CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS (2/1)
February 1, 1958 to February 28, 1958

Studio Session for Mickey Gilley, February 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Dusty & Dot Rhodes, February 4, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bill Pinky & The Turks, February 7, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ike Turner & Tommy Hodge, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bill Justis & Sid Manker, February 13, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, February 14, 1958 / Sun Records (1)
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, February 14, 1958 / Sun Records (2)
Studio Session for Jack Clement, February 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jack Clement, February 17, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Warren Smith, February 23, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Barbara Pittman, February 24, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, February/March 1958 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 1958

If there had been no Jerry Lee, then the three demos his cousin Mickey Gilley offered might have grabbed Sam Phillips' attention. As it was, these demos, probably mailed-in, were fired away apparently without ceremony. Gilley was always destined to be Jerry Lee Lite. The rest of the post- Lewis hopefuls were recorded at 706 Union and they represent a rich variety of sound and influences.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

For most of his career, Gilley lived in the shadow of his cousin, Jerry Lee Lewis. They both learned to play the same old Starck upright piano in Ferriday, Louisiana, where Mickey grew up. But in 1952, at the age of 16, he left his family and his music in Ferriday, moved to Houston and became a construction worker. It wasn't until Lewis had a monster hit with "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" in 1957 that Mickey thought he could do that too, and decided that he wanted to pursue a musical career.

In August 1957 he went to Houston's Gold Star studio and cut "Tell Me Why"/"Ooh Wee Baby" for the aptly named Minor label. Undeterred by its poor sales, Gilley tried his luck at the Sun studio in Memphis, where he sang four songs at an audition (eventually released in the 1980s).

Sam Phillips didn't need a Jerry Lee Lewis imitator when he had the real thing under contract. Early in 1958, Mickey hooked up with Charles 'Red' Matthews, writer of the hit song "White Silver Sands".

Matthews produced the single "Call Me Shorty"/"Come On Baby" (two exuberant rockers), which was placed with Dot and sold well regionally.

Over the next few years, Gilley recorded for a wide variety of independent labels: Khoury (1959), Rex (1959), Potomac (1960), Lynn, Paula, Sabra, Princess, Supreme, San, Astro (his own label) and many more. Most of these recordings were rock and roll in Jerry Lee's style, with an occasional country number thrown in for good measure, for instance "Is It Wrong" and "Lonely Wine", both of which sold well in the South in 1964-1965. Meanwhile Mickey played a never-ending series of bars and clubs. Throughout the 1960s Gilley had his dreams, but little else.

In February 1958 Mickey Gilley appeared on the larger label, Dot, with ''Call Me Shorty'', a session that may have been recorded at Sun. The publishing on the Dot recordings was through Memphis record man Chuck Matthews who ran OJ Records and may have facilitated the Sun and Dot sessions.

STUDIO SESSION FOR MICKEY GILLEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS PROBABLY 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE FEBRUARY 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

The three songs heard here on this session are piano and vocal tours de force in the Lewis manner, with nothing but a few bass notes in support. Technically, the piano is stormingly good but it lacks the commanding left hand of Lewis and Gilley's vocals lack Lewis's ''presence'', his confidence, his charisma. The first two songs are good rockers and would have been contenders if Lewis hadn't got there first. The third, a version of Lewis's calling card, ''Whole Lotta Shakin''', just shows up the similarities, and the differences in their styles. Gilley comes off second best.

01- ''C'MON BABY/HAVE A LITTLE PARTY'' – B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Mickey Gilley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date February 1958
Released: November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-11-10 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - YOUR LOVIN' MAN
Reissued: - 1997 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8277- 24 mono
SUN ROCK & ROLL

02 - ''THINKIN' OF ME'' – B.M.I. - 1:41
Composer: - Mickey Gilley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date February 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-11-9 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - YOUR LOVIN' MAN
Reissued: - 1995 Sparkleton Records (CD) 500/200rpm SP-CD 99006-4 mono
MICKEY GILLEY'S ROCKIN' ROLLIN' PIANO

03 – ''WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN' GOIN' ON'' – B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Dave Williams-Sunny David
Publisher: - Marlyn Music
Matrix number: None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date February 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-11-11 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKIN' YEARS - YOUR LOVIN' MAN
Reissued: 1995 Sparkleton Records (CD) 500/200rpm SP-CD 99006-3 mono
MICKEY GILLEY'S ROCKIN' ROLLIN' PIANO

04 – ''WHOLE LOT OF TWISTIN' GOIN' ON'' – B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Dave Williams-Sunny David-Mickey Gilley
Publisher: - Marlyn Music
Matrix number: None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date February 1958
Sometimes reissued as ''Shake It For Mickey Gilley''
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8263-17 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES – VOLUME 4

05 – ''CALL ME SHORTY'' - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Matthews
Publisher: - Follows Music
Matrix number: - MW 10588
Recorded: Unknown Date February 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Dot Records (S) 45rpm standard single Dot 15706 mono
CALL ME SHORTY / COME ON BABY
Reissued: - June 24, 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15711 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT - VOLUME 5

06 – ''COME ON BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Mick Gilley
Publisher: - Mellows Music
Matrix number: - MW 10589
Recorded: Unknown Date February 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Dot Records (S) 45rpm standard single Dot 15706 mono
COME ON BABY / CALL ME SHORTY
Reissued: - June 24, 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15711 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT - VOLUME 5

07 – ''WOLFHOUND''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: Unknown Date February 1958

Probably more songs recorded. The tapes were leased to Dot Records.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mickey Gilley – Vocal and Piano
More Details Unknown

For Biography of Mickey Gilley see: > The Sun Biographies <
Mickey Gilley's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 1, 1958 SATURDAY

Johnny Cash tops the country charts with "Ballad Of A Teenage Queen" while also making the pop top 20.

The singles "Breathless" b/w ''Down The Line'' (Sun 288) by Jerry Lee Lewis and ''Baby Please Don't Go'' b/w ''Wouldn't You Know'' (Sun 289) by Billy Riley are released.

PI 3522 ''College Man'' b/w ''The Stranger'' by Bill Justis and His Orchestra issued.

Elvis Presley recorded ''Wear My Ring Around Your Neck'' at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, California. It's Elvis final session to feature his original bass player Bill Black.

''Over The rainbow'' songwriter Harold Arlen and his wife, Anya, have a son, Samuel Arlen. ''Over The Rainbow'' is destined to become a country hit for Jerry Lee Lewis in 1980, and a concert favorite for Trisha Yearwood and Martina McBride.

FEBRUARY 3, 1958 MONDAY

Decca released Bobby Helms ''Just A Little Lonesome''.

Jerry Lee Lewis's ''Great Balls Of Fire'' had been riding high on all the charts and staying at number 1 on the country charts for weeks. On this day, Johnny Cash's Sun single "Ballad Of A Teenage Queen" entered the Billboard Hot 100 at number 83, eventually peaking at number 16. It also gave Johnny Cash his first number 1 country record. The record sold over 180,000 copies during January alone and another 280,000 before June 1958. ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen'' was composed by artist and repertoire man, Jack Clement. This development was not surprising, given that in 1957 he had been the third-selling country artist in the country, just behind Marty Robbins and Ray Price.

Jack was musically versatile, having played country, Hawaiian, and polka bands in Boston, Washington, and elsewhere on the East Coast and around the Memphis area for several years. Country was his love. He said when he was a little boy and didn't have a good radio, he would put a coat hanger on his big toe and prop his leg up on the bed to get better reception for the Grand Ole Opry. He liked the old-fashioned sound of Kentucky bluegrass, as well as traditional ballads. The tunes he wrote showed all these influences at time.

Johnny Cash had recorded ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen'' in late 1957 and was pushing it on his many appearances, live and on TV and radio lucrative that he had given up a regular spot on the Grand Ole Opry. Sam Phillips had initially been the one to record Johnny, producing his two previous hits, ''Folsom Prison Blues'' and ''I Walk The Line'', and most of those on the album for which Barbara Barnes written the liner notes. He had gradually been turning over the studio to Jack Clement and Bill Justis, and Jack was Johnny Cash's producer.

Jack was not inclined to continue in Sam's rhythm and blues groove, instead looking toward Nashville for inspiration. In a nod to the Anita Kerr Singers of RCA, Jack brought in the Gene Lowery Singers to back Johnny Cash on ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen''. In the title and story of young romance, he made an appeal to the teenage record-buying public. This record did not have the stark quality of Cash's earlier releases, and the softer sound was largely responsible for the record's making it to the twenty of the pop charts for the first time. Clearly, Cash was picking up that target audience of teenagers with this record, while still maintaining his popularity with the country fans. But, according to Barbara Barnes, she felt pretty sure that the teenagers were buying it for the B-side, ''Big River'', a Cash composition which was a much more arrested record. Somewhat folk-sounded with Jack Clement’s nice acoustic guitar playing, it had an insistent rhythm that flowed through the story of a man chasing an elusive woman all the way down the Mississippi River from St. Paul, Minnesota, to New Orleans. Humor shines through on some Cash's rhymes in the tune, as in ''cavorting in Davenport''. The title ''Big River'' had been suggested by Carl Perkins, who thereby repaid the debt he owed Johnny for suggesting the title of his smash hit, ''Blue Suede Shoes''. Carl also came up with the title of ''I Walk The Line''.

FEBRUARY 6, 1958 THUESDAY

The Munich Air Disaster took place when a British European Airways flight crashed at the Munich Airport. The flight was carrying 44 people when it crashed soon after take-off. Many of those on board were sports journalists and members of the Manchester United football team who were on their way home after having qualified for the semifinals in the European Cup. A total of 23 people died as a result of the crash, 8 of them were members of the Manchester United team. The pilot of the flight survived and was later charged with negligence as it was originally believe that a build-up of ice on the planes wings had caused the crash. While there was some ice found on the wings it was determined that a build-up of slush on the runway was the major contributing factor in the crash as it stopped the plane from gaining enough speed for a proper take-off. The crash was a tragedy, especially for sports fans, as the loss of several very young and talented players was devastating. It took Manchester United nearly 10 years to rebuild the team and in 1968 they went on to win the European Cup.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR DUSTY & DOT RHODES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FEBRUARY 4, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

Under the competition of a newer generation of rockabilly combos, Slim Rhodes soon found himself dropped from the Sun label. Although he did make several other recordings for labels like Cotton Town Jubilee, including an interesting promotional disc for Hart's bread on the Hart's label, Slim mainly concentrated on radio and TV work. New generations of the family came through, from sister Dot, who also recorded as Dottie Moore on King, to Slim's niece Sandra Rhodes who at one time pursued a solo career with Fantasy Records, and sang as a backup singer on countless sessions at Hi Records in Memphis.

Today, Speck Rhodes is still in the music business in Nashville, Dusty Rhodes lives in a small town in West Tennessee, and Brad Suggs has moved to Florida, where he works for Sears. The full story of the Rhodes band would take more space than is available here, and much work remains to be done in interviewing members of the Rhodes band and fleshing out the contribution they made to country music in the Mid-South.

01(1) - "I'VE NEVER BEEN SO BLUE" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 4, 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charlie Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30104 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 4 - COTTON CITY COUNTRY
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-1-19 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311 FK-1-18 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

In a never-ending attempt to keep up with changing musical styles, the Rhodes aggregation held on this final session. The sound of "I've Never Been So Blue" is remarkably similar to latter-day Johnny Cash records cut at Sun, owing in no small way to the style of pianist Jimmy Wilson. The lead vocal is taken by Dot Rhodes but it is not clear whether she is supported by the other members of the Rhodes clan or whether she has recorded a double-tracked vocal in the manner of Skeeter Davis. It could almost be the Miller Sisters who had left Sun some months before this was recorded. This marked the Rhodes band's swansong at 706. A comparison with the very earliest of their recordings shows the distance that country music had come in eight years.

01(2) - "I'VE NEVER BEEN SO BLUE" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 4, 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-3-21 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ethmer Cletus ''Slim'' Rhodes - Guitar
Dorothy ''Dot'' Rhodes Moore - Vocal

Probably:
Perry Hillburn '' Dusty'' Rhodes - Vocal & Fiddle
Luther Bradley ''Pee Wee'' Suggs - Guitar
Gilbert Ray ''Speck'' Rhodes - Bass
Unknown - Drums
Jimmy Wilson – Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 7, 1958 FRIDAY

SLIM RHODES NEWS-LINE - That read:
Dear Etta,

Just a note to let you know about the news Radio and TV, shows we have coming up. Beginning next Saturday morning, February 8th, 11:30 a.m. on WMC Radio, which will originate live from the show room floor of Hoehn Chevrolet at 367 Union Avenue in down town Memphis.

Our new TV show will begin the following Tuesday night, February 11th, on channel 5, WMCT, from 6:00 to 6:30 p.m, and we will be on every Tuesday night thereafter. The sponsor of both radio and TV shows will be Hoehn Chevrolet, the South's largest Chevrolet Dealer.

We would appreciate it very much if you would write at least one card a week to our radio program, and one to our TV program, as it is important that we get a lot of mail, so please have your friends write too.

You are invited to attend our radio and TV shows anytime you are able. Tell your friends they are invited too. We are going to have guests on our radio and TV programs, big name stars like Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Bill Justis among others.

If you or any of your friends are interested in buying a new or used car, be sure and to to Hoehn. Tell the Hoehn salesman Slim sent you.

We are happy to have you as one of our fans, write often, and come when you can to our show.

We love you. Your friend, Slim Rhodes.

FEBRUARY 7, 1958 FRIDAY

Studio session with Bill Pinkney at Sun Records, Memphis, Tennessee, for Phillips International label. It was always a mystery how Bill Pinkney of the Drifters ended up on Phillips International for a single. The answer comes from Roland Janes' scrapbook. Early in 1958, Janes went out on a Bill Justis tour and asked the artist to sign a program for his wife, Betty Jo. Don Briggs (who later managed Edwin Starr) signed, as did guitarist Sid Manker, who wrote, ''Like Help''! below Justis's signature. At the top of the page in florid script Bill Pinkney wrote, ''Luck to you from Bill Pinkney, formerly of the Drifters''. In a recent conversation, and got along well with Justis, who brought him to Memphis during or after the tour.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILL PINKY (PINKNEY) & THE TURKS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY FEBRUARY 7, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - BILL JUSTIS

On second thought, maybe PI was going to specialize in artists whose last name started with "P". Pittman, Powers and now Pinky. Actually, that's Pinkney, although his handle was surgically shortened to Pinky. In any case, Pinky was the first black artist who had graced a Sun microphone in quite a while. In fact, other than Rosco Gordon (who would enjoy another Sun release later in 1958), the place was starting to look as lillywhite as a Klan meeting. But Pinky changed all that.

Once there Bill Pinkney conceived this knee jerk response to "At The Hop" with producer Bill Justis for a one-off 45 on Phillips International.

01 - "AFTER THE HOP" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Bill Justis-Bill Pinkney
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 317 - Master
Recorded: - February 7, 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3524-A < mono
AFTER THE HOP / SALLY'S GOT A SISTER
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

"After The Hop" is one of those Larry Williams teen records that manages to work in names like Short Fat Fanny while creating images of dancing away the night. In many ways this is mindless teen fluff from 40 years ago, yet its instrumental track has an undeniable energy starting with those strangled sax notes by Bill Justis. The longer the track goes on, the more Sun fans will recognize it as a reprise of Roy Orbison's "Chicken Hearted", recorded just months earlier.

"Sally's Got A Sister" is a slightly different matter. Although it doesn't quite know what it wants to be or, more aptly, how to get there, there is a very interesting record buried in here.

The verses (more references to "Long Tall Sally" and company) are trite enough to make you sit back and pay attention when the release (containing the title) finally arrives. This songs works! Then there's the business of the instrumental break: not one, but two.

After Bill Justis has his way say and we're expecting Pinkney and the Turks to come back in with the hook-aden release again, we're treated to 12 more bars of jamming, this time by Roland Janes. A strange record indeed.

02 – ''SALLY'S GOT A SISTER'' - B.M.I. - 3:12
Composer: - Bill Pinkney
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 318 - Master
Recorded: - February 7, 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3524-B < mono
SALLY'S GOT A SISTER / AFTER THE HOP
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

03 – ''HIGH SCHOOL ROCK'' - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Bill Pinkney
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - February 7, 1958
Released: - 2013
First appearance: - Flower Foot Music Internet iTunes MP3-11 mono
DO I HAVE TO GO... BACK SCHOOL - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Pinkney - Vocal / Bill Justis - Saxophone
Roland Janes - Lead Guitar / Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums / Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Chorus The Turks consisting of Willie Peppers,
Gerald Hendrix, Tom Abston and James Curry

For Biography of Bill Pinkney see: > The Sun Biographies <
Bill Pinkney's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The Original Bill Pinkney, born 15 August 1925 in Dalzell, Sumter County, South Carolina, and died 4 July 2007 in Daytona Beach, Florida. Pinkney was singing alongside Brook Benton in the Jerusalem Stars when Clyde McPhatter drafted him into the Drifters in 1953.

After McPhatter left, Pinkney sang lead on a few songs, including "Steamboat" before the Drifters' manager (and owner), George Treadwell, fired him in 1957.

Then headed to Memphis and did a tour with Bill Justis and Roland Janes, which probably accounts for this one-off single. In all likelihood, it was recorded shortly before Pinkney put together a group called the Flyers with Bobby Hendricks that made one record for Atco Records.

Pinkney meanwhile was still recording occasionally with the Drifters until Treadwell fired the lot in 1958. He then formed a group called The Original Drifters that lasted well into the 1970s.

Bill Pinkney’s death on 4 July 2007 marks the end of a significant era in Drifters history. He was found dead at the Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort. Pinkney was scheduled to perform with the Original Drifters for Fourth of July festivities there. Bill Pinkney was 81 years old.

When he returned from World War II Bill was decorated with four bronze stars for action in France and Germany. He had his own Army gospel quintet in Europe, the US Friendly Five, then after his return home Bill formed the Singing Cousins and also sang with the Wandering Four. A move to New York provided Pinkney with an opportunity to play in the Negro Baseball League for the New York Blue Sox and he also sang with the Jerusalem Stars (with Benjamin Franklin Peay - a.k.a Brook Benton) then moved on to the Southern Knights before crossing the secular divide to the Drifters.

Though Bill was not present in the first line up of Clyde McPhatter’s Drifters in June 1953 when they recorded their first Atlantic session (who were in fact Clyde (lead), William Anderson, David Baughan (tenors), David Baldwin (baritone), James Johnson (bass)), he was present on the next famous session in August 1953 when the iconic ''Money Honey'' was recorded. This time the line up was Clyde (lead), Gerhart Thrasher, Bill Pinkney (tenors), Andrew Thrasher (baritone) and Willie Ferbee (bass) and by the third session Ferbee was gone and Pinkney had taken over his more familiar role as bassman.

Bill’s biggest claim to fame came in February 1954 when he recorded a shared lead with Clyde on the Drifters sensational version of ''White Christmas''. The group remained unchanged until McPhatter was drafted into the US Army in October 1954.

At that time Pinkney became ‘leader’ of the group, handling their organisation and finances when they were out on tour. As spokesman for the group he went to the Drifters manager George Treadwell in mid 1956 on their behalf to try to negotiate a better wage deal for them.

Treadwell owned the Drifters name-mark under ‘Drifters Incorporated’ and paid them each a low weekly wage. A row broke out, Pinkney was sacked and Andrew Thrasher quit. New members were recruited and they continued to tour. Pinkney formed a new group the Flyers with ex Swallow and McPhatter sound-alike Bobby Hendricks but their Atco single didn’t chart and when Treadwell needed a new lead for a Drifters session in April 1958, Hendricks was in place. The money troubles rumbled on and Treadwell sacked the Drifters in May giving their name to the Crowns, another group he had under contract. This was the group that cut ''There Goes My Baby'' which took the ‘new’ Drifters to the top of the pop charts in June 1959.

Meanwhile Bill had cut the single ''After the Hop'' in Memphis on Sam Phillips ‘Phillips International’ label as Bill Pinky & the Turks. He then formed the first group of Original Drifters but they couldn’t get a recording deal in New York under that name and Treadwell brought actions against them at venues when they performed. They made two singles for End in 1959 as the Harmony Grits, though neither sold well but by 1964 Pinkney had managed to get legal recognition for the Original Drifters. James Brown produced ''Don’t Call Me'' / ''I Do The Jerk'' (featuring Jimmy Lewis and Bobby Hollis) for Fontana. The Original Drifters first came to the UK in 1966 and they returned here several times with various lineups. They cut a series of one shot singles for Veep, Game, Southern Charisma, S&J and Christopher, over the following 20 years, then in 1988 they signed to Marion Carter’s Ripete Records who issue several singles and two albums (''Christmas With The Drifters'' and ''The Anthology''). For almost 50 years Bill performed with the Original Drifters as they toured the world. Many fine singers passed through their ranks including David Baughan, Gerhart Thrasher, Chuck Cockerham, Benny Anderson, Ali/ Oli Woodson, (who Joined the Temptations) and more recently Richard ‘Knight’ Dunbar, Vernon Young (died February 2005), and Ron McPhatter, Clyde’s son.

For many years it was a struggle but more recently Bill Pinkney had begun to gain some recognition for his many years of pioneering and tireless performing. In the past few years he was represented by Maxine Porter and Superstar Unlimited, who run a website (www.originaldrifters.com) that lists the group’s upcoming gigs, photos and many salient facts about this extraordinary man.

Pinkney has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame in 1988, Vocal Group Hall Of Fame in 2000 and the Beach Music Hall Of Fame. In February 1999, he was honoured by the Rhythm And Blues Foundation as a Pioneer.

South Carolina awarded Bill its highest civilian honour 'Ambassador Of Entertainment' and established a state park in birthplace of Dalzell, Sumter County, SC. Pinkney was also awarded an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts by Coastal Carolina University in May 2001.

He even received a letter of recognition from Nelson Mandela and the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame for its ‘Legends’ series has filmed an oral history of his life for archival inclusion. In addition to those mentioned above there are other Original Drifters CDs available and a DVD ‘Doo Wop 51’ (US format) which features Bill and Bobby Hendricks. In 2003 he published his autobiography ''Drifters 1: Bill Pinkney'' himself. In recent years Pinkney ran the Original Drifters on a rotational basis to cover the countrywide appearances. Like the Drifters themselves BPO had there copyists and spin off groups. No doubt the Original Drifters will continue without Bill, but he was the man that made it all happen. He was the last of the ''Money Honey'' line up to die and only Bobby Hendricks remains from that first Drifters incarnation.

Bill Pinky (Pinkney) died on July 4, 2007 at the Daytona Beach Hilton, preparing for yet another gig. He had moved back home, basing himself in Sumter, South Carolina, where he was buried, and where the Willie (Bill) Pinkney Community Park is named in his memory.

- Peter Burns, July 2007

SPRING 1958

By 1958 all black artists and associates from the early days of the Memphis Recording Service and Sun Records had been firmly consigned to the past. The surviving tapes had been tied together with elastic bands and stored away as mementos of less prosperous days. The blues singers who remained in Memphis did not have the marketability of those who had departed, and Phillips' head had been turned around by the gold he found in an unexpected quarter. Still, his success with rock and roll should not obscure the insight that Sam Phillips brought to recording the blues. He worked hard to get the best from his artists. He usually knew when they were thing to play something to please the white guy behind the glass. He wouldn't yell at them if they arrived late, and when other labels might do one or two takes and call it a night, Phillips would sit behind his tape deck until sunup if he thought the musicians on the studio floor might capture the sound that he heard in his head.

Despite his perfectionism, the hits he had enjoyed in 1953 showed Phillips that the demographic base he was servicing was simply too narrow. ''Keep in mind there were a number of very good rhythm and blues'', he said in 1982. ''The base wasn't broad enough because of racial prejudice. It won't broad enough to get the amount of commercial play and general acceptance overall, not just in the South. When you're on the road, sixty-five or seventy thousand miles a year, as I was in those days, you get a lot of input from the ground. On Mondays and Wednesdays, when the jukebox operators would come by the distributor for their weekly supply of records, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays, when the smaller retail outlets would come by, I'd be there. They'd tell me, 'These people (the blacks) are ruining our children'. Now these were basically good people, but conceptually they did not understand the kinship between the black and white people in the South. So I knew what I had to do to broaden the base of acceptance''.

The path toward commercial salvation was made clear by the success of one young singer who, like Phillips, intuitively understood black music and quickly synthesized both a musical style and an image that would enable Phillips to take yellow Sun records into places where the had never been before.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Unknown date 1958, Sam Phillips takes six songs recorded in St. Louis by Ike Turner, with vocalist Tommy Hodge, but they are not released. Note: Three of these songs were previously issued with incorrect titles. By 1958 Sam Phillips had almost given up on recording black music. Billy Emerson and Rosco Gordon apart, there hadn't been any releases by black artists during 1957, and only "Sally Jo" by Rosco Gordon would appear during this year.

Nevertheless, Sam Phillips bought six titles from Ike Turner, perhaps at Ike's insistence - or perhaps as a token of the business that they'd done, to the profit of both, in the frantic years at the beginning of the decade.

Ike was now a major force in the St. Louis black music industry, which was active but intensely parochial, and he was having trouble getting product onto a major label. This batch of songs sound like demos and perhaps their sale paid of Ike's studio bills: for very shortly after wards, Ike went to Chicago and recorded a bunch of sessions for Eli Toscano's Cobra and Artists labels, including this song, which he retitled ("I Known") "You Don't Love Me" from its opening line. Tommy Hodge's congested vocal is very low in the mix, although his performance is strong enough. Carlson Oliver takes two choruses of a fairly basic tenor sax solo, and the song is soon over.

STUDIO SESSION FOR IKE TURNER & TOMMY HODGE
FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
RECORDED IN EAST ST. LOUIS, ILLINIOS
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

01 - "(I KNOW) YOU DON'T LOVE ME (GET IT OVER BABY)" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Ike Turner
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30103-A-1 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 3 - DELTA RHYTHM KINGS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-8-23 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Singer Hodge was a large, placid man, but Billboard detected hints of Little Richard and Sceamin' Jay Hawkins in him, concluding its review of this song ''Good close to the soil was''.

02 - "DOWN AND OUT (HOW LONG WILL IT LAST)" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Ike Turner
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30103-A-2 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 3 - DELTA RHYTHM KINGS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-8-24 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Ike had begun to experiment with the vibrato arm, later dubbed not entirely with affection a "twang bar", on his Fender guitar during the Federal sessions he'd cut the previous year. These agitated wailing notes would achieve their greatest significance on Otis Rush's Cobra singles, "Double Trouble" and "All Your Love". Here, they pump up the anxiety gauge admirably as Tommy Hodge frets his way through a typically angst-ridden piece, teenage or otherwise. This song was re-recorded for Artists Records as "Down And Out". But on this side, the stylistic influence of B.B. King is obvious, but the emotional variation that Turner gets out of the instrument is special.

03 - "I'M GONNA FORGET ABOUT YOU (MATCHBOX)" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Ike Turner
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30103-A-5 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 3 - DELTA RHYTHM KINGS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 8-7-25 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Once again Ike shows the whammy bar no mercy. He tried to find a good home for ''I'm Gonna Forget About You (Matchbox)'', this song, recording it for Eli Toscano's Cobra/Artistic labels in Chicago in 1958 with Tommy Hodge singing. He recorded another version for Cobra with Jackie Brenston and yet another with Otis Rush, but none of them was released at the time. Only on the tape mailed to Sun was it titled ''I'm Gonna Forget About You'', on all other versions, it bore the more succinct title ''Matchbox''.

And in those pre-Beatle days, ''Matchbox'' was a title known only to the handful of fans who'd bought Carl Perkins' Sun single, and an even smaller number of pre-War blues and hillbilly fans. It would answer a few questions if we could have been the letter that accompanied this tape. Tuner seemed to be between contracts, not that being under contract ever impeded him from recording for another company. Phillips, though, had his attention diverted by Johnny Cash's defection to Columbia and Jerry Lee Lewis's career implosion. Ike Turner's tape, if not the blues as a whole, must have seemed like a missive from a forgotten planet.

04 - "YOU AIN'T THE ONE (YOU CAN'T BE THE ONE FOR ME)" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Ike Turner
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30103-A-6 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 3 - DELTA RHYTHM KINGS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-8-26 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

As we've seen from his own and Little Milton's sessions, Ike Turner had a strong affection for New Orleans rhythm. On ''You Ain't The One'', the song also suits Tommy Hodge's unique vocal chords, as well as Carlson Oliver's tenor sax, which here he wields in the manner of King Curtis to some extent. It shows that Ike was still thinking about the hit parade. It would be a little while before he distilled the right ingredients, but he wasn't far off the mark here. Sam Phillips kept the tapes but, as far from the blues as some may think these titles are, he was no longer interested in the market to which they spoke.

05 - "WHY SHOULD I KEEP TRYING" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Ike Turner
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30103-A-7 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 3 - DELTA RHYTHM KINGS
Reissued: - 2010 Mastercorp Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE ROOTS OF ROCK

Name (Or. NO. Of Instruments)
Tommy Hodge - Vocal
Ike Turner - Guitar
Carlson Oliver - Tenor Saxophone
Fred Sample - Piano
Jesse Knight - Bass Guitar
Unknown – Drums

For Biography of Tommy Hodge see: > The Sun Biographies <
Tommy Hodge Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 8, 1958 SATURDAY

Earl Scruggs' third son, Steve Scruggs, is born in Nashville. He goes on to play piano for several years in his father's band, The Earl Scruggs Revue.

FEBRUARY 12, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Brunswick released Buddy Holly's pop hit ''Maybe Baby''. Twenty years later, the song becomes a country hit for Susie Allanson.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILL JUSTIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY FEBRUARY 13, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Bill Justis was in effect the Artist & Repertoire man at Sun during his tenure, and many familiar names recur in his line-ups such as Roland Janes, James M. Van Eaton, Billy Riley, and Jimmy Wilson. Just to whet the appetite there here two unissued tracks recorded by Justis, a good rocking instrumental "Scroungieville" and "Laura" with Sid Manker on guitar. In effect it was unusually whatever studio musicians were around.

01 – "SCROUNGIEVILLE" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - William Everette Justis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably February 13, 1958
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8302-24 mono
706 UNION INSTRUMENTALS

02 – "LAURA" - B.M.I.
Composer: - William Everette Justis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - February 13, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Justis - Tenor Saxophone
Sid Manker - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Vernon Drane - Saxophone
Nelson Grill - Saxophone

For Biography of Bill Justis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Bill Justis's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Riding high on the success of his biggest two hits in early 1958, Jerry went into the studio with his road band Jay W. Brown on bass and Russell Smith on drums (there was no guitarist) and cut a session of mostly Elvis Presley hits. They all remained in the vaults until at least the late 1960s with the exception of this song, which was the opening track on his first album ''Jerry Lee Lewis'' the following year. The 1972 cut from ''The Killer Rocks On'' (coincidentally also the opening song) is faster with some great piano and a much bigger band, including a string section (recorded live in the studio!).

Unusually recorded with his road drummer at the time Russell Smith instead of the usual Jimmy Van Eaton (also with his father-in-law Jay W. Brown on bass), this wasn’t released until Charly’s ''Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumpin’ Piano'' album in 1974, the first of three 16-song albums they released that year. It’s not bad, but Jerry’s more mature vocals on the 1971 cut blows it away.

Recorded during the ''Would You Take Another Chance On Me'' sessions, it wasn’t released at the time (despite being the equal or better than anything else on the album), instead being issued on the Dutch ''The Mercury Sessions'' album in 1985. Jerry Lee Lewis at his vocal peak.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY FEBRUARY 14, 1958 (1)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

1 – "SOMEDAY (YOU'LL WANT ME TO YOU)" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Jimmy Hodges
Publisher: - Duchess Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1974
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 300002-B7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AND HIS PUMPING PIANO
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-27 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"Someday (You'll Want Me to Want You)" is a popular song written by Jimmie Hodges and was published in 1944. The song has become a standard, recorded by many pop and country music singers included by Elton Britt's 1946 version peaked at number 2 on the country charts.

The recording by Vaughn Monroe was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-3510 (78rpm) and 47-2986. It first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on July 29, 1949 and lasted eighteen weeks on the chart, spending two weeks at number 1. The recording by The Mills Brothers was released by Decca Records as catalog number 24694. It first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on August 12, 1949 and lasted 15 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 8. A version by Jodie Sands barely made the Top 100 chart in 1958, reaching number 95, but did better in the United Kingdom, where it spent 10 weeks on the charts, peaking at number 14. Singer Della Reese released a rendition of the song in 1960, and it peaked at number number 56 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and number 31 on Cash Box's best-selling chart. American country artist Patsy Cline posthumously released a single version of the song, which reached at number 23 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 chart in 1964. The recorded version by Jerry Lee Lewis, recorded on February 14, 1958, released on November 1974 for his Charly LP compilation ''Jerry Lee Lewis And His Pumping Piano'' (CR 300002).

2 - "DON'T BE CRUEL" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Otis Blackwell-Elvis Presley
Publisher: - Elvis Presley Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - EP Master
Recorded: - February 14, 958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA 108-A1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-26 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Note: "Don't Be Cruel" is a song recorded by Elvis Presley and written by Otis Blackwell in 1956. It was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2002. In 2004, it was listed number 197 in Rolling Stone's list of 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The song is currently ranked as the 173th greatest song of all time, as well as the sixth best song of 1956, by Acclaimed Music.

"Don't Be Cruel was the first song that Presley's song publishers, Hill and Range, brought to him to record. Blackwell was more than happy to give up 50% of the royalties and a co-writing credit to Presley to ensure that the "hottest new singer around covered it".

Freddy Bienstock, Elvis' Music Publisher, gave the following explanation for why Elvis received co-writing credit for songs like Don't Be Cruel. "In the early days Elvis would show dissatisfaction with some lines and he would make alterations, so it wasn't just what is known as a ''cut-in''. His name did not appear after the first year. But if Elvis liked the song, the writers would be offered a guarantee of a million records and they would surrender a third of their royalties to Elvis'''.

Elvis Presley recorded the song on July 2, 1956 during an exhaustive recording session at RCA studios in New York City. During this session he also recorded "Hound Dog", and "Any Way You Want Me". The song featured Presley's regular band of Scotty Moore on lead guitar (with Presley usually providing rhythm guitar), Bill Black on bass, D.J. Fontana on drums, and backing vocals from the Jordanaires. The producing credit was given to RCA's Steve Sholes, although the studio recordings reveal that Presley produced the songs in this session by selecting the song, reworking the arrangement on piano, and insisting on 28 takes before he was satisfied with it. He also ran through 31 takes of "Hound Dog. All studio tapes lost.

The single was released on July 13, 1956 backed with "Hound Dog". Within a few weeks "Hound Dog" had risen to number 2 on the Pop charts with sales of over one million. Soon after it was overtaken by "Don't Be Cruel" which took number 1 on all three main charts; Pop, Country, and Rhythm And Blues. Between them, both songs remained at number 1 on the Pop chart for a run of 11 weeks tying it with the 1950 Anton Karas hit "The Third Man Theme" and the 1951/1952 Johnnie Ray hit "Cry" for the longest stay at number one by a single record from late 1950 onward until 1992's smash "End Of The Road" by Boyz II Men. By the end of 1956 it had sold in excess of four million copies. Billboard ranked it as the number 2 song for 1956. Presley performed "Don't Be Cruel" during all three of his appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show in September 1956 and January 1957.

"Don't Be Cruel" went on to become Presley's biggest selling single recorded in 1956, with sales over six million by 1961. It became a regular feature of his live sets until his death in 1977, and was often coupled with "Jailhouse Rock" or "Teddy Bear" during performances from 1969.

According to author Mark Lewisohn in "The Complete Beatles Chronicles" (p. 362) The Beatles performed it live from at least 1959 till 1961 if not later. They finally recorded a laid-back version during the massive Get Back (1969) sessions which has never been released. However ex-Beatles John Lennon, Ringo Starr, Pete Best, and Lennon's former bandmembers The Quarrymen as well as Tony Sheridan (who was asked to join The Beatles) all recorded versions of it.

Many other artists including Connie Francis (1959, Rock 'N' Roll Million Sellers), Annette Peacock, Barbara Lynn (1963, Jamie 1244 45rpm, number 93 on the Hot 100), Bill Black's Combo, Billy Swan, Devo, Cheap Trick, Daffy Duck, Merle Haggard, Jerry Lee Lewis at Sun with a very good version of the song (EPA 108) in 1958, Neil Diamond, and Jackie Wilson have recorded the song. Presley was said to be so impressed with Wilson's version that he would later incorporate many of Wilson's mannerisms into future performances. Debbie Harry recorded the song for the Otis Blackwell tribute album Brace Yourself! A Tribute to Otis Blackwell. A cover by American country music duo The Judds peaked at number 10 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart in 1987. Cheap Trick's version of this song reached number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1988. Jonathan Rhys Meyers lip-synched the original version of the song in a scene from Elvis, where it shows him performing at the Jacksonville Theater. Suzi Quatro was inspired by Presley singing "Don't Be Cruel". She is the first female bass player to become a major rock star. This broke a barrier to women's participation in rock music. Quatro had her "Elvis moment" on January 6, 1957, when she was six years old. With her older sister Arlene, she was watching

Elvis on The Ed Sullivan Show. Arlene was screaming as Elvis sang "Don't Be Cruel". When he sang "Mmmmmm", Quatro had her first sexual thrill (but did not know what it was). Then their father (Art) entered the room, said "That's disgusting", and switched off the television. At this point Quatro decided that she wanted to be Elvis. (Art later brought home a copy of Elvis singing "Love Me Tender" and conceded "OK, dammit - so the kid can sing!").

3 - "PINK PEDAL PUSHERS" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally
Recorded: - February 14, 1958
Released: - April 1971
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 124-A4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - MONSTERS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-23 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Jerry Lee Lewis' rendition here, although it is tempting to categorize ''Pink Pedal Pushers'' with ''Blue Suede Shoes'' and ''Put Your Cat Clothes On'' as Carl Perkins' apparel-oriented songs, we think it doesn't along with those other two. ''Blue Suede Shoes'' is abut someone's devotion to his own shoes and ''Cat Clothes'' consists of Carl's getting his woman dressed up fancy 'causes they;re going out dancing. ''Pink Pedal Pushers'', on the other hand, is actually about fashion. In the right clothes, it says, you'll be good-looking, desirable, and popular. Mark Twain said, ''clothes make the man''. We can safely extend that to women and high school is where that becomes about as important an idea as it's ever likely to. So this song belongs with Joe Bennett & the Sparkletones' ''Black Slacks'' (BCD 15972) a top 20 hit in 1957 and the following year's ''Short Shorts'' by the Royal Teens (which reached number 3) and ''Tight Capris'' by Jody Reynolds (flip side of the big hit, ''Endless Sleep''. Pedal pushers and capris, by tie way, were much alike - tight calf- length pants that were popular with the younger set

Maybe the most obvious lyrical connection to ''Pink Pedal Pushers'' occurs in Gene Vinent's classic track ''Be Bop A Lula''. Admiring Ms. Lula's clothing, Vincent sings ''She's the girl in the red blue jeans/ She's the queen of all the teens''. In Perkins' case, he too is ready to extend the crown to his well-dressed girl. ''Her pink pedal pushers made her the queen of them all'' Royalty was quite easy to come by in Teen Land in the 1950s.

This next attempt 1958 and the later recorded 1962 version at the Roy Brown (via Elvis Presley) classic were recorded for Sun, and both were deemed not worthy of release at the time. The 1958 cut here is the wildest, and even features a snatch of ''Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On'', but wasn’t issued until 1983 on ''The Sun Years'' box-set. The 1962 cut is much slower and more laid-back, but features a tremendous vocal performance from Jerry (one of his best). This first saw the light of day via the 1969 ''Rockin’, Rhythm & Blues'' LP.

4(1) - "GOOD ROCKIN' TONIGHT" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Roy James Brown
Publisher: - Blue Ridge
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 14, 1958
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-5-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-22 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"Good Rocking Tonight" was originally a jump blues song released in 1947 by its writer, Roy Brown and was covered by many other recording artists. The song includes the memorable refrain, "Well I heard the news, there's good rocking tonight!".

Brown had first offered his song to Wynonie Harris, who turned it down. Only after the Brown's record gained traction in New Orleans did Harris decide to cover it. Harris's version was even more energetic than Brown's original version, featuring black gospel style handclapping. This may have contributed to the composition's greater success on the national rhythm and blues chart. Brown's original recording hit number 13 of the Billboard Rhythm & Blues chart, but Harris' record became a number one rhythm and blues hit and remained on the chart for half a year. Brown's single would re-enter the chart in 1949, peaking at number 11. Harris had a reputation for carousing, and sometimes forgot lyrics. His "Good Rockin'" recording session largely followed Brown's original lyrics, but by the end, he replaced the last section with a series of raucous "hoy hoy hoy!" interjections, a commonly used expression in jump blues tunes of the time, going back to 1945's "The Honeydripper" by Joe Liggins.

The song is a primer of sorts on the popular black music of the era, making lyrical reference to Sweet Lorraine, Sioux City Sue, Sweet Georgia Brown, Caldonia, Elder Brown, and Deacon Jones. All of these characters had figured prominently in previous hit songs. While Brown missed out on the biggest hit version of his song, its success kicked off his own career, which included two number 1 rhythm and blues hits. In 1949, he released "Rockin' at Midnight", a sequel to "Good Rockin' Tonight", which might be thought of as "Good Rockin' Tonight Part II" because it included updates on the same characters as the original. It reached number 2 on the Rhythm & Blues chart, where it remained for a month.

In 1954, "Good Rockin' Tonight" was the second Sun Records release by Elvis Presley, along with "I Don't Care If The Sun Don't Shine" on the flip side. Elvis Presley and his bandmates hewed closer to the original Roy Brown version, but omitted the lyrics' by-then-dated roster of names in favor of a simpler, more energetic "We're gonna rock, rock, rock!" Described as "a flat-out rocker" country radio programmers blanched, and older audiences were somewhat mystifie

A live show broadcast from Houston disc jockey Bill Collie's club documented that the crowd "barely responded" to the song. "Blue Moon Of Kentucky", the uptempo version of the Bill Monroe classic, has "the fans go stark raving nuts with joy". Both sides of this second record featuring "Elvis Presley, Scotty and Bill" "stiffed".

The song was used for the Elvis Presley biopic Elvis which starred Jonathan Rhys-Meyers as Presley; it was used for a scene where he is performing at the Louisiana Hayride in 1956. Jerry Lee Lewis recorded an unreleased version the song for Sun Records. Ronnie Montrose recorded a hard rock cover of the song on his band's debut album with Sammy Hagar on vocals. The Honeydrippers with Robert Plant & Jeff Beck, recorded the song under the name "Rockin at Midnight". Paul McCartney recorded the song for the Unplugged (The Official Bootleg) album.

Bruce Springsteen performed the song during his 1978 Darkness Tour, usually as the opening number. He also occasionally performed the song on The River Tour in 1980-81. Springsteen performed the song for the first time in 27 years in 2008 on the Magic Tour. A Gene Summers cover version of "Good Rocking Tonight" was included on a French compilation album The Big Beat Show issued by Big Beat Records (BBR1000) in 1981. Contraband, an all-star hard rock group recorded their version of the song for their debut self-titled album in 1991. Ricky Nelson recorded the song for his 1958 album Ricky Nelson. Lonnie Lee recorded the song for his 1993 album Don't Look Back; his version is a more guitar-based rock 'n' roll version.

Other cover versions of the song include the Treniers', Pat Boone's, James Brown's, Dread Zeppelin's (on their Hot & Spicy Beanburger album), Montrose's (whose version was covered by NWOBHM band Diamond Head), Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen and Kevin DuBrow's. Robert Plant and the Honeydrippers had a successful cover of "Rockin' at Midnight". Early 60s Mexican band Los Teen Tops recorded a Spanish and successful version: "Buen rock esta noche". Wes Paul Gerrard features this song heavily in his live performances, often opening up with it in his second set. He will record the song in his new Manchester to Memphis album which he is recording at Sun Studio, Memphis, Tennessee in May 2010.

Jerry recorded ''Hound Dog'' this Leiber and Stoller composition twice for Sun, both of which remained in the can for many years (like far too many other Sun recordings). This session of mostly Elvis covers, though this one doesn’t work quite as well as ''Don’t Be Cruel'' or ''Jailhouse Rock''. It was first issued on ''Rockin’ And Free'' in 1974. The 1960 cut is far more bluesy, and owes as much to Big Mama Thornton’s original as it does to Elvis Presley’s more famous cover. Despite it’s quality, this had to wait until the ''Don’t Drop It'' album in 1988 for a release (the song is also on both of Jerry’s 1964 ‘live’ albums).

5(1) - "HOUND DOG" - B.M.I. - 1:24
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Jerry Leiber Music - Mike Stoller Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 14, 1958
Released: - July 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm 6467 029-B2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - ROCKIN' AND FREE
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-25 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"Hound Dog" is a twelve-bar blues song by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. It was recorded by Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton on August 13, 1952 in Los Angeles and released by Peacock Records in March 1953. "Hound Dog" was Thornton's only hit record, spending 14 weeks in the Rhythm and Blues charts, including seven weeks at number 1. Thornton's recording of "Hound Dog" is listed as one of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's "500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll", and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in February 2013.

"Hound Dog" has been recorded more than 250 times. The best-known version of "Hound Dog" is the July 2, 1956 recording by Elvis Presley, which is ranked number 19 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the ''500 Greatest Songs of All Time''; it is also one of the best-selling singles of all time. Presley's version, which sold about more than 10 million copies globally, was his best-selling song and "an emblem of the rock and roll revolution. It was simultaneously number 1 on the United States pop, country, and Rrhythm and Blues charts in 1956, and it topped the pop chart for 11 weeks - a record that stood for 36 years. Presley's 1956 (RCA 20/47-6604) recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1988.

"Hound Dog" has been at the center of many lawsuits, including disputes over authorship, royalties, and copyright infringement by the many answer songs released by such artists as Rufus Thomas and Roy Brown. From the 1970s onward, the song has been featured in numerous films, in ''Grease'', ''Forrest Gump'', ''Lilo and Stitch'', ''A Few Good Men'', ''Hounddog'', ''Indiana Jones'', ''The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull'', and ''Nowhere Boy''.

On August 12, 1952, rhythm and blues bandleader Johnny Otis asked 19-year-old songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller to his home to meet blues singer Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton. Thornton had been signed by Don Robey's Houston-based Peacock Records the year before, and after two failed singles, Robey had enlisted Otis to reverse her fortunes. After hearing Thornton rehearse several songs, Leiber and Stoller "forged a tune to suit her personality, brusque and badass". In an interview in Rolling Stone in April 1990, Stoller said: "She was a wonderful blues singer, with a great moaning style. But it was as much her appearance as her blues style that influenced the writing of ''Hound Dog'' and the idea that we wanted her to growl it''. Leiber recalled: "We saw Big Mama and she knocked me cold. She looked like the biggest, baddest, saltiest chick you would ever see. And she was mean, a ''lady bear'', as they used to call 'em. She must have been 350 pounds, and she had all these scars all over her face" conveying words which could not be sung. "But how to do it without actually saying it? And how to do it telling a story? I couldn't just have a song full of expletives''. In 1999, Leiber said, "I was trying to get something like the Furry Lewis phrase 'Dirty Mother Furya'. I was looking for something closer to that but I couldn't find it, because everything I went for was too coarse and would not have been playable on the air''. Using a "black slang expression referring to a man who sought a woman to take care of him", the song's opening line, "You ain't nothin' but a hound dog", was a euphemism, said Leiber. The song, a Southern blues lament, is "the tale of a woman throwing a gigolo out of her house and her life".

The song was written for a woman to sing in which she berates "her selfish, exploitative man", and in it she "expresses a woman's rejection of a man, the metaphorical dog in the title". According to Iain Thomas, "'Hound Dog' embodies the Thornton persona she had crafted as a comedienne prior to entering the music business" by parading "the classic puns, extended metaphors, and sexual double entendres so popular with the bawdy genre''. Rhythm and blues expert George A. Moonoogian concurs, calling it "a biting and scathing satire in the double-entendre genre" of 1950s rhythm and blues.

Leiber and Stoller wrote the song "Hound Dog" in 12 to 15 minutes, with Leiber scribbling the lyrics in pencil on ordinary paper and without musical notation in the car on the way to Stoller's apartment. Said Leiber, "Hound Dog'' took like twelve minutes. That's not a complicated piece of work. But the rhyme scheme was difficult. Also the metric structure of the music was not easy''. According to Leiber, as soon as they reached the parking lot and Stoller's 1937 Plymouth, "I was beating out a rhythm we called the 'buck dance' on the roof of the car. We got to Johnny Otis's house and Mike went right to the piano…didn't even bother to sit down. He had a cigarette in his mouth that was burning his left eye, and he started to play the song''.

Elvis Presley's 1956 version Larry Birnbaum described "Hound Dog" as "an emblem of the rock 'n' roll revolution". George Plasketes argues that Elvis Presley's version of "Hound Dog" should not be considered a cover "since, most listeners, were innocent of Willie Mae Thornton's original 1953 release". Michael Coyle asserts that "Hound Dog", like almost all of Presley's "covers were all of material whose brief moment in the limelight was over, without the songs having become standards''. While, because of its popularity, Presley's recording "arguably usurped the original", Plasketes concludes: "anyone who's ever heard the Big Mama Thornton original would probably argue otherwise''.

Presley was aware of and appreciated Big Mama Thornton's original recording of "Hound Dog". Ron Smith, a schoolfriend of Presley's, says he remembers Elvis singing along to a version by Tommy Duncan (lead singer for the classic lineup of Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys). According to another schoolmate, Elvis' favorite rhythm and blues song was "Bear Cat (the Answer to Hound Dog)" by Rufus Thomas, a hero of Presley's. Nevertheless, it was Freddie Bell and the Bellboys' performance of the song, with Bell's amended lyrics, that influenced Presley's decision to perform, and later record and release, his own version: "Elvis's version of ''Hound Dog'' (1956) came about, not as an attempt to cover Thornton's record, but as an imitation of a parody of her record performed by Freddie Bell and the Bellboys. ..The words, the tempo, and the arrangement of Elvis' ''Hound Dog'' come not from Thornton's version of the song, but from the Bellboys'''.

According to Rick Coleman, the Bellboys' version "featured Dave Bartholomew's three-beat Latin riff, which had been heard in Bill Haley's ''Shake, Rattle and Roll'''. Just as Haley had borrowed the riff from Bartholomew, Presley borrowed it from Bell and the Bellboys. The Latin riff form that was used in Presley's "Hound Dog" was known as "Habanera rhythm'', which is a Spanish and African-American musical beat form. After the release of "Hound Dog" by Elvis Presley, the Habanera rhythm gained much popularity in American popular music.

Presley's first appearance in Las Vegas, as an "extra added attraction", was in the Venus Room of the New Frontier Hotel and Casino from April 23 through May 6, 1956, but was reduced to one week "because of audience dissatisfaction, low attendance, and unsavory behavior by underage fans''. At that time, Freddie Bell and the Bellboys, who had been performing as a resident act in the Silver Queen Bar and Cocktail Lounge in the Sands Casino since 1952, were one of the hottest acts in town. Presley and his band decided to take in their show, and not only enjoyed the show, but also loved their reworking of "Hound Dog", which was a comedy-burlesque with show-stopping va-va-voom choreography. According to Paul W. Papa: "From the first time Elvis heard this song he was hooked. He went back over and over again until he learned the chords and lyrics''. Presley's guitarist Scotty Moore recalled: "When we heard them perform that night, we thought the song would be a good one for us to do as comic relief when we were on stage. We loved the way they did it''. When asked about "Hound Dog", Presley's drummer D. J. Fontana admitted: "We took that from a band we saw in Vegas, Freddie Bell and the Bellboys. They were doing the song kinda like that. We went out there every night to watch them. He'd say: 'Let's go watch that band. It's a good band!' That's where he heard 'Hound Dog,' and shortly thereafter he said: 'Let's try that song'''.

When asked if Bell had any objections to Presley recording his own version, Bell gave Colonel Tom Parker, Presley's manager, a copy of his 1955 Teen Records' recording, hoping that if Presley recorded it, "he might reap some benefit when his own version was released on an album''. According to Bell, "Parker promised me that if I gave him the song, the next time Elvis went on tour, I would be the opening act for him - which never happened''. In May 1956, two months before Presley's release, Bell re-recorded the song in a more frantic version for the Mercury label, however it was not released as a single until 1957. It was later included on Bell's 1957 album, ''Rock & Roll…All Flavors'' (Mercury Records MG 20289). By summer 1956, after Presley's recording of the song was a million-seller, Bell told an interviewer: "I didn't feel bad about that at all. In fact, I encouraged him to record it''. After the success of Presley's recording, "Bell sued to get some of the composer royalties because he had changed the words and indeed the song, and he would have made millions as the songwriter of Elvis’s version: but he lost because he did not ask Leiber and Stoller for permission to make the changes and thereby add his name as songwriter''.

Soon after, Elvis Presley added "Hound Dog" to his live performances, performing it as comic relief. "Hound Dog" became Elvis and Scotty and Bill's closing number for the first time on May 15, 1956 at Ellis Auditorium in Memphis, during the Memphis Cotton Festival before an audience of 7,000. Presley's performance, including the lyrics (which he sometimes changed) and "gyrations", were influenced by what he had seen at the sands. As the song always got a big reaction, it became the standard closer until the late 1960s.

By 1964, Elvis Presley's version of "Hound Dog" had been covered over 26 times, and by 1984, there were at least 85 different cover versions of the song, making it "the best-known and most often recorded rock and roll song". In July 2013 the official Leiber and Stoller website listed 266 different versions of "Hound Dog", but acknowledged that its list is incomplete. Among the notable artists who have covered Presley's version of "Hound Dog" are: Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps; Jerry Lee Lewis in July 1974 for his Sun International LP ''Rockin' And Free'' and in November 1988 for the Zu-Zazz LP ''Jerry Lee Lewis - Doný Drop It''; Chubby Checker; Pat Boone; Sammy Davis, Jr.; Betty Everett; Little Richard; The Surfaris; The Everly Brothers; Junior Wells; The Mothers of Invention; Jimi Hendrix; Vanilla Fudge; Van Morrison; Conway Twitty; Jimi Hendrix and Little Richard; John Lennon and the Plastic Ono Elephant's Memory Band; John Entwistle; Carl Perkins; Eric Clapton; James Taylor; and (in 1993) Tiny Tim (in his full baritone voice). In 1999 David Grisman, John Hartford, and Mike Seeger included "Hound Dawg" on their 1999 album Retrograss, which was nominated for a Grammy in the Traditional Folk Album category in 2000.

''Jailhouse Rock'' recorded with several other Presley titles, this would’ve made an ideal track for Jerry’s first album but had to wait until the 1971 Sun International ''Monsters'' album for release instead. The 1986 re-cut (released on ''Rocket'' 2 years later) isn’t bad, but The Jordanaires water things down considerable (even Elvis had the sense not to use them on this song!).

6 - "JAILHOUSE ROCK" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Jerry Leiber Music - Mike Stoller Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 14, 1958
Released: - April 1971
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 124-B2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - MONSTERS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-24 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"Jailhouse Rock" is a song written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller that first became a hit for Elvis Presley. The song was released as a 45rpm single on September 24, 1957, to coincide with the release of Presley's motion picture, ''Jailhouse Rock''.

The song as recorded by Presley is number number 67 on Rolling Stone's list of ''The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time'' and was named one of ''The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll''. In 2004, it finished at number 21 on AFI's ''100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema''. Presley's performance of the song in the film, choreographed as a dance routine involving himself and a large group of male prisoners, was featured among other classic MGM musical numbers in the 1994 documentary ''That's Entertainment! III''. The film version differs from the single version of the song, featuring backing instrumentation and vocals not heard on the record.

Some of the characters named in the song are real people. Shifty Henry was a well-known LA musician, not a criminal. The Purple Gang was a real mob. "Sad Sack" was a U.S. Army nickname in World War II for a loser, which also became the name of a popular comic strip and comic book character. According to Rolling Stone, Leiber and Stoller's "theme song for Presley's third movie was decidedly silly, the kind of tongue-incheek goof they had come up with for The Coasters. The King, however, sang it as straight rock and roll, overlooking the jokes in the lyrics (like the suggestion of gay romance when inmate number 47 tells Number 3, 'You're the cutest jailbird I ever did see') and then introducing Scotty Moore's guitar solo with a cry so intense that the take almost collapses''. Gender studies scholars cite the song for "its famous reference to homo-erotics behind bars'', while music critic Garry Mulholland writes, "'Jailhouse Rock'' was always a queer lyric, in both senses''. Douglas Brode writes of the filmed production number that it's "amazing that the sequence passed by the censors".

The single, with its B-side "Treat Me Nice" (another song from the film's soundtrack) was a US number 1 hit for seven weeks in the fall of 1957, and a UK number 1 hit for three weeks early in 1958. It was the first record to enter the UK charts at number 1. In addition, "Jailhouse Rock" spent one week at the top of the US country charts, and reached the number 2 position on the Rhythm and Blues chart. Also in 1957, "Jailhouse Rock" was the lead song in an EP (extended play), together with other songs from the film, namely "Young and Beautiful'', "I Want To Be Free'', "Don't Leave Me Now'' and "(You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care" (but with "Treat Me Nice" omitted). It topped the Billboard EP charts, eventually selling two million copies and earning a double-platinum RIAA certification. In 2005, the song was re-released in the UK and reached number 1 for a single week, when it became the lowest-selling number 1 in United Kingdom history, and the first to enter at number 1 twice.

Other significant recordings by Jerry Lee Lewis for Sun Records, recorded February 14, 1958 for the Sun International LP release ''Monsters'' (LP 124 April 1971); The Beatles regularly performed "Jailhouse Rock" starting in 1958 (as The Quarrymen) and continuing all the way through 1960. "Jailhouse Rock" was performed regularly in a medley along with many old rock and roll hits by Queen as early as 1970 and was the opening song on Queen's 1979 Crazy Tour and the 1980 North American tour for The Game. It is the last song in the motion picture The Blues Brothers. The song is featured in the 1995 film ''Casper'' and the 2006 direct-to-video animated film ''Leroy and Stitch''. American Idol Season 5 contestant Taylor Hicks performed it on May 9, 2006, and Season 7 contestant Danny Noriega performed it on February 20, 2008. In an episode of Full House, Jesse and Becky sing this song at their wedding reception. The song was used on Dancing with the Stars for four different jives by Lisa Rinna, Lil' Kim, Tommy Chong and Alek Skarlatos. The song is included in the musical revue Smokey Joe's Cafe. Scenes from the music video of the One Direction single "Kiss You" are based on the "Jailhouse Rock" production number from the Elvis film.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Probably Ray W. Brown - Bass
Probably Russell Smith – Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY FEBRUARY 14, 1958 (2)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

There's no little uncertainty about the timeline for the recording of ''High School Confidential''. Although most, if not all, performances are believed to date from mid-February 1958 to the end of March 1958, quite how many sessions during this period were required to amass two dozen takes remains difficult to assess. The dates of April 20 and 21, formerly attached to the recording of the more polished takes of the song, including those which led to the production of the master, conflict with published accounts of an intense touring schedule that saw Lewis fulfill thirty-nine engagements in as many days commencing on March 28, 1958. What is apparent is that the earliest recordings of the song, released here for the first time fifty-seven years after the event, predate much of the work involved in preparing for the first album and originate from sessions devoted primarily to securing a recording of ''High School Confidential'' suitable for the soundtrack of the movie of the same name. All that is known for sure is that Jerry Lee Lewis went to Hollywood to film his contribution to the MGM drama at the end of February and it would appear that he had already expended a fair amount of effort on the song in the Sun studio.(*)

1(1) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-26 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

As now revealed for the first time, the earliest takes of ''High School Confidential'' were based on an arrangement that is in stark contrast to the one with which we are familiar courtesy of Lewis's fourth millionselling disc. In the first three takes the band is set on replicating the broken-beat rhythm of ''Breathless'', while Roland Janes' guitar solo centres on a completely different hook. In some respects it's almost as though we have a new tune to savour. Having said that, these early takes at times sound a mite ragged and they lack some of the barnstorming energy of the issued master and the associated takes. Initially, there's not too much evidence of the extensive ad-libbing in the lyric that characterised later takes; the first three are all in broad conformity but they do feature the memorable couplet, sadly abandoned by the time we get to the master take, ''we're gonna burn off our shoes; we've got a lotta leather to lose''. In take 4, things begin to sound more recognisable; the drummer sticks to a steady beat and Roland Janes likewise changes gear. Having taken his eye off the lead sheet, Jerry Lee switches the ''lotta leather'' and ''burn off our shoes'' lines around. In take 5, these lines are again delivered to order while, ahead of his second solo, at 1 minute 57 seconds, Jerry Lee tells us ''everybody's doing something at the high school hop''. The terms loosely indicative of dancing, be they ''shakin', rockin', boppin' or hoppin''', become increasingly random. The opening verse of take 11, in an unparalleled departure from the norm, promotes the claim that everybody is ''boppin' to'', as opposed to ''boppin' at'', the high school hop.(*)

Somewhere along the way the ''movie-take'' and a comparable alternate were recorded. It has been argued by some that these originated not at the Sun studio itself but rather on a sound stage in Hollywood. However, the fact that the ''sister'' take to the cut used in the film was found in the Sun archive suggests that, notwithstanding the peculiarities which set them apart from the other versions, not least the absence of a guitar, these are indeed genuine Memphis recordings. It seems plausible that the procedure applied in respect of Warner Brothers and ''Jamboree'' some months earlier was again engaged to oblige the producers of ''High School Confidential''. Unfortunately, the original tape to which Jerry Lee mimed from the back of a moving truck during the opening credits has not been found at Sun, so what is heard here, on BCD 17254-18-29, is a reconstruction using clips taken from the soundtrack. The limitations of the source in no way detract from the sheer exuberance of Lewis' singing and plating and this representation of the song is amongst the finest. Both the lyrics and the production schedule of the motion picture point to the supposition that these two takes were amongst the earliest to be recorded.(*)

1(2) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-27 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(3) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-28 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(4) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 4
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-29 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(5) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-18 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-30 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(6) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-31 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

In the next phase of the song's development we're treated to several other ''lost lines'' that had been discarded or forgotten by the time the master was cut. For example, at 0:58 in take 6 we're informed that ''everything is shocking''; the same take draws to a close with a unique couplet ''all the kids are jumpin'', they really think it's something''; in take 10 there's both ''a little jukin''' and some ''movin' and groovin'''. Ad-libbing is by now the order of the day although it's not without a cost, as confusion abounds on occasions; note in take 9 how Jerry Lee sings across the guitar solo.(*)

1(7) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 7
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-5-A6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-19 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

1(8) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 8
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-8-3 mono
SUN RECORDS – THE ROCKING YEARS - WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN'
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-5-33 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(9) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 9
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-5-A7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-20 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

1(10) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 10
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - August 1986
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 1044-A8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE WILD ONE - ROCKIN' AND A-BOPPIN'
AT THE HIGH SCHOOL HOP!!
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(11) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 11
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(12) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 12
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(13) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 13
Recorded: - February 14, 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First a ppearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-11-12 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(14)(15) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - 2 False Starts - Take 14
Recorded: - February 14, 1958
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-5-A8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-17 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

The final few seconds of each take often reveal some useful clues to help distinguish one from another. Notice how in take 4 Jerry Lee wraps up his vocal with an aggressive flourish; at the close of take 8 there's a groan of frustration at what seems to be regarded as a below par finish; towards the end of take 10, one of the comparatively less frenzied run-throughs, in which they're ''gonna blow away all these blues'', he appears to be a little distracted. Not so in the much more energetic take 11, which harks back to ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On'' with the respite of ab ''easy now'' section and a ''don't stop me now'' plea, foreshadowing a storming finish.(*) (see also: Mid-March 1958 Sessions).

1(16) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 15
Recorded: - February 14, 1958
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Note: The above track, without guitar, and the next movie track, may have been recorded during either of the two series of recordings identified with the February 14 session. The original tape of the movie version has not been found, but a copy has been reconstructed from different elements of the film soundtrack.

1(17) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (2) - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Movie Take - Tape Lost
Recorded: - February 14, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 14, 1958 FRIDAY

Carl Smith recorded ''The Best Years Of Your Life'' during the afternoon at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

FEBRUARY 15, 1958 SATURDAY

On her daily talks with Jud Phillips, Barbara Barnes continued to be a saga of his adventures, not all connected with selling records. One day Jud reported meeting Christine Jorgensen at a party.

She was the first person the public knew of being transformed from a man into a woman through surgical, hormonal, and other mysterious means. Late-night TV host Jack Paar was having a field day at her expense, but Jud said when he met her at a party she was pleasant and right attractive.

Another time he told of being propositioned by a reputed Mafia man in buffalo who offered Jud $1,000 to sleep with his wife. She'd been looking him over in a restaurant, and Jud said it took all his diplomacy to convey to this man that his wife was certainly a desirable woman but that he just had to say ''no'' to this suggestion in respect for the marital vows of himself and the lady.

Jud spent more time in New York than anywhere else. On this day in February he was there to witness the kickoff of the Dick Clark Saturday night ''Beechnut Show''. Clark’s afternoon ''American Bandstand'' was popular, and now he was making the big leap. Jud had placed several of Sun's artists on the weekday show and had developed a good relationship with Tonny Mamarella, Dick Clark's producer, and other staff.

Jerry Lee Lewis was one of the featured performers on this premiere, along with Pat Boone, Connie Francis, Johnnie Ray, and Chuck Willis. Jerry Lee was doing his monster-hit, ''Great Balls Of Fire'', as well as his brand new release, ''Breathless''. Jerry Lee was the hottest act on the show, having sold a million copies of ''Great Balls Of Fire'' in December and reaching number 2 on the pop charts, number 3 in rhythm and blues, and number 1 in the United Kingdom charts. The single would stay on the charts for a total of 21 weeks, what the trade papers termed ''a smash''.

According to Myra Lewis Williams, reported in the book ''Great Balls Of Fire'', ''Jerry opened the television premiere of the Dick Clark Saturday Night Show on February 15. From its new home at the Little Theatre on Broadway, Clark launched his network experiment with fingers crossed, hoping five hundred warm bodies would brave a blizzard to watch Pat Boone, Connie Francis, Johnny Ray and others lip-synch a favourite song. He was surprised to find fifteen hundreds kids standing behind police barricades knee-deep in winterbourne gutter wash one hour before rehearsal were to begin. Inside, a heated debate warmed the hall as Clark's crew were having a difficult time explaining to Mr Lewis, replete in black tux with leopard lapels and two-tone shoes, that it would not be necessary for him to rehearse in the traditional manner.

''I know it ain't necessary, I jus' wanna try out the place'' Jerry said, sitting down at a bright white baby grand. ''No, you don't understand'', the technician tried again. You won't be playing. You'll be mouthing the words to your recording''. ''I'll be dammed. I ain't sittin' up here like a damn dummy and...''. Jerry finished his refusal to lip-synch by silently opening and closing his mouth like a goldfish. ''But, Mr Lewis, we're not set up for live performance. Everybody will be doing pantomime''. ''I don't give a damn what everybody else does. I ain't no puppet, and I didn't come all the way up here to play charades''.

That night, Pat Boone mimed ''Everybody's Gonna Have A Wonderful Time Up There'' and Connie Francis convincingly faked ''Who's Sorry Now'', but Jerry Lee Lewis played and sang exactly as he always had, straight from the heart and his own vocal cords. He was introduced by Kay and Elaine, co-presidents of his fan club, which had grown to more than five thousand followers.

According to Elaine Orlando, ''I was living with my parents at the time. The phone rang and my Mother said, ''The Dick Clark Show wants to speak to you about Jerry Lee Lewis. A female associate of Dick's asked me if I would be willing to come to the studio to be interviewed regarding the idea of introducing Jerry singing ''Great Balls Of Fire''. I said sure, and they gave me the information regarding The Little Theater''.

''In my meeting with Dick I told him there were two -co-presidents of the fan club, myself and Kay. Dick said Kay would be in the audience, but I would be the one to introduce Jerry singing ''Great Balls Of Fire''. Jerry was surprised to see me there, but we didn't speak prior to the broadcast or after''.

Bluegrass vocalist and guitarist Jimmy Martin joins ''The Louisiana Hayride''.

FEBRUARY 17, 1958 MONDAY

Review in Billboard magazine says ''The vigorous renditions by Jerry Lee Lewis on these two rockabilly blues ''Breathless'' backed ''Down The Line'' (Sun 288) are potent follow-up to ''Great Balls Of Fire''. The artist is at his energetic best on both sides, and both appear strong bets to make it''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JACK CLEMENT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE FEBRUARY 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01 - "IT'L BE ME'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jack Henderson Clement
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost
Recorded:- Unknown Date February1958

02 - "BALLAD OF A TEENAGE QUEEN" - B.M.I. 2:15
Composer: - Jack Henderson Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded:- Unknown Date February1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-10-5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-6-5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Presumably, this is the original version of Jack Clement's folk ballad for the ''Bandstand'' crowd. It contained a few couplets that didn't make it to the final version. These include ''She was queen of the senior prom/she could cook just like her mom''. Did Jack Clement have his tongue firmly implanted in his cheek when he concocted this sugary little epic? We may delay gives all of Clement's a sibilant quality that is probably a little overdone. Phillips allowed Clement to pitch the song to Cash, but he didn't like the song at the outset and hated it by the time Clement had finished his overdubs. ''Dear god'', Clement remembers him saying, ''tell me it hasn't come to this''.

"Ballad of a Teenage Queen" the song written by Jack Clement was first recorded by Johnny Cash for his Sun single (Sun 283) and released in December 1957, and for his 1958 album ''Sings The Songs That Made Him Famous''. The song hit number one on the United States Country charts and number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song tells the story of a "small town girl" (the prettiest they've ever seen) who loved the boy next door (who worked at the candy store). She was taken to Hollywood by a movie scout where she became famous, leaving the boy. Eventually she sold all her fame to go back to the boy from the candy store because amid it all she was unhappy without him.

"Ballad of a Teenage Queen" the song written by Jack Clement was first recorded by Johnny Cash for his Sun single (Sun 283) and released in December 1957, and for his 1958 album ''Sings The Songs That Made Him Famous''. The song hit number one on the United States Country charts and number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song tells the story of a "small town girl" (the prettiest they've ever seen) who loved the boy next door (who worked at the candy store). She was taken to Hollywood by a movie scout where she became famous, leaving the boy. Eventually she sold all her fame to go back to the boy from the candy store because amid it all she was unhappy without him.

03 - "QUENCH MY THIRST" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Jack Henderson Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date February 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-10-7 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-6-7 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Clement was writing a lot of songs during 1957, many of which appeared on Sun discs. This one didn't quite make it although it is virtually certain that Johnny Cash was invited to render it in his gentle baritone. There is an undeniable musically laying beneath Clement's work but the visceral quality that Sam Phillips cherished, and which sets apart the music he recorded, is nowhere in sight.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jack Clement - Vocal and Guitar

For Biography of Jack Clement see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jack Clement's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

In the wake of Sun going global, Sam Phillips became snowed under with his daily production and engineering chores. He sorely needed an extra pair of hands and Jack Henderson Clement, from Whitehaven, Tennessee, came on board to oversee these task in the spring of 1956.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JACK CLEMENT
AT THE RCA STUDIO FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

RCA STUDIO B.
30 MUSIC SQUARE WEST, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY FEBRUARY 17, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - JACK CLEMENT
AND/OR CHET ATKINS

In February 1958, Jack Clement and pianist Jimmy Wilson, plus coon, took off for the RCA Studios in Nashville. They hired bass player Bob Moore and recorded four songs. This is not quite the rockin' boppin' opus we were looking for, but by now most Sun fans knew what to expect from Jack Clement. He was the man who 'commercialized' our gyrating heroes; sweetened their recordings with choruses and got them to sing about teenage queens. So this record (Sun 291) was not altogether unexpected. In fact, these sides were not even recorded at Sun. Clement made a small side-trip to Nashville and cut these little forays into the country crossover market.

01 - "TEN YEARS"** - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 296 - Master
Recorded: - February 17, 1958
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 291-A < mono
TEN YEARS / YOUR LOVER BOY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Ten Years" was the major contender on this session, a light pleasant country ballad with an epic story song feel to it. Its the Jack Clement style, and it was repeated in October when Jack Clement recreated the sound at Sun on "Black Haired Man".

"Teen Years", like the aforementioned "Teenage Queen", tells a tale of love lost through disuse. In "Teenage Queen", there's a last minute happy ending for the kiddies. This is the adult version: there's no such luck here. Perhaps the only highlight for Sun fans is Clement's I-IV acoustic guitar fills between verses. They're a nice touch, but it would take a miracle to overcome the effects of the chorus, whose lines are mixed up far too prominently, even by 1958 pop music standards.

2(01) - "YOUR LOVER BOY"** - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated 
Matrix number: - U 297 - Master
Recorded: - February 17, 1958
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 291-B < mono
YOUR LOVER BOY / TEN YEARS
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Your Lover Boy" comes closer to the mark. There's some really fine gospel piano here and an engaging folky feel to the proceedings. But once again, the choral sound swamps everything in sight. Some of the chorus' replies to Clement's vocal lines are utterly bizarre ("Save those trees for your lover boy"). For a taste of how this track sounded before sweetening the undubbed version is available on Bear Family BFX 15211. Not a bad record!

2(2) - "YOUR LOVER BOY" - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 17, 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-10-9 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-6-9 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

This undubbed track of ''Your Lover Boy'' shows that Clement and his buddies had cranked up a rocking opus from a slender premise. If you listen to the lyrics, you can see that they are almost totally nonsensical, full of non-sequiturs, etc. However, the undubbed master gives us a clearer view of the innate drive and simplicity that was diluted by the overpowering chorus.

Clement obviously intended to overdub a chorus because there are gaping holes in the arrangement, but, with almost sixty years perspective, the song probably sounds better in its nakedness.

The next two sides sat in the can for over a year before finally appearing in February 1959. If anyone wonders just how much creative control producer Jack Clement had achieved in the Sun studio, one needs look no further than this record. Clearly, Clement had his eye on a bigger segment of the pop marketplace than crossover country. What goes on here is a far sight beyond sweetening some Johnny Cash tracks.

03 - "THE MINSTREL SHOW"*/** - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Bill Justis-Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 338 - Master
Recorded: - February 1958
Released: - February 9, 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3536-A < mono
THE MINSTREL SHOW / THREE LITTLE GUITARS
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

On "The Minstrel Show", Clement has attempted to recreate the noisy, good time feeling of turn of the century entertainment. In truth, he hasn't done a bad job; its just that this form of music will hold little pleasure for most Sun collectors.

The real inspiration here comes from a more recent icon of popular culture, and Clement has followed obediently in his shoes. This track is a spot-on imitation of something Mitch Miller might have created with his "sing-along" music for the brain-dead. What an awful role model Clement has chosen.

04 - "THREE LITTLE GUITARS" - B.M.I. - 1:34
Composer: - Jack Clement-Billy Riley
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 339  - Master
Recorded: - February 1958
Released: - February 9, 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3536-B < mono
THREE LITTLE GUITARS / THE MINSTREL SHOW
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5
 
On this side will be more tolerable to most Sun fans simply because the voices and trite lyrica are gone. However, this style of melodic construction owes nothing to contemporary country or rockabilly. Instead, it is rooted firmly in the early 1900s. It is just what you might have heard at one of those minstrel shows or, if you really want to push the time machine, on a backporch in somebody's southern plantation. You can almost imagine Stephen Foster hiding in the bushes taking notes.
 
05 - "TONGUE TIED SMITH''
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - February 1958
 
06 - "EDGE OF TOWN''** - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Jack Clement-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Publishing
Matrix number: - K2WW-1409
Recorded: - February 1958
Released: - 1959
First appearance: RCA Victor (S) 45rpm standard single 47-7602-A mono
EDGE OF TOWN / WHOLE LOTTA LOOKIN'
Reissued: - 2013 Railroad Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
STAY BY MY SIDE
 
07 - "WHOLE LOTTA LOOKIN'''** - 1:55
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: -  Acuff Rose Music Publishing
Matrix number: - K2WW-1410
Recorded: - February 1958
Released: - 1959
First appearance: RCA Victor (S) 45rpm standard single 47-7602-B mono
WHOLE LOTTA LOOKIN' / EDGE OF TOWN
Reissued: - September 18, 2012 Cherished Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
HIGH SCHOOL HOP - VOLUME 1 
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jack Clement - Vocals and Guitar/Mandolin
Billy Riley - Guitar
Bob L. Moore - Bass
Cliff Agred - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Jack Thomas - Tuba*
Band Chorus 
 
The Anita Kerr Singers - Chorus**/*
 
The Jack Clement sound was country, but it was not the Sun sound. It was acoustic, with a ringing tones instead of the muddy cash bass sounds. It was worked out with the help of Clement's buddy, Jimmy C. Wilson, Jack says, "Wilson was nearly as crazy as me. He was a bit of a nut. He lived in rooms above Taylor's Restaurant and he was a great player if he was in the mood. He had a pet coon which he used to bring in and chain to the piano. He used to dismantle and re-build old guns up in his room and he set fire to the place one time. After that he loosed off a rocket, a home-made thing, up there and they threw him out. He went to California and married Nudie the tailor's daughter".
 
For Biography of Jack Clement see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jack Clement's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

> Page Up <

> Continued: 1958 Sessions 2 (2) <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©