CONTAINS
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1955 SESSIONS 7
July 1, 1955 to July 31, 1955

Studio Session for The Miller Sisters, July 1, 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, July 11, 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Snow, Mid July 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, July 30, 1955 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 1, 1955 FRIDAY

Keith Whitley is born in Sandy Hook, Kentucky. Married to Lorroe Morgan in 1986, his rich vocals done some of the most expressive singles of the late-1980s, although his career is shortened when he dies from alcohol poisoning in 1989.

Ernest Tubb introduces Patsy Cline in her Grand Ole Opry debut, as she performs ''A Church, A Courtroom and Then Goodbye''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE MILLER SISTERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1955

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY JULY 1, 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

This is the first record by The Millers Sisters to appear on the Sun label (their earlier coupling appeared on Flip 504). For a brief moment in Sun history (Sun 229, Sun 230) Sam Phillips had released back to back records by female artists. Maggie Sue Wimberley followed by the Miller Sisters. You might have thought Sam and Sun were changing direction. But then it was back to reality.

Sun 230 is the first record by the Miller Sisters to appear on the Sun label. (their earlier coupling appeared on Flip 504). It was a source of continuing frustration and amazement to Sam Phillips that he was unable to produce a hit record by Elsie Jo and Millie. The Millers (sister-in-law, actually, rather than sisters) had an unerring and intuitive vocal blend that epitomized the best of pure country harmony. Somehow their artistic success was never matched commercially, and by the late 1950s the Miller Sisters were separated by miles and circumstances, never to record again.

01 - "THERE'S NO RIGHT WAY TO DO ME WRONG" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:21
Composer: - Ted Meyne
Publisher: - Southern Music
Matrix number: - U 168 Master
Recorded: - July 1, 1955
Released: - January 15, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 230-A < mono
THERE'S NO RIGHT WAY TO DO ME WRONG / YOU CAN TELL ME
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-1-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Billboard incorrectly described ''There's No Right Way To Do Me Wrong'' in January 1956 as an effective weeper, which suggest that they had not even listen to it, or, if that had. they’d listened to the wrong version. Despite its theme, the track moves along at a sprightly pace that belies its subject matter. As he did on all the girls releases, Phillips coupled a true weeper with some uptempo material and he must have thought very highly of this song because it was one of the very few non Hi-Lo copyrights released by Sun in 1956. The song was originally recorded at half tempo in December 1953 by Rose Maddox. Although Phillips credits Gabe Tucker and Smokey Stover, Rose's record credits west coast songwriter Ted Meyne.

The balled side, "You Can Tell Me", was contributed by a novice songwriter named Homer Eddleman, Jr., who submitted a tape postmarked Route 1, Marianna, Arkansas. Unlike the thousands of wannabees who sent tapes to Sun during the 1950s, Eddleman's dream came true: his name appeared as a composer credit on a yellow Sun record. The first four notes of his song are identical to "Tennessee Waltz", but from there Eddleman and the Millers are on their own. The storyline is clever and unusual, and packs a pretty good punchline. Too bad more folks didn't get it.

About ten years later, blues singer Bobby Bland recorded an interesting variant on this theme called ''Your Friends''. Separate by years, miles, race, and audience Bland's record shows that some themes are timeless and can be reworked into and style.

02 - "YOU CAN TELL ME" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:37
Composer: - Homer Edelman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 169 Master
Recorded: - July 1, 1955
Released: - January 15, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 230-B < mono
YOU CAN TELL ME / THERE'S NO RIGHT WAY TO DO ME WRONG
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-1-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

03 – "STUDIO CHATTER" - B.M.I. - 0:23
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably July 1, 1955
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-3-18 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Millie and Jo offer solid chanting on a weeper destined for rural juke action. Had this been issued, it wasn't, Billboard might have said, ''May not break out of the hinterlands but waltz tempo adds to back country feel. Strong cleffing and usual Sun back shack sound make this disking a winner''.

04 - "LOOK WHAT YOU'VE DONE TO MY HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Roy Estes Miller
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - July 1, 1955
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-3 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-3-34 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

This is one of the few extant takes of ''Woody'' without Woody Woodpecker sound effects grafted onto it. There are at least ten takes of this tune in the vaults although it is ironic that, after all the work on Roy's novelty song, nothing was released. Despite the trite and dated lyric, the girls turn in a really spendid vocal, considerably better than the material deserved.

05 - ''WOODY'' - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Roy Ester Miller
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1, 1955
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-7 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-2 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

06 - "I KNOW I CAN'T FORGET YOU, BUT I'LL TRY" - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Roy Estes Miller
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1, 1955
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-4 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-3-35 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

The first time Colin Escott and Hank Davis heard this track was on an acetate played by Marion Keisker in Memphis. They were struck by its pure country charm and lamented the fact that music like this was unlikely to find its way into commercial release. Fortunately, that problem has been solved and this wonderful track takes its place in the legacy left behind at Sun by the Miller Sisters.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elsie Jo Miller - Duet Vocal
Mildred Wages - Duet Vocal
Buddy Holobaugh or Roy Miller - Guitar
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Probably Bill Cantrell - Fiddle
Jan Ledbetter or William Diehl - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums

For Biography of The Miller Sisters see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Miller Sisters' Sun/Flip recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 2, 1955 SATURDAY

''The Lawrence Welk Show'' debuts on ABC-TV, providing a launching pad for the career of Lynn Anderson, who joins the cast for one season in September 1967.

JULY 3, 1955 SUNDAY

The ''Denton Record-Chronicle'' reports, ''Two NTSC students will be special guests on Sunday night's Starlight Concerts show in Fair Park Bandshell in Dallas. Dick Pender (sic) and Wade Moore, rhythm and blues exponents, will present ''The Wallflower'', ''Hey, Miss Fanney'', ''Ooby Dooby'', ''When Will You Love Me'' and ''You And Me''. Pender and Moore, who have performed on stage shows at NTSC and the Campus Theater here, are seen on Dallas Big D Jamboree and are featured performers on Magazine, a weekday show seen at 1:15 p.m. on WFAA-TV''.

JULY 4, 1955 MONDAY

Future Sun recording star Dean Beard reconnected with Elvis Presley in Brownwood on a day when Elvis was slated to perform a triple-header (i.e. three concerts in three locations) for the only time in his career. The Stephenville concert was an early morning gospel event where he sang nothing but sacred music. Scotty Moore gave Beard a copy of Presley's first 78rpm, ''That's All Right'', and Beard later framed it and returned it to Scotty. Late in life, Beard would retrieve a box from under his bed reportedly containing letters from Elvis.

Pop singer John Waite is born in Lancaster, England. A frontman for The Baby's and Bad English, he scores his biggest solo hit with 1984's ''Missing You'', remade 15 years later as a minor country hit by Brooks and Dunn.

Capitol released The Louvin Brothers' ''When I Stop Dreaming''.

Steel guitarist Buddy Emmons moves to Nashville as a member of Little Jimmy Dickens band. Emmons becomes a premier session musician on hits by George Strait, Jim Reeves, Ray Price, Merle Haggard, Mark Chesnutt, and of course Elvis Presley in 1969 for his Memphis sessions, produced by Chips Moman.

CBS introduces the summer replacement sitcom ''Those Whiting Girls'', featuring Margaret Whiting, who landed nine duets with Jimmy Wakely in the Top 10 of the Billboard country single chart.

JULY 6, 1955 WEDNESDAY

Webb Pierce recorded ''Love, Love'' and ''If You Were Me (And I Were You)'' at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

JULY 9, 1955 SATURDAY

Patti Page appears on the cover of TV Guide.

''Rock Around The Clock'' by Bill Haley & The Comets reaches number one in Billboard magazine's US charts, replacing Perez Prado's version of ''Cherry Pink And Apple Blossom White'', which had been top for 10 weeks. Quaintly described on Decca's label as 'fox trot', it stays at the top for nine weeks until 3 September, when it is replaced by Mitch Miller's Yellow Rose of Texas.

JULY 10, 1955 SUNDAY

Songwriter Stan Munsey is born in Eaton, Pennsylvania. He authors the Tim McGraw hit ''All I Want Is A Life''.

JULY 11, 1955 MONDAY

Elvis Presley recorded ''Mystery Train'' and ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' (Sun 223) at Memphis' Sun Recording Studio on 706 Union Avenue.

Jenny Peer files for divorce in Charleston, West Virginia, from bandleader Bill Peer, accusing him of adultery with his protege, Patsy Cline.

Columbia released Carl Smith's ''Don't Tease Me''.

JULY 1955

In July of 1955, Jake Earls stopped by the studio to watch Presley cut ''Mystery Train'', Phillips originally released the song on Sun by blues singer Junior Parker (SUN 192). Phillips owned the song publishing rights, so he was very interested in seeing Presley record it. When Presley couldn't remember the lyrics, Earls went home to retrieve his copy of Parker's record. ''Mystery Train'' appeared as one side of Presley's last single for Sun and on his first single for RCA Victor. The flip side, ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'', was Presley's first number one hit on Country & Western charts across the country.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1955

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SESSION FILED AS MONDAY JULY 11, 1955
PROBABLY MORE THAN ONE SESSION
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Probably more than one session

Carl Perkins began to work with Quinton Claunch and Bill Cantrell on a second single, this one to be brought out on the Sun label. The formula of coupling a slow country ballad with an uptempo rhythm novelty remained unchanged: "Let The Jukebox Keep On Playing" saw the ghost of Hank Williams looming large again. But the flip side, "Gone, Gone, Gone" owed an obvious debt to no one, and was an entire dimension beyond the uptempo hillbilly flipside of his first record.

The steel guitar sat out the song, the fiddle ghosted far back in the mix, leaving Perkins front and center. It gave the first indication of Perkins' amazing rapport with himself, as he scatted phrases vocally, completing them on guitar. In delivery and feel, it was pure rhythm and blues.

''LET THE JUKEBOX KEEP ON PLAYING''

Fans of Carl's back in the 1950s who decided to check out some of his releases before ''Blue Suede Shoes'', hoping to find some unknown early rockers, were in for a shock when they found this. Same label, about six months earlier than ''Shoes'', the word ''Jukebox'' in the title, all the omens were there How could this happen?

We know today that Carl worshiped as the throne of Hank Williams before he caught the boppen' fever. This record was what billboards used to call a ''dolorous chant''. It's gram, humorless, sad and mournful, and it's great. For many fans who got in at rockabilly's ground floor, this record was a learning experience. You got the whole deal here: sawing fiddle, soaring pedal steel. This is as fine an example of mid-1950s Memphis country music as you're likely to. And let's make one thing absolutely clean; Carl was very good at this stuffboth writing it and performing it. There were thousands of Hank Williams wannabees, well after has death In 1953 Carl was one of them and he was on his game here.

The one surviving outtake of ''Jukebox'' reveals one obvious lyrical difference from issued version, and it's not clear whether it was an intentional deference or a lyrical fluff Carl sings, ''Let the jukebox keep on playing / Let my record go around''. Is that ''my'' as in the one I've selected for my nickel, or ''my'' as in the one I've recorded, maybe even this one?

Other than that it's not clear why this take was held back in favor of the issued one. This performance has a considerably more stylized vocal than the original single. Whether that entered into Sam's decision is anybody's guess at this point.

01(1) - "LET THE JUKEBOX KEEP ON PLAYING"* - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-1-8 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Contains a selection of lesser-known Sun cuts and alternate takes
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-18 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

The trick is to follow Carl Perkins recording career in a forward direction, hearing this single first and then "Blue Suede Shoes". Unfortunately. Most Sun fans did it in reverse order. Although the hillbilly roots of Carl Perkins music are now well documented, it was a bit of a stunner going from "Blue Suede Shoes" to the first four bars of "Jukebox". Beyond the culture shock, this is a fine back -country hillbilly record, circa 1955: competent, but not ground breaking. It is lovable, frankly, because its Carl, and we all know what came next.

Surprisingly, W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland was barely audible on either of the two uptempo numbers Perkins had released to that point. He was playing with brushes and Sam Phillips mixed him as far back as he could manage in the cramped studio. It seems as though Sam Phillips shared the prevailing aversion to using drums on country records. "Sam said, 'What do you need 'em for?" recalled Perkins to Dave Booth. "I said, 'W.S. just plays, he don't play loud'. Sam came to agree. He said, 'He don't sounds like drums, he sounds like clickin'. Sounds good".

01(2) - "LET THE JUKEBOX KEEP ON PLAYING"* - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 94 Master Take 2
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - August 1, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 224-A < mono
LET THE JUKEBOX KEEP ON PLAYING / GONE, GONE, GONE
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-4-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

02(1) - "WHAT YOU DOIN' WHEN YOU'RE CRYING"* - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 6467 028-4 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - VOLUME 3
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-1-9 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

02(2) - "WHAT YOU DOIN' WHEN YOU'RE CRYING"* - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-20 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

This ls another one of those enigmatic early Carl Perkins recordings that never saw light of day on Sun. It's styles owes an obvious to Hank Williams, and truth be told, it's a damn fine song. The title is tied to an eight-note melody that becomes a powerful hook with repeated listening. In fact, that enticing and familiar melody line (C - D - F - E – D - C - E - E in key of C) has inspired several of us' to search through our memories of pop/country songs released in the 1950s just before and after Carl's song was recorded.

We know of no precursor to this melody (i e, Carl did not ''steal'' it from anywhere we can tell). The reason it sounds maddeningly familiar to us is that it (or at least the first six notes, anyway) shows up on several slightly later records of the era. The earliest we know of is Jimmy Willlams' MGM record of Leslie Lyle's song, ''Go Ahead And Make Me Cry'' (MGM K12150), released in November 1955. (This is a different Jimmy Williams than the one who recorded for Sun in 1957, by the way) A better known version of this catchy melody appears on Patsy Cline's ''Poor Man's Roses'' (written by this non-hillbilly tunesmiths Milton Deluck & Bob Hilliard) that charted in February, 1957, as did Patti Page's cover version. Most successful with the melody was Jimmy Clanton's Top 10 1958 hit recording of his own composition ''Just A Dream''. But none of these pre-dates Carl's recorded. If there ls a predecessor to his use of the tune, we haven't been able to fin it.

However, the pedal steel intro on Carl's record does have traceable ancestry. It goes back to Little Roy Wiggens' steel intro to Eddy Arnold's 1954 mega-hit ''How's The World Treating You''. Stan Kesler's 4-bar intro (and outro) to Carl's recording is virtually identical to what Wiggins played.

Two versions of the song by Carl survive, with virtually identical instrumental work and arrangements, but decidedly different words. Once again, Carl has shown his facility for improvising lyrics on the spot. The next time you hear somebody praise Jerry Lee for being the King of Lyrical Improvisation, think about what you've heard by Carl on this collection.

The first outtake offers the more confident and effective vocal, although either of them would have been a credible single had Carl not enjoyed sudden, unexpected success in another domain altogether. ''Blue Suede Shoes'' spelled the end of Carl's hillbilly career at Sun and caused worthy recordings like this to be shelved. Over half a century later, we can give them the attention and respect they deserve.

''YOU CAN'T MAKE LOVE TO SOMEBODY''

This song should make every Carl Perkins fan sit up and take notice. By digging deep into the vault, we have found five versions of the title (plus a false start) stemming from at least two different sessions. None of these appeared as a single or an LP track on the original Sun label.

Maybe the subject matter was considered a tad too risque for the time. Whatever the reason, both Carl and Sam took this song quite seriously, before abandoning it and moving on. You'll hear range of styles here, from a more traditional hillbilly approach to a drum-centered version as rock and roll began to dominate the charts barely a year later.

More than anything, these recordings show us that Carl was really inventing or refiring a new kind of music that was accurately referred to as ''hillbilly bop''. Make no mistake about it: this was hillbilly music, but Carl was literally bopping all over the stage or studio when he performed. His phrasing free and spontaneous – something for which hillbilly singers have rarely been noted. You can hear the spirit of Hank Williams looming over some these takes, but when Carl breaks into wordless scat singing, you know he had left Hank Williams behind.

Just listen to these five-plus outtakes and feel the energy Carl brings to the performances. Carl (and his band) are truly giving birth to this music as they perform it. You're never entirely sure which lyrics Carl will sing or how he'll accent a vocal line or play his guitar.

Throwaway couplets like ''Listen boy, ain't no joy, being lonely'' reveal the ease and brilliance with which he composed songs. In truth, ''composed'' is probably too heady a term for what Carl did. His guitar offers counterpoint to the vocal. He's not simply strumming or playing in rhythm.

When Carl played like this, he and his brother Clayton (slap bass) were an entire band unto themselves. Both drums or acoustic rhythm guitar were unnecessary. Remind yourself that those stellar guitar breaks you hear are coming from Carl. Elvis had Scotty. Carl had Carl.

There's a strong similarity between Carls' vocalizing and guitar playing on this title and ''Gone, Gone, Gone'' which might base been a reason this title was set aside Once Sam decided to release ''Gone'' on Carl s second record (and on his LP), this song might have seemed redundan. Both reveal that free, even jazzy approach Carl brought to his performances. The composition, itself, may have been fairly straight. but once Carl got his teeth into it, it was anybody's guess where it was headed.

The truth is that kind of jivey freedom is not a quality of rockabilly any more than it is of hillbilly music. Carl eventually became associated with rockabilly (Blue Suede Shoes was the turning point), but this song that predates ''Shoes'' by perhaps six months, is written and performed in a different style altogether. It resembles, in melody and feel, Elvis' 1955 Sun recording of ''Just Because'', a song that dated back to nearly the turn of the century.

03(1) - "YOU CAN'T MAKE LOVE TO SOMEBODY" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-1-11 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-10 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(2) - "YOU CAN'T MAKE LOVE TO SOMEBODY" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1 - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1018-11 mono
RABBIT ACTION
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-11 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(3) - "YOU CAN'T MAKE LOVE TO SOMEBODY" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-1-29 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-12 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(4) - "YOU CAN'T MAKE LOVE TO SOMEBODY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - Sun Unissued

04(1) - "GONE, GONE, GONE" - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-3-10 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-2-14 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

04(2) - "GONE, GONE, GONE" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-16 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

04(3) - "GONE, GONE, GONE" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-167 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

''GONE, GONE, GONE''

Rockabilly music at its beginning was basically country musicians taking a high-energy country-music approach to songs with blues structure. And ''Gone, Gone, Gone'' is the first Sum release with a country singer performing a 12-bar blues that he wrote. (EarI Petersen's record of ''Boogie Blues'', Sun 197, has blues structure verses but the refrain is straight country music).

Considering what happened at Sun in the years after, that alone would make this a landmark record. We have three outtakes of the song, and they reveal a nice progression toward the released version - from country music to sometime more closely resembling rock and roll. Most of that is due to Carl's guitar playing during his vocals.

Going from the first to the third of these outtakes, he restricts himself to doing almost nothing but playing a percussive backbeat, foregoing the occasional melodic or harmonic fills. Meanwhile, Clayton Perkins' slap bass drives the song along. W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland's drums have little to do with that do with that drive. By his own reckoning, W.S. could barely play the drums at this point, and in W.S's clear memory, Sam was none too thrilled about having drums cluttering up the mix. In one of his few concessions to the status quo, Sam stood shoulder to shoulder with the folks at the Opry. Drums had no place in country music. Whatever you hear of W.S. Drums on that early records is bleed through from the bass mike. There was no separate microphone on the drums. Obviously, all that would change very soon at 706 Union Avenue.

Carl's vocal are about unrestrained as you can get. He whoops it up, scat sings, shouts encouragement himself in the solos and gives an exciting stage show right there in the studio. And, as he did so often he rewrites the lyrics on the spot. So we go from ''It must be jelly 'cause jam don't shake like that'' to ''That must be my gal yours don't look like that''. Sometimes, ''I'm gone, gone, gone'' and sometimes ''She's gone, gone, gone''. It hardly matter.

Occasionally, particularly in the second of our three tracks, you can hear Bill Cantrell's fiddle squeaking high above the rest. Clearly, Sam tried to keep it hidden. He didn't intend this to be a pure country record.

Overall, these takes are a snapshot of the peculiar progress from country music played with abandon to rock and roll. Carl and the boys are pretty close to the finish line.

"Gone, Gone, Gone" is a different story, however. Here we can see the bouncy, hillbilly bop that was already in the process of evolving into rockabilly. Make no mistake, this is still rural music. Carl is singing about, "going round to the square dance", an activity that might have left them a tad cold north of the Mason-Dixon. But lyrics are really not very important here. Sam Phillips has mixed Perkins' vocal back behind the bass and the lead guitar, establishing what is really important. In fact, he's mixed Bill Cantrell's fiddle (yes, there really is a fiddle on "Gone, Gone, Gone"!) even further into the next country. Billboard got the message, proclaiming "The rhythm sound is unusual and contagious... a bouncy blues in flavoursome combined country and rhythm and blues idiom". Indeed it was.

"Let The Jukebox Keep On Playing" b/w "Gone, Gone, Gone" was released on August 1, 1955, the same days as Elvis Presley's last Sun single. By the time Perkins went back into the studio, Presley had departed and Sam Phillips had a little money to throw behind a new song that Perkins had written.

04(4) - "GONE, GONE, GONE" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 95 Master Take 4
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - August 1, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 224-B < mono
GONE, GONE, GONE / LET THE JUKEBOX KEEP ON PLAYING
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-4-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

05(1) - "DIXIE BOP / PERKINS WIGGLE" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Phonogram Records (LP) 33rpm 6467 028 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - VOLUME 4 - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-1-14 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

''PERKINS WIGGLE''

This song is an anomaly. Its one that Carl had played in the clubs for some years, calling it the ''Perkins Boogie''. But it's not a boogie, it's a pop song. Craig Morrison pointed out in ''Go Cat Go'' that it's obviously adapted from ''Tuxedo Junction'', Erskine Hawkins' 1940 hit memorializing a Birmingham dance hall which became an even bigger hit for Glenn Miller and was featured in the 1953 movie, ''The Glenn Miller Story''.

The song ls about ''a red hot rhythm they don't understand,a brand new boogie they don't understand'', ''everybody's doin''' it with a rock rock rock'', and ''doin' the boogie-woogie with the Dixie bop''. Dixie bop might have been a nice name for what we came to call rockabllly, but this ain't it. Despite the high-energy promise of the lyric, the record is altogether subdued. The nearest thing to boogie happens on the last of the three outtakes in Carl's guitar work behind the last verse. This is a nice easygoing song in the spirit of an earlier era, and a good record, even if atypical for Carl. What plans Sam Phillips might have had for it we'll never know, but he expended some tape and studio time in getting three versions recorded.

With the benefit of hindsight, this song's most interesting aspects are the ways that Carl relied on it in his later records. One that it fed was ''All Mama's Children''. First, and most obvious, both have a vocal line sung over a stop by the band. Here. it's ''doin' the Perkins Wiggle with the Dixie Bop '', later it ' would be ''alla mama's children are a ''doin' the bop''. A second connection is the guitar solo. Carl's second solo in the first of our outtakes here is a direct forerunner of his first solo in ''All Mama's Children''.

05(2) - "DIXIE BOP / PERKINS WIGGLE" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-22 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

05(3) - "DIXIE BOP / PERKINS WIGGLE" - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 -Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1955
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-23 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Quinton Claunch - Electric Guitar
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums
William E. Cantrell - Fiddle, is ghosting on one take
of "Gone, Gone, Gone"* and "Dixie Bop'' / ''Perkins Wiggle"*

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun/Flip recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 13, 1955 WEDNESDAY

Faron Young recorded ''It's A Great Life (If You Don't Weaken)'' and ''For The Love Of A Woman'' in Nashville.

JULY 14, 1955 THURSDAY

Ernest Tubb recorded ''The Yellow Rose Of Texas'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

JULY 15, 1955 FRIDAY

Record producer Chuck Howard is born. Howard produces such hits as Billy Dean's ''Somewhere In My Broken Heart'', LeAnn Rimes' ''One Way Ticket (Because I Can)'' and John Berry's ''Your Love Amazes Me''.

JULY 16, 1955 SATURDAY

''The First Badman'' opens, with Tex Ritter narrating. The cartoon depics Texas a million years ago, a cross between western movies and ''The Flintstones''.

JULY 17, 1955 SUNDAY

Disneyland opens in Anaheim, California. The Disney corporation later founds the country label Lyric Street Records, earning hits with Shedaisy, Rascal Flatt, Love And Theft and Aaron Tippin.

JULY 18, 1955 MONDAY

Capitol released Hank Thompson's ''Most Of All''.

Walt Disney opens the 74-acre Disneyland theme park at Anaheim, California.

Walt Disney studios in Hollywood, sponsored by Eastman Kodak, demonstrates its cinema-in-the- round system, Circarama, later shown at the Brussels International Exposition in 1958. (The system is installed at Disneyland this year).

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE SNOW
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1955

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY JULY 19, 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Although Eddie Snow enjoyed only one release of the Sun label, he was no stranger to 706 Union. Back in 1952, singer and pianist Snow had recorded nearly a dozen titles at Sun as part of guitarist Elven Parr's In The Groove Boys from Osceola, Arkansas. Most of these tracks were superior small combo rhythm and blues that have since made their belated way into release on various Sun compilations.

When Snow returned to Sun in 1955, he recorded with a house band that included Floyd Murphy on guitar and saxman Bennie Moore. Both sides of Sun 226 featured above average material that Billboard called "Two strong sides by a sizable talent". The A-side "Ain't That Right" contains some humorous and funky philosophy delivered by Snow in a talk'sing style that owes much a bluesman Willie Mabon. The debt to Mabon's "I Don't Know" is particularly apparent.

There is a strong Chicago sound to this record, so it should be no surprise that Snow moved there. Truth be told, the vocal instrumental balance is not among Sam Phillips best work. This is particularly unfortunate since Snow's clever lyric bears listening to.

01 - "AIN'T THAT RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Eddie Snow
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 160 Master
Recorded: - July 19, 1955
Released: - August 1, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 226-A < mono
AIN'T THAT RIGHT / BRING YOUR LOVE BACK HOME
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-4-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

This side of Snow's single was a misogynistic masterpiece that today's police would have pounced on, howling. Nothing that a "no good woman" 24 can affect a good man's health, he goes on "I tried to get it through/you men (are) hard- headed/dog that bite your hand/don't give her no credit". Two more rueful verses follow before a brief alto sax solo and Snow's last acerbic observations: "When you talk about good women, I ain't got no faith/the women nowadays tryin' to take man's place/if a woman comes to your house and her face looks like a man/bet your last dollar your old lady gonna start to raise some sands". Perhaps it was more than bad distribution that prevented this record from succeeding. When Billboard got around to reviewing it in October 1955, it said, ''Snow walls some sally philosophy in this potent talking and refrain effort. Should do well in many sectors. Good down-to-earth stuff''. Indeed.

Eddie Snow first appeared on the doorstep at 706 Union as the pianist with Elven Parr's In The Groove Boys in 1952, after they'd journeyed from Osceola, Arkansas to cut a demo for Chess Records. Snow reappeared in 1955 with Benny Moore, another Parr alumnus, to cut a single for Sun records. The results are this rolling blues with a catchy tune that might have done quite well but for Sam Phillips' lack of promotional capital - and the fact that by this stage Sun was already ostentatiously touting itself in the trades as "America's number 1 Country Label".

The flipside ''Bring Your Love Back Home'' shows Snow in a less articulate, but highly pleasing mode. The harmony riffing saxes behind him are very effective. The alto sax solo is probably by Benny Moore, who'd obviously spent long nights listening to Charlie Parker's 78rpm's. The other player might be Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, who later joined Count Basie, but who'd begun his career honking in rhythm and blues bands.

02 - "BRING YOUR LOVE BACK HOME" - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Eddie Snow
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 161 Master
Recorded: - July 19, 1955
Released: - August 1, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 226-B < mono
BRING YOUR LOVE BACK HOME / AIN'T THAT RIGHT
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-4-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

03 - "WHO'S BEEN DRINKING MY WINE'' - B.M.I. - 3:09
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 19, 1955
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Charly MP3 mono
BLUES CLASSICS - BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-7-23 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

''Who's Been Drinking My Wine'' this song is drawn from the ''Mama Don't Allow'' style book. The core theme is stated (in this case, the mysterious disappearance of Eddie Snow's wine) and everyone in the band comes forward for his moment of suspicion. This kind of performance can be fun, but generally works betters at a live gig than on record. The track features riffing horns and some stop rhythms, as well as an incessant beat not unlike an uptempo version of Smokey Joe's ''The Signifying Monkey''. Snow reveals yet again that he ain't much of a vocalist. Curiously, he alternates between being off-mic and pushing the needle into the red zone. The end is a raggedy mess, suggesting this was simply a warm-up track that managed to get taped and preserved, with no serious thought given to release at any time.

04 - "SORRY LITTLE BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 19, 1955
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Charly MP3 mono
BLUES CLASSICS - BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-7-24 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

The first 12 bars really lay down a fine instrumental groove and Eddie's vocal just slides right in and takes full advantage. During the 120bar break things are turned over to Eddie's piano. Unfortunately he doesn't have very much to say. Stay tuned: that problem is about to be addressed in the next take.

05 - "I GOT TO PUT YOU DOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Eddie Snow
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 19, 1955
Released: - September 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30126-A-6 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 11 - MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-7-25 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Despite the different title, you've probably figured it out. This is an alternate take of the same song (''Sorry Little Baby''). One law of songwriting is that you can't copyright a title. As you can see here, a brand new title didn't change anything. But there are important musical changes as you're about to hear. Take a listen to just how important the balance between vocal and band can be. Sam had adjusted the dials et voila! This is what mixing is all about. Another change worth noting: gone is Snow's pointless noodling on the piano, replaced this time by a lovely fluid sax solo. This is an appealing combination of grit and class. The player was very much more than just another honker, lending credence to the belief that it's future hard bop star Eddie ''Lockjaw'' Davis. Once things get going, Snow uses the rolling rhythm to show off his limited vocal chops. He also brings in some unusual vocal lines (''my nose is on the ground'' is a highlight). So is that final verse about ''like a baby loves his milk''? Just where is Eddie going with that? What's going to rhyme with milk? There aren't that many options and Snow chooses a rather strange one: something about how a silkworm feels about his silk. The only other songwriter to come close to invoking this image was W.C. Handy in ''Loveless Love'' (''From milkless milk and silkless silk/We are growing used to soul-less souls''). Just how does a silkworm feel about his (or her) silk? Is it a close relationship? One thing for sure: of the thousands of recording done at 706 Union Avenue, it's the only one that has ever invoked images of silkworms.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Snow - Vocal and Piano
Floyd Murphy - Guitar
Eddie Davis - Tenor Saxophone
Bennie Moore - Alto Saxophone
Jeff Greyer – Drums

For Biography of Eddie Snow see: > The Sun Biographies <
Eddie Snow's  Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 20, 1955 WEDNESDAY

Coral Records released Patsy Cline's first single, ''A Church, A Courtroom And Than Goodbye'' and ''Honky Tonk Merry Go Round''.

JULY 21, 1955 THURSDAY

Bass player Howie Epstein is born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. A member of Tom Petty's band, The Heartbreakers, for 20 years, he produces three hits for girlfriend Carlene Carter, ''Come On Back'', ''Every Little Thing'' and ''I Fell In Love''.

JULY 23, 1955 SATURDAY

Chess Records released Chuck Berry's rhythm and blues classic ''Maybellene'', hailed in the Country Music Foundation's ''Heartaches By The Number'' among the 500 greatest country singles ever made.

JULY 25, 1955 MONDAY

Columbia signs The Collins Kids to a recording contract. It never amounts to any hits, but it's an important step in the career of California songwriter Larry Collins, who writes such hits as ''Delta Dawn'' and ''You're The Reason God Made Oklahoma''.

Capitol released Tommy Collins' two-sided hit, ''I Guess I'm Crazy'' backed with ''You Oughta See Pickles Now''.

JULY 30, 1955 SATURDAY

Johnny Cash recorded the first version of ''Folsom Prison Blues'', plus ''Luther Played The Boogie'', Mean Eyed Cat'' and ''So Doggone Lonesome'' at the Sun Recording Studio on 706 Union Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

"Folsom Prison Blues" was not only a moderate country hit for Johnny Cash in early 1956, but also a song which would later help to resurrect his career when he recorded it live in Folsom Prison. Cash was quickly establishing himself as an exceptional country tunesmith. When he claimed "I wrote Folsom Prison Blues in August (1955). I had seen a movie called 'Inside The Walls Of Folsom Prison' which inspired the song", there was little reason to doubt him. It not appears that more than a Hollywood movie inspirit Cash.

In 1953, Gordon Jenkins recorded one of his 'concept albums' called "Seven Dreams". It held a track sung by Beverly Mahr called "Crescent City Blues". The lyrics included: "When I was just a baby. My mama told me, Sue (a boy named Sue?). When you're grown up I want that you. Should go and see and do. But I'm stuck in Crescent City. Just watching life mosey by. When I hear whistle blowing, I hang my head and cry". It ended. "If I owned that lonesome whistle. If that railroad train were mine. I bet I'd find a man. A little farther down the line. Far from Crescent City is where I'd like to stay. And I'd let that lonesome whistle. Blow my blues away".

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1955

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY JULY 30, 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "FOLSOM PRISON BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 173 - Master
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Released: - December 15, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 232-B < mono
FOLSOM PRISON BLUES / SO DOGGONE LONESOME
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-1-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Sound familiar? Gordon Jenkins thought so when he finally heard "Folsom Prison Blues". Although he waited until Cash's tenure at Sun was over to sue, Cash suffered a major blow to the ego as well as pocketbook. Regardless of authorship, the original version of "Folsom Prison Blues" is a fine record, featuring one of Luther Perkins' most memorable solos.

Luther, Sam had long since come to realize, could barely pick one string at a time, and then with very little sense of certainty. It almost defied belief to watch him try to find his way to the simplest statement of melody, while Johnny Cash, whom Sam otherwise considered as patient and even-tempered a man as he had ever met, would grow increasingly choleric at Luther's seeming inability to stumble through a single phrase. Sam Phillips took Luther aside. ''I had him pick to me, you know, just by himself, we'd go through it and get that take, that feel, that essence, till, everybody knew, 'This is it'''. Then they would try another take, and at just about the point that it seemed they might actually get through it, Luther would hit a note that had never been heard before. ''I mean, you would utter a little prayer'', Sam said, ''sometimes even close your eyes and not move a meter, and you'd want to stuff cotton in your ears and say, 'Let him get through it, let me just wake up, and find out, that he made it''. But he never did. And yet when Johnny Cash expressed his embarrassment and displeasure, to Sam, not to Luther, and even suggested replacing his lead guitarist just so they could get the cut, Sam held firm and said, ''Look, John, you can take your ass out the front door, but leave me Luther''. Because Luther was one of the key elements to the absolute distinctiveness of their sound.

"So Doggone Lonesome", a true Cash original (as far as we know), actually received more of the chart action at the time of its release, a fact often obscured by the enduring popularity of "Folsom". ''So Doggone Lonesome'' from his point of view was the best song Cash had ever written, but, he noted with self-conscious sarcasm to an Air Force buddy just days after the session, it probably wouldn't sell more than three or four copies, ''because I don't have a steel guitar in the band. Heck, people don't want anything different... Shoot, those teenage girls don't care about catchy rhythm. They want to hear a pretty steel guitar. 'Cause everybody has a steel guitar. Guess I'm just wasting my time. My music is so shallow and simple''.

02(1) - "SO DOGGONE LONESOME" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Released: - Sun Unissued

02(2) - "SO DOGGONE LONESOME" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Released: - Sun Unissued

02(3) - "SO DOGGONE LONESOME" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 172 Master Take 3
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Released: - December 15, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 232-A < mono
SO DOGGONE LONESOME / FOLSOM PRISON BLUES
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-1-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

"Mean Eyed Cat" was a delight to rockabilly fans everywhere as they witnessed Cash's closest flirtation with their favoured craft. This track had a backwoods charm and energy that went beyond commercial concerns. In fact, the song lacked even a rudimentary 'hook', that simple device aimed at keeping a song in memory. Even the title seemed to have been pasted on after the fact. In place of such commercial artifice were some of the sweetest rural images this side of the Appalachians. Line like "He spit his tobacco, said I'll be dad blamed, I believe I 'did' see her leaving on a East bound train".

03(1) - "MEAN EYED CAT" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Released: - Sun Unissued

03(2) - "MEAN EYED CAT" - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrx number: – U 385 Master
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Released: - October 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 347-B < mono
MEAN EYED CAT / PORT OF LONELY HEARTS
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

No one was going to make much money on this tune, and it was unlikely to be covered by other acts, but for Cash's diehard fans, it was just what the doctor ordered. For his part, Cash maintained that "Mean Eyed Cat" was an unfinished song, and in 1996 he wrote another verse before recording it for his "Unchained" album.

On this side, Phillips dug deep into Cash's Sun catalogue and came up with a little autobiographical gem on this session. "Luther Played The Boogie" had been deemed unworthy of release for over three years. Now it was just what the doctor ordered: an original Sun copyright that would be unlikely to interfere with disc jockey attention to the "hit side" of Sun 316. Surprisingly, this little bit of vintage whimsy drew more than its share of attention at the time and has been enjoyed by collectors ever since for both its sound and content.

04(1) - "LUTHER PLAYED THE BOOGIE" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Released: - Sun Unissued

04(2) - "LUTHER PLAYED THE BOOGIE" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Released: - Sun Unissued

04(3) - "LUTHER PLAYED THE BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 350 Take 3 - Master
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 316-B < mono
LUTHER PLAYED THE BOOGIE / THANKS A LOT
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-1 mono
THE MAN IN BLACK 1954-1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 31, 1955 SUNDAY

Seventeen years after The Monroe Brothers split, Bill and Charlie Monroe deliver their first full-fledged reunion concert at the New River Ranch in Rising Sun, Maryland. Bill Monroe appears in a sling, having broken his collarbone in a bathtub accident.

Elvis Presley performs at the Hesterly Armory in Tampa, Florida. A photo from the show is used the following year as the cover for Elvis Presley's first album for RCA Victor titled ''Elvis Presley'' (LPM-1254).

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©