CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS (1/2)
January 1, 1958 to January 31, 1958

Studio Session for Mack Self, January 4, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Roy Orbison, January 4, 10, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Danny Stewart, January 6, 1958 / Sun Records 

Studio Session for Ray Smith, Probably January 10, 1958 / Sun Records
- True Story About Ray Smith - 

Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, January 16-18, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Glenn Honeycutt, January 20, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, January 21, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bond, January 25, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Edwin Bruce, January 26, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Red Williams, January 26, 1958 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 1958

Glenn Honeycutt hung around Sun for another year or so. On one occasion, he walked in on Johnny Cash talking to Phillips; on another, he sang a sausage commercial while Roy Orbison played harmonica. There was a session in January 1958 but the songs weren't developed for release. As far as he can remember, Honeycutt never joined any package shows. He played in bars and clubs around Memphis and the Tri State area but never went on the road. ''The first time I was ever on radio was with Roland Janes, Billy Riley and J.M. Van Eaton. It was a live broadcast from some little town in Arkansas one Sunday afternoon. I didn't realize that I was supposed to talk between songs so I'd sing then take a break and there was all this dead air. The radio people were real upset. I remember that I'd brought my own band but I begged and pleaded with Roland and Jimmy to back me because they'd done such a good job on the record''.

In 1958 Honeycutt joined the United States Post Office as a letter carrier, a job he held until retirement.

JANUARY 1, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Johnny cash gives his first New Year's performance at San Quentin prison in California. He does several more in ensuing years.

JANUARY 3, 1958 FRIDAY

Lyricist Richard Adler marries actress Sally Ann Howes, known for her work on Broadway in ''My Fair Lady''. Seven years earlier, Adler had a country hit as a songwriter with Ernest Tubb and Red Foley's version of ''The Strange Little Girl''.

JANUARY 4, 1958 SATURDAY

Bob Wills gives his blessing to rock and roll in The Tulsa Tribute, ''Why, man, that's the same kind of music we've been playin' since 1928! It's just basic rhythm and has gone by a lot of different names in my time''.

Former country hitmaker Lawrence Welk appears on the cover of TV Guide.

Rhythm and blues artist Little Willie John recorded ''Talk To Me, Talk To Me'' in New York City. The song becomes a country hit twice, once for Freddy Fender, and once for Mickey.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The traditional circuit of regional radio in rural Arkansas, was the route taken by Mack Self to lay his musical credentials in front of Sam Phillips. As so often happened at Sun, when he was invited to the studio, Mack had to accept there'd be a good deal of hanging around whilst he waited his turn at the mike. A pair of true blue country sides released over two years apart was the total sum of his efforts, whilst the peppery "I Vibrate" languished undeservedly for the next two decades.

"Vibrate", "I just got thinking about how some people start jumping up on tables, just carrying on. Just don't know when to quit. They're just shakin' all over. Excited. That's what I was singing about".

Mack concludes with laughter, "The song just turned out to be a masterpiece. Conway Twitty heard me sing it in a club one time and thought it was a good song. I think he might have recorded his own version, but nothing happened with it" recalled Mack Self.

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY JANUARY 4, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Actually, the story is a bit more complicated. It appears that Twitty (still Harold Jenkins at the time) did like the song, but he was more taken with the title than the lyrics. He and his drummer Jack Nance wrote their own version called "I Vibrate (From My Head To My Feet)". The song was included in the May, 1958 session that also yielded the mega-hit song "It's Only Make Believe". Twitty's own "vibrating" song appeared on his first LP and was the basis of a stage routine during which Twitty stood stock still while "vibrating" Shades of the lyrics to Jerry Lee's "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On". There is one other interesting similarity between Mack's original "Vibrate" song and Conway's "I Vibrate". In Mack's hands the title becomes a three-syllable word - "Vi-er-ate". Conway pronounces it exactly the same way. Maybe it's an Arkansas thing.

01(1) – "VIBRATE" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 4, 1958
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30128-A-6 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 3 - ROCKABILLY SUNDOWN
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-9-6 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-24 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Getting back to Mack's version, there's no denying the whole idea sounds rather sexy. The thought of your woman vibrating - that's got to be good news, right? Mack sure seemed to think so, considering the list of things (including a bed of rattlesnakes) he was willing to take on for the simple pleasure of watching it happen. The track features a wonderful two-note guitar figure (3-1 or C#-A since Mack sings it in the key of A). That little guitar figure works as a powerful hook for the song, although there's no shortage of appeal here. For one thing, this is pretty straight-ahead rockabilly and surely as close to the genre as Mack ever got at Sun. For another, there's that great confusion between the 4- and 5-chord in each verse, which actually becomes quite endearing after a while. And just in case you're listening to lyrics (admittedly, not a favorite sport among rockabilly fans), you've got a great collection of images telling you just how much seeing this woman "viberating" means to Mack. "Climb a tree bare footed". Wow? Now there's a though. You gotta be from the country to have dreamed that up!

01(2) - "VIBRATE" - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 4, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-13 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

It was very different from Mack's sole Sun single, which was pure unadorned hillbilly music, and very different from his sole Phillips International single, which was a Tom Dooley soundalike number.

03 - "LITTLE ONE" - B.M.I. - 1:00
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 4, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-9 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

"Little One", this is as close to a pop ballad as Mack came at Sun. Although the song is easy to underestimate at first hearing, the melody can creep into your memory and haunt you for days. The simple 1-5-1-5 chord changes (and the waltz tempo) set the stage for a fine piece of crossover pop/country. Remember, this was recorded circa 1957, the year that records like Ferlin Husky's "Gone" hit the charts. "Little One" is certainly the least appreciated (and least re-issued) title in Mack's Sun catalogue. To make it a bit more interesting, we managed to locate a false start to give the performance a little more depth.

04 - "LITTLE ONE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 4, 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-9-7 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311 FK-5-25 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Little One'' a beautiful country ballad seems to be no more than an early run-through. The song was never worked up for release, perhaps because it is essentially just rejuggled cliches. It certainly lacks the stunning images of ''Easy To Love'' and in comparison it is easy to see why Sam Phillips decided to leave it on the cutting room floor. Nevertheless, it provides a welcome addition to the small legacy of Mack Self recordings.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Therlow Brown - Guitar
Jimmy Evans - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Mack Self see: > The Sun Biographies <
Mack Self's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 1958

As much as Barbara Barnes her restorative weekend, she could hardly wait to get back to Sun on Monday to see what was going to happen next. Jack Clement and Regina Reese were already there when Barbara arrived, and she confessed to them her confusion and difficulty getting the hang of things at Sun. ''There doesn't seem to be any order here'', she said. ''I never know what to expects''. ''That's it, B.B. And you never will. I used to feel that way, but you have to go with it, relax. Just look upon it as your own three-ring circus'', Jack advised.

Regina had been listening, at the same time opening the mail. In the stack of letters she found and handed to Barbara a little flat package that turned out to hold a nice surprise. It was a type of recording never seen before, but with two tunes on each side. It was what they called an Extended Play album, or EP. This one was from the European partner, London Records. The flexible plastic cover had an orange background and showed a fellow lounging on a haystack, with the title ''Hillbilly Rock'' (RES 1089). The singer, Roy Orbison, was one of the guys who played shows in the mid-South with Sun's other artists, so he was in town often and came to hang around occasionally. The next time he showed up, Barbara Barnes was eager to let him see it. To her surprise, he wasn't thrilled with his release.

''I don't like that cover too much'', Roy said softly. He had a country and western band at home in West Texas, but being depicted as a hillbilly offended his dignity. He represented the western part of country-western music, and he had changed his band's name from the Wink Westerners to the Teen Kings, in hopes of becoming a rock star. He had grown up more urbanized, and he'd been to college.

''But Roy, this means you are popular enough in Europe to warrant this EP. You be happy. The liner notes were very complimentary'' said Barbara. The featured tune was ''Ooby Dooby'', one of his four Sun releases thus far and his biggest hit. It was described as an up-tempo rock and roll number that had nonsense lyrics. The rhyming title reminded to Little Richard's ''Tutti Frutti'', and songs like these were a reason that condescending critics said rock and roll was juvenile.

''Ooby Dooby'' was a good record'', Roy had to admit. ''It was number 59 on the Billboard pop charts and sold a quarter of a million records''. Roy liked the feeling of having a successful record, and he was impatient for another. Instead of goofing around or shooting the breeze with Billy Riley or the other guys, he seemed to be working when he came in, sitting in the studio playing his guitar, at times just sitting and thinking writing down a line or two, or occasionally coming the the studio office to talk about his career aspirations. He seemed very focused on success and was frustrated Sam Phillips wasn't paying more attention to him. On the day he was looking at his EP, he seemed friendly and inclined to chat, so Barbara Barnes asked for a favor.

''Roy, I need to stop by the printer's for a minute'', she said. If I catch the bus, it will take me all morning. Would you mind driving me there and back if you have time''?, I asked. He said he would and very politely opened the door for me to climb into his sleek, finned white Cadillac. I was thinking, ''By the looks of this car, he's doing pretty well. Why isn't he happy''”?

''This is a really comfortable car, Roy, Barbara said. ''You must be very proud of it''. He replied, ''This is my ''Ooby Dooby'' car. When I bought it I thought I could afford it. Last year I made $50,000 but by the way things are going now, I'll be lucky if I make $3,000 this year. I've had one release since ''Ooby Dooby'' and I don't have much hope for it''. He said it with a sense of despair, as if fearing that his luck might never change. The odd tune that Bill Justin had written for him, ''Chicken Hearted'', seemed like a loser to me, too. Roy's voice sounded thin and had a little quaver on this one, and I didn't like the lyrics. Neither did Roy''.

''How did you get to Sun'', Barbara Barnes asked. ''Well, the long way around, I guess. I found out about Sun when I saw Elvis in Dallas in 1954'', Roy said. ''I was doing country at the time, but when he sang ''Maryellen'', the crowd went wild''. Roy said he decided he wanted a crowd to respond to him that way, and that's why he came to Memphis. In effect, he wanted to be the next Elvis. Roy dropped Barbara off at the studio and glided away in his big machine. When Barbara had a chance to talk with Jack Clement, she asked him about Roy.

''It too a while for Sam to get interested in him, but he has hopes for Roy as an artist and especially as a songwriter. He likes his picking, too. When he and his girlfriend Claudette came to town, Sam and Becky put them up for a while''. Jack added that Sam sometimes found it frustrating to work with Roy, because he didn't sing loud enough and was always bugging them with these ballads he wanted to sing. ''Sam wants everybody to stick with rock and roll. That's what's commercials'', Jack concluded.

Roy had a bit of an identity problem when it came to rock, because he wanted to be a star like Elvis, but he didn't have love for rhythm and blues that came out in the music of Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee, and others. Maybe he hadn't drunk Mississippi River water growing up. ''But Sam likes Roy. One time they were having a session and Roy's band walked out on him. I would have thought Sam would blow up about that, but he just told Roy to forget it, there were other bands'', said Barbara.

Listening later to the four tunes on the EP, the music was good, but wondered if Roy Orbison wouldn't be a hard sell in the teen market. It hadn't hurt Buddy Holly's career that he, like Roy, wore glasses, but Buddy Holly was better looking than Roy, who had a plump face with no jaw line to speak of. He was sort of on the pudgy side, plus he seemed to carry a gloomy air around with him. The only way he compared with Elvis was the pompadour.

Still, Jack Clement had said he was a pretty good showman, despite seeming so introverted. Sam had got him the bookings through Bob Neal's agency, which Sam had some connection with or maybe a business interest in. When Roy was booked on shows with Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash, he had held his own because of his experience on radio and in the bands he had had ever since he was about fourteen years old.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Roy often talked about being out of the business for seven months and those could be the months between this last known Sun session in January 1958 and his first trip to Nashville in July.

At Sun, Roy Orbison was only one of a stable of young rockabillies, one who became easily lost in the shuffle after his first hit. It was a legacy that Orbison would be eager to disown after his huge success on Monument, but one from which he drew in subtle ways throughout his career.

"Neither Elvis nor I though our work for Sun was any good", he was fond of saying. "Then, around 1970, the era of instant history come along. Everybody saw it as a beginning".

In one of the least commercially astute moves of his career, Sam Phillips had kept Roy Orbison on a steady diet of rock and roll. Phillips golden ear told him once again that he had heard something unique; yet in Orbison's case, he didn't know what to do with it. "Roy had a definite feel for rock", claims Phillips. "I think that if we had been able to keep his band together I would not have let Roy go''.

''I really have to take the blame for not bringing Roy to fruition. Its still my regret that I didn't do more promotion for him". Orbison knew that his talent was being misdirected at Sun, and events to come would prove it. As he returned to Texas though, he was beginning to question whether he wanted to continue as a performer at all. He admitted to a measure of jealousy over the fact that Buddy Holly, a fellow Texas who had joined Norman Petty's musical frontier in Clovis a year after Orbison had left, had started to score heavily, while his own career seemed hopelessly roadblocked. Buddy Holly had recorded two of his songs and Jerry Lee Lewis had recorded ''Go! Go! Go!'' as ''Down The Line''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROY ORBISON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY JANUARY 4 &
FRIDAY JANUARY 10, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT
MUSICAL DIRECTOR - BILL JUSTIS

01 - "YOU TELL ME" - B.M.I. - 1:31
Composer: - Johnny R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDX 4-D1 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-18 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

02 - "I GIVE UP" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDX 4-D2 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-19 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

03 - "ONE MORE TIME" - B.M.I. - 1:15
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 1956
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461-25
mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-20 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

04 – "LOVESTRUCK" - B.M.I. - 1:21
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - January 1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461-22 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-21 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

05(1) - "THE CLOWN" - B.M.I. - 1:42
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 1958
Released: - 2001
First appearance Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-22 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

05(2) - "THE CLOWN" - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461 AH-26 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-2-7 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

06(1) – "CLAUDETTE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Roy K. Orbison
Publisher: - Warner Chappell Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 1958 - Vocal Guitar Demo
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm 6641 180-24 mono
THE SUN STORY
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-23 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

In January or February 1958, Roy Orbison worked a show in Hammond, Indiana, to pitch some songs to the Everly Brothers. ''I just said hello and headed for the door when they asked if I had any material'', Roy said later. ''I said I had one song and played them ''Claudette''. They said, 'Write down the words, Roy', so I tore off this cardboard box top and wrote down the words''.

Years later, in a deposition taken in conjunction with his lawsuit against Acuff-Rose, Orbison recalled that the Everly's manager, music-publisher, Wesley Rose of Acuff-Rose, had sent him a contract for ''Claudette'' in care of Sun Records. ''Sam Phillips got onto the phone'', Roy said, ''and it was a three-way conversation. I remember Sam saying that he wanted to get something out of it because I was his artist. But, I wasn't signed as a songwriter to Sam Phillips. I remember Wesley Rose saying, 'Why do you want part of Roy's money'? And that impressed me. The next morning, I signed the contract for ''Claudette''.

Sam Phillips remembered it differently, insisting that he had the publishing on ''Claudette'' and was being asked to surrender it. If true, that would be because Roy had signed a music publishing deal with Phillips' Hi-Lo Music at the same time he has signed a recording contract with Sun, and this was almost certainly not the case because Roy had written songs that had been demo'd at Norman Petty's studio on which Petty not only half of the composer credit but all of the music publishing. Songs like ''An Empty Cup'' and ''You've Got Love'', both recorded by Buddy Holly in September 1957, would have been co-published by Hi-Lo Music if Roy had been signed to an exclusive Hi-Lo contract.

''The next thing I know'', said Phillips, ''Roy came to me like a gentleman and said he had an opportunity to record for someone else if it was alright with me. Well, we had to sit down and have a little prayer meeting. I considered everything in my interests and hopefully in his and we worked out a deal on the songs which enabled him to do this''. In all likelihood, the discussion played out in a far less friendly fashion. During the threeway conversation with Wesley Rose, Phillips used the threat of dropping Roy from Sun, but when Roy seemed very interested in that prospect, Phillips decided to hold Roy to his Sun option. As part of the deal under which Roy eventually left Sun, he had to sign away the composer's royalties on all the Hi-Lo songs he had written, the most lucrative of which was ''Down The Line (Go! Go! Go!).

06(2) – "CLAUDETTE" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Roy K. Orbison
Publisher: - Warner Chappell Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 1958 - Vocal Group Demo
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-29 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

One of his infrequent outings took him to Indiana for a concert appearance with The Everly Brothers, and it was there that he played Don and Phil the basis of "Claudette", a eulogy to his then-new wife. As the flipside to their multi-million selling "All I Have To Do Is Dream" it became Roy's dream ticket into Nashville. His full band demo is presented here.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians

Talking later about his dealings with Sam Phillips, Roy said, ''Sam taught me a lot about business and contracts... afterwards''. While Perkins, Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and others came to look back fondly on their days at Sun, Roy remained ambivalent. ''Sam was pretty much full of himself'', he told Joe Smith. ''He seemed to know what he was doing, but, as it turned out, I don't think he did. But he lived his life the way he wanted''. When Roy found fame on Monument Records, Sam Phillips released a compilation of his old stuff titled ''At The Rockhouse''. Roy went to Sun on one occasion around 1960 or 1961. Phillips told him he'd want to return to Sun eventually. Jud Phillips was in the office and said, ''The hell he will''!

For Biography of Roy Orbison see: > The Sun Biographies <
Roy Orbison's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 5, 1958 SUNDAY

The notes in the frustratingly incomplete Sun files say, Tommy Blake was back again at Sun. This time, his partners, Hall and Adams were absent, and Blake recorded with drummer Van Eaton, guitarist Ed Bruce and Sid Manker, bassist Stan Kesler, and pianist Jim Wilson. All were paid $11.25. Phillips also paid four vocalists three dollars a piece.

The Everly Brothers perform ''Wake Up Little Susie'' in New York on CBS' weekly program ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The episode also features pop singer Johnny Ray.

JANUARY 6, 1958 MONDAY

Barbara Barnes parttime employee for Sun Records went to work fulltime and she was feeling pretty confident. She had already gotten familiar with the office during the six months she had freelanced, and she had gotten to know Sam, Jud Phillips, and Sally Wilbourn and had met Jack Clement a couple of times. Sam had given the key to the door in case she needed to open up. When she arrived she was happy to see Sun´s receptionist Regina Reese, already sitting ad her desk, all fresh and perky.

Jerry Lee Lewis moves into a new house at 4752 Dianne Drive, Whitehaven, Mississippi.

Chuck Berry recorded ''Johnny B. Goode'' at the Chess Studio in Chicago. The song has a future as a country hit, when Buck Owens remakes it in 1969.

Jerry Lee Lewis sews up the number 1 spot on the Billboard country singles chart with ''Great Balls Of Fire''.

JANUARY 1958

Local boy Danny Stewart had something, and it wasn't just the Sun sound. His voice was just different enough and adaptable enough to have made it, but Stewart had ephemeral involvement in the music scene and he became a newsman on local television and started his own real estate business.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Danny Stewart is a household name in Memphis – and not on the strength of his solitary Phillips International single which sank without a trace in the early months of 1959. He was the former president of Dan Stewart Realtors and his name can still be seen in front yards throughout Memphis, even though he sold the company in 1997 and retired to Atlanta. At one point, he had over 120 agents reporting to him. In 1958, Stewart, newly arrived in Memphis from his native Jackson, Tennessee, gigged around town with a band that included Richard Paige.

They worked as backup musicians for Dickey Lee and the Daydreamers and played their own gigs. Bill Justis invited them to audition at Sun but, by the time Sam Phillips decided that they had some potential, Justis had quit and it was Ernie Barton who engineered the session.

The swamp-poppy ''Somewhere Along The Line'' was seen as the A-side and ''I'll Change My Ways'' was a song that Stewart concocted in the studio. But it was the split-tempo ''I'll Change My Ways'' with that grabbed some airplay in Memphis and parts of Texas. Some, but not much.

Soon after his sole Phillips International single disappeared from view, Stewart married and phased out the band. He worked as a disc jockey and moved into television (Channel 4 in Dallas and Channel 13 in Memphis) before starting his real estate business in 1974. And from that modest beginning sprang a very different kind of success story.

STUDIO SESSION FOR DANNY STEWART
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY MONDAY JANUARY 6, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILL JUSTIS
RECORDING ENGINEER - ERNIE BARTON

Baby-faced Danny K. Stewart, from Jackson, Tennessee, got his initial look in at 706 Union after Bill Justis spotted his band working the Memphis clubs behind Sun artist, Dickey Lee. In terms of influences it would be fair to say that Elvis figured big in Stewart's life, a fact borne out by the vocal mannerisms on his "Somewhere Along The Line". After a spell working in TV and radio he set up a highly lucrative real estate business, selling property in Shelby County.

01 - "SOMEWHERE ALONG THE LINE" - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Don Padgett
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited 
Matrix Number: - P 388 - Master
Recorded: - Probably January 6, 1958
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3561-A < mono
SOMEWHERE ALONG THE LINE / I'LL CHANGE MY WAYS
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Somewhere Along The Line" sounds more like swamp pop than typical Memphis fare. On the flip-side "I'll Change My Ways", all that we're missing is the "Hold it fellas, that don't move me. Let's get real real gone for a change" line. The resemblance to vintage Elvis stops there, however, as this tune might have appeared in a film like "King Creole".

02 - "I'LL CHANGE MY WAYS" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Danny Stewart
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 389 - Master
Recorded: - Probably January 6, 1958
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3561-B < mono
I'LL CHANGE MY WAYS / SOMEWHERE ALONG THE LINE
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

03 - ''SCROUNGIE'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Bill Justis-Sid Manker
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued

04 - ''LITTLE BY LITTLE
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued

05 - ANOTHER DAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Danny Stewart
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet sample mono
ROCK CLASSICS - AMPHETAMING ANNIE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Danny Stewart - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Scotty Moore - Bass
Lee Cornello - Drums
James Terry or Jerry Smoochy Smith - Piano
Bill Justis - Tenor Saxophone
Vernon Drane - Tenor Saxophone
Nelson Grill - Saxophone

For Biography of Danny Stewart see: > The Sun Biographies <
Danny Stewart's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 1958

Sam Phillips apparently signed Ray Smith without seeing him in person. It appears as if there was a demo session on January 10, 1958, followed by three sessions that year. A few Sun session guys, notably Charlie Rich, augmented Smith's group. The Rock And Roll Boys' lead guitarist, Stanley Walker, was originally from Grand River, Kentucky, and he'd met Smith at a skating rink in Metropolis, Illinois. To that point, Walker had only played with a gospel group, the Rambos. His uncle walked up to Smith after the show and asked him to take a listen to the kid.

''First he took me by a club where a band was plying. He had me sit in with that band'', Walker told Sheree Homer. ''Then he took me in to live with him and his family. He gave me three dollars a night. He fed me, clothed me, and gave me a place to sleep. We were as close as brothers''.

JANUARY 1958

As Sun's golden era receded into the past, there were still some artists whose style and approach harked to earlier times. Chief among these was Ray Smith. Armed with as music talent and ambitions as anyone who ever walked into the Sun studio, Smith saw scant success on Sun. Sometimes, as on ''Right Behind You Baby'' (Sun 298), he rocked like a wonderful confluence of Elvis Presley and Billy Riley; other times he sang ballads with mannered but enthralling gusto. On leaving Sun for the first time - he was one of the few to come back - he went to Jud Phillips' Judd label where ''Rockin' Little Angel'' gave him a taste of real chart success, peaking just below the national pop Top Twenty. But then he lost his way and seemed incapable of sustaining a relationship with any label that extended beyond a few singles.

JANUARY 7, 19558 TUESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's two-sided hit ''Don't'' and ''I Beg Of You'' ( RCA Victor 47-7150).

Bobby Helms recorded ''Just A Little Lonesome'' in Nashville at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

JANUARY 8, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis perform on TV ''Big Record Show'', hosted by Patty Page, filmed in New York City.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Ray Smith arrived at Sun Records in Memphis in 1958 with a lot of talent and a lot of hope. He was on the label in the critical years just behind the first wave of artists who defined the rockabilly sound. The label needed someone to take it on another notch when Johnny Cash left and Jerry Lee Lewis's career hit the press barrier.

Ray Smith had the voice and the desire to have been that man. His songs underlined it: ''So Young'', ''Willing And Ready'', ''Rockin'Bandit'', and ''You Made A Hit''.

But he didn't make a hit, to everyone's frustration - that of his manager Charlie Terrell, that of Sam and Jud Phillips of Sun, and not least his own. Instead, Ray Smith mace his mark on popular music history with his big hit, ''Rockin' Little Angel'' on Jud Phillips' Jud Records.

After his brief period as a successful rock and roller, Ray Smith made a good living at times on the night club circuit, the country circuit and later the the revival circuit. He was a really good singer but never managed to recreate the almost magic formula of the Sun and Judd years.

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: EARLY 1958 / PROBABLY FRIDAY JANUARY 10, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLIE RICH
MUSICAL DIRECTOR - BILL JUSTIS

The precise date on Ray's recording at Sun is far from clear. Five songs not released at the time, "Life Is A Flower", "Little Girl", "I Wanna Be Free", "Two Pennies And A String", and "The Girl Meant For Me" were ultimately found in a tapebox that bears the legend "Ray Rockin' Smythe & The Rockin' Rockers". They may have been demos submitted by Terrell in order to obtain Ray's contract, or alternatively they may have been recordings made at a demo session which was logged as taking place on January 10, 1958.

01(1) - "I WANT TO BE FREE" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Jerry Leiber Music - Mike Stoller Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably January 10, 1958
Released: - 2009
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-19 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

01(2) - "I WANT TO BE FREE" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Jerry Leiber Music - Mike Stoller Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably January 10, 1958
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1009-11 mono
I'M RIGHT BEHIND YOUR BABY
Reissued: - 1991 Sun England (CD) 500/200rpm Sun 32-8 mono
RAY SMITH - ROCKIN' WITH RAY

02 - "FOREVER YOURS" - B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably January 10, 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-10-8 mono
SUN RECORDS – THE ROCKIN' YEARS - WILLING AND READY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-20 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03(1) - "LITTLE GIRL" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Charly International APS
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably January 10, 1958
Released: - 2002
First appearance: -2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-21 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

"Little Girl" is one of the rarest titles in the Ray Smith Sun catalogue. Like much of the Smith session file, it is all but impossible to determine information about date and personnel. Having said this, aural evidence strongly suggests that this is a tune written by Charlie Rich.

Listen to the first line of the release. It is virtually identical to the melodic line in "Breakup" - "Don't you remember the time we were so true". It is also probably Rich playing piano on this date.

In fact, there was a strong tie between Charlie Rich and Ray Smith at Sun. Rich wrote (and played on) four of the first six titles Smith recorded for Sun. There is also a wealth of unissued material by both Rich and Smith revealing their connection.

The Charlie Rich tape vault at Sun contains demos like "Deep Freeze" written and or recorded specifically for Smith, and Smith himself, recorded more tunes written by Charlie Rich than by any other Sun composer. The performance here is even more enthusiastic than previously issued versions and shows once again that Stanley Walker was one fine guitarist.

03(2) - "LITTLE GIRL" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Charly International APS
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably January 10, 1958
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1009-7 mono
RAY SMITH - I'M RIGHT BEHIND YOU BABY
Reissued: 1991 Charly (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 32-10 mono
ROCKIN" WITH RAY

03(3) - "LITTLE GIRL" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Charly International APS
Matrix number: - None – Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably January 10, 1958
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405 AH-13 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

04 - "WHY WHY WHY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably January 10, 1958

05 - "BREAK UP" - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably January 10, 1958
Released: - 2009
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-23 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Dean Perkins - Steel Guitar
Stanley Walker - Guitar
James Webb - Bass
Gary Diamond - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

For Biography of Ray Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ray Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

TRUE STORY ABOUT RAY SMITH

Raymond Eugene Smith was born on 30 October 1934 in Melber, Kentucky not far from the town of Paducah. He once described his childhood as, "happy, very sad, poor, and a will to rise above it''. He told: "I was born in the midst of nowhere, thirteen miles west of Paducah out in the country. My dad was a sharecropper and a sheet metal worker. He also worked for the atomic bomb plant in Paducah, organised by former Vice President Barkley. As a kid. I delivered Barkley's newspapers the 'Paducah Sun Democrat'''.

Ray was the seventh child in a large family but somehow his mother found the time to teach him the rudiments of piano playing and to encourage an interest in music. When he had first started school, he went with a recommendation from his mother that he could sing: soon he was persuaded to get up and sing in class, at age six. He later told interviewer Dave Booth. ''I didn't want to do it. Felt like a goddamn fool''.

He didn't have a long or very consistent schooling: "My family and I moved from Melber to County Line Road where we lived at Mr Dowell's farm and from there we moved out in the country close to Mayfield. Kentucky, then to St. John's and another farm on Highway 45 halfway between Paducah and Mayfield. At that time I was nine years old. From there we moved to Lone Oak, west of Paducah, where I attended school for the fourth to eighth grade. My father bought a farm called Pepper's Farm seven miles north of Lone Oak, but by then I had left home - at the age of twelve. After that, my father sold the farm and moved to Paducah. I visited there frequently while working as a helper on a Coca-Cola truck.

Somehow his reputation as a singer stayed with Ray throughout his disrupted and troubled formative years, and not only in school. It followed him through his after-school job as a waiter at Price's Barbecue, through his early employment in the local Coca-Cola bottling plant, to the International Shoe Company where his job was to stick the soles to the uppers. Tired of these kinds of tasks, and not yet thinking of music as a career, Ray Smith the reluctant singer decided in 1952 to join the Air Force. He said, "I joined on July 22, 1952, and had my basic training at Sampson Air Force Base and then transferred to Fort Knox, KY".

After initial training in Kentucky, Smith was posted to California in 1953. His girlfriend. Lillie, followed him west and they were married there in 1953, moving into married quarters at George Air Force Base, Victorville, California. Once again, the story that he was a musician and singer followed Ray Smith, and by now he was taking a real interest in the idea himself. He recalled that his first paid singing job was in Nora's Desert Inn near Barstow in 1953 where he formed a little group in which he played guitar and sang country songs.

Band members included Armand Whitman, brother of the emerging singing star Slim Whitman, and Lee Standerford. Soon the men in his unit encouraged Ray to compete in a forces talent show. He sang ''Lovesick Blues'', and won. He told Dave Booth, "I was strictly a country music fan. I loved Eddy Arnold, Marty Robbins, Faron Young''.

He may even have been a fan of country singer Ray Smith, a Californian twenty years older than our Ray, who became a radio star in New York in the 1940s and who recorded on the major label, Columbia, as well as on Coral, London (as Hank Dalton), National, Continental, and other smaller labels. Our Ray would not, though, have heard of a a young Oklahoman about to embark on a career under the names of Ray Smith and David Ray, known for his rocking recording of ''Jitterbuggin' Baby''. So there was more than one Ray Smith. but no others with the talent of our man.

The early days of rockabilly and rock and roll almost passed our Ray Smith by. He was posted to Chambley Air Force Base near Metz in northeastern France in 1954 for a year and a half, where he lived off base with Lillie and would play country music on weekends and in the evenings. Eventually someone brought a copy of an unusual record to his attention: Ray remembered, "When I was in Metz. I heard Elvis Presley's first record. thought it was shit; I wasn't used to that kind of material, I guess''.

What Ray was used to, apart from Eddy Arnold and Hank Williams and the sounds of Nashville as filtered through Paducah radio, were jazzy popular songs of the kind he heard performed over the radio by Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. He found that his relatively deep voice was more suited to the relaxed style of Eddy Arnold than the keen strains of Hank Williams and, even within country music, he was developing a style based around heavy ballads. At the same time, though, he was also becoming converted to the new sound of rock and roll and trying to figure out how he could be picked up and carried to success by its developing momentum.

Returning to Paducah as a civilian in June 1956 with the aim of starting a career in music, he formed Ray Smith and the Rock & Roll Boys and played in clubs around the Paducah area. The Boys were James Webb, a bass player from Bardwell, Kentucky, Dean Perkins, a guitarist and steel player from Mayfield, Kentucky, guitarist Raymond Jones from Bardwell, and Henry Stevens from the small town with the big name, Metropolis, Illinois on drums.

Sandy Smith, a hometown friend of Ray's wife, said: "I have known Lillie since I was a teenager and Ray was playing every Friday night at the National Guard Armory His nickname for me was 'Bones' because I was so skinny Ray was also very thin''.

Ray Smith remembered the early days. ''We did mostly one-nighters, concerts and night clubs in Kentucky Illinois, Missouri, Tennessee. Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Oklahoma, California, as many states as there are in the USA ... we worked them all. My first radio show was on WMOK, Metropolis, IL. Ed Hills was the announcer and it was the original Ray Smith and the Rock and Roll Boys''. Then I had a radio show in Benton, KY. I also had my own TV show for two and a half years on WPSD, channel six, in Paducah. My announcer was Bill Green. My original sponsor was Beardsley Chevrolet, of Bardwell, KY. We aired every Monday night from 7:00-7:30pm and later on Wednesday from 8:00-8:30: also I was contracted to do my own show on Channel seven in Evansville, Indiana on Saturday afternoons''.

So Ray Smith was an emerging star on his own terms in his own local world. Enter the man with the big cigar. In Ray's case, the catalyst who took him from Metropolis to national TV and from small clubs to Sun Records was Charlie Terrell, the owner of C. W. Terrell Lime Corporation of Sikeston, Missouri. Terrell had his fingers in pies other than lime, and he was always keen to make a buck in a new venture. Not a stranger to controversy - he took out an ad in the 'Sikeston Herald' of July 22, 1954 disassociating himself with a former employee - Terrell was also something of a local patron of good causes, and he soon decided that Ray Smith was a really good cause who could make them both some money.

Charlie Terrell told: ''I had a trucking business, and my involvement in the music business came about gradually. One of my truck drivers, Onie Wheeler, was a budding musician and singer and he came to me and needed some financial help to get on in the music business. I helped him with that and we got him onto OKeh Records, and I just sort of became his manager. Eventually I started to promote shows for him and for other performers. I booked Onie out with Elvis Presley and I booked Presley into shows here in Sikeston. Gradually it all became a bigger deal than it started out to be. I was supposed to be the lime man''.

''One day I saw Ray Smith on a local TV show out of Paducah. He was playing guitar and singing and he had a little band over there. I thought he had talent, and the next week I drove up there and asked him if he had a manager and whether he wanted to get on in his career. He said, sure, did you eversee anybody that wouldn't. 'So I signed him right there at the TV station'', recalled Terrell.

Ray Smith didn't recall it being such a cut and dried deal. He was busy with radio and TV work even without a proper manager. He described how Terrell, ''kept asking me 'When can I meet you for discussion regarding management and a recording contract' and he came to my home three times, and on the third time I drove into my driveway and there was a car sitting in front of my home. The man got out of the car with an attache casein his hand, walked up to me and said 'Are you Ray Smith? I'm Charlie Terrell and this is the third time I've been here. 'We talked business and he said 'If I can get you a contract on a leading label, will you sign with me as your manager? 'I said 'Yes', and just three days later he returned from Memphis, Tennessee with a contract from Sun Records signed by Sam Phillips. I thought, 'this is my man''.

Terrell explained: ''I decided to take Ray Smith to Sam Phillips at Sun because knew Sam through booking Elvis and Onie Wheeler. I knew his label was hot and working in the big time. I thought that he would promote Ray Smith well. So I took an audiotape from one of Ray's TV shows to play for Sam. It was some Elvis songs and some other rock and roll and ballads. It was just before Christmas and one of Ray's songs was ''Christmas Time Pretty Baby'', and Sam just flipped over that. Sam was smart - he knew when he heard talent, and he signed Ray to Sun straight away on the first visit''.

It was probably in January 1958 that Ray Smith first set foot in Memphis and in the Sun studio. It was a strange day - Ray had signed for a label he'd never visited and Sam Phillips had signed an artist he'd never met - and it culminated with the two men turning up at a demo session not being able to recognise each other. Charlie Terrell laughed at the memory: ''At that first session, neither knew who the other was. I had taken Ray down to Memphis shortly after getting him signed, with his band, and we did some songs as a run-through to show Sam exactly what Ray could do. One was ''I Want To Be Free'- that was an early one Ray did''.

By now, Ray Smith was a paid-up convert to the Presley style of rock and roll. He told Dave Booth, ''I got to like his music. Even got to meet him. Played pool at his house''. This definitely had an influence on the sort of music Smith recorded at Sun during 1958 and 1959. Apart from the unissued attempts at a Presley song, ''I Want To Be Free'', written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller for the movie ''Jailhouse Rock'' and issued by Presley on an extended play disc in October 1957 - the influence was more in Ray's vocal delivery and, like Presley, he proved very adept at recording both fast, wild songs and more measured rockaballads. Like everyone else at Sun, Ray was subjected to the Sam Phillips lecture about the importance of feeling over pure technicality, and he was asked to record songs by Sun's in-house group of engineers and musicians; particularly Charlie Rich, Jack Clement and Stanley Kesler.

Charlie Terrell confirmed the sequence of events: ''Along with ''I Want To Be Free'', Ray had a song called ''Little Girl'' that he wanted to record. But we were down there for two or three days, and the next day Sam brought in Charlie Rich to play piano and Jack Clement to make the recordings. Charlie Rich had some songs and they all wanted Ray to do his songs. There was ''Break Up'' and ''So Young'', and some others. Then, after that they brought in Stan Kesler to play on sessions. We had met Stan a little earlier when we recorded Onie Wheeler, and soon Stan was our buddy, and he had some songs for Ray ''Two Pennies And A String'' was his song, an early one that I thought was going to be a record''.

As far as can be pieced together from Sun's recording logs and tape boxes, Ray Smith made recordings in January and March 1958 and from these emerged his first record, the classy rocker ''So Young'' coupled with the all-out screamer ''Right Behind You Baby'', issued on April 9, 1958 on Sun 298.

The initial demo sessions of January 10, 1958, featured Ray's own band, Stanley Walker and Dean Perkins, guitarists, James Webb on bass, and drummer Gary Diamond, along with Sun's staff pianist Charlie Rich. Webb and Diamond had replaced Jones and Stevens in the band. The earliest surviving Ray Smith recordings seem to be a version of Carl Perkins' ''Forever Yours'', where Ray's vocal performance hovers somewhere right in between Presley, Perkins, and Buddy Holly, and where Dean Perkins plays steel guitar, ''I Want To Be Free'', and ''Little Girl''.

These were followed within a few days by the Charlie Rich songs ''Why Why Why'' and ''Breakup''. Lead guitarist Stanley Walker was the main man in the band and remained present through all Smith's early Sun sessions, The other musicians were also fairly constant but (here were some changes in personnel with Stan Kesler and Jimmy Van Eaton taking bass and drums from Webb and Diamond on occasion.

After the January sessions, those of early March 1958 seem to have focused on yet more cuts of ''Break Up'' along with ''So Young'', ''Right Behind You Baby'', and the storming threesome of ''You Made A Hit'', ''Willing And Ready'', and ''Shake Around'', all with a shooting, steely guitar sound effect. They probably also included Stan Kesler's song, ''Two Pennies And A String'', found on its own in a tape box marked 'Ray Rockin Smythe and his Rocking Rockers'. The box - but not the contents - could have been the one in which Charlie Terrell submitted Ray's TV show demos, and on which the name of Ray and his band had been recorded wrongly, but more likely the phrase was a kind of joke by Sun's engineers and producers Jack Clement and Bill Justis.

Ray Smith enjoyed the loose and jokey atmosphere at Sun. He told Dave Booth: "On ''So Young'' I remember Charlie Rich was on piano. The intro and the ending was the same and I remember we faded out on that damned thing. After we'd faded, Charlie was still sitting there playing his lick. Everybody had done stopped and Sam yelled; Charlie, we're done. We're finished!' Charlie was feeling good. He'd reach up, get a drink, never miss a lick'''.

Considering that it was issued in a batch of discs that included Jerry Lee Lewis's ''High School Confidential'' and Johnny Cash's ''Guess Things Happen That Way''. Ray's first Sun disc gained good reviews and good publicity. Billboard said of So Young that it was, "a good, robust sound on a rockabilly tune with typical 'Sun sound" by a strong talent''. The review compared ''Right Behind You Baby'' to Presley's discs and said it was "another fine side by a talented newcomer."

There had been some confusion about what the first Ray Smith record would be. Masters of ''So Young'' and ''Break Up'' were pulled from the session tapes, placed in a separate box, and marked for release on April 10, but these were not in fact issued and ''Right Behind You Baby'' was substituted for ''Break Up''. Charlie Terrell remembered: ''Ray did ''Break Up'' and it was all ready for his first single release but then Jerry Lee Lewis heard Ray's tape and he decided that he wanted the song. He had some influence there with Sam, and Sam let Jerry Lee have it. We were ticked off about that I can tell you''. Lewis's version was issued that August, and it was also recorded by its writer, Charlie Rich.

But Ray was satisfied with ''So Young'' in the end. He said: "So Young'' put me on the 'Dick Clark Show' at the Little Theatre in New York City, which lead to other TV shows such as 'American Bandstand' and other shows all over the nation''. To be more precise, it was Jud Phillips who put Ray on those shows.

Charlie Terrell said: ''As soon as Ray had made his first sessions, we met Sams brother, Jud, who was in charge of promotion for the label. He was a wonderful promotion man and he got Ray onto the Dick Clark TV show in Philadelphia, 'Dance Party', before anyone had ever heard of Ray Smith. He promoted his first record, ''So Young'', on that show. Jud just had a way about him when it came to getting people to take notice''.

So, too, did Ray Smith have a way about him. Don Hindman, his stepbrother recalled: ''I was home from the Air Force on leave. I had a red and white 1957 Chevy with red and black interior back then, and had bought a new red and black shirt with ruffles on the front to go with the interior of the car. Well, when I returned to Andrews air force base. I looked for my shirt and could not find it. I had left it at home right? Not. Ray showed tip on 'American Bandstand' and guess what he was wearing? Yep, my shirt''.

A more important prop for Ray's live appearances and TV slots was his bandleader, Stanley Walker. Charlie Terrell confirmed: "Ray always had his guitar player. Stanley Walker with him on shows, even things like Dick Clark's show in Philadelphia. Stan was the basic of the band and he was always there with Ray, always''. It was Walker who contributed the zippy guitar runs and figures on many Ray Smith recordings, including the rockers ''Willing And Ready'' and ''Shake Around'', unissued back at the time, recorded in March 1958.

In May, another Ray Smith session yielded a range of different styles but little that saw the light of day at the time. Further recordings of a ballad, ''Why Why Why'' were made at the time. along with a northern-influenced pop-rocker, ''Life Is The Flower''.

Ray Smith recalled those sessions fondly. They would often last all night. He told Dave Booth, ''I won $100 off Sam Phillips one time. This was four or five in the morning and we were betting on the first song Hank Williams ever sung on the Opry. I told him it was ''Lovesick Blues'' and Sam said, 'Hell no, It was Mansion On The Hill''. I said, Bullshit! Sam said, ''I'll bet you $100' and I said, 'You're on.' So Sam goes and phones Audrey Williams in Nashville. I said, 'I'm gonna get on the other extension', because I knew Audrey and had backed her up on country shows. Sam said 'Audrey, I'm sitting here with Ray Smith and we got $100 bet on the first song Hank ever sung on the Opry''. She said it was ''Lovesick Blues'', 'and Sam said 'Godamn it, Audrey, you just cost me &100 and he told Sally to go write out a cheque for $100. I shoulda taken that son-of-a-bitch and framed it. But I didn't - I spent it! But Sam is a hell of a guy. Crazy! He'd go a week without shaving. Damned nice guy, though. Started us all".

JOHN WILLIAM (JUD) PHILLIPS - was born in 1921 and lived his early life in Alabama before joining the Marines where he served as a Master Sergeant in the South Pacific for four years during the Second World War. After the war, he stayed on the west coast for a while and worked in artist promotion with a number of big names including Jimmy Durante. Eventually he found his way back home, and by the time Sun Records was formed in 1952 and then relaunched in 1953 he was on hand to help get the label off the ground. Sam Phillips said: ''Jud played a very important part in the early stages of Sun Records.

He kidded everybody about being the world's greatest promotion man, and that wasn't altogether incorrect. But Jud had a versatile mind. He would love to get too many things going at the same time for his own good''.

In 1953, Jud and Nashville music businessman Jim Bulleit each put up a third share in the capital that enabled the relaunch of the Sun label, and they both went on the road promoting records and artists while Sam Phillips concentrated on recording them. Jud and Sam had a close but combative relationship.

They both believed in the concept of Sun and their religious upbringing found expression in how the label promoted the underdog a lot of times, Jud wrote in a letter to Sam from Nashville on July 28, 1953, about the singing group, the Prisonaires, that recorded for Sun even while they were inmates of the state penitentiary: ''I get a great joy out of helping people that I think really appreciate it, and I know you do too'. But business was always business, and in another letter written on August 23, 1954, from radio WJOI in Florence, Alabama - on a letterhead with the slogan 'almost everyone under the Sun listens to... .WJOI'' - Jud was seeking $800 owed to him by Sam. Jud wondered: "Perhaps you have overlooked it? I'm going to the bank in the morning to borrow enough to get by on until I hear from you". A year later, the exchange was still continuing, and Sam wrote to Jud: ''I will pay when I can, even though I know there is no way to get out with a dollar".

That conviction proved incorrect, of course, when Sun was able to pay its debts with the sale of Elvis Presley's contract and to start to develop into a big player on the recording scene with the likes of Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis. Jud Phillips was involved in transporting all of these artists way beyond their rural routes and onto national TV and international music sales. In particular, he worked with Jerry Lee Lewis, whom he saw as a major star. Jud was responsible for the promotion strategy that led to Lewis's success, and he later advised and helped manage Lewis for many years in the 1960s and 1970s. He stood by Lewis after the teenage bride scandal and, according to his nephew, Johnny Phillips: "Uncle Jud was maybe the only person Jerry Lee Lewis ever really trusted''.

His nephew, Knox Phillips said: "In a time before there was a definition for a promotion man, Jud was the person that people patterned themselves after. I never met a single person that didn't like him, from industry people to the artists. He was the consummate charismatic communicator. The techniques that he developed in the fifties are still being used. Maybe refined a little, but I doubt it''.

But those techniques involved money: Jud Phillips was a stylish dresser, and an epic wheeler-dealer - a man with an eye for the main chance. He once joked to Sun recording artist Billy Riley, ''when I'm gone, it'll take every accountant in Tennessee to straighten out all my deals."

Jud told in 1973, some fifteen years after the event: ''The Judd label came about when Sam and I had a real separation of the ways, based on Jerry Lee Lewis. And, then, the payola investigations were just under way at that time, and a lot of people thought that I had paid disc jockeys and different people to help us promote artists and so forth, haven't been an angel - but I don't think I've ever done anything wrong in the industry, because t don't see that I've promoted anybody that's been bad for the industry''.

"How the Judd label came about - there were a bunch of moneyed people, people that had a lot of money They wanted me to divorce myself from the shackles of Sam and to get into it myself and they put up all the money I think they put up. I believe it was a million dollars, and they gave me one third of it to produce and to merchandise and all. Al McLendon, he was a doctor - there were three doctors in it, Dr McLendon, Dr Maxwell, and Dr Wright. I can't think of all the people. Anyhow, they put the money up and gave me no questions at all. Sun had nothing whatsoever to do with Judd Records. At that time, Sun was Sam, and he's never had a hit since I left the Sun company. He's never got in the charts. We cut 11 - no, we cut 14 masters on the Judd label and we had 11 pick hits in 'Billboard' - he was insanely jealous''.

The reality was similar to Jud's exposition, but not quite as well funded or as successful as Jud remembered it. He ran the label out of his home in Alabama at first, although his records carried the impressive strapline "Judd Records - New York, Muscle Shoals, Hollywood''. It seems that somehow the label designer got their wires crossed with Jud and the result was a record label called Judd and not Jud. Charlie Terrell said "Jud's brother, Tom Phillips, set up the distribution for the Judd label and he was very much involved with that''. The label had issued at least seven and possibly fifteen singles - none of them earth shattering - before Ray Smith turned upon Judd 1016 in August 1959. The first was Judd 1001 by Bobby Denton, a recent high school graduate from Cherokee, just outside Florence, later a local politician and businessman but then singing about going ''Back To School'' and ''Sweet And Innocent'', the very song that Roy Orbison would cover within a matter of weeks in his RCA debut, it was reviewed in the trade press on August 25, 1958.

Other Jud discs included ''The Creels'' with ''Do You Wanna Jump'', Mark Taylor with Linda Lou, and Morris Simmons, a protege of bandleader Pee Wee Maddux with ''Sharlene''. In May 1959 came a rare solo outing by Sun's session guitarist extraordinaire, Roland Janes, ''Guitarville'', underlining the fact that Bill Justis was now involved with production work for Judd Records. Justis was known for slanguage that tended to put "ville"at the end of everything. There were other discs by Bobby Denton among Jud Phillips' roster of Alabama, Memphis, and Nashville artists. There was also the strange case of Judd 1007, Curley Money singing ''Gonna Rock'', because that disc gave the label's address as 812 161 Ave South Nashville.

It took a little time for Ray Smith to enter the Judd Records story. Charlie Terrell eventually secured his release from his contract with Sun and, according to Terrell: ''There was a song called ''Rockin' Little Angel'' that Jud heard by a band of four black boys from Mobile, Alabama. They had it on a little disc down there, called ''Rock And Roll Angel''. Jud told me about it and soon after when it was in Mobile I heard it too. So we decided it was right for Ray to record, but my wife, Joanne Terrell, changed the song to ''Rockin' Little Angel''. The idea was to soften it a little, as we all thought that the harder rock and roll wouldn't last. Jud paid $600 to hire RCA studio B in Nashville and we had Chet Atkins and Grady Martin, Bob Moore, Floyd Cramer, all the top players, and the Jordanaires singing back-up. Bill Justis was the engineer - I was the one who loaned him the money to move to Nashville from Memphis. We recorded ''Rockin' Little Angel'' and ''That's All Right'' and after we'd done it Chet Atkins liked the songs so much he called Steve Sholes at RCA head office and they wanted to buy the tapes. Jud wouldn't let them go. though. He had faith in Ray Smith''.

According to Jud's son, also named Jud, "Chet Atkins called Steve Sholes and said he had a talent in the studio on a rental session that was worth looking at for RCA. Sholes reportedly called my father and offered $10, 000 advance to Smith and that RCA would take over the sessions from that point. Apparently my father turned down the offer''.

However, Jud Phillips did go for an alternative deal involving Bill Lowery's National Recording Corporation out of Atlanta, Georgia. Jud issued an initial pressing of Judd 1016, ''Rockin' Little Angel'' and ''That's All Right'' at his own expense, and it was reviewed in the trade press in August 1959. When the record started to hit, all subsequent copies bore the legend -'Subsidiary of National Recording Corp Atlanta'. Charlie Terrell remembered it this way: ''I instigated the deal where NRC became involved with Judd Records. I knew Bill Lowery pretty good, and told him about Ray Smiths abilities and the great new record he had on Judd. So Bill called Jud and wanted to get involved. Lowery and NRC paid for all Ray's Judd sessions after the first one, and they were all made at RCA in Nashville''.

Bill Lowery had just started in the record business having emerged from the radio and publishing businesses and he was on his way to building a real music empire in Atlanta. By 1970, the Lowery group of music publishing companies was the second largest measured in 'Billboard' chart hits. Lowery's catalog included ''Young Love''. ''Games People Play'', ''Dizzy'', ''Walk On By'', and many others by his stable of artists and writers including Joe South, Tommy Roe, Jerry Reed. Ray Stevens, The Tams, Ric Cartey, Kenny Hayes, Billy Joe Royal, and a host of others. Even Lowery's vice president was named Mary Tallent! In 1970, 'Billboard' reported: "The Bill Lowery complex is about as complex as a complex can be'', and described Lowery as "the unquestioned head of commercial music in Atlanta... and a man who simply doesn't know how to slow down''.

Lowery was from Leesburg. Louisiana, born in 1924, and he had lived and worked in radio variously in California, then Shreveport, Hot Springs, Arkansas, Oklahoma City, Wichita Falls, and Elizabethton, Tennessee by the time he was 23 years old. In Elizabethton at WBET he became the youngest radio station manager in the country in 1947. In 1949 he helped set up the programming format of a new station. WQXI in Atlanta, and in 1951 he was on the much bigger Atlanta station, WGST where one of his many roles was as Uncle Ebeneezer Brown, a country character and disc jockey. While doing this he began developing and booking talent, and from there he got into publishing with his musician partner Dennis 'Boots' Woodall, starting with a gospel song by Joseph 'Cotton' Carrier. Lowery soon developed a link with Capitol Records producer Ken Nelson. In 1956, he picked up the publishing on Gene Vincent's ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'', and didn't look back.

In 1957 Lowery started to dabble in recording with the Fox label and the Stars label, recording at WGST. In March 1958, he set up National Recording Corp. and started issuing discs on the NRC label. 'Billboard' reported: "A new label N.R.C. (which stands for National Recording Corporation) has been setup in Atlanta, Georgia. by Bill Lowery. Latter is the publisher of such recent hits as ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'', ''First Date, First Kiss'', and ''Young Love''. Lowery has already cut his firms first release with youngster Paul Peek, formerly of Gene Vincent's Blue Caps''. Lowery had a recording studio in Atlanta in a former school building. He soon set up the Scottie and Jax labels, and diversified his operations, setting up a publishing office in Nashville (1958 to 1961), a distribution operation in Birmingham (from April 1959), and a record pressing plant in Atlanta. It was at this time that he started taking on other record labels for pressing and distribution.

On October 5, 1959, 'Billboard' announced'. "The NRC record company here (Atlanta) has just purchased Jud Phillips' Jud label, which currently has a promising single in Ray Smith's ''That's All Right''. Phillips is joining NRC's offices here and will work on promotion for both Judd and NRC labels."

It seems that Jud did a pretty good job of promoting Ray Smith. By January 22, 1960, ''Rockin' Little Angel'' was at number 22 in the national popular sales charts. On the back of the hit, Smith's band was renamed the Rockin' Little Angels and Jud was again able to get him some good TV exposure and prestigious show dates. Ray Smith appeared on 'American Bandstand' and a number of one-nighter tours for Dick Clark, Charlie Terrell described Jud at work: "When he was promoting Ray Smith to TV producers or show promoters, Jud Phillips used to say if you think Jackie Wilson's a talent, then you ought to see Ray Smith''. Smith himself said, on a live recording made in 1962, '"Rockin' Little Angel'' did pretty good for me, due to payola".

Jud Phillips recycled a big tour bus that he had bought for Jerry Lee Lewis at the height of his initial success. Jud's son felt that "Jud - my father b- conceived and built the first customised rock and roll tour bus which he used to promote Ray Smith. It was fully equipped with shower stereo system throughout. TV. telephone. comfortably slept eight: this was unheard of in 1959". Ray Smith certainly appreciated the bus. In later years he described it as 'having running hot maids and water, "while his wife looked back on it as "a whorehouse on wheels".

How appropriate, then that the next release on Judd Records was Ray Smith's version of ''Put Your Arms Around Me Honey'', Judd 1017, issued in the spring of 1960 and reviewed in Billboard' that April. It was recorded on February 23, 1960 at the first of three sessions funded by NRC for Judd. Charlie Terrell remembered them well: "I attended all Ray's recording sessions in those early years. Never missed a one. I was a bit older than Ray, but we were very friendly from the start and I treated him like he was my son. Our families were real close, and for years, everything he did, I was there. They called us the 'Missouri Mafia''.

''Put Your Arms Around Me Honey'' was backed by a ballad, ''Maria Elena'', and it made its way slowly to just number 71 on the popular charts by May 1960. According to the recording logs of bass player Bob Moore, demo sessions had been held on February 1, for three hours, for which Moore was paid $30, and on February 9, for one hour. The master sessions were on Tuesday February 23 at 7.00 pm followed by another at 11:30, both of which ran over the allotted three hour timeslots. The session included a number of other songs including the ones chosen for Ray Smith's third Judd single, Judd 1019 issued in June 1960, which coupled One Wonderful Love with It Makes Me Feel Good. This one was a good pop-rock record but it failed to make the charts at all.

Smith was still in demand for live performances though, based on his own talent and the promotional work of Jud Phillips. Charlie Terrell confirmed: ''In the days when he was with Judd and Sun. Ray was on some rock 'n roll package shows, but he was a showman in his own right. He could carry a show himself. He was playing some very big and very nice night clubs, and we took him out to Vegas. He played the Golden Nugget and so on''.

In October 1960 came Ray's fourth and final single, Judd 1021, ''Blonde Hair Blue Eyes'' and ''You Don't Trust Me'', and an LP called ''Travelin With Ray'', Judd LP 701. This single and some of the album tracks were made on Tuesday March 15, 1960 in two sessions at RCA, one at 8:00pm and another night session at 11:00pm. Once again, these sessions were produced by Bill Justis.

The LP collected most of Ray's singles alongside some unissued songs. Overall, it reveals a man working within the parameters of rock and roll and the softening sounds of 1960 popular music, but who was nevertheless capable of a wide range of good music. Rockers like ''That's All Right'', and Charlie Rich's ''Rebound'' sit well alongside catchy and classy soft rockers and Dean Martin-inspired ballads that included ''You Don't Want Me, You Make Me Feel Good'' and ''I'll Be Coming Home''. Smith benefitted at this time from the contacts Bill Justis and Bill Lowery had with a number of good young songwriters, including Marijohn Wilkin and Ray Stevens.

There were to be no more Ray Smith discs on Judd, however. Despite Smith's hits and two successful discs by Tommy Roe in 1960, including the big hit ''Sheila'' (spelled ''Shiela'' on the record label), Bill Lowery's NRC operation went bankrupt. It was caught in the well-known trap of being unable to collect funds from distributors fast enough to keep up with the outgoings. Lowery ran other small labels later, and guitarist Stanley Walker recorded a single on the Lowery Records label, but in the main Bill Lowery decided to focus on publishing as his main business, Jud Phillips decided to stick to artist promotion and other acivities outside music, and Charlie Terrell was left looking for another deal for Ray Smith.

He found a potentially big deal in March 1961 with Infinity Records, based in California and part of the Howard Hughes empire. Bill Justis produced two Nashville sessions for the label but the promises of a big promotional push for Ray never came to fruition and soon Terrell was again looking fora new deal.

He found one in the summer of 1961 - Ray Smith was back at Sun Records for a second time. Probably he was not displeased to have a crack at being on Sun in its new Nashville phase. When asked once what he remembered most about being on Sun, he replied, simply, "Happiness, parties, etc'. On October 24, 1961 at ten in the evening he went into Sam Phillips' Nashville studio and worked all night, recording four songs that appeared on his last two Sun singles. Charlie Terrell remembered it well. "When Ray went back to Sun Records after Judd, we used the new studio in Nashville. Sam owned and built the studio, and Sam was there at the session, though we still had Bill Justis producing and engineering. He had Billy Sherrill as his electrician and helper. It was a good session with a lot of fine musicians. Pig Robbins was the pianist, and Bob Moore was the bass player''.

Sun 372 was issued on November 21, 1961, and teamed the catchy mid-tempo tale about the exploits of the ''Travlin' Salesman'' with the sincere and measured ballad ''I Won't Miss You Til You Go''. Less than three months later, on February 9, 1962, came Sun 375 which contained two more good contenders for pop success in Candy Doll and Hey Boss Man. Neither of Ray's last two Sun discs fared very well in the marketplace and Charlie Terrell was soon back out there looking for another deal. He found a small one, with Roland Janes Rita Records in Memphis, and a potentially bigger one with Vee-Jay in Chicago.

Neither worked out well, and Ray next did the rounds, to Warner Bros., Smash, Tollie, Celebrity Circle, and Diamond. Around 1966 the options dried up and Smith made three singles for BC, a label owned by Charlie Terrell himself, By now, Smith had long since lost his guitarist, Stanley Walker, who went to work for singer Jean Shepard appearing on the Grand Ole Opry and the 'Hee Haw' TV show.

In 1967, Ray Smith decided to move his family to Burlington, Ontario to play the club circuit in southeastern Canada. He was disillusioned with recording and found Ontario a better base for touring in the northern part of the USA. He said that it gave him better media exposure too: "I had TV shows all over Canada. on Channel 9. Toronto. Channel 11 Hamilton and Ottawa Channel 12''.

His music was now moving back towards country. He recorded into the 1970s on another string of labels, from Caravan to Corona, and on to Zirkon and Celebrity Circle. In 1972 he had a small hit on Nashville's hot label, Cinnamon, but it was then that his long association with Charlie Terrell ended. According to Terrell: "Ray was making good money playing good clubs and venues, and he was driving Cadillacs - but his biggest fault was that he didn't want to get out and do any promotional work, I continued to manage him even after he moved borne to Canada but I was unable to get him to follow up on the good opportunities we had. I was busy with other things and couldn't chase him all round the country and we just had to drop out of that arrangement. Ray was always a drinker - but it got more and more as time went on''. Ray's step brother, Don Hindman, said: "Ray had talent, but he just wouldn't leave the booze alone''.

Ray Smith ended his recording career several years later on small Canadian labels like Wix and Boot. By then, he was recording for the rock and roll revival market and combining his own songs with interpretations of songs by Presley, Lewis, and the other big leaguers. Originally a rhythm guitarist on stage, Ray had always played piano too, though not on records, and he now started to make the piano more of a feature in his act. Reviewing an album on Wix, writer Bill Millar found. 'Smith pounds the piano with a ferociousness fit to upset the Richter Scale, and his under-developed sense of accuracy - on a par with Esquerita - simply adds to the fun''.

In 1978 and 1979, Smith toured the revival scene in England and other countries in Europe. It was to mixed reviews. In London, too much beer consumed before a show found Bill Millar among an audience suffering "fluffed words, unexpected screams and general ineptness.., he tried to kick the piano stool and missed.... a unique theatrical experience''. Yet other shows from the period were a resounding success and, on his more sober days, it was still easy in the late 1970s to see through the years and back to the real Ray Smith - the man who had so impressed Charlie Terrell and Sam and Jud Phillips. The man with one of the best and most adept voices in popular music, the man with the ability to sell a song both on record and on stage, the showman who was at home with the piano or the guitar, and with the music of the million dollar quartet or the ratpack. The man with a line in witty or sarcastic quips, and with a desire to succeed.

Success in Ray Smith's personal life came and went the same way it did in his career. On November 29, 1979, he went to visit his estranged wife, Lillie, apparently to talk about him coming back home. The conversation didn't go well. According to Charlie Terrell: "After he was in Canada, Ray was popping pills as well as drinking. He committed suicide after he came back from a tour. He'd been on prozac from a doctor, and he had these personal problems. He'd been messing around with a secretary near Hamilton, Ontario and he came off tour to see his wife to get her back. She took him back many times before, but this time she wouldn't do it. He was depressed - he couldn't stand any kind of rejection. He took a gun from the drawer and shot himself. Their son was right there in the house''. Terrell was one of the pallbearers at Ray Smith's funeral on December 2, 1979.

The Phillips brothers survived Ray Smith by over one and two decades respectively. Jud Phillips died on July 20, 1992 in Memphis, from throat cancer. He had continued in some aspects of artist promotion for many years after giving up Judd Records as well as running a number of other businesses including a bottling plant in his home town of Florence, Alabama. Sam Phillips died in July 2003 in Memphis. Bill Lowery died in Atlanta in 2004.

The last link to Ray Smith and the Rock & Roll Boys is manager Charlie Terrell, and the last active member was Stanley Walker, whose band was still advertised in the 'Paducah Sun in 2006, playing local fairs and old peoples tea dances. Not a fate that Ray Smith would have aspired to, and not one the highly talented, highly strung, and intermittently focused singer was ever likely to have achieved.

JANUARY 1958

Toward the middle of the week, Sun secretary Barbara Barnes was beginning to feel frustrated. Still no Sam. Almost every day musicians would be in the studio playing sometimes rehearsing tunes with our unofficial house band, other times, Jack Clement might be having a session with musicians she didn’t recognize. Back in her office, she could hear and almost feel through the walls the bass going ''thump, thump'', a sound that got integrated into her nervous system through her years at Sun. There wasn't much drinking during the daytime, but often she could tell from the wastebaskets in the morning that there were some festive night sessions going on.

It was after one of these that Regina Reese and Barbara Barnes came in one morning to find Jack Clement looking disheveled and obviously drunk, having spent the entire night with the musicians in the studio. The other guys had left, but Jack was sitting at Sally Wilbourn desk and in the mood to talk. He and Regina had dated before Barbara came to Sun, so their relationship was sometimes a little edgy. She looked at him warily as he talked of one thing and another, occasionally pausing to sing s phrase of a song. He had a tic that made one of his eyes blink off and on. Then he addressed Barbara. ''Barbara Barnes'', he said. He said again. ''B.B. That's your name, I'm going to call you B.B.'', and then he started to muse about what he wanted to do that day. The girls were paying half-attention until he said what he wanted to do was have sex. But he hated to get all cleaned up, call a girl, take her out, and go through all that routine. He just wanted to have sex. Barbara hadn't heard a guy speak his thoughts quite so bluntly before, but Regina and Barbara both just nodded. Then Jack looked to Barbara and said, ''Do you ever wake up horny? Wait, let me give you my phone number''. He tore a little pink slip from Sally's phone pad and wrote down his phone number. ''You cab call me any morning. Just call that number. Barbara said, ''Thank you, Jack''.

Then Jack got up and left. The girls didn't hear of any accidents or arrests, so the girls assumed he made it home to sleep it off. By late afternoon Jack was back, refreshed, ready to get back at the task of finding songs and talent, making recordings like a good A&R man.

JANUARY 13, 1958 MONDAY

After three months on the air, ''The Guy Mitchell Show'' is telecast for the final time on ABC. The theme is a song associated with Marty Robbin's ''Singing The Blues''.

JANUARY 14, 1958 TUESDAY

''Don't Fence Me In'' songwriter Cole Porter enters New York's Columbia Presbyterian Hospital with an infection in his leg bones.

JANUARY 15, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Elvis Presley recorded ''Hard Headed Woman'' for the movie ''King Creole'' at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

Keyboard player Kurt Howell is born in Winter Haven, Florida. He joins breezy West Coast band Southern Pacific, which hits the top 10 four times during the late-1980s, reaching number 2 with ''New Shade Of Blue''.

JANUARY 17, 1958 FRIDAY

On a dark and gloomy Friday morning at the end of January 1958, the front door crashed open, a booted foot kicked in before the whole person could be seen, and there appeared Jerry Lee Lewis in the flesh. Barbara Barnes had anticipated this moment, and now, she was finally getting to meet the singer she had been praising in print and conversation since last summer. She wasn't surprised by his swagger, that redneck stride that announced ''better not get in my way'', but Barbara was unprepared to see how young he looked, and how tall.

Maybe he looked shorter in pictures because he was usually seated at a piano. The famous mop of hair was quite noticeable, long only on top and wavy, and he had barely gotten inside the door when he whipped out a comb from his back pocket and ran it through the peroxided golden locks.

Perhaps ''immature'' is the better word, not ''young'', but Barbara wouldn't have guessed she were about the same age. Maybe he seemed young because his father had come up with him from Ferriday, Louisiana. Elmo was even taller than Jerry Lee by a few inches, maybe six feet four, rail thin, with long arms that hung limply from stooped shoulders. His complexion was gray, and he wore a suspicious expression that made me shrink a little (maybe a hint of violence?). It was very clear that he was possessive and proud of his son and had come to defend him from whatever threats might exist at 706 Union. Barbara had seen people like this walking the streets of South End in Corinth, but a person not from the South might say he looked like those photos of Okies on their trek to California during the Depression or Kentucky moonshiners the way the movies showed them to be.

Receptionist Regina Reese called Jack Clement to the front to greet the visitors. Jack and Jerry Lee got along well because it was Jack who had discovered him for Sun Records, and they probably wanted to talk about the session that was scheduled for the next day. Off they went to Taylor's cafe for some lunch.

JANUARY 18, 1958 SATURDAY

The next afternoon when Barbara Barnes again saw Jerry Lee Lewis, he was in full character. The person she saw this time, singing and playing the piano, was not a kid but a man, a roiling, explosive package of energy and sound. Normally, she didn't work on Saturday, but Sam Phillips had asked her to entertain Jerry Shifrin, a Roulette Records promotion man who from New York was in town. Jerry would doubtless have preferred to be with Sam, but Sam was hard to pin down. Shifrin had said on the phone he was headed our way on a sales tour through the South, but he might have been scouting talent in the way the Atlantic and Imperial guys, among others, had been doing for a long time.

Barbara picked him up at his hotel in a rental car and showed him the Mississippi River Bridge, drove him through Overton Park and Zoo, and took him to lunch before facing the inevitable. She had to take him to the studio, which she knew would compare poorly with what she imagined to be a sophisticated Roulette studio in New York. The Sun studio was about twenty by thirty-five feet, had five mikes, a few metal folding chairs, a piano, and the usual debris the musicians generated.

On the way to the studio, Barbara told Jerry Shifrin the story of how Jerry Lee Lewis had first come to Sun in the fall of 1956. Sam was out of town, but Jerry insisted that somebody hear him. Sally Wilbourn buzzed Jack Clement in the control room and repeated to him what Jerry Lee had told her, that he played piano like Chet Atkins played the guitar. Jerry Lee sat down at the piano and proved it by plating ''Wildwood Flower''. That sounded pretty good to Jack, so he asked him what else he had. Billy Riley was there, too, with his bass tuned up to accompany the audition if need be. Jerry elected to do ''Crazy Arms'', and Jack rolled the tape.

When Sam returned and Jack played the tape for him, Sam exclaimed, ''I can sell that''. So ''Crazy Arms'', paired with ''End Of The Road'', was duly issued, and it was only a year later that Jerry's big hit, ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On'', electrified the country. Barbara told him the story of how she came to be with Sun, about answering Jerry Lee's fan mail, but now Kay Martin and Elaine Berman Orlando, who had formed the Jerry Lee Lewis fan club, had taken over that task.

When the two arrived at the studio, they took the chance to walk to the control room during a break in taping and Barbara introduced Jerry Shifrin to Jack Clement. Jack and the musicians went right ahead rehearsing numbers were possible for the B-side of Jerry's next release. Since ''Great Balls Of Fire'' was approaching a million in sales, they had again called on the noted songwriter Otis Blackwell for a follow-up for Jerry Lee, who didn't usually write his own material. They had been working on that number, ''Breathless'', before we arrived, Jack said, and it was coming along.. Now they were considering several songs, including Roy Orbison's ''Down The Line'', which was eventually picked for the flip side. Sam would like the fact that Sun was to have in-house publishing for that one.

Jerry Lee was sitting at the piano bare-chested. It was wintertime, but the studio was fairly warm, and Jerry he'd worked up a good sweat with his muscular piano playing. Barbara had heard he gave it his all, whether for 10 people or 10,000, and the evidence was right before her eyes, this was a show. His pants were riding well below his waistline, exposing hid ''outie''. The studio was smokey and littered with beer cans, and Jerry Lee was talking back and forth to Jack Clement in the control room between takes or whenever Jack interrupted to start a new take.

Barbara was standing behind Jack in the control room and Jerry Shifrin was at her side. She would have liked it to be a prettier scene, and Barbara must have shaken her head just imagining what the visitor must think. After Barbara left, Jerry Shifrin told her how impressed he was with the sound they hearing in the control room, the famous ''Sun Sound''. As a person in sales, Jerry was more concerned with Sun's track record than an untidy studio or even Jerry's unkempt appearance. Barbara knew the industry and the fans had great respect for the success of the label. She just wished we could have greater pride in the appearance.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jerry Lee Lewis' early 1958 sessions involved the recording of numerous other items of substantial merit that were initially laid aside, amongst them covers of songs associated with Elvis Presley (''Jailhouse Rock'', ''Hound Dog'', ''Good Rockin' Tonight'', and ''Don't Be Cruel'') and Hank Williams (Your Cheatin' Heart), together with a straight blues, ''Hello Hello Baby''. In a brave move on Sam's part, the lattermost would find a place on Jerry Lee Lewis' second album some three years after its taping but the release of the Presley related material had to await a rather longer passage of time.(*)

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY JANUARY 16 TO SATURDAY JANUARY 18, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

This 1958 version of ''I Love You Because'' is performed at a very slow and plodding tempo, though it's not without its charm and features some nice piano. This remained unissued until the 1983 ''The Sun Years'' boxset. Far better is the faster 1961 version (though the backing singers are a bit annoying), first released on ''Original Golden Hits Volume Three'' in 1971. Lastly is the beautiful 1969 version, released on ''Country Music Hall Of Fame Hits Volume 1''.

1(1) - ''I LOVE YOU BECAUSE'' (1) - B.M.I. - 3:02
Composer: - Leon Payne
Publisher: - Bourne Music - Acuff Rose Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-A3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1-19 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"I Love You Because" is a 1949 song written and originally recorded by Leon Payne. The single went to number four on the Billboard Country & Western Best Seller lists and spent two weeks at number one on the Country & Western Disk Jockey List, spending a total of thirty-two weeks on the chart. "I Love You Because" was Payne's only song to make the country charts. "I Love You Because" has been covered by several artists throughout the years like Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Hank Locklin and many more.

In 1950, Ernest Tubb a number 2 and Clyde Moody each recorded their own version both making the Top 10 on the Country & Western charts. In 1963, Al Martino recorded the most successful version of the song peaking at number three on the Hot 100 and number one on the Middle-Road (or Easy Listening) chart for two weeks in May that year.

In 1964, Jim Reeves took the song to number five in the United Kingdom. In 1976, the song was the title track of a posthumous Jim Reeves album, which peaked at number 24 on the Billboard Country chart. The single version reached to number 54 in the United States that year. In 1983, Roger Whittaker got the song "into the lower reaches of the country chart''.

The 1956/1957 version of ''I Love You Because'' is performed at a very slow and plodding tempo, though it’s not without its charm and features some nice piano. This remained unissued until the 1983 ''The Sun Years'' box-set. Far better is this faster June 1961 version (though the backing singers are a bit annoying), first released on ''Original Golden Hits Volume Three'' in 1971. Lastly is the beautiful 1969 version, released on ''Country Music Hall Of Fame Hits Vollume 1''.

2 - "I LOVE YOU SO MUCH IT HURTS" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Floyd Tilman
Publisher: - Lane Publications
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 114-A2 mono
A TASTE OF COUNTRY
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1-7 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"I Love You So Much It Hurts" is a song written and recorded by Floyd Tillman in 1948. His version reached number 6 on the Folk Best Seller charts and spent a total of nineteen weeks on the chart. In 1948, Jimmy Wakely had his second number one on the Folk Best Seller chart with his version of the song. Wakely's version spent a total of twenty-eight weeks on the chart and four non-consecutive weeks at the top. In 1949, the Mills Brothers recorded a version of the song which reached number eight on the Race Records chart and number eight on the pop chart.

Other sigificant recordings included, Charlie Gracie in 1957; Jerry Lee Lewis on the album ''A Taste Of Country (Sun International LP 114) released on April 1970; Patsy Ann Noble in 1960; Bob Luman in 1960, on the album ''Let's Think About Livin'''; Tennessee Ernie Ford in 1961, on the album ''Tennessee Ernie Ford Looks At Love''; Patsy Cline in 1961, on the album ''Patsy Cline Showcase''.; Ray Charles in 1962, on the album ''Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music''; George Morgan with Marion Worth in 1964, on the album ''Slippin' Around''; Don Gibson in 1968; Andy Williams in 1974 on his album, ''You Lay So Easy On My Mind; and John Prine in 1995, on the album ''Lost Dogs And Mixed Blessings'' respectively.

3 - "I'M SORRY, I'M NOT SORRY" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-B7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-8 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

This recording by Jerry Lee Lewis was for the first time recorded by Carl Perkins for Sun on March 1956 that featured material admittedly composed by somebody else. The song had been written by Wanda Bellman, an aspiring, singer/songwriter from Jonesboro, Arkansas. She submitted the song via demo to Sam and went from being an unknown to a professional almost overnight when her copyright appeared on one side of a Carl Perkins record (Sun 249) and released on August 3, 1956. Pretty impressive stuff. We do know that Wanda engaged in an extended correspondence with Sam Phillips throughout this period. He stoked Wanda's fires even higher when he had her come to Memphis in 1957 and record five sides. None were released at the time although they continue to be resurrected on Sun reissues internationally. It is possible that Sam, being Sam, made the most of Wanda Ballman's enthusiasm when he acted as her a new found benefactor and champion. In later years, Wanda persevered and had her material recorded by main stream artists like Loretta Lynn and Charley Pride.

4(1) - "SEXY WAYS" (1) - B.M.I. - 0:30
Composer: - Hank Ballard
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start – Breakdown
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-10 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Although Jerry attempted the song at two different sessions during this 1958 session, he never actually sung “Sexy Ways”, during his first attempt in January he changed the lyrics to “Cool Cool Ways”, and then in April this became “Carrying On”. Both are impressive, but none of them were released until a couple of compilations in 1974. By 1965 the world had changed a little and he finally felt brave enough to record the proper lyrics: with a superb drums and cymbals intro (probably by Buddy Harmon) this inspired performance was one of the many highlights of ''The Return Of Rock'' later that year.

4(2) - "COOL, COOL WAYS (SEXY WAYS)" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Hank Ballard
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1974
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 300002-B5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AND HIS PUMPING PIANO
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-11 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

5(1) - "GO! GO! GO! (DOWN THE LINE)" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-27 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

On Jerry Lee Lewis' return to the Sun studio in mid-January 1958, Sam Phillips also persuaded Jerry Lee to redefine Roy Orbison's ''Go, Go, Go'' as the moody rocker ''Down The Line'' for the flip of the planned release, Sun 288, to ensure that fifty percent of the publishing credits from the new 45 would accrue to Sun itself, whatever was on the A-side. Whereas ''Breathless'' won the day for Blackwell and proved to be Lewis's third gold disc, Hammer's ''Milkshake Mademoiselle'' was destined to remain unheard for some fifteen years, although neither song was to be blessed with an easy gestation in the studio.(*)

In spite of that, all concerned arrived at a suitable arrangement for ''Down The Line'' without any obvious angst, with Jerry Lee once again employing the by now familiar riff to open proceedings. The impression is gained that during the course of taping the first four takes something of a party atmosphere prevailed, but a change in attitude is discernible in the fifth take, maybe a day or two later, where the pace is stepped up a couple of gears and everyone appears to be much more focussed on the job in hand. Jerry Lee experiments a little more with the lyrics on the first couple of attempts, losing concentration during the solos, and at this stage no-one seems certain as to how to wrap things up with conviction. By take 7, however, that problem has been ironed out and they're ready to move on and what proves to be the master.(*)

5(2)(3) - "GO! GO! GO! (DOWN THE LINE)" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - 2 False Starts - Take 2
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-B6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-7 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

5(4) - "GO! GO! GO! (DOWN THE LINE)" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - July 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (EP) 45rpm JLL EP 001-B2 mono
THE FABULOUS JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-30 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

5(5) - "GO! GO! GO! (DOWN THE LINE)" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First a ppearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-11-6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-31 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

5(6) - "GO! GO! GO! (DOWN THE LINE)" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-B8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-32 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

5(7) - "GO! GO! GO! (DOWN THE LINE)" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 6
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-6 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-33 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

5(8) - "GO! GO! GO! (DOWN THE LINE)" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 7
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-11-7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-34 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

5(9) - "GO! GO! GO! (DOWN THE LINE)" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 290 - Master Take 8
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1957
Released: - February 17, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 288-A < mono
DOWN THE LINE / BREATHLESS
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

More serious rockabilly fans were instantly enamored with "Down The Line", of course a reworking of Roy Orbison's timeless "Go Go Go", which had adorned the flipside of Orbison's 1956 hit "Ooby Dooby". True to his edict, Sam Phillips selected this take that was long on feeling, if a bit short on technical perfection. From the first eight bars, you know this is a good one. Jerry's tight little combo cooks beautifully with the bass and guitar complementing his piano boogie. But then the seams start to show. Jerry Lee demonstrates his well known flair for blowing lyrics and ends up mumbling his way through the chorus. Worse yet, by the fourth bar of the solo, it has become painfully obvious that the guitarist has gone rather woefully out of tune. If you don't look too closely, this record is very exciting, especially if you don't mind your excitement tinged with sloppiness.

''Down The Line'' although only released as a B-side (of ‘Breathless’), the song gained legendary status amongst fans during the early 1960s due to the fact that Jerry more often than not opened his shows with the song (I’ve only listed the studio versions here but for the ultimate rock and roll experience check out the 1964 ‘Live At The Star Club, Hamburg’ version (actually not included on the original album though it’s on the Bear Family CD re-issue). The 1963 ''Golden Hits'' re-cut has a very different arrangement from the mid-tempo Sun cut, performed at a much faster tempo that’s closer to the Roy Orbison original. The 1973 version from ''The Session'' would be a strong contender for the ultimate studio cut if it wasn’t for the way Jerry’s voice “goes” at one point.

''Jambalaya'' was recorded with guitarist Roland Janes, electric bass player Jay W. Brown and drummer Jimmy M. Van Eaton. Everyone in the room knew immediately they had something special on their hands. The track was slotted onto Jerry's forthcoming LP and over the years has been acknowledged as one of the album's standout tracks. The thing to remember when listening to music like this more than 60 years later is that it was created spontaneously. There were no ''charts'' to follow. The musicians couldn't even fall back on familiarity; they were not performing this song night after night. Indeed, this may have been the first time they ever played ''Jambalaya'' together.

The one advantage they had (other than familiarity with the song itself), was musical rapport with each other. Jerry Lee and J.M. had demonstrated that rapport from the first time they met in the studio barely over a year ago. Fifteen months later that musical communication was almost telepathic. Jimmy M. Van Eaton shuttles from playing backbeat, to accenting every beat (essentially soloing during Jerry's vocal) to providing counter rhythms on the crash cymbal as Jerry resumes singing following the guitar solo.

6 – "JAMBALAYA (ON THE BAYOU)" - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Hank Williams-Moon Mullican
Publisher: - Acuff-Rose Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - EP Master
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA 109-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-28 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

The recorded version here by Jerry Lee Lewis' "Jambalaya (On the Bayou)" is a song written and first recorded by American country music singer Hank Williams that was released in July 1952. Named for a Creole and Cajun dish, jambalaya, it spawned numerous cover versions and has since achieved popularity in several different music genres.

With a melody based on the Cajun song "Grand Texas", some sources, including Allmusic, claim that the song was co-written by Hank Williams and Moon Mullican, with Williams credited as sole author and Mullican receiving ongoing royalties. Williams' biographer Colin Escott speculates that it is likely Mullican wrote at least some of the song and Hank's music publisher Fred Rose paid him surreptitiously so that he wouldn't have to split the publishing with Moon's label King Records. Williams' song resembles "Grand Texas" in melody only.

"Grand Texas" is a song about a lost love, a woman who left the singer to go with another man to "Big Texas"; "Jambalaya", while maintaining a Cajun theme, is about life, parties and stereotypical food of Cajun cuisine. The narrator leaves to pole a pirogue down the shallow water of the bayou, to attend a party with his girlfriend Yvonne and her family. At the feast they have Cajun cuisine, notably Jambalaya, crawfish pie and filé gumbo, and drink liquor from fruit jars. The second line in the verse has had various interpretations. Yvonne is his "ma chaz ami-o", which is Cajun French for "my good girlfriend" (ma chère amie). Williams uses "ma chaz ami" as one word, thus the "my" in front of it. The "o" at the end of "ami" is a poetic/lyrical device making the line match the phrasing of the previous line and rhyme with it. If you listen closely, Hank Williams is singing "I'm gonna see mamma chers amio." referring to seeing the mother he loves and the first line refers to the home cooked food he is used to. This avoids the awkward "my" with "ma cher", which doesn't make sense to someone who is bi-lingual. Mamma in this context can mean either his real mother or can be an affectionate term for his wife/girlfriend.

Williams recorded the song on June 13, 1952, his first recording session in six months, at Castle Studio in Nashville with backing provided by Jerry Rivers (fiddle), Don Helms (steel guitar), Chet Atkins (lead guitar), Chuck Wright (bass) and probably Ernie Newton (bass). Interestingly, the recording Williams made differs significantly from Mullican's. Since the original melody of the song was from "Grand Texas", the song is a staple of Cajun culture. However, although Williams kept a Louisiana theme, the song is not a true cajun song, and it is precisely because of this that song gained such widespread popularity: "Ethnic music is usually unpalatable for a mass market unless it is diluted in some way (Harry Belafonte's calypsos, Paul Simon's Graceland...the list is endless). The broader audience related to 'Jambalaya' in a way that it could never relate to a true cajun two-step led by an asthmatic accordian and sung in patois''.

The song, it reached number one on the United States country charts for fourteen non-consecutive weeks. After Williams released his version, Cajuns recorded the song again using Cajun instruments. However, they used Williams' lyrics translated into the Cajun French language. "Jambalaya" remains one of Hank Williams' most popular songs today. International, translated or derived versions do exist at least in Chinese, Dutch, Finnish, French, Italian, Polish German, Spanish and Estonian.

A demo version of Williams singing "Jambalaya (On the Bayou)" with just his guitar, likely recorded in 1951, is also available. Williams composed a sequel to the song from the female perspective, "I'm Yvonne (Of the Bayou)", with Jimmy Rule, recorded by Goldie Hill. It was not as popular. As with "Jambalaya" there is speculation that Williams may have purchased this song from Mullican. Jerry Lee Lewis recorded the song for his EP ''Jerry Lee Lewis'' (Sun EPA 109) at Sun Records on January 16, 18, 1958, and again released for the 1969 album ''Sings The Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 1''.

7(1) - "MILKSHAKE MADEMOISELLE" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Jack Hammer
Publisher: - Northern Song
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take 1
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-B5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-12 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

The first recordings of ''Milkshake Mademoiselle'' carries a strong residual imprint of ''Down The Line'' and it almost comes as a surprise, once past the intro, to hear Jerry Lee sing the words ''down to the drugstore'' instead of ''you can't be my loving baby''. The rather curt opening of the ensuing readings, devoid of an intro worthy of the name, is a little too brusque for comfort. In contrast, by the time of the third complete take, Jerry Lee's more animated intro enlightens the song but it's clear that he's having trouble performing it to his own high standards. The similarities between the two complete takes in this phase of the song's development end with the onset of each piano solo; in the first, Lewis's right hand runs up and down the keyboard whereas in the next it stays in the same octave throughout.(*)

7(2) - "MILKSHAKE MADEMOISELLE" (1) - B.M.I. - 0:32
Composer: - Jack Hammer
Publisher: - Northern Song
Matrix number: - None - 2 False Starts
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-5-A1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(3) - "MILKSHAKE MADEMOISELLE" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Jack Hammer
Publisher: - Northern Song
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-5-A1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-14 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

7(4)(5) - "MILKSHAKE MADEMOISELLE" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Jack Hammer
Publisher: - Northern Song
Matrix number: - None - 2x False Start- Take 3
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-15 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-5(6) mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(6) - "MILKSHAKE MADEMOISELLE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:17
Composer: - Jack Hammer
Publisher: - Northern Song
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Take 4
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(7) - "MILKSHAKE MADEMOISELLE" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Jack Hammer
Publisher: - Northern Song
Matrix number: - None - Take 5
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-5-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

In the final take, which may well be from a later date, given that a second guitarist features prominently, Jerry Lee initiates proceedings by mimicking the role of a telegraph operator, deliberately or otherwise. It's doubtless too fanciful to imply that he was using Morse code to spell out ''wow, o, wow'' with the opening twenty-one strikes of a single note, but who knows; pop music has always been full of hidden messages. In ant event, this was the recording of the song officially released in 1973, becoming the first new Lewis track to be unearthed from the vaults by Martin Hawkins and Colin Escott, to add to those which had been included on Sun International LPs at the whim of Shelby Singleton. Its release aroused huge interest amongst European fans, and it proved to be the taster for many of the delights which followed over the ensuing decade.(*)

7(8) - "MILKSHAKE MADEMOISELLE" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Jack Hammer
Publisher: - Northern Song
Matrix number: - None - Take 6 - Unknown Second Guitar
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - May 1973
First appearance: - Phonogram Records (LP) 33rpm 6467 025-B2 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-9 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Earl Solomon Burroughs, born on September 16, 1925, in Fulton County, Georgia, is a songwriter, singer, dancer, and Master of ceremonies. Better known as Jack Hammer is probably best known as the co-writer of one of the immortal classics of rock and roll, "Great Balls Of Fire", a Jerry Lee Lewis' number 2 hit from 1957. Born in New Orleans, he moved to California as a youngster and then, probably in the mid-1950s, to New York City, where he became the M.C. at the Baby Grand Theatre.

Earl Solomon Burroughs, (his real name) started writing songs in the 1950s. One of his earliest compositions, credited to Earl Burrows, was the spectacular "Fujiyama Mama". It was recorded by Annisteen Allen in late 1954, covered by Eileen Barton soon afterward and is probably best known in the version of Wanda Jackson from 1957, though none of these versions charted. Probably in 1955 he changed his name from Earl Burroughs to Jack Hammer, as "Rock 'N' Roll Call" by the Treniers (recorded on December 15, 1955) shows the writers as Jack Hammer and Rudolph Toombs. This song was also recorded by Louis Jordan in 1956. In April of that year, Hammer's composition "Knock Kneed Nellie From Knoxville" was recorded by the Jumping Jaguars (Decca 29938), a side-project of Franny Beecher of Bill Haley's Comets. It is possible that Hammer was a member of this group. "Football Rock"/ "So What" (Decca 30109, released October 1956) was the first release under his own name. His next appearance on record was "Girl, Girl, Girl" (Roulette 4046, 1958), a good rocker, followed by two singles on Kapp in 1959.

Hammer is probably more important as a songwriter than as a singer. The story behind "Great Balls Of Fire" (as revealed by Stuart Colman) is as follows. Hammer wrote a song of that name and submitted it to New York songwriter Paul Case, who at that time also happened to be musical consultant for the forthcoming movie "Jamboree". Case was unimpressed with the contents but loved the title. He subsequently called Otis Blackwell, who had never met Jack, and commissioned him to write a new song around the title, to be used in "Jamboree". Hammer was in full agreement to this arrangement as the deal was to be split right down the middle. In 1958, Jerry Lee Lewis recorded "Milkshake Mademoiselle" (unreleased at the time), Big Danny Oliver cut the exuberant rocker "Sapphire" and the Cadillacs scored a number 28 hit with "Peek-A-Boo", all penned by Hammer. "Croc-O-Doll" was written for the Impacts (RCA 7583), in 1959. In that year, a record was released "Black Widow Spider Woman"/"Doggone That Moon", credited to Jack Hammer and the Pacers on the Milestone label, but this was in fact a pseudonym for rockabilly/country singer Werly Fairburn. In 1960, Hammer recorded a strange LP for the Warwick label, "Rebellion - Jack Hammer Sings and Reads Songs and Poems of the Beat Generation".

The next year Hammer moved to Europe. First to Paris where he appeared in cabaret doing Sammy Davis and Chuck Berry impersonations. But he stayed much longer in Belgium, where he was discovered by Albert Van Hoogten, who had founded the Ronnex label in 1951. Jack recorded a whole bunch of twist ditties for Ronnex, which were also released in other European countries on a variety of labels (Oriole in the UK). The most successful of these was "Kissin' Twist", which sold especially well in Belgium (number 3), Germany, France and Sweden. Jack was an excellent dancer and in Belgium he became known as "The Twistin' King", which was also the title of an LP (the only LP that Ronnex ever released). The album had a different title in every country where it came out; in the UK it was called "Hammer + Beat = Twist" (Oriole PS 40020, 1963). Some of the more successful twist recordings were also recorded in German and/or Spanish for the local markets. By 1971 he was living in Wiesbaden, Germany, where he played the U.S. military bases. Apart from "Swim"/"Color Combination", there were no new releases in the 1970s. Hammer moved back to New York in order to play the part of Jimi Hendrix in a proposed film, but the plans for this movie foundered in the early to mid-1980s. At present (2010) he is living in Hollywood. A BMI search tells us that he has written 144 songs registered with BMI, including those credited to Earl Burroughs and Earl Burrows.

8(1) - "BREATHLESS" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-13 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-10 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Here five unreleased takes of ''Breathless'' but the original classic 4th single, this was Jerry’s 3rd biggest U.S. hit, and in the U.K. it tied with ''Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On'' as his 2nd biggest hit (the biggest being ''Great Balls Of Fire'' of course). Despite, this he’s rarely performed the song ‘live’ even during the 1960s (he’s said on more than one occasion that he hates the song). The 1963 re-cut (for ‘Golden Hits’) has far more drive & enthusiasm, and is superior despite having too many musicians and backing singers behind him. He re-recorded several of his early hits again in late 1988 for the ‘Great Balls Of Fire!’ movie & soundtrack album the following year, & did a surprisingly good job on most songs including this.

8(2) - "BREATHLESS" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-11-8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-11 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

8(3) - "BREATHLESS" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-5-A3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEAR
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-12 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

8(4) - "BREATHLESS" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-11-9 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-13 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

8(5) - "BREATHLESS" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5
Recorded: - January 16-18, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-14 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes and/or Billy Riley - Guitar
Jay W. Brown - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 18, 1958 SATURDAY

Later the day, Jerry Shifrin and Barbara Barnes went to dinner at Justine's, a wonderful French restaurant in an old house in Memphis, located at 19 Coward Place, eating artichokes and a tender, juicy steak with Bearnaise sauce. (Most Memphians know it as the Old Justine's Restaurant - the New Orleans-style French restaurant owned by Justine Smith for 37 years, starting in 1958. The stark-looking light pink stucco house with white marble front steps survived a Civil War skirmish on the property, the worst of the Yellow Fever epidemics in the late 1800's, and the volatility of the 20th century restaurant business. In the 60's and 70's, Justine's was perhaps the main upscale restaurant in Memphis. See: www.historic-memphis.com). Afterwards they wound up at the Sharecropper, semi-private club to which Barbara had a key. Because of Memphis's strange liquor laws, mixed drinks couldn't be served by bars. But at a club such as this one, you could either bring a bottle with you for the bartender to use in making drinks, or you could even rent a locker, stock it, and have your booze at hand whenever you dropped by.

A singer with a sprinkle of gray in his hair was sitting at the piano accompanying himself. Mostly he played without singing, lost in his music. He seemed to be making love, not entertaining. He played dreamy standards like ''Laura'' and ''Misty'', and like so many lounge singers everywhere, was playing more for himself than for the people all around, who were so engrossed in their own conversation that they barely heard the music. Then, later we knowing that the musician was Charlie Rich, one of the artists at the Sun record company.

There was repercussions to the visits of Jerry Shifrin and Barbara Barnes to Jerry Lee Lewis's session, which went on for some time after they left. Sam Phillips had come in, and Jerry Lee was quick to corner him. He had said, ''Mr. Phillips, you've got some bad women working for your company''. Sam asked him what he meant and Jerry said, ''That Barnes woman. She came in here today and while I was recording, she was standing in the control room, just shaking her head''. ''Now hold on, Jerry, you took it all wrong. She's a big fan of yours. She was shaking her head because she just couldn't believe any one person could have so much talent''! Sam reassured him. Jerry was satisfied with Sam's explanation.

JANUARY 19, 1958 SUNDAY

Stephanie Davis is born in Bridge, Montana. She co-writes the Garth Brooks hits ''We Shall Be Free;; and ''Learning To Live Again''.

Hank Locklin recorded ''It's A Little More Like Heaven'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

JANUARY 20, 1958 MONDAY

Elvis Presley begins shooting for ''King Creole'', his last movie before the start of his two-year Army hitch.

Columbia released Ray Price's ''Curtain In The Window''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR GLENN HONEYCUTT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JANUARY 20, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01 - "ON MOBILE BAY" - B.M.I. - 1:36
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - January 20, 1958
Released: - February 9, 2009
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SNAJ 743 mono
SUN ROCKABILLY MELTDOWN

02 - "SKYLARK BABY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 20, 1958
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bopcat Records (LP) 33rpm Bopcat 700 mono
ROCK AROUND THE TOWN

03 - "CAMPUS LOVE " - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 20, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS
Reissued: - 1999 Stomper Time Records (CD) 500/200rpm STCD9 mono
FERNWOOD ROCK 'N' ROLL

04- "RIGHT GAL RIGHT PLACE RIGHT TIME" - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 20, 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Bopcat Records (LP) 33rpm Bopcat 400-9 mono
GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Glenn Honeycutt - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of JGlenn Honeycutt see: > The Sun Biographies <
Glenn Honeycutt's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 1958

Jack Clement hadn't called a session, and only Regina Reese, Kay Keisker, and Barbara Barnes were in the studio. But some musicians Barbara was beginning to recognize as regulars came in about noon to practice. With Jack not there, they weren't too focused and they had some beer and Thunderbird wine. The music was getting louder and happier as the afternoon wore on.

According to Barbara Barnes, ''The drummer was J.M. Van Eaton, the youngest of the group, a short, innocent-faced young man with a blond crewcut. He had started at Sun when he was too young to drive, and Billy Riley had to pick him up for sessions. J.M. was sort of hazing me, playing a marching-band beat when I walked through the studio. Martin Willis, the sax player, would laugh when J.M. did that, but I would march on pretending not to notice. Roland Janes, who played guitar and bass, had taken a dislike to me at first glance and wasn't friendly. During my second day at work he was sitting on the loveseat when he looked up and said defiantly, ''You don't need to look at me like that. I bet I've got more money than you have''. I must have been in another world, because I hadn't been thinking of him or even aware I was looking at him. I was too stunned to say anything, but Regina gave a little laugh and exclaimed, ''Roland''! He was right, though. He no doubt had more money than I did''.

''Billy Riley was there as usual'', Barbara said. ''I had been struck by the way he jutted out his chin on the beat, like a cobra about to strike. Most musicians nodded or patted their feet. That day, however, he decided to forsake the group to visit my little office to inform me that he was just the special one who was going to take out this new chick. He was obviously happy drunk when he came bouncing acrobatically into my office. He had the beautiful high cheekbones, dark complexion, and gleaming black hair of one of the Cherokee ancestors. In fact, that day I could see in him a wild Indian, muscular, compact, and untamed'' says Barbara.

''You are going out with me tonight'' Billy announced. ''You are going to say, 'I never had as good a time as I did when I went out with Billy Riley'''. ''I don't think that's such a good idea, Billy'', Barbara said. He was charming and funny as he kept elaborating on how he really knew how to show a girl a good time. After a while, the thought dawned on him that Barbara really wasn't going to accept and he left, but he didn't seem crushed. The last hour before five went slowly, but Barbara had found enough work to do setting up some artist files, and at closing time she walked to the front just minutes before Kay Keisker, who had to share her shipping space in the studio with the musicians, came through the door crying. She said that one of the guys had molested her. Regina and Barbara tried to soothe her and find out what had happened, but she was incoherent. She told Kay to go sit down next door and than go home. With the musicians, Barbara had enough. She opened the door to the studio in her most authoritative voice, ''Everybody out. I'm closing the studio''. The musicians looked at her, and J.M. Hit a lick on the snare and then the cymbal. ''I mean it, leave'', she commanded. They looked from one to the other and then back to Barbara. ''You have to get out'', she said. ''Right now''.

They actually got up and left. When the last one was gone, Regina got out her key to lock up, and she said, ''B.B, you were magnificent''. After these initial incidents, Barbara was accepted as one of the gang, and she began to become friends with the musicians and to enjoy seeing, hearing, and talking with them.

JANUARY 21, 1958 TUESDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''Blue Boy'' and ''Overnight'' during an evening session at RCA Studio B. in Nashville.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY JANUARY 21, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

When you're hot, you're hot. Jerry Lee managed to follow his mega-hit "Great Balls Of Fire" with yet another blockbuster from the pen of Otis Blackwell. "Breathless" is another wild performance, complete with a heavy breathing hook that grabbed more than its share of disposablee teenage income. The song's structure is less than typical, and far from the blues and country music on which Jerry Lee cut his teeth. Although Jerry's piano plays a less central role here than ever before, the artist still manages to make this performance his own. Jerry's Louisiana pronunciation of "You know I 'doin' like a wood in flame" is a delight.

1(6) – "BREATHLESS (2)" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Nor Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 21, 1958
Released: - July 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (EP) 45rpm JLL EP 001-A2 mono
THE FABULOUS JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-15 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

''Breathless'' provides an example, to be observed on at least two further occasions when hit-making was the order of the day, of Lewis persisting with an opening arrangement that doesn't produce the desired outcome, before simply giving up and trying something else which almost immediately proves beneficial. The first five takes (session January 16-18, 1958) repeat an opening cascade that one feels ought to serve as a leitmotif throughout the song, but which subsequently fails to reoccur. Yet each attempt leaves something to be desired.(*)

Conversely, when Jerry Lee simplifies matters with the relatively unsophisticated hammering of a single chord, things begin to sound more organised. Despite that, it remains something of an ordeal for all involved in coming to terms with the broken-beat shuffle rhythm of the song, while at times Jerry Lee has difficulty in stretching elements of the lyric to complement the music adequately. The most consistently uncomfortable passage occurs in each take around the 1.15 mark, immediately following the gloomy weather forecast of ''wind, rain, sleet or snow''. Lewis repeatedly struggles with the declaration ''I will be wherever you go'', variously trying, without success, to make two syllables out of either or both of the words ''I-will-be'' with deliberation but a lack of conviction. Eventually, in take 8, (session January 21, 1958) he achieves the right balance by effectively adding the words ''am'' and ''to'', delivering the line as ''I'm gonna be wherever you go'' and the die is cast. One more take and it all falls into place.(*)

1(7) – "BREATHLESS (2)" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 21, 1958
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-9-8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-16 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(8) – "BREATHLESS (2)" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 21, 1958
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-4-18 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-17 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(9) – "BREATHLESS (2)" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 291 - Take 4 Master
Recorded: - January 21, 1958
Released: - February 17, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 288-B < mono
BREATHLESS / DOWN THE LINE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

This song was a calculated shot at the pubescent market, with Jerry's breathy delivery of the title as its hook. "Breathless" moved up the charts with the help of a ploy devised by Jud Phillips and Dick Clark. Beechnut chewing gum had sponsored the networking of Dick Clark's "Bandstand" show, but initial response was unfavorable until Jud and Dick Clark figured out how to kill two birds with one stone with a cross-promotion deal. Jerry Lee Lewis sang "Breathless" on "The Dick Clark Show''.

''Breathless'' spent 15 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, peaking at number 7 in April 1958. The song also reached number 4 on the country chart, number 3 on the Rhythm And Blues chart, and number 8 in the UK. The B-side, "Down the Line", also charted in 1958, reaching number 51 on the Billboard pop singles chart.

The song was re-released in 1979 as part of the Sun Records Golden Treasure Series as Sun 25 and on the Quality label in Canada in 1958. The song was also featured in the 1983 film Breathless starring Richard Gere and Valerie Kaprisky as well as the Jerry Lee Lewis song "High School Confidential". The song has been covered several times, including versions by Tom Jones, Mickey Gilley, Wanda Jackson, X, Cliff Richard, Albert Lee, Mike Berry, Hal Munro, The Paramounts, Chas and Dave, and Otis Blackwell.

2(1) - ''COLD COLD HEART'' - B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Hiriam Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
May have been recorded during the previous session
Recorded: - January 21, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-C5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1-21 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Note: ''Cold Cold Heart'' may have been recorded at the previous session.

"Cold Cold Heart" recorded here by Jerry Lee Lewis' on this session, is a country song, written by Hank Williams. This blues ballad is both a classic of honky-tonk and an entry in the Great American Songbook.

Williams adapted the melody for the song from T. Texas Tyler's 1945 recording of "You'll Still Be In My Heart," written by Ted West in 1943. The song achingly and artfully describes frustration that the singer's love and trust is unreciprocated due to a prior bad experience in the other's past. Stories of the song's origins vary. In the Williams episode of American Masters, country music historian Colin Escott states that Williams was moved to write the song after visiting his wife Audrey in the hospital, who was suffering from an infection brought on by an abortion she had carried out at their home unbeknownst to Hank. Escott also speculates that Audrey, who carried on extramarital affairs as Hank did on the road, may have suspected the baby was not her husband's. Florida bandleader Pappy Neil McCormick claims to have witnessed the encounter: "According to McCormick, Hank went to the hospital and bent down to kiss Audrey, but she wouldn't let him. 'You sorry son of a bitch,' she is supposed to have said, 'it was you that caused me to suffer like this'. Hank went home and told the children's governess, Miss Ragland, that Audrey had a 'cold, cold heart,' and then, as so often in the past, realized the bitterness in his heart held commercial promise''.

The first draft of the song is dated November 23, 1950 and was recorded with an unknown band on May 5, 1951. Like his earlier masterpiece "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry'', it was released as the B-side (MGM10904B) to "Dear John" (MGM-10904A), since it was an unwritten rule in the country music industry that the faster numbers sold best. "Dear John" peaked at number 8 after only a brief four-week run on Billboard magazine's country music charts, but "Cold Cold Heart" proved to be a favorite of disc jockeys and jukebox listeners, whose enthusiasm for the song catapulted it to number 1 on the country music charts. Williams featured the song on his Mother's Best radio shows at the time of its release and performed the song on the Kate Smith Evening Hour on April 23, 1952, which ran from September 1951 to June 1952; the appearance remains one of the few existing film clips of the singer performing live. He is introduced by his idol Roy Acuff. Although a notorious binge drinker, Williams appears remarkably at ease on front of the cameras, with one critic noting, "He stared at the camera during his performance of ''Cold Cold Heart'' with a cockiness and self-confidence that bordered on arrogance''.

The song would become a pop hit for Tony Bennett, paving the way for country songs to make inroads into the lucrative pop market. In the liner notes to the 1990 Polygram compilation Hank Williams: The Original Single Collection, Fred Rose's son Wesley states, "Hank earned two major distinctions as a songwriter: he was the first writer on a regular basis to make country music national music; and he was the first country songwriter accepted by pop artists, and pop A&R men''.

That same year, it was recorded in a pop version by Tony Bennett with a light orchestral arrangement from Percy Faith. This recording was released by Columbia Records as catalog number 39449. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on July 20, 1951 and lasted 27 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 1. The popularity of Bennett's version has been credited with helping to expose both Williams and country music to a wider national audience. Allmusic writer Bill Janovitz discusses this unlikely combination: "That a young Italian singing waiter from Queens could find common ground with a country singer from Alabama's backwoods is testament both to Williams' skills as a writer and to Bennett's imagination and artist's ear''.

Williams subsequently telephoned Bennett to say, "Tony, why did you ruin my song''? But that was a prank, in fact, Williams liked Bennett's version and played it on jukeboxes whenever he could. In his autobiography ''The Good Life'', Bennett described playing "Cold Cold Heart" at the Grand Ole Opry later in the 1950s. He had brought his usual arrangement charts to give to the house musicians who would be backing him, but their instrumentation was different and they declined the charts. "You sing and we'll follow you'', they said, and Bennett says they did so beautifully, once again recreating an unlikely artistic merger.

The story of the Williams-Bennett telephone conversation is often related with mirth by Bennett in interviews and on stage; he still performs the song in concert. In 1997, the first installment of A&E's Live By Request featuring Bennett (who was also the show's creator), special guest Clint Black performed the song, after which Bennett recounted it. A Google Doodle featured Bennett's recording of the song on its Valentine's Day doodle in February 2012.

Other significant recordings there are including Louis Armstrong recorded "Cold Cold Heart" on September 17, 1951, and released it on Decca Records; Donald Peers recorded it on October 5, 1951, released EMI via His Master's Voice label as catalog number B 10158; Dinah Washington recorded it in 1951; Petula Clark and Gene Autry sang the song in the 1952 movie Apache Country; Jerry Lee Lewis released the song as a single on Sun Records in 1961 and included another version on the 1969 LP ''Sings the Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 2''; Jazz singer Norah Jones included a sultry swing version on her 2002 album ''Come Away With Me'', which was seen as "reintroducing" modern audiences to the song.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Jay W. Brown - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Eddie Bond returned to Sun. There were three sessions between November 28, 1957 and May 5, 1958, but no singles. The band is reckoned to be Bond's Stompers with the addition of John ''Ace'' Cannon on saxophone. Following his Mercury deal, Eddie Bond began label-shopping through the South, particularly around Memphis, Tennessee. First stop was 706 Union Avenue, where Jack Clement produced three titles, in a more-country-than-rockabilly mould.

None were issued at the time having to wait for the rockabilly revival and subsequent glut of compilations released in the 1970s and 1980s.

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BOND
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY JANUARY 25, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01(1) - "BROKE MY GUITAR" - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Eddie Bond-Jack Clement
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 25, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1035-9 mono
SUNSET SPECIAL
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1-20 mono
EDDIE BOND - ROCKIN' DADDY

The most curious element of his somewhat odd "Broke My Guitar" is a total lack of verses. Such an omission defies the basic logic of song structure; choruses that butt up against each and every middle eight further complicate the issue.

01(2) - "BROKE MY GUITAR" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Eddie Bond-Jack Clement
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Version - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 25, 1958
Released: - 2020
First appearance: -  Sun Records Countdown Media Internet 11 mono
THE SUN RECORDS SOUND OF EDDIE BOND

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bond - Vocal and Rhythm Guitar
Reggie Young - Lead Guitar
Johnny Fine - Drums
Jimmy Smith - Piano
Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Eddie Bond see: > The Sun Biographies <
Eddie Bond's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDWIN BRUCE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SUNDAY JANUARY 26, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS,
JACK CLEMENT AND /OR STAN KESLER

01(1) - "SWEET WOMAN" - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 298 - Master
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 292-A < mono
SWEET WOMAN / PART OF MY LIFE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Sweet Woman" was enough to rekindle the faith of Sun fans in early 1958. From the first 4 bars, it was clear we were in the presence of greatness. Everything works here. This is an edgy, tense record with not the slightest concession to pop sensibilities. Its hard to imagine two guitars, a bass and drums put to better use. Bruce's vocal is a standout. He was barely 18 when he recorded these sides, which more than fulfilled the promise of his first Sun outing (See SUN 276).

01(2) - "SWEET WOMAN" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15194-9 mono
EDWIN BRUCE - ROCK BOPPIN' BABY
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-6-26 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

01(3) - "SWEET WOMAN" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Demo
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - 2021
First appearance: - 2021 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17616-9 mono
THE COMPLETE SUN & WAND RECORDINGS 1957- 1965

02 - "PART OF MY LIFE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Heath-Heath
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 299 - Master
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 292-B < mono
PART OF MY LIFE / SWEET WOMAN
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

As he had previously, Bruce uses the flipside to demonstrate his interest in ballad singing. Curiously, the style here owes more to northern doo wop than it does the Memphis churchy moaning popularized by Elvis Presley. Edwin Bruce went on to record for Sun until mid-1956, although he never again saw his name on a yellow label from Memphis. In 1959 Edwin Bruce extended his talent into acting and made his television debut in the police drama, The Naked City on ABC TV. In 1962 he found success as a songwriter with "Save Your Kisses" (the B-side of Tommy Roe's "Sheila"), ahead of enjoying hits of his own for RCA and Monument.

03 - "ALONE WITH A BROKEN HEART" - B.M.I. 1:40
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15194-7 mono
EDWIN BRUCE - ROCK BOPPIN' BABY
Reissued: - 2021 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17616-7 mono
THE COMPLETE SUN & WAND RECORDINGS 1957- 1965

04 - "BABY THAT'S GOOD" - B.M.I. 2:31
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - 1978
Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1010-11 mono
SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 1
Reissued: - 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15194-10 mono
EDWIN BRUCE - ROCK BOPPIN' BABY

05 - "BALLAD OF RINGO" - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15194-4 mono
EDWIN BRUCE - ROCK BOPPIN' BABY
Reissued: - 2021 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17616-4 mono
THE COMPLETE SUN & WAND RECORDINGS 1957- 1965

06 - "JUST BEING WITH YOU" - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15194-6 mono
ROCK BOPPIN' BABY
Reissued: - 2021 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17616-6 mono
THE COMPLETE SUN & WAND RECORDINGS 1957- 1965 

07 - "KING OF FOOLS" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15194-5 mono
ROCK BOPPIN' BABY
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-6-28 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959 

Edwin Bruce demo'd his song ''King Of Fools'' in a Johnny Cash-like style and played his own Luther Perkins guitar part. That song and some others might have been intended for the ears of Johnny Cash. The log books suggest that Bruce played guitar or sang back-up on one of Cash's last sessions, although Bruce has no recollection of it. A lot of tape was expended on ''King Of Fools'suggesting that it was seen as a potential third Sun single. 

08 - "YOU COME TO ME" - B.M.I. - 1:30
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15194-8 mono
ROCK BOPPIN' BABY
Reissued: - 2021 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17616-8 mono
THE COMPLETE SUN & WAND RECORDINGS 1957- 1965

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Edwin Bruce - Vocal and Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson – Piano

By 1986, when Edwin Bruce talked to David Booth, Bruce felt charitable toward Sun Records and Sam Phillips. ''Genius is an overused word, but Sam Phillips was probably a genius. He had an exceptional ear for talent, of course. In my case, he was 25 years early. Sun Records has a significant role in the heritage of the music industry but, as a 17 or 17 year old, I had no concept of being part of developing history. It was the only game in town. Sam Phillips had a two track board and two mics in the studio. You achieved a balance by turning the volume up on the singer's mike and moving the group further or closer to the band mike. There was no such as sound baffling although the studio doubled as a warehouse so there were boxes of records everywhere. Accidentally, those boxes served as bafflers but there was a lot of leakage. I didn't know a great deal about the intricacies of the industry. My parents were guiding my career at that time, not knowing a lot about it either. I certainly didn't realize that I was part of something people would be talking about three decades later''.

For Biography of Edwin Bruce see: > The Sun Biographies <
Edwin Bruce's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RED WILLIAMS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JANUARY 26, 1958
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

01 - ''I'M LOSING YOU'' – B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Red Williams
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm Redita RLP 125 mono
ROCK AND ROLL FEVER
Reissued: - January 1, 1997 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8277 mono
SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL - VOLUME 1

02 - ''MY TRUE LOVE SAID GOODBYE'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Red Williams
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - January 26, 1958
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8181 mono
SUN HILLBILLY

Name (No. Or. Of Instruments)
Red Williams – Vocal
Roland Janes – Guitar
Billy Riley – Bass
Sid Manker – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

For Biography of Red Williams see: > The Sun Biographies <
Red Williams' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 24, 1958 FRIDAY

The Hank Snow Music center, an instrument shop, opens at 810 Church Street in Nashville. On hand for the festivities, Ernest Tubb and Wilburn Brothers.

Elvis Presley's ''Jailhouse Rock'' becomes the first single ever to enter the United Kingdom's charts at number 1.

JANUARY 26, 1958 SUNDAY

Guitarist B. James Lowry is born in Pensacola, Florida. A member of the 1980s pop group The Boys Band, he goes on to play on sessions behind Luke Bryan, Jo Dee Messina, Faith Hill, Martina McBride, Tim McGraw and Reba McEntire, among others.

Jimmie Rodgers sings ''Oh-Oh, I'm Falling In Love Again'' on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Buddy Holly also appears on the CBS program, with Holly's producer, Norman Petty, watching from the audience.

JANUARY 27, 1958 MONDAY

Despite a protest by ''Heartbreak Hotel'' writer Mae Boren Axton, who questions his ''moral character'', Canadian Hank Snow becomes an American citizen during a ceremony in Nashville.

Rhythm and blues singer Little Richard enters a theological seminary in Huntsville, Alabama, on his way to becoming an ordained minister. His song ''Lucille (You Won't Do Your Daddy's Will)'' becomes a country hit 25 years later for Waylon Jennings.

Decca released Kitty Wells' remake of ''I Can't Stop Loving You''.

Jerry Lee Lewis to appear two shows with Buddy Holly, Paul Anka and Jody Sands at the Civic Auditorium, Honolulu, Hawaii.

JANUARY 28, 1958 TUESDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis and Ronald Hargrave secure copyright for ''High School Confidential''.

JANUARY 30, 1958 THURSDAY

Merle Haggard is imprisoned at San Quentin for a botched burglary attempt.

Ferlin Husky appears on NBC's ''The Lux Show'' featuring Rosemary Clooney.

JANUARY 1958

Grease and mud. That's what Bill Justis called the fare at the next door hang-out, Taylor's Restaurant. Among the questions Barbara Barnes Sun's secretary, raised when Sam was talking about hiring her concerned the lack of places to eat in the neighborhood. As time went on, she found out that Mrs. Taylor's was it for food, and the Sun clientele could have kept it in business. Modest though it was with its Formica-topped booths, bare tables, and Naugahyde seating, it was like an adjunct office where staff could socialize and Sam Phillips could talk business. Bill Justis sat there alone to write lead sheets. Mrs. Del Taylor, who somehow brought to mind the worldly wise pub keepers in British movies, was happy for everybody to stay as long as cared to.

Most everyone just had coffee there in the morning, but Jack Clement, Sam, and Sally Wilbourn ate breakfast there almost every day. Fresh eggs cooked over easy in bacon grease sat proudly on the white plates beside a generous serving of bacon or sausage patties. Buttered toast could be spread with jam from the jars on the
tables. Rosemary, Mrs. Taylor's daughter, came around with refills for the coffee and was cheerful and friendly, especially with the musicians.

Lunchtime the tables filled up with mechanics and salesmen from nearby automobile row, while the little Sun crowd claimed the booths by the window. At noon, the place buzzed with talk, drowning out the jukebox, and the air grew hazy with cigarette smoke. The employees of Sun lunch there most days, usually
ordering vegetable soup or the sirloin strip. Soup was less than a dollar and the steak about two dollars. Mrs. Taylor kept some tabs in a box under the counter. Every so often would ask her to see how much there owed .

JANUARY 30/FEBRUARY 5, 1958

Jerry Lee Lewis on an Australian tour with Buddy Holly, Paul Anka, Jody Sands and Johnny O'Keefe.

JANUARY 31, 1958 THURSDAY

The United States puts it's first satellite into space the Explorer 1.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©