CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
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1952 SESSIONS 9
September 1, 1952 to September 30, 1952

Studio Session for B.B. King, September 1952 / RPM Records
Studio Session for Johnny Ace, September 1952 / Flair Records
Studio Session for Earl Forest, September 1952 / Flair Records
Studio Session for Walter Horton, September 15, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Rosco Gordon, September 15, 1952 / RPM Records
Studio Session for Jesse ''Tiny'' Kennedy, September 25, 1952 / Trumpet Records
Studio Session for Sherman ''Blues'' Johnson, September 30, 1952 / Trumpet Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
RPM/Chess/Trumpet/Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR B.B. KING
FOR RPM RECORDS

YMCA BUILDING, 254 SOUTH LAUDERDALE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SEPTEMBER 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER
AND/OR JOE BIHARI

Another King single was recorded, the up-tempo side of which is featured here and contains some glorious rolling piano of Ike Turner, but still no guitar?

01 - ''BOOGIE WOOGIE WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Jules Taub-B.B. King
Publisher:
Matrix number: - MM 1925 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date September 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single RPM 374 mono
BOOGIE WIIGIE WOMAN / STORY FROM MY HEART AND SOUL
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-12 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
B.B. King - Vocal & Guitar
Possibly Bill Harvey - Tenor Saxophone
Possibly George Coleman - Alto Saxophone
Possibly Floyd Jones - Trumpet
Possible Ike Turner - Piano
Possibly Richard ''Tuff'' Green - Bass
Possibly Ted Curry - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY ACE & EARL FOREST
FOR FLAIR RECORDS

YMCA BUILDING, 254 SOUTH LAUDERDALE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SEPTEMBER 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER
AND/OR JOE BIHARI

It is also likely that the Flair 1015 single, which featured Johnny Ace and Earl Forest with a side apiece, was cut at this B.B. King session. Ace and Forest were the core of a loose group of musicians collectively called ''The Beale Streeters'' and both recorded virtually exclusively for Duke Records, so how and why they ended up on this Flair release is a bit of a mystery.

01 - ''MIDNIGHT HOURS JOURNEY''* - B.M.I. - 3:31
Composer: - Joe Josua
Publisher: - Flair Publishing
Matrix number: - FL 133
Recorded: Unknown Date September 1952
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - Flair Records (S) 78rpm Flair 1015 mono
MIDNIGHT HOURS JOURNEY / TROUBLE AND ME
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-2-9 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

02 - ''TROUBLE AND ME''** - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Joe Josua
Publisher: - Flair Publishing
Matrix number: - FL 134
Recorded: - Unknown Date September 1952
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - Flair Records (S) 78rpm Flair 1015 mono
TROUBLE AND ME / MIDNIGHT HOURS JOURNEY
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-2-10 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Ace - Vocal * & Piano *
Earl Forest - Vocal ** & Drums
Possibly Ike Turner - Piano
Possibly George Coleman - Alto Saxophone *
Possibly Bill Harvey - Tenor Saxophone **
Unknown - Baritone Saxophone **
Unknown - Guitar *
Onzie Horne - Vibraphone *
Possibly Richard ''Tuff'' Green - Bass

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 1952

Rosco Gordon is voted 8th most likely artist to come up with rhythm and blues hits by Jukebox operators (ironically, it will be eight years before his next national rhythm and blues hit). The Dominoes were number 1.

Sam Phillips records Walter Horton for Chess Records. The title "Little Walter's Boogie" is deliberately misleading, as Checker have a huge hit on their hands with "Juke" by Little Walter Jacobs. Horton's record is scheduled, but never shipped.

Sam Phillips records Tiny Kennedy for Trumpet Records.

Legendary film maker Charlie Chaplin is denied re-entry into the United States during September of 1952. Chaplin and his family had been traveling to London for the premiere of his movie “Limelight” when they were told they would not be allowed back into the country. Chaplin, along with many others in Hollywood, had faced harsh scrutiny from the House Un-American Activities Committee and Senator Joseph McCarthy during the height of the Cold War due to Chaplin’s perceived leftist political beliefs. Chaplin vowed to never return to the United States, but eventually visited again in 1972.

SEPTEMBER 3, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Tennessee Ernie Ford and his wife of ten years, Betty Jean, have their second son, Brion Leonard Fabian Ford, in Monterey Park, California.

After multiple attempts to understand his unorthodox behavior, Woody Guthrie is finally diagnosed at Brooklyn State Hospital with Huntington's chorea, a rare genetic disease that wreaks havoc on the nervous system.

SEPTEMBER 4, 1952 THURSDAY

The rhythm and blues group Gladys Knights and The Pips is formed in Atlanta, George. Noted for such hits as ''Midnight Train To Me'' and ''You're The Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me'', Knight earns a Country Music Association nomination in 1994.

SEPTEMBER 6, 1952 SATURDAY

Rosco Gordon's next single ''What You Got On Your Mind'' b/w ''Two Kinds Of Women'' (RPM 365) released.

Buddy Miller is born in Fairborn, Ohio. Married to Julie Miller, he rises as a noted singer and guitarist during the 1990s, working alongside Emmylou Harris and contributing to the Americana movement.

Jambalaya (On The Bayou)'' lifts Hank Williams to number 1 on the Billboard country chart.

SEPTEMBER 8, 1952 MONDAY

Hank Williams sells a Williamson County farm, one year after its original purchase.

Capitol Records released Skeets McDonald's ''Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes''.

SEPTEMBER 11, 1952 THURSDAY

Having left New Orleans and the Swingtime label the year before, Ray Charles signs a recording contract with Atlantic Records, where he becomes a major star. Charles goes on to bridge the gap between pop and country with ''Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music''.

The daily CBS variety program ''The Steve Allen Show'' is telecast for the final time. Allen wrote the Margaret Whiting and Jimmy Wakely country hit ''Let's Go To Church (Next Sunday Morning)''.

SEPTEMBER 12, 1952 FRIDAY

MGM released a double-sided Hank Williams hit, ''Settin' The Woods On Fire'' and ''You Win Again''.

Columbia released the new single of Carl Smith, ''Our Honeymoon''

SEPTEMBER 13, 1952 SATURDAY

Don Fagenson is born in Detroit. Under the name Don Was, he becomes a significant pop record producer, and also produces tracks for Travis Tritt and Garth Brooks, plus the album ''Rhythm Country And Blues''.

Webb Pierce makes his first appearance on the Grand Ole Opry, where he performs ''Back Street Affair''.

SEPTEMBER 15, 1952 MONDAY

Decca released Webb Pierce's ''Back Street Affair''.

Studio session for Walter Horton and Rosco Gordon at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WALTER HORTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: MONDAY SEPTEMBER 15, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

On this time, Little Walter (Jacobs) cracked the rhythm and blues charts with '''Juke'' and was firmly entrenched at number 1. It would, of course, have been absurd to have two Little Walters in the same field of music, never mind on the same label, and it was clear which horse the Chess brothers intended to back. Around the same time, October 1952, Phillips send dubs of Raymond Hill and Willie Nix to Chess, and both were refused. The relationship that had started so promisingly with ''Rocket 88'' eighteen months earlier was ending. The Chess brothers had plans to get Howlin' Wolf to Chicago, and were happy to see the back of Phillips' other artists. Horton didn't get another shot at leading a Chess session until 1964, but he was in Chess's Chicago studio as early as January 9, 1953, first with Gus Jenkins and then as Little Walter's replacement with Muddy Waters.

01(1) - "LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - 1041 Take 1 Master 
Is significantly different from the other takes.
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - Chess 1529 was cancelled before release.
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1529-A < mono
LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE / WEST WINDS ARE BLOWING
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-9 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY

01(2) - "LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-12 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY

01(3) - "LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-16 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

An alternate take of the track originally earmarked for the other side of Chess 1529 (i.e. "West Winds Are Blowing") - and perhaps the title of this side gives a clue as to why Chess pulled the plug on this release, as they were having huge success with Little Walter Jacobs at the time. Mind you, they could easily have retitled this powerful instrumental (what would have been wrong with "Big Walter's Boogie"?) - but it seems that this coincided with their decision not to take any further product from Sam Phillips anyway. Instead they began to concentrate more on in-house productions, and Horton didn't get another chance with Chess Records until 1964.

02(1) - "WEST WINDS ARE BLOWING" - B.M.I. - 3:04
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm SUNBOX 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-8 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY

02(2) - "WEST WINDS ARE BLOWING" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - 1042 Take 2 Master
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - Chess 1529 was cancelled before release.
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1529-B < mono
WEST WINDS ARE BLOWING / LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-14 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Why Chess shelved this and its projected flip is baffling, as musically it is extremely powerful, the combination of harp and lead guitar from Joe Hill Louis during the break being particularly effective. The instruments blend together perfectly, and the musicians play with an empathy which is notoriously difficult to capture in a studio setting.

Chess scheduled a presently unidentified take of each of the above for issue on Chess 1529, but it was never released.

03 - "IN THE MOOD" - 1 - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Garland
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-15 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Walter Horton and his friends were in the process of working up "We All Gotta Go Sometime", which began as a version of "She Left Me A Mule To Ride", which Sam Phillips in turn had named after the opening verse of "Grandmother Got, Grandfather Told". In fact, its Horton's version of John Lee "Sonny Boy" Williamson's "Shotgun Blues", which he also recorded as "Sonny Boy Jump". Still with us? As good as the first take is, someone must have suggested the musicians loosen up by playing "In The Mood". Everybody starts a bit tentatively, but Walter soon gets into his stride, riffing confidently until it was time to take a solo. During the next few choruses he works on ideas which would resurface some five months later, when he and Jimmy DeBerry recorded their version of Ivory Joe Hunter's "I Almost Lost My Mind" and someone gave it the misleading title of "Easy".

04 - "WE ALL GOTTA GO SOMETIME" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-17 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Having had a couple of goes at "Grandmother Got, Grandfather Told", the next two takes - while retaining some of the same verses, including the previous title verse - show some variation in the melody line and a radical change in the lyrics. These now are lifted practically piecemeal from Big Bill Broonzy's "I Feel So Good", with the chorus changed to "We all gotta go sometime". While the evidence is there on tape, one can only speculate as to who suggested the change and why Horton's version remained unissued but Joe Hill Louis' own recording of the song made op one side of SUN 178.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter Horton - Vocal (except 1) and Harmonica
Jack Kelly - Piano
Joe Hill Louis - Guitar
Willie Nix - Drums

For Biographies of Walter Horton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Walter Horton's Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROSCO GORDON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR RPM RECORDS 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: PROBABLY SEPTEMBER 15, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 – ''DREAM BABY (DREAM ON BABY)''' – B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1899 Master
Recorded: - Probably September 15, 1952
Released: - November 1, 1952
First appearance: RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 369-A < mono
DREAM BABY / TRYING
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-15 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS

Rosco's name is misspelled on all RPM labels.

02 – ''TRYING'' – B.M.I. - 3:31
Composer: - B. Vaughn
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1898 Master
Recorded: - Probably September 15, 1952
Released: - November 1, 1952
First appearance: RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 369-B < mono
TRYING / DREAM BABY
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-16 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS

03 – ''LUCILE (LOOKING FOR MY BABY)'' – B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Rosco Gordon-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1900 Master
Recorded: - Probably September 15, 1952
Released: - November 15, 1952
First appearance: RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 373-A < mono
LUCILE (LOOKING FOR MY BABY) / BLUES FOR MY BABY
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-17 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS

Rosco's name is misspelled on all RPM labels.

04 – ''BLUES FOR MY BABY'' – B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Jules Traub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1901 Master
Recorded: - Probably September 15, 1952
Released: - November 15, 1952
First appearance: RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 373-B < mono
BLUES FOR MY BABY / LUCILE (LOOKING FOR MY BABY)
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-18 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal & Piano
Probably The Beale Streeters:
Johnny Ace - Piano
Bobby Bland - Guitar
Billy Duncan - Saxophone
Earl Forrest - Drums

For Biographies of Rosco Gordon see: > The Sun Biographies <
Rosco Gordon's Chess/RPM/Duke/Sun/Flip recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 16, 1952 TUESDAY

Bobby Randall is born in Midland, Michigan. He becomes guitarist for Sawyer Brown, performing on such hits as ''Step That Step'' and ''This Missin' You Heart Of Mine''. Randall leaves the band in February 1991.

Ray Price remakes ''Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes'' during a morning session at Nashville's Castle Studio.

SEPTEMBER 17, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Steve Sanders is born in Richland, Georgia. In 1987, he replaces William Lee Golden in The Oak Ridge Boys, taking the soulful lead on such singles as ''Gonna Take A Lot Of River'' and ''Beyond Those Years'' prior to Golden's return in 1995.

On his 29th, and final birthday, Hank Williams visits the Alamo, then plays San Antonio's The Barn, owned singer Charlie Walker. Future Texas Tornado Doug Sahm, age 11, sits on Williams' lap and plays ''Steel Guitar Rag''.

Sonny James recorded his first hit, ''That's Me Without You''.

SEPTEMBER 19, 1952 FRIDAY

Porter Wagoner holds his first RCA recording session at KWTO Radio in Springfield, Missouri, beginning with a cover of Hank Williams' ''Settin' The Woods On Fire''.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1952 SATURDAY

Hank Williams introduces ''Louisiana Hayride'' producer Horage Logan to Billie Jean Jones, the former girlfriend of Faron Young. Williams marries her four weeks later.

SEPTEMBER 21, 1952 SUNDAY

Kenneth Trebbe is born in Topeka, Kansas. Under the name Kenny Starr, he has a 1975 country hit with ''The Blind Man In The Bleachers''. The song is simultaneously a pop hit for David Geddes.

CBS viewers watch Roy Rogers, Dale Evans and ''Over The Rainbow'' songwriter Harold Arlen take bows from the audience on ''Toast Of The Town'' hosted live from New York by Ed Sullivan.

SEPTEMBER 22, 1952 MONDAY

Woody Guthrie is released from Brooklyn State Hospital in New York. During the previous four months, he was treated at three different hospitals for alcoholism but later diagnosed with a neurological ailments, Huntington's chorea.

The Louvin Brothers recorded ''Let Us Travel, Travel On'' in their first session for Capitol Records. The song is reprised by Marty Stuart and Del McCoury in the award-winning tribute album ''Livin', Lovin', Losin'': Songs Of The Louvin Brothers''.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1952 TUESDAY

Hank Williams recorded ''Take These Chains From My Heart'', ''Kaw-Liga'' and ''Your Cheatin' Heart'' during what proves to be his final recording session, at the Castle Studio in Nashville's Tulane Hotel.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Hank Williams signs a three-year contract to return to The Louisiana Hayride for $200-a-week for Saturday night performances.

The Carlisles recorded ''No Help Wanted'' in Nashville.

SEPTEMBER 25, 1952 THURSDAY

The CBS series ''Music Hall'', hosted by Patti Page, airs for the last time after less than three months on the air.

Studio session with Tiny Kennedy at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee. While Lillian McMurry may have concentrated her early promotional efforts on Sonny Boy Williamson's and Willie Love's records, it was after all because the initial tallies showed them to be the best-selling. And while it was true that she auditioned all comers at The Record Mart, she also frequently stepped out with her husband Willard or her brother Milton to the Alamo Theatre, just a few doors down in the 300 block of North Farish, in Jackson, Mississippi, where their neighbor and Alamo Lehman would invite them to enjoy bands and revues he booted. There, sitting in the back with Arthur and Willard, she first saw Tiny Kennedy sing with Tiny Bradshaw's Orchestra in October of 1951.

''Tiny was so big and fat, when he sang his fat just went up and down rockin' with him'', she remembers. ''We put him under contract and recorded him''. Painfully aware of the limitations of the cumbersome sonic process at Scott's, which required a new blank disc for every take, sometimes running to 120 takes per title, Lillian was already searching for a better alternative and decided to try the taping facilities at WHBQ in Memphis, Tennessee. She sent Kennedy and the band of Jackson's musicians including Elmore James there on October 22, 1951, but the session turned out poorly and she scrapped it and determined to try again. She planned to record Tiny during the historic Cedars of Lebanon session in Jackson that December. ''I sent Tiny a plane ticket'' she recalled, ''and had Mose Allison's band come up from Baton Rouge. Tiny didn't show up and spent the money''. The young Allison, then a student at Louisiana State University, had stopped by The Record Mart now and then to advertise his talents, and had gained Lillian's respect. She would have to pay Mose and his band for travel expenses and wait nearly a year before finally getting some good takes on blues belter Kennedy.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jesse Tiny Kennedy had already recorded for Capitol in 1949 with the great pianist Jay McShann. An all-out entertainer, he spent his career touring, doing blues, popular jazz numbers and comedy routines with slick bands like Bradshaw's, which was booked by the prestigious William Morris Agency in New York. Bradshaw's Orchestra recorded many sides for the King label in Cincinnati. In fact, Kennedy listed his home address as Cincinnati during the mid-fifties, although his original contract named 1006 King Street, Chattanooga as home.

Kennedy never actually recorded with Bradshaw, and seems to have been an elusive quarry for recordings in general. It remained for Sam Phillips to finally capture Tiny Kennedy for Trumpet in ''Finest Sonocoustic Sound'' at 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, with a mighty band of local musicians, several of whom were regulars at Phillips' blues sessions period. His Memphis Recording Service offered up-to-the-minute taping technology in a newly designed studio, along with a variety of services for hire, which paid the bills while he struggled to start his own Sun label. Lillian McMurry booked the session for September 25, 1952, somehow managed to convince Tiny show up, and let Sam provide the house band and do the engineering, as well as run dubs and acetate masters for eventual pressings. The results were memorable.

Kennedy's ability to ''rock the house'' with his gutsy vocals a perfect complement in the playing of Sun regulars Richard Sanders, Calvin Newborn, and Houston Stokes. This nucleus had achieved a level of communion that had them riding the cutting edge of rhythm and blues into the dawn of rock and roll with a fluid, ebullient sound that does indeed rock, roll, swing, drive, and alternately simmer and burst into flame throughout the session.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JESSE ''TINY'' KENNEDY
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR TRUMPET RECORDS 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
TRUMPET SESSION: THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 25, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER

Tiny Kennedy was anything but diminutive, either in stature or vocal range. "Big and fat" was how Trumpet Records boss Lillian McMurry vividly described him, and she should know: Trumpet recorded the shouter in 1951 and again in 1952.

The vocalist born as Jesse Kennedy, Jr., on December 20, 1925 in Chattanooga, Tennessee had recorded with the great Kansas City pianist Jay McShann for Capitol in 1949 prior to joining Tiny Bradshaw's jumping band as one of its featured front men. After a session with Elmore James in 1951 didn't result in anything releasable, McMurry sent Kennedy up to Sam Phillips's fledgling Memphis Recording Service on the famous 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, in September of 1952.

Sam Phillips did some mastering and copying for other labels, but very little custom recording. He made an exception for Lillian McMurry at Trumpet Records in Jackson, Mississippi. McMurry had signed Tiny Kennedy but couldn't get the results she wanted at the WHBQ studio in Memphis. After that, he'd failed to show up for a session in Jackson, so she must have booked time at Phillips' Memphis Recording Service with some trepidation. She'd signed Kennedy after seeing him at Jackson's Alamo Theater when he fronted Tiny Bradshaw's orchestra. Kennedy was a mountain of a man with a voice to match, and he was from Chattanooga, as this song attests.

Sam Phillips placed him with the cream of musicians on the session, which produced the fine "Strange Kind Of Feelin'," "Early In The Mornin', Baby" (with overdubbed crowing by "Elmer, the Disc Jockey Rooster"), and "Blues Disease," included guitarist Calvin Newborn and saxophonist Richard Sanders. After the session, McMurry lit upon the idea of dubbing a rooster onto the intro.

In nearby Hattiesburg, Chuck Thompson was the early morning man on WFOR, and he had a pet rooster, Elmer, who crowed on cue and was sufficiently well known for Minnie Pearl's ''Pickin' And Singin' News'' to do a little feature on him. Phillips added Elmer to the tape, and McMurry crudely collaged him to Kennedy's promo photo.

01(1) - ''EARLY IN THE MORNING, BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC 130 Master
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Trumpet 187-A < mono
EARLY IN THE MORNING, BABY / STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-26 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

01(2) - ''EARLY IN THE MORNING, BABY'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Golbe Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (CD) 500/200rpm AA701-3 mono
THE ALLIGATOR TRUMPET SERIES - STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'

On ''Strange Kind Of Feelin''', the rhythm section of Wilbur Steinberg, Calvin Newborn, Ford Nelson, and Houston Stokes propels this jumping blues. Add three saxophonists and an obese vocalist, and 706 Union must have been very full that day, so full that Phillips might have been the saxes or Kennedy out in the lobby. Lillian McMurry told researcher Marc Ryan that she grew tired of trying to nail down Tiny for sessions, and let him have his release. Three years later up in New York, Kennedy recorded ''Strange Kinda Feelin'' once again, this time for RCA's Groove imprint. For neither label was ''Strange Kinda Feeling'' a hit.

02(1) - ''STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN''' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Robbins Music
Matrix number: - DRC 131 Master
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Trumpet 187-B < mono
STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN' / EARLY IN THE MORNING, BABY
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-27 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

The alternate take of ''Strange Kind Of Feelin''' heard here, previously unreleased, was at first chosen for issue on Trumpet 187 by the McMurry's, who then changed their minds in favor of the other take at the last minute.

02(2) - ''STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN''' - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (CD) 500/200rpm AA-701-1 mono
THE ALLIGATOR TRUMPET SERIES - STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'
Reissued: - 1990 Trumpet (CD) 500/200rpm Trumpet AA-701 mono
STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'

Sam Phillips' multitracks the backing vocals for an unusual effect at the intro of Kennedy's second Trumpet single, ''Blues Disease''. On some level, the song is fairly mundane, but the rhythm section, accented by a very busy Calvin Newborn on guitar, is so tight and slick, it redeems the record.

03 - "BLUES DISEASE" - B.M.I - 2:29
Composer: - Tiny Kennedy
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC-132 Master
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Trumpet 188-B < mono
BLUES DISEASE / DON'T LAY THIS JOB ON ME
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-28 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Thieving clergymen had been a staple of black vaudeville from the get-go, and Kennedy draws on that long tradition with a narration inexplicably titled ''Don't Lay This Job On Me''. Specifically, Kennedy seems to be drawing on vaudevillian Bert Williams' ''Elder Eatmore'' narrations. The Money to build a new church has been purloined, and the threat of damnation hangs over everyone. Ford Nelson carries the accompaniment in an oddly inappropriate cocktail blues style. If this was an anomalous entry in the music recorded at 706 Union, it was a good one. It all comes down to Kennedy, and he pulls it off.

04 - "DON'T LAY THIS JOB ON ME" - B.M.I - 3:06
Composer: - Tiny Kennedy
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC-133 Master
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Trumpet 188-A < mono
DON'T LAY THIS JOB ON ME / BLUES DISEASE
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-29 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

On ''Don't Lay This Job On Me'' finds the group noodling along in an effete jazz style with pianistic by Al Nelson that suggest Erroll garner, while Tiny carries on with his mock sermon, a vaudeville tradition that dated back at least fifty years to the pioneering recordings of black ragtime comedians like Bert Williams, Shelton Brooks, and Ham Tree Harrington.

05 - ''HONEYMOON WALTZ'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 157 - Trumpet Unissued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952

06 - ''YOU CAN'T HAVE YOUR CAKE AND EAT'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 158 - Trumpet Unissued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952

07 - ''HEART FOR SALE'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 159 - Trumpet Unissued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952

08 - ''HAVE YOU HEARD ABOUT THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER'' - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (CD) 500/200rpm AA-701-2 mono
THE ALLIGATOR TRUMPET SERIES - STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'
Reissued: - July 2, 2013 Blue Paradise Records Internet iTunes MP3-8 mono
COMPILATION - BLUES ICON

The biting, bumping and grinding guitar solo by Calvin Newborn, the brother of the more famous Phineas Jr., in ''The Farmer's Daughter''does as much as Tiny's evocative lyrics to conjure up the image of the bucolic beauty.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jesse Tiny Kennedy - Vocal
Calvin Newborn - Guitar
Alfordson ''Ford'' Nelson - Piano
Richard Sanders - Saxophone
Bill Fort - Saxophone
Robert Hamp - Saxophone
Wilburn Steinberg - Bass
Houston Stokes - Drums
Elmer, the disc jockey Rooster - Crowing (DRC 130)

A final Trumpet session for Kennedy, arranged by Lillian at the Nola Studios in New York City in June of 1953, failed to produce anything that she considered original enough to issue. Ultimately despairing in his ability to come through with fresh material, and unable to work closely with him due to the constant touring that kept him roaming up and down the East Coast most of the time, Lillian released Tiny from his contract in 1955 so he could sign with the New York-based RCA's Groove subsidiary. For years afterward, Kennedy would pass through the south once a year on tour with the Harlem Revue, and would call Lillian and Willard whenever he sang at the State Fair in Jackson, Mississippi. Sometime during the 1960s, he stopped calling, and to this day, his fate is unknown. ''We never did get a sensible explanation about the time he didn't show up here, for this session'' remembered Lillian. ''Tiny was like a child in a lot of ways, you know. He couldn't seem to understand some things, but he dang sure could sing the blues''.

For Biographies of Tiny Kennedy see: > The Sun Biographies <
Tiny Kennedy's Trumpet recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

LILLIAN SHEDD MCMURRY - was an American record producer, influential in the development of blues music. Lillian Shedd was born on December 30, 1921 in Purvis, Mississippi, and married furniture-store owner Willard McMurry in 1945, settling in Jackson, Mississippi. In 1949, she was helping her husband clear out a shop he had bought when she came upon a pile of old shellac 78rpm phonograph discs, including Wynonie Harris' recording of "All She Wants to Do Is Rock". Curious, McMurry played it on the store's record player and became so inspired that, as well as selling the stock she had discovered, she also decided to record more music like it.

By her own account, until that point she, as a white woman, had been completely unaware of the music being made on her doorstep by her African-American neighbours.

She formed Trumpet Records in Jackson in 1950. The first releases were of gospel music, but she soon auditioned and recorded both slide guitarist Elmore James, on his original recording of "Dust My Broom", and "Sonny Boy Williamson" (Aleck "Rice" Miller). Initially, McMurry apparently thought that "Williamson" was the original musician of that name. Many of the sides he first recorded for Trumpet, such as "Eyesight To The Blind" and "Nine Below Zero", later became blues standards.

Rising debts caused Trumpet to fold in 1955, and McMurry went back to working in her husband's shop. In 1998, she was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame, one of the few record producers to be granted that honour.

Lillian McMurry pioneering work was recognized in 1998 when she was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame; sadly, McMurry died of a massive heart attack on March 18 of the following year. She was 77 years old.

On November 17, 2007, Lillian Shedd McMurry and Willard McMurry were honored with a historical marker on their former recording studio in Jackson, Mississippi. Her daughter, Vitrice, her son-in-law, and her granddaughter attended along with Dr. Woody Sistrunk. The McMurry family was awarded a plaque to go along with the historical marker

CHUCK THOMPSON & ELMER – Was America's most unusual WFOR disc jockey team. Chuck Thompson and his partner, Elmer, (a rooster), who perform for WFOR when Chuck's neighbor dared him to take a bantam rooster on his early morning show. Since they have performed over 500 shows together, Chuck translates Elmer's crowing, and Elmer, translations Thompson served WMGY and WJJJ, Montgomery, Alabama, after being graduated from Alabama, and hit WELO, Tupelo, Mississippi, en route here. Elmer earns his feed from the feed folks, Chuck has to buy his.

SEPTEMBER 27, 1952 SATURDAY

Virginia Hensley debuts as a singer with Bill Peer and His Melody Boys at the Brunswick Moose Hall in Winchester, Virginia. He becomes her manager and gives Patsy Cline her new first name.

Sue Thompson makes her debut on the Grand Ole Opry.

SEPTEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY

Dulcimer player David Schnaufer is born in Hearne, Texas. He appears on Kathy Mattea's 1988 hit ''Life As We Knew It'' plus Alison Kraus ''You Will Be My Ain True Love'' from the movie ''Cold Mountain''.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1952 MONDAY

Gene Autry is an undercover agent in the Old West with the on-screen debut of ''Wagon Team'', co-starring Pat Buttram. Autry re-visits his signature song, ''Back In The Saddle Again''.

Jean Shepard has her first recording session for Capitol Records at the label's recording studio on Melrose Avenue in Hollywood.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SHERMAN JOHNSON & HIS CLOUDS OF JOY
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR TRUMPET RECORDS 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
TRUMPET SESSION: TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 30, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER

During the very brief period when Sam Phillips was doing custom work for Lillian McMurry's Trumpet Records, he was handed Sherman Johnson, an undistinguished shouter who took his band's name from Andy Kirk's ''Clouds Of Joy'' and his style from Wynomie Harris. As was the case with Tiny Kennedy, McMurry tried to record him elsewhere before paying Phillips to handle the session.

01(1) - ''PRETTY BABY BLUES'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Krazy Kat Records (LP) 33rpm Krazy Kat KK 7427 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - UNISSUED TITLES FROM THE 1950s

01(2) - ''PRETTY BABY BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 134 Master
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Trumpet 189-A < mono
PRETTY BABY BLUES / SUGAR MAMA
Reissued: - May 1994 Alligator Records (CD) 500/200rpm Alligator ALCD 2800 mono
SHOUT, BROTHER, SHOUT - 1950S R&B FROM THE LEGENDARY TRUMPET RECORDS LABEL

No more distinguished on his other Trumpet release, Sherman Johnson coupled a Korean War novelty song with the paint-by-numbers ''Pretty Baby Blues''. Newborn Sr's band swung professionally, and Richard Sanders rocked out on baritone sax, but they can't compensate for the ordinariness of Johnson's voice and song. Even with a strong local following as an rhythm and blues jock in Meridian, Johnson gave Lillian McMurry no incentive to schedule another session; if anything, he gave her incentive to sue him. In 1853, he pitched ''Saving My Love For You'' to Johnny Ace. Problems was that in October 1951, McMurry had recorded Johnson singing that song and she'd copyrighted it.

In November 1953, Ace's producer, Don Robey, wrote to McMurry to inform her that he had acquired all rights to the song, and that the earlier copyright was invalid. McMurry chose not to fight Robey or sue Johnson.

02 - ''SUGAR MAMA'' - B.M.I. - 3:12
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 135 Master
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Trumpet 189-A < mono
SUGAR MAMA / PRETTY BABY BLUES
Reissued: - May 1994 Alligator Records (CD) 500/200rpm Alligator ALCD 2800 mono
SHOUT, BROTHER, SHOUT - 1950S R&B FROM THE LEGENDARY TRUMPET RECORDS LABEL

Was ''Hot Fish'' a double entendre blues? Almost certainly. It was based quite closely on a saucy old vaudeville number best known as ''Get 'Em From The Peanut Man'' and sung by Lil Johnson and Georgia White back in 1936. As Sherman Johnson was a disc jockey on WTOK in Meridian, Mississippi, McMurry might have thought she could move sufficient copies in south Mississippi to pay for the session. She might have been wrong. Johnson was clearly discouraged when he wrote to McMurry soon after the record was released, but she admonished him, saying, ''You are about the nicest guy and we do appreciate your attitude, but I feel like spanking you because you seem to have given up''.

03 - ''HOT FISH'' - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC 136 Master
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Trumpet 190-A < mono
HOT FISH / LOST IN KOREA
Reissued: - May 1994 Alligator Records (CD) 500/200rpm Alligator ALCD 2800 mono
SHOUT, BROTHER, SHOUT - 1950S R&B FROM THE LEGENDARY TRUMPET RECORDS LABEL

04 - ''LOST IN KOREA'' - B.M.I. - 3:19
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC 137 Master
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Trumpet 190-B < mono
LOST IN KOREA / HOT FISH
Reissued: - May 1994 Alligator Records (CD) 500/200rpm Alligator ALCD 2800 mono
SHOUT, BROTHER, SHOUT - 1950S R&B FROM THE LEGENDARY TRUMPET RECORDS LABEL

05 - ''BLUES JUMPED A RABBIT'' - B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Krazy Kat Records (LP) 33rpm Krazy Kat KK 7427 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - UNISSUED TITLES FROM THE 1950s
Reissued: - March 30, 2012 Vintage Masters (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE MOST UNDERRATED BLUES PLAYERS EVER

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sherman ''Blues'' Johnson - Vocal
Calvin Newborn - Guitar
Phineas Newborn, Jr. - Piano
Richard Sanders - Saxophone
Phineas Newborn, Sr. - Drums

For Biographies of Sherman Johnson see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sherman Johnson's Trumpet recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
RPM/Chess/Trumpet/Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube < 

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