ''Hit The Road Jack'' which reached number 1 pop in 1961. Carl ultimately abandoned those chords in favor of a more conventional set of changes on our last two Sun outtakes.

We've got one rare home demo and six more performances (the last one a fragment) that come from two distinct studio sessions. On the home demo, he seems merely to be getting the song and vocal approach recorded but there's no sign of what the arrangement will be when there's a band to work with.

The next four tracks are clearly from the same studio session. Clayton is playing an electric bass. W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland is, uncharacteristically, doing most of his work on the high-hat and bass drum and using the snare only for rolls and dramatic effects. Carl's guitar playing behind the vocal is subdued. In fact, the whole thing is subdued; the drum is the most audible instrument and the vocal is what's featured. And although there is a little ambitious guitar work at the end of outtakes 4 and 5, there's not a good solo in the bunch.

Outtakes 6 and 7 are different. They're studio takes and include, as W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland recalls, Jimmy Smith on piano. (The key and tuning had to move a little bit from the previous four outtakes to accommodate the piano.) The big change in these two tracks is, as we mentioned earlier, the chord structure of the first two lines of the verse - that fancy walk-down chord progression is gone and ''Pink Pedal Pushers'' is now a conventional 3-chord rock and roll song.

W.S. doesn't rely on the bass drum and high-hat the way he had on the preceding four tracks; the snare is his emphasis now. In the first of these last two outtakes there are two guitar solos but neither is stellar. Jimmy Smith's chords in the mid-range of the piano add little. In fact, this whole track sounds subdued. Maybe they were just warming up for the next take.

Sadly, our final take of this song is incomplete - it begins during the first guitar solo. But the whole thing has come to life. Carl's vocal is so unrelentingly enthusiastic that he even gives up his narrative style on the line ''she kind of favors her mom''. He provides a new lyrical touch - now the pants ''made her the talk of the town'' rather than ''the queen of them all'. His terrific second guitar solo includes pieces of the solos on the released versions of ''Matchbox'' and ''Boppin' The Blues''. Jimmy Smith is now tinkling up at the high end of the piano where we can hear him and he doesn't compete with Carl's guitar. But it's the drumming in particular that drives this track along wonderfully - including a reprise of the single-stroke roll from ''Matchbox''. The take has the kind of energy that makes us wish we had the entire thing with a few extra verses thrown in for good measure.

But all of this was moot as far as Sun was concerned. By late 1957, Carl had lost hope in response to what he perceived as Sam's loss of faith in him. He was also none too happy with the financial arrangements at Sun anymore, but was really too in awe of Sam Phillips to confront him or demand a change. Carl wasn't the only Sun artist whose relationship with label-owner Phillips had become, to put it mildly, psychologically complex. Carl was easy pickin's when Columbia Records in the person of Don Law came calling. By the spring of 1958, Carl was a Columbia artist with Johnny Cash part of the same exodus.

Carl was still working on ''Pink Pedal Pushers''uring the label change and it became his first release on Columbia in the spring of 1958. On the Columbia version, Carl uses the more conventional chord changes he used on the final Sun outtakes.

01(1) - "PINK PEDAL PUSHERS" – B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably Late 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-4 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(2) - "PINK PEDAL PUSHERS" – B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably Late 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-5 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(3) - "PINK PEDAL PUSHERS" – B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably Late 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-6 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(4) - "PINK PEDAL PUSHERS" – B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably Late 1957
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-3-13 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-7 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(5) - "PINK PEDAL PUSHERS" – B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably Late 1957
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-3-12 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-8 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(6) - "PINK PEDAL PUSHERS" – B.M.I. - 1:35
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Take 7- Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably Late 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-9 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: DECEMBER 6, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Although it sounds tailor-made for the Perkins' vernacular, ''Lend Me Your Comb'' was in fact a cover of the vapid original by Carol Hughes. Full marks therefore to the maestro for taking a New York pop confection and glazing it convincingly with a rockabilly veneer. Carl was extremely proud of his brother Jay's vocals in this swansong Sun single.

01(1) - "LEND ME YOUR COMB" - B.M.I. - 0:16
Composer: - Kay Twomey-Ben Weisman-Fred Wise
Publisher: - Alamo Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 6, 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-30 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

''LEND ME YOUR COMB''

Carl Perkins needed a hit record. The days of ''Blue Suede Shoes'' were plainly over and Sam, not to mention Carl, was willing to try just about anything to rekindle his success. ''Lend Me Your Comb'' qualifies as ''anything''. Think of it as The Everly Brothers meet Mickey & Sylvia. How could you miss with such a mixture? And this wasn't just any Everly Brothers song; the lyric is straight out of ''Wake Up Little Susie''.

There's still the mystery of how this song, right out of New York's Tin Pan Alley, made its way to Carl. It seems the route may have been rather indirect. Carl's was not the first recording of the song to hit the market. There were at least two earlier versions. The original of ''Lend Me Your Comb'' featured a double-tracked vocal by Carol Hughes and appeared on Roulette 404 I. Her record (with some gender-appropriate lyrical differences) received a Spotlight review in Billboard on December 30, 1957 as a ''cute rockabilly ditty'' with ''good rock work support''. The industry bible concluded that this record ''might make it''. Bernie Nee's cover released almost immediately on Columbia 41090 was also well received as ''a fine vocal effort that could click with the kids''. At this point with a couple of versions already on the market, an enterprising publisher's rep may have pitched the song to Sam Phillips as a sure ticket for renewed pop success for his hungry artist. Mr. Nee is a story, himself. This singer, songwriter, entrepreneur may be familiar to some collectors as the voices of the Five Blobs who appeared in the soundtrack of the classic 1958 horror movie, ''The Blob'', featuring the screen debut of Steve McQueen.

And so for the first time in a while, Carl and Jay brought their brotherly harmony to a recording session. We've got three outtakes here and the results are a long way from ''Sure To Fall''. The problem wasn't that Carl and Jay were too country, it was that both were very free phrasers. Carl never approached music in a four-square manner. He rarely sang on the beat. He vocalized spontaneously, sometimes ahead of, sometimes behind the beat. In a word, he brought a jazz sensibility to country music. That hybrid approach is part of what makes him very special.

Carl's guitar solos reveal the unmistakably influence of Mickey Baker, whose guitar work on ''Love Is Strange'' was all over the airwaves in l 957. The original Carl Perkins discography by Colin Escott & Martin Hawkins lists a steel guitar player named Bernie. We believe this to be in error in two ways. Firsts there is no steel guitarist here, at least in the sense that steel guitar usually refers to a pedal steel guitar. There does sound like a slide guitarist playing behind Carl's work on the solo, although his identity is not known. We believe Bernie may have been scribbled somewhere on the notes for this session, but it more likely refers to singer Bernie Nee who had the earlier version of ''Lend Me Your Comb'', that was clearly the basis for the arrangement Carl used in the studio.

01(2) - "LEND ME YOUR COMB" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Kay Twomey-Ben Weisman-Fred Wise
Publisher: - Alamo Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 6, 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-31 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(3) - "LEND ME YOUR COMB" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Kay Twomey-Ben Weisman-Fred Wise
Publisher: - Alamo Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 6, 1957
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-3-14 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-32 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(4) - "LEND ME YOUR COMB" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Kay Twomey-Ben Weisman-Fred Wise
Publisher: - Alamo Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 6, 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-33 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(5) - "LEND ME YOUR COMB" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Kay Twomey-Ben Weisman-Fred Wise
Publisher: - Alamo Music
Matrix number: - U 289 - Master Take 4
Recorded: - December 6, 1957
Released: - December 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 287-A < mono
LEND ME YOUR COMB / GLAD ALL OVER
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Lend Me Your Comb" was the first time Carl Perkins leaned toward a Latin rhythm. Cha chas were a long way from the honky tonks of Jackson, Tennessee. Carl and brother Jay did their best imitation of Don and Phil Everly here, and the result were credible, if a bit self-consciously teen oriented. Certainly, Carl's version remains more lovable than other attemps at this timeless opus by Carol Hughes on Roulette or Bernie Nee on Columbia.

02 - "INTERVIEW CARL PERKINS" - B.M.I. - 0:30
Interview in 1978, in the middle of a promotional campaign
to launch his then-new album, "Ol' Blue Suede's Back".
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - 2002 Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-8-8 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

''LOOK AT THAT MOON''

There are two Carl’s involved in this story although we're not exactly sure of all the deals. Further complicating things is the fact that both of these Carls - Perkins and Mann - were based in (or near, in the case of Mann) Jackson, Tennessee, recorded for Sun and worked with drummer W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland. Carl Perkins was leaving Sun just about the time that Carl Mann was walking in the door, so it's hard to determine the degree of overlap. This song brings the confusion to the fore.

All indications are that Carl Perkins wrote and recorded ''Look At That Moon''. He left two fairly raw demos of it behind, and present both of them. The song appeared almost immediately on a Carl Mann session and Mann's version is considerably more polished and energetic inn Perkins'. Mann's discography indicates it was cut at the ''Mona Lisa'' session but aural evidence suggests otherwise.

It seems odd that Carl Perkins would pitching songs to a fledgling artist like Mann when he, himself, was always looking for commercial material at the end of his Sun career. W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland appeared on both of their sessions and later sort of ''managed'' Mann's career, although Holland resists the formal meaning of that term. W.S. may have been the connection between the Carls, and brought this new Perkins composition to Mann. The most recent version of the Carl Mann discography (BCD 16684) takes the easy way out: the song is credited to until Mann and Perkins. 'I don't think they ever met face to face'', recalls W.S., ''although they were certainly aware of each other's work. It's unlikely they wrote a song together''.

So what has Carl Perkins left us here? Right from the start this sounds more like a Car1 Mann track than a Carl Perkins record. It's got that rolling piano/bass sound that would eventually characterize ''Mona Lisa''. The thing is, however, that sound hadn't yet been established by Mann so it seems unlikely Perkins was tailoring material to his new labelmate. On the first take Perkins offers those ''Oh ho ho's'' as vocal filler in a way that Carl Mann never did. Perkins' guitar break is perfectly serviceable, but the arrangement just cries out for 8 or 16 stinging bars by Eddie Bush, Carl Mann's distinctive guitar player. One big change here is in the bass. Clayton is no loner playing his upright slap bass. Some time been the ''Forever Yours'' session and what we have here, Clayton made the change from acoustic to electric. Given the loss to the distinctive Carl Perkins sound, one can only hope it was a reluctant change.

The second take is a bit more together (there was some noticeable chord confusion on the first), although Carl launches into a needless additional verse after his guitar break instead of moving directly into the release. Things kind of go downhill from there and we end up with a good demo rather than the possible master we were heading for. In truth, the best version of the song was the issued Carl Mann recording you can find on BCD 15713 or BCD 16684.

03(1) - "LOOK AT THAT MOON" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 6, 1957
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-3-15 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-1 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

Had events, been different, Carl Perkins' mentor, Hank Williams, may well have latched on to such a tailormade piece of material as "Look At That Moon" and become a part of the rockabilly foundation himself. This joyous little opus was committed to tape by Carl at his final visit to the Sun studio late in 1957 ahead of his new deal with Columbia. For once he was backed up by an electric bass rather than the tried and tested upright played by his brother, Clayton.

03(2) - "LOOK AT THAT MOON" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 6, 1957
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 101 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-3-17 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Vocal* and Rhythm Guitar
Bernie - Steel Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 6, 1957 FRIDAY

When Elvis Presley returned to the WDIA Goodwill Revue at the Ellis Auditorium in Memphis on December 6, 1957, a stylish shot of him with Brook Benton and 'talking shop' with Little Junior Parker, the Staple Singers, the Spirit of Memphis Quartet and Bobby Bland appeared in Memphis's mainstream afternoon paper, The next day the Memphis Press-Scimitar, accompanied by a short feature that made Elvis' feelings abundantly clear. ''It was the real thing'', he said, summing up both performance and audience response. ''Right from the heart''.

Buddy Holly and the Crickets make their television debut on "The Ed Sullivan Show" singing "That Will Be The Day'' and "Peggy Sue".

DECEMBER 7, 1957 SATURDAY

The Everly Brothers appear on NBC-TV's "The Perry Como Show".

DECEMBER 8, 1957 SUNDAY

Newspaper article in the Bridge News concerning the release of the movie ''Jamboree''.

The Platters perform ''Only You (And You Alone)'' from New York on CBS' ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The song is destined to become a country hit for Reba McEntire.

DECEMBER 9, 1957 MONDAY

Pop singer Donny Osmond is born in Provo, Utah. In 1976, he joins sister Marie Osmond, with whom he hosts a TV variety show, to win the American Music Award for Favorite Country Band, Duo or Group.

Bobby Helms scores a number 1 country single in Billboard with ''My Special Angel''.

DECEMBER 10, 1957 TUESDAY

Carl Smith recorded ''Your Name Is Beautiful'' during an evening session at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville.

DECEMBER 11, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Ray Price recorded ''Curtain In The Window'' during an overnight session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

June Carter marries Edwin Nix, her second husband.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 11, 1957
SESSION HOURS; UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

From listening to Carl Perkins recordings it seems he used here for the first time his EchoSonic amp on ''Glad All Over'', which was his very last single and session for Sun. It is important to notice that the split-second tape delay the Sun was famous for, was never a part of Carl's sound and actually the echo from the EchoSonic amp didn't suit Carl's way of playing.

''GLAD ALL OVER''

We are disappointed to report that there are no known outtakes of ''Glad All Over''. If Carl and the band did not nail this title in one take, where have the outtakes gone? It is possible, of course, that this title, which appeared in the 1958 film ''Jamboree'', was not recorded at Sun, even though it was released on the Sun label. Sam had already reached well beyond his usual business approach when he made a deal to get Carl and Jerry Lee Lewis into the teen music pic ''Jamboree'' in return for choosing two of the producers' copyrights (Carl famously chose to sing '' All Over'' rather than ''Great Balls Of Fire'', possibly denying himself a return to mass market attention)

''Glad All Over'' appeared on Carl's final Sun single (Sum 287) Drummer W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland thinks it might have been recorded in New York, but is not certain. However, Carl's bio suggest that the session was engineered by Jack Clement (at Sun). In the likely event the demo for the song came to Sun with the memorable drum hook already on it. W.S. would eve learned it right off that record. ''No doubt about it. I don a know why else I would have played that little drum thing right there'', observes W.S. He also agrees that learning the song and its arrangement straight off a demo might have reduced the session time it took for the band to record a final take, perhaps eliminating outtakes altogether. ''I don't know that we ever played it more than one''.

In any case, Sun Records contributed two songs and film clips to the movie. The songs share one striking feature: they are uncommonly short. ''Glad All Over'' runs l :40 and the issued version of ''Great Balls Of Fire'' times out at l :56. Given that the whole movie barely runs 70 minutes. these brief running times are not surprising.

Until further notice, ''Glad All Over'' remains a missing episode in the Carl Perkins Sun Outtake story.

01 - "GLAD ALL OVER" - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Aron Schroeder-Sid Tepper-Roy C. Bennett
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 288 - Master
Recorded: - December 11, 1957
Released: - December 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 287-B < mono
GLAD ALL OVER / LEND ME YOUR COMB
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Although Carl Perkins did not have a hand writing "Glad All Over", it lies well within the style of his Sun output. Reportedly, Carl passed on "Great Balls Of Fire" and chose this title as his ticket to appear in the movie "Jamboree". Not only was the choice ill-considered, but ultimately Carl did more for the movie than it ever did to resurrect his sagging career.

In any case, by the time this record appeared at the dawn of 1958, Carl was no longer a Sun artist. It was only at this point that Carl's Sun LP appeared, fully two years after the success of "Blue Suede Shoes". Indeed one track from the LP, "Right String Baby", was recorded at the final session that produced "Glad All Over". Although additional material remained in the can at 706 Union, Carl Perkins never saw his name on another Sun single after he left the label in 1958.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums

The final blow came with the movie "Jamboree". Originally titled "The Big Record", it had been mooted while Carl Perkins was still a hot property. He had been signed to the production as a star and Jerry Lee Lewis had been signed as an afterthought. Otis Blackwell (who had written "Don't Be Cruel" and "All Shook Up" for Elvis Presley) was music director and he sent down a set of dubs for Perkins and Lewis to consider for the movie. Perkins reportedly passed on "Great Balls Of Fire" and chose instead to perform "Glad All Over". It was coupled with another non-original, a cover version of Carol Hughes' Roulette recording of "Lend Me Your Comb".

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 1957

Summarize of Carl Perkins: The lightly-strummed A-chord that introduced Elvis Presley's ''That's All Right'' introduced rock and roll as we know it. With Presley's fifth single, ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget''/''Mystery Train'', in the country charts, Sam Phillips sold his contract, and, with the funds, paid some bills and promoted a song he's just recorded, Carl Perkins' ''Blue Suede Shoes''. We have a new twist on Blue Suede Shoes: a radio edit,currently in the possession of collector Larry Rumsey. The word liquor was crudely edited out and replaced by pop. One of the first stars of rock and roll, Carl Perkins was also among its first causalities. Too much has been made of the car accident. His pop music career wasn't doomed when his Chrysler slammed into a poultry truck; it was doomed because you simply could not take the country out of Carl Perkins by substituting pop for liquor on ''Blue Suede Shoes''. And did he seriously think that ''Dixie Fried'' or ''That's Right'' would get played anywhere but 500-watt hillbilly stations?

In the years since these recordings were made, rockabilly has come an industry catchphrase, if not catchall. In case we forget, Carl Perkins' Sun recordings are always there to remind us that rockabilly means ''rocking hillbilly'' music. To get a sense of how Perkins innovatively transformed hillbilly into rockabilly, listen to Rex Griffin's ''Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby'' from 1936. An occasional novelty song aside, the pop market has never accepted roots music. Released when the rules governing pop airplay were rewritten daily, ''Blue Suede Shoes'' was part novelty and part roots, and Perkins doubtless deserved the moment of good fortune. It was probably little compensation to him, but there was more sure knowledge of the roots of American music in his recordings than you'll find in most pop songs of the era. Sure, those pop records sold more copies back then, but ''Dixie Fried'' sound better every year. We should always approach Carl Perkins' early recordings on bended knee.

DECEMBER 1957

Roy Hall recorded at Sun, but in Hall's case the things that counted against him included his age, his unpredictable vocal style, his drinking, and his business savvy. Hall's career was extensive and normally based out of Nashville or Detroit but at one stage around 1958 he was associated with Jud Phillips so that might explain his appearance at Sun.

Eunice Kathleen Waymon (blues-singer Nina Simone) played in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at Queen Mary Room in the Rittenhouse Hotel. She performed in New Hope, Pennsylvania, at the Playhouse Inn. In December she recorded in a 13 hours session, 14 songs among ''Bethlehem''. The exact date is unknown, but it was in the fall of 1957.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

By now, Jerry Lee Lewis had shown the world what could be make of the ding dong song. His version of Roy Hall's ''Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On'' for Sun hit the upper echelons of a multitude of sales charts in the summer of 1957. Lewis's promotion was handled by Jud Phillips, the brother of Sun's owner, Sam Phillips, and it was around this time that Jud made contact with Roy Hall, or vice-versa. The result was two-fold. Soon Jud launched his own record label, Judd Records, which featured a Louisiana band called Cookie and the Cupcakes.

Roy Hall was brought in to manage some aspects of the Judd artists' live bookings. But prior to that, the meeting of Hall and Jud let to two boxes of tapes being recorded by Hall and lodged in the vaults of Sun Records.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROY HALL
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY DECEMBER 10, 12, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

There seem to have been two different Sun sessions. The first tape box had a note in it saying ''My Girl And His Girl'', a song by Nashville promoter Red Wortham, was recorded on December 10, 1957, and then a note in Sam Phillips' recording log referred to a different session on December 12, indicating that Roy Hall had recorded with a musician identified only as ''Reggie'' (Reggie Young being the prime candidate), Stan Kesler on bass, Otis Jett on drums and Jimmy Smith on piano. This make sense because the other songs have a different sound. It seems that Hall does not playing piano here and that the sessions focused on his singing. Hall hadn't been the vocalist on most of his earlier country recordings, and on some of the Decca and Fortune sides his voice is a little thin and under-recorded. What the Sun sessions did successfully was to bring Hall's voice right upfront, and we hear him singing more powerfully here than might have seemed possible on earlier evidence.

01 – "CHRISTINE" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Roy Hall
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 10, 12, 1957
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1035-12 mono
SUNSET SPECIAL
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records 500/200rpm BCD 16210-10 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

''Christine'' is faster and tighter than the Decca cut. ''Christine'' is still gone from home and Hall still wants her to come back home to get him out of jail. This time, it is the County Jail, not Davidson County, indicating that Hall was recording in Memphis rather than Nashville. Roy gives the pleading vocal all he's got, and the record gallops along with a mixture of purpose and chaos, rather like a Sonny Burgess record. Whether Sam Phillips was looking in the Burgess sound or something smoother is not known but the presumably didn't hear what he wanted and nothing from the Sun tapes was issued.

02 – "I LOST MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Roy Hall
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 10, 12, 1957
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1035-14 mono
SUNSET SPECIAL
Reissued: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8317-18 mono
ESSENTIAL ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 5

''I Lost My Baby'' is little more than a demo, a fast tune somewhere between blues and country with a tinkling guitar run throughout and an uncredited saxophone playing quietly along.

03 – "SWEET LOVE ON MY MIND" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Roy Hall
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 10, 12, 1957
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1035-13 mono
SUNSET SPECIAL
Reissued: - Bear Family (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16747-22 mono
RAY HALL - ROY ROCKS

04 – "MY GIRL AND HIS GIRL" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Roy Hall
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Fast Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 10, 12, 1957
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8236-25 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 4
Reissued: - 2005 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16747-20 mono
RAY HALL - ROY ROCKS

05 – "MY GIRL AND HIS GIRL" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Roy Hall
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Slow Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 10, 12, 1957
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm Redita 124-8 mono
ROCK AND ROLL BLUES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Hall - Vocal and Piano
Reggie Young - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Otis Jett - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Unknown - Saxophone

Jimmy Wilson was paid on this session to play piano,
so perhaps its not Hall we hear.

After Sun, Roy Hall concentrated on management rather than performing. As a sideline, he and Webb Pierce formed their own record label, Pierce Records, but this was short-lived and by 1967 Hall formed a promotion agency Roy Hall Attractions in Dallas, Texas.

For Biography of Roy Hall see: > The Sun Biographies <
Roy Hall's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on >YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 12, 1957 THURSDAY
 
Jerry Lee Lewis 22, marries 13 year old second cousin Myra Gale Brown in Hernando,   Mississippi while still married to to another woman.  Brown's age and blood relationship to Lewis caused an uproar on his first tour of England and was  later criticized by anti-rock and roll Christian preachers.  Myra Gale Brown was born on July 11, 1944 was the daughter of Lewis's first cousin, Jay W.  Brown, who was also the bass guitar player in Lewis' band. The scandal over the marriage  destroyed Lewis' promising rock career, although he later gained acceptance in country music circles.
 
The couple had two children, Steve Allen Lewis (named after the entertainer), who drowned at age  three, and daughter Phoebe, who now is her father's manager and lives at his ranch in Nesbit, Mississippi. They divorced on December 9, 1970, after 13 years of marriage.
 
Myra later wrote,  together with Murray Silver, a biography of Lewis, Great Balls of Fire: The Uncensored Story of  Jerry Lee Lewis (ISBN 0-688-01384-8). This book was originally released in October 1982 by  William Morrow & Company. The book inspired a 1989 movie called Great Balls of Fire!, where  Myra was portrayed by Winona Ryder.
 
Myra is currently a real estate agent near Atlanta, Georgia.
 
DECEMBER 12, 1957 THURSDAY
 
Jim Reeves recorded ''I Love You More'' during his first session at his label's new Nashville facility, RCA Studio B.
 
A disc jockey for KEX radio in Portland, Oregon, is fired for playing Elvis Presley's version of ''White Christmas''.
 
DECEMBER 13, 1957 FRIDAY
 
June Carter appears for the second time on the ABC-TV weekly series ''The Adventures Of Jim Bowie''.
 
DECEMBER 14, 1957 SATURDAY
 
Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps play in Dallas on the "Big D Jamboree".
 
DECEMBER 16, 1957 MONDAY
 
Gene Vincent and Bobby Helms appear on "American Bandstand".
 
DECEMBER 17, 1957 TUESDAY
 
Recruiters offer Elvis Presley special status for his expected military enlistment. He turns it down.
 
DECEMBER 19, 1957 THURSDAY
 
Elvis Presley receives his draft notice from Milton Bowers, of the Memphis Draft Board. Bowers calls him personally, rather than sending the notice through the mail.
 
DECEMBER 20, 1957 FRIDAY
 
Kitty Wells recorded ''I can't Stop Loving You'', written by Don Gibson, at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.
 
DECEMBER 21, 1957 SATURDAY
 
After giving Colonel Tom Parker a red sports car for Christmas, Elvis Presley goes to the Grand Ole Opry in a tuxedo. He takes pictures with Brenda Lee, Johnny Cash, Hank Snow, Ray Price and Faron Young, among others, and goes on stage to wave to the audience.
 
DECEMBER 22, 1957 SUNDAY
 
Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers perform on "The Ed Sullivan Show''.
 
RCA Victor announces a price hike for 45 rpm singles from 89 to 98 cents Mercury and  Imperial follow as all record companies eventually will do. At the same time United States companies were selling as many as 10 million portable record players a year. Priced at less than $50, these record players became fixtures in teenagers' bedrooms and family recreation rooms. Prior to the late fifties, most young people had to listen to their music on the family record players and radio.
 
Invented in the fifties, transistor radios were becoming common accessories for music-obsessed teens. These small radios sold for less than $25 and often included an earplug for private listening.
 
Merle Haggard attempts to rob a restaurant, mistenly believing it had closed. He ends up serving time in San Quentin.
 
DECEMBER 23, 1957 MONDAY
 
Left unattended in jail, Merle Haggard walks out the front door of the Bakersfield police station, a day after the attempted robbery of a restaurant.
 
Alan Freed's Christmas Show of Stars started in New York at the Paramount Theater for 12-days. Featuring on the show where Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Everly Brothers, The Rays, Paul Anka, and Danny & The Juniors', Jo Ann Campbell, the Crickets, and the Shepherd Sisters.
 
According to a New York newspaper ''Teenager Queued Six Blocks To See $100,000 Of Rocking Pop Stars''. ''Alan Freed's all-star rock and roll show has broken every existing record at New York's Paramount Theater''. During the first week of the 12-day run, when the teenagers were on Christmas holiday from school, the queues were up to six blocks long.
 
The talent budget was over $100,00 but jockey Freed was expected to come out with a net profit of close to $50,000 when the counting was complete. Most impressive performer of all was the ranting, raving, stomping Jerry Lee Lewis whose frantic rock and rolling and piano playing literally fractured the audience. The mass hysteria reached a crescendo when Lewis took over, to the point where the shrieking and stomping very nearly eclipsed the music.
 
According to Kay Martin, ''That show lasted ten big rockin' days. Elaine and I were there for every single show, five shows a day. What was going on? Well, Jerry had married Myra on December 12, a few weeks before this gig, and since no one was supposed to find out about it, she was in the hotel room all the time during those days! Elaine and I would be in the lobby of the hotel giggling the Christmas decorations hanging from the ceiling; green balls, which we kidded around as belonging to Billy Riley's Green Men, waiting for Jerry between shows. He'd come down in the elevators, pick us up, and the three of us would walk down the block to the backstage door of the world famous Time Square Paramount. One of the photos from us shows us going up an escalator in the lobby of the hotel, and another of Jerry going through the backstage door, with the guy who was in charge. We would go up to the dressing room with Jerry, hang out until he had to go on, watch his show, then go back with him either to the hotel, or the dressing room, or out to eat, or Jerry would relax between shows playing piano backstage behind the movie screen. He would often gather several of the stars around the piano and sing and play while the Grade B movie was playing between the stage shows. Once, the stage manager came around to tell him he had to quit because it was too loud and was leaking into the theater while the movie was playing! He said, ''Mr. Lewis, you and your fan club just have to quit making so much noise''. Ha, ha! The ''fan club'' included Buddy Holly, the Everly Brothers, and more... Sam Phillips and his wife and sons, Knox and Jerry, in the city for the New Year's celebration when 1957 became 1958''.
 
Bobby Helms recorded ''Jacqueline'' at the Bradley Studio in Nashville. The song appears in the movie ''The Case Against Brooklyn''.
 
DECEMBER 24, 1957 TUESDAY
 
After escaping a day earlier, Merle Haggard is apprehended at his brother's home, handcuffed and returned to the Bakersfield Jail.
 
Elvis Presley writes to the draft board, requesting a deferment so that he can film ''King Creole'' for Paramount.
 
DECEMBER 25, 1957 WEDNESDAY
 
Elvis Presley observes Christmas at Graceland Mansion in Memphis for the first time.
 
DECEMBER 26, 1957 THURSDAY
 
Jimmie Osborn commits suicide with a 32-caliber pistol following a spat with his wife at his trailer home in Louisville, Kentucky. The singer/songwriter had three hits, the biggest coming with a topical single, ''The Death Of Little Kathy Fiscus''.
 
The military draft board grants a deferment to Elvis Presley so that he can film ''King Creole'' for Paramount.
 
DECEMBER 28, 1957 SATURDAY
 
Having previously made the cover of TV Guide with the rest of his family, Ricky Nelson is highlighted on the magazine's front as a solo star. 
 
DECEMBER 28, 1957 SATURDAY
 
On this date, an add published in Billboard that reads: "A whole lot of thanks for voting me  Most Promising Male Country Vocalist of 1957 Jerry Lee Lewis. Great Chart maker: "Great  Balls Of Fire" SUN 281 exclusive on Sun Records".
 
DECEMBER 29, 1957 SUNDAY
 
Shreveport clairvoyant Bernard Ricks calls ''Ring Of Fire'' songwriter Merle Kilgore and warns him to check on his daughter. Kilgore finds the baby is being smothered by a pile of clothes.
 
DECEMBER 30, 1957 MONDAY
 
Webb Pierce recorded ''You'll Come Back'' in the afternoon at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.
 
Columbia released Carl Smith's ''Your Name Is Beautiful''.
 
DECEMBER 31, 1957 TUESDAY
 
Ernest Tubb is fined $250 when he hits a tree, driving drunk, on Lynwood Terrace in Nashville with his 1957 Cadillac.
 
END 1957
 
After Hayden Thompson's Phillips International record had been out for some months, and  he realised that "Love My Baby" easn't going to be a hit, he found that he had a decision to  make. The first flush of mid-South rockabilly was over and by early 1958 there were now many other singers like him trying to make their way in the path of Elvis Presley, Johnny  Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and the few successful ones. The performing and recording options in  Memphis were limited and so when Hayden was offered a regular gig in Chicago in May 1958,  he took it!
 
The extended play Sun 107 ''The Great Ball Of Fire'' by Jerry Lee Lewis issued.
 
END 1957
 
With ''Great Balls Of Fire'' climbing the charts and ''The Great Ball Of Fire'' EP also on release, Jerry Lee Lewis' career was firmly in the ascendancy, how might the impetus be maintained? Lewis spend much of of what was left of 1957 in the north-eastern States, commencing with a six day engagement in Washington and ending with a twelve day season bridging both Christmas and the New Year at the Paramount Theatre in New York City. Although he still found time on December 12 to journey to Hernando, Mississippi for what would prove to be a fateful marriage ceremony. Meanwhile, Jack Hammer and Otis Blackwell, the duo behind ''Great Balls Of Fire'', independently vied for the huge paycheque that would favour the writer of the next million-seller, respectively submitting for consideration ''Milkshake Mademoiselle'' and ''Breathless''.(*) 
 
END 1957
 
It may be that Carl Perkins recorded more memorable music during his three years at Sun  Records than he has recorded during the balance of his career to his death. No one but Sam  Phillips could seem to draw the rough edges out of Perkins and capture the bite in his guitar  playing. A comparison of Perkin's Sun recordings with the remakes he cut for a variety of  labels makes an eloquent case for the chemistry at 706 Union. Even ''Dixie Fried'' sounded  like a report of a church social when Perkins rerecorded it for Mercury. The edge had gone.
 
Twenty years later, his frustration and bitterness dimmed and his place in the history books  assured, Perkins characterized Sam Phillips as a man who was ''as near a genius as any man I  ever met. He didn't have a light in the studio saying ''ready'', or a clock on the studio wall to  scare you. There was no such thing as a standard three-hour session. He said, 'Get in there  and pick, boy. We'll find the record when we get through'. There was a feeling there that I've  never found since. We were trying 100 percent, and Sam Phillips captured it''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: END 1957 OR EARLY 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

Gene Simmons recorded about a dozen titles for Sun over a three year period. Although he has become something of a Memphis legend, there was relatively little to show for all his Sun recordings work at the time. Simmons enjoyed one release on the Sun label, and that itself was something of an afterthought when Sam Phillips released SUN 299 about a year and a half after it had been recorded, and only because Simmons was on the cusp of success with another label.

01 - "PEROXIED BLONDE AND A HOPPED UP FORD" - B.M.I. - 1:35
Composer: - Jack Clement (Gene Simmons)
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - End 1957 or Early 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm LP 110-13 mono
COTTON CHOPPER COUNTRY
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-2 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

Note: The Redita LP wrongly credits the song to Jack Clement.

A bit of mystery continues to swirl around "A Peroxide Blonde And A Hopped Up Model Ford". For one thing, shouldn't the be a Model T Ford? And is and supposed to be in? But putting titles aside, this track sound pretty close to a finished master and quite a reaseable one at that. So where's the rest ot it? And why was the tape stored anonymously on a Jerry Lee out-take reel? Gene claims to have written and recorded it and his sidemen Carl and Jessie confirm the story. So where's the full version? This might not have been as pressing a question had Brian Setzer not gotten into the act in 2005, wanting to include the song as part of his CD tribute to Sun Records (Rockabilly Riot Volume 1). For the project, the former Stray Cat returned to the rockabilly world that had fuelled his early career and includes Gene's title among other Sun tracks that included both the well-known and the utterly obscure (Peroxide Blond fell into the latter camp). And so Gene wentt 'draggin' down Main once more", this time with Brian Setzer in tow. Unfortunately, this meant that Gene had to provide the missing lyrics, which he found himself in no position to do almost 50 years later. As Carl recalls, "Gene and Brian had to get together and write some new lyrics for it so that Brian could record it". The modern rendition, a duet between Setzer and Gene, is part of a collection described by the Boston Phoenix as being "propelled by hot licks invented by white hicks". Setting such elitist prose aside, Carl concludes "It was a nice honor for Gene to have his music recognized like that after all these years". In fact, Gene's companion, Shirley Green, proudly reported that she has a framed picture on their wall of Gene and Brian Setzer performing the song together in Nashville.

02 - "IF I'M NOT WANTED" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - 2563
Recorded: - End 1957 or Early 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-7-10 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - THE CHAINS IN LOVE
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-5 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

The latter sounds incomplete, with empty spaces left for a vocal chorus or recitation by Gene.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Jessie Carter - Upright Bass
More Details Unknown

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <
Gene Simmons' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

This two tracks by Vincent ''Guitar Red'' Duling clearly date from the rock and roll era. Duling's bent-note guitar style belongs in the later era and drummer Robert Prindell keeps rock-steady time behind him. The song bears a similarity to Johnny Fuller's 1958 Checker recording of ''All Night Long'' and it could have been recorded that late. This was Dennis Binder's group, and in 1956 he was joined by saxophonist Aaron Corthen, who worked in Chicago and later sprang to prominence as A.C. Reed.

This incarnation of Binder's group hung together from 1956 until 1960 or 1961, so this session almost certainly dates from those years. After toiling in anonymity for some years, Reed came to the fore with Buddy Guy during the 1970s. He left Guy in 1977, touring with Albert Collins before going out on his own. Reed died in 2004. Guitar Red died in 2001. Dennis Binder is still among us as of this writing.

STUDIO SESSION FOR VINCENT DULING
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY 1957/1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

1(1) – ''GO AHEAD ON '' - B.M.I. 2:45
Composer: - Vincent Duling
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30126-B-1 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK VOLUME 11 - MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS
Reissued: - March 5, 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Charly MP3-8 mono
BOPPIN' THE BLUES

1(2) – ''GO AHEAD ON '' - B.M.I. 2:16
Composer: - Vincent Duling
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-7-32 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

If Fats Domino could do it, why not Guitar Red? The shadow of Fats looms over this track. It's not the New Orleans piano and sax; Red's vocal is a note for note done of Fats' melody lines. This song compresses the familiar elements of about five Fats Domino hit records into one tune but ultimately sounds undistinguished. At best it was a B-side looking for a hit.

2(1) – ''BABY PLEASE DON'T GO'' – B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: Vincent Duling
Publisher: Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30126-B-2 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK VOLUME 11 – MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-7-33 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

2(2) – ''BABY PLEASE DON'T GO'' – B.M.I.
Composer: Vincent Duling
Publisher: Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CRB 1061-1-5 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - RED HOT & BLUE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Vincent ''Guitar Red'' Duling - Vocal and Guitar
Dennis Binder - Piano
Al Smith - Bass
Aaron Corthen - Saxophone
Robert Prindell - Drums

For Biography of Vincent Duling see: > The Sun Biographies <
Vincent Duling's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

From a pair of tape boxes intriguingly marked Hunky Dory (sic), we have slowly pieced together the story of their likely origin. Sam Phillips had no memory of the group, but he remembers they were associated with a Memphis disc jockey. A printed program for the Cotton Makers' Jubilee (the African American equivalent of Memphis's big pageant, the Cotton Carnival) carried a WLOK advertisement for a disc jockey called Hunky Dory, and that seemed too much of a coincidence.

A little research revealed that Hunky Dory was actually Chester McDowell. Born in Beaumont, Texas, McDowell was a decorated World War II veteran who began singing with spiritual groups before landing on KCIJ, Shreveport around 1951 as a disc jockey named Daddy Yo Hot Rod. In Jud Phillips road trips reports to Sam, mentions McDowell.

After several years on WLOK as Hunky Dory, McDowell moved in July 1958 to KYOK, Houston, another station owned by the OK Broadcasting chain. At KYOK he was Hotsy Totsy. Confirmation that McDowell was involved in the Hunky Dory recordings came from the files of Duke Records in Houston. Later in 1958, Chester McDowell recorded two of the songs demo'd at Sun for Duke. So it seems that McDowell came to Sun, probably in the months before he left Memphis, to demo some songs with a vocal group and make full recordings of other songs with a conventional small rhythm and blues combo.

STUDIO SESSION FOR HUNKY DORY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY 1957/1958 (1)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The song that became the other side of Chester McDowell's first Duke single was shaped after countless other doo-wop records. Clearly, the demo version ''I Wonder Why'' heard here features the same lead singer as ''Don't Leave Me'', and it's almost certainly not McDowell. We have a clear idea of what McDowell sounded like from that first Duke single, and he wasn't as accomplished as the lead heard here and on ''Don't Leave Me''. Unlike the hauntingly soulful ''Don't Leave Me'', this was paint-by-numbers doo wop. Replace Sun's tape echo with school toilet echo or tenement stairwell echo, and it could have been made in Bedford-Stuyvesant. Good, certainly; memorable, perhaps not.

01 - ''I WONDER WHY'' - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Chester McDowell
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1062-A-1 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-15 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

The skill with which the four voices navigate ''I Want My Baby Back'' this a cappella song suggests that McDowell might have recruited a gospel quartet. They are very assured.

02 - ''I WANT MY BABY BACK'' - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-13 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Hardly a candidate for release in 1958, especially not a 3 minutes, 45 seconds, this is a stilling performance nonetheless. Truly, the blues. The group sounds young, and Chester McDowell's contribution was probably limited to songwriting. Sun's tape echo fleshes out the sound, almost becoming one of the instruments we don't miss. The lead singer was so nuanced and confident, it's hard to believe we didn't hear him again on Hi, Stax, of Goldwax. With the spartan background of the other voices, he had few places to hide but no need of them. McDowell clearly liked this song and had faith in it because soon after arriving in Houston in July 1958, he recorded it for Duke Records as ''Don't Leave Me'' together with ''I Wonder Why''. Thirty years passed before Jerry Osborne released this version, but it's not only one of the last rhythm and blues recordings made at the old Sun studio, but arguably one of the best. In common with the best Sun recordings, it's profoundly soulful and delightfully at variance with what was selling.

03 - ''BABY DON'T LEAVE ME'' - B.M.I. - 3:54
Composer: - Chester McDowell
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1062-A-4 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-14 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Confirming that the Hunky Dory recordings were made in late 1957 or early 1958, ''A Lady Called Mother'' was a cover version of the Swan Silverstones' 1957 Vee-Jay single ''A Lady Called Mother''. Almost hillbilly-like in its pastoral vision as a sainted mother, it was the work of the Silvertones' original baritone and sometime manager John H. Myles. The anonymous lead on Hunky Dory's tape was clearly influenced as much by the dulcet falsetto pf the Silvertones' lead, Claude Jeter, as by Sam Cooke. This alone makes his identity all the more intriguing. He recorded both sacred and secular music with Hunky Dory. Did he record again? If so, in which style?

04 - ''A LADY CALLED MOTHER (I'D LIKE TO BE THERE)'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - John H. Myles
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1062-A-2 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-31 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Hunky Dory offers their stellar version of a gospel standard that has found its way into both white and black traditions. Originally viewed as a ''negro spiritual'' the song quickly crossed the racial divide and appeared on a 1934 recording by the Carter Family, as well as later work by Bill Monroe, the Oak Ridge Boys, John Fogerty, and Swan's Silvertones. This stellar version reminds us of the song's power as well as the power of a cappella music.

Assuming you could find a place for some musical instruments here, just what would they add to the arrangement"The track also reveals something more subtle about Sun's later day recording techniques. The group's pumping rhythm is abetted here by strong reverb.

Once the quartet gets going, the reverb is less noticeable; in fact, it is almost invisible. But if you listen closely to the soloist's opening notes, you'll hear just how much ''fattening'' the echo has literally thrown into the mix. And nothing sounds artificial. The track just soars.

05 - ''WORKIN' ON THE BUILDING'' - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1062-A-6 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-32 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

06 - ''I HEAR THE SAVIOUR CALLING'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1062-A-7 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY
Reissued: - April 1, 2012 Vintage Master Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
GOSPEL ULTIMATE INSPIRATIONAL SONGS

07 - ''DOWN HOME'' - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1062-A-9 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY
Reissued: - April 1, 2012 Vintage Master Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
GOSPEL ULTIMATE INSPIRATIONAL SONGS

08 - ''OLD TIME RELIGION'' - B.M.I. - 1:16
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1062-A-8 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY
Reissued: - April 1, 2012 Vintage Master Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
GOSPEL ULTIMATE INSPIRATIONAL SONGS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hunky Dory (Chester McDowell) - Vocal
Unknown Vocal Group

For Biography of Hunky Dory see: > The Sun Biographies <
Hunky Dory's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DJ SPOTLIGHT, CHET MCDOWELL, KYOK, HOUSTON, TEX. - Chet McDowell, a native of Beaumont, Texas, is a triple-threat man: He sings, writes songs and is a disc jockey. Some of his records include ''I Wonder Why'', ''Tell Me Now'' and ''You Don't Know The Golden Rule''. After finishing high school, McDowell worked with several spiritual quartets. He began as DJ on KCIJ Radio, Shreveport, La., in 1951, where he was known as Daddy Yo Hot Rod. Later, on WLOK Radio, Memphis, Tenn., he was known as Hunky Dory. Now he's just Chet McDowell. A World War II veteran, he has three campaign bars and three Bronze Stars. He is married and has four children.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HUNKY DORY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY 1957/1958 (2)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

It hardly needs stating that there were at least two Hunky Dory sessions, and on the evidence of Chester McDowell's Duke recordings, the singer on ''This Misery'' is McDowell himself. Unlike the delightfully uncommercial songs heard immediately before this, we're now positioned in commercial vocal group rhythm and blues circa 1958. And who would have been more plugged into that scene than Chester McDowell? It's frenetic but largely unmemorable. The drummer was noted as Jeff Grayer. If, as seems likely Grayer was a mis-spelling of Greyer, he was a link to earlier times at Sun because he'd played on sessions by Luther Steinberg and Eddie Snow, and later worked with Price Gabe aka Ed Kirby. The only Sun session regular was bassist-guitarist Sid Manker, the cowriter of Bill Justis's 1957 hit, ''Raunchy''.

01 - ''THIS MISERY'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1062-A-5 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-8-16 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

02 - ''WHY DON'T YOU USE YOUR HEAD'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1957/1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1062-A-3 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hunky Dory (Chester McDowell) - Vocal
Unknown Vocal Group
William Walker - Unknown
Sid Manker - Guitar/Bass
Unknown - Piano, Saxophone
Jeff Greyer - Drums

For Biography of Hunky Dory see: > The Sun Biographies <
Hunky Dory's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WINK MARTINDALE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/58

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1957/1958
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

01 - ''CHATTER/BUG-A-BOP'' - B.M.I. - 1:35/3:58
Composer: - Wink Martindale
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: 1989
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Zu-Zazz Z 2005-2-8 mono
MEMPHIS SATURDAY NIGHT

Note: This tape also contains several unknown titles featuring Bill Justis piano solos.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Wink Martindale - Vocal
Bill Justis Orchestra

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ANNETTE MCGEE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/58

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1957/1958
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

Annette McGee submitted her tape to Sun around 1957 or 1958. In addition to ''Your Cheatin' Heart'', the tape also included such non-Annette originals as ''Hound Dog'', ''Don't Be Cruel'' and ''You Are My Sunshine''. The singer is surrounded by a fair bit of echo - even by Sun's standards. Although her repertoire is drawn from pop, rock and country hits of the day, Annette is plainly at home in a breezy, jazz-based style.

The singer might have been in her 20s or 30s when this demo was made. That would put her in her 80s or 90s today. Attempts to locate Annette living anywhere in the mid-South were unsuccessful. In fact, Sun archaeologist Hank Davis spread his net to include the Midwest, California and the Pacific Northwest. There are a lot of Annette McGees out there and, over two dozen phone calls later, it turned out none of them had ties to this demo. As one of them said to Hank Davis, ''Nobody in my family can carry a tune in a bucket''.

And although women of a certain age named Annette McGee seem to die on a regular basis, none of the obits we examined were an obvious match to what we'd expect to read about a woman who submitted a jazzy demo of Elvis and Hank Williams songs to Sun some 60 years ago. If the lady is still alive, we missed a chance to bring some unexpected excitement to her life.

01 - ''YOUR CEATIN' HEART'' B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: 2019
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17504-11 mono
SUN SHINES ON HANK WILLIAMS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Annette McGee - Vocal and Guitar

For Biography of Annette McGee see: > The Sun Biographies <
Annette McGee's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©