CONTAINS
For audio recordings click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1955 Sun Schedule <

1955 SESSIONS (6)
June 1 , 1955 to June 30, 1955

Studio Session for Johnny Cash, Probably Mid 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Mac Sales & Jake Rules, Mid-1955 / Meteor Records
Studio Session for Rosco Gordon, June 9, 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Jones Brothers, June 11, 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, June 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, June 18, 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bond, 1955 / Ekko Records
Studio Session for The Marigolds (Prisonaires), June/July 1955 / Excello Records
Studio Session for Charlie Feathers, June 24, 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Feathers, June or July 1955 / Sun Records 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Playlists of the Artists can be found on 706 Union Avenue Sessions of > YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1955

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY MID 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Its official. The bottom of the barrel had finally been reached. This is Johnny Cash's last release in 1964 on the original Sun label. For it, the powers that be had to go back, all the way back, to the beginning. How many Cash fans in May 1964 knew that they were listening to Cash's audition tape from nearly ten years earlier, featuring the likes of Mr. Red Kernodle on steel guitar? If its primitive you like, its primitive you get. Stan Kesler led an overdub session that could do little to disguise the raggedness of the original, although the song's gently baiting, self-deprecating humor was probably one of the factors that sold Sam Phillips on Johnny Cash all those years earlier.

> WIDE OPEN ROAD <
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Johnny Cash Music
Matrix number: - U 505 - Master (2:27)
Recorded: - Mid 1955
Released: - May 1, 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single Sun 392-A mono
WIDE OPEN ROAD / BELSHAZZAR
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-1/23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Cash was represented by a two-sided gem. Even Billboard got on "Port Of Lonely Hearts", calling it, in essence, a diamond in the rough and extolling its singalong qualities. Sam Phillips had to dig deep for this; it was a 1955 demo, and the fact that it was issued at all spoke volumes about Sun's dependence upon Cash and about the timelessness of his music. Somehow the marketplace failed to grasp the song's subtle charms. Sam Phillips must have been wondering whether the jocks and distributors were conspiring to stay off Cash's old product, even when it stacked up well against his more recent work on Columbia in the early 1960s.

PORT OF LONELY HEARTS
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 (2:32)
Recorded: - Mid 1955
Released: - Sun Unissued

> PORT OF LONELY HEARTS <
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 412 Take 2 - Master (2:32)
Second vocal and harmony overdubbed by Johnny Cash
Recorded: - Mid 1955
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 347-A mono
PORT OF LONELY HEARTS / MEAN EYED CAT
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2/11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

> I COULDN'T KEEP FROM CRYING <
Composer: - Marty Robbins
Publisher: - B.M.I. - ATV Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (1:59)
Recorded: - Mid 1955
Released: - 1969
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 115-A-1 mono
THE SINGING STORY TELLER
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-1/13 mono
JOHNNY CASH THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

> NEW MEXICO <
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Overdubbed for release on LP 1275 (2:03)
Undubbed on Sun Box 103.
Recorded: - Mid 1955
Released: - 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1275-9 mono
THE ORIGINAL SUN SOUND OF JOHNNY CASH
Reissued: - 1984 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 103 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

Overdub Session April 21, 1964 for ''New Mexico''
Bobby Wood - Piano

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR MAC SALES &
JAKE RULES WITH THE ESQUIRE TRIO
FOR METEOR RECORDS 1955

METEOR RECORDING STUDIO
1746 CHELSEA AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
METEOR SESSION: MID 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - LESTER BIHARI

Mac Sales is a pseudonym for Malcolm Yelvington, who still was under contract with Sun Records at the time of this recording. This group first recorded for Sun Records and were frustrated by the wait for a second Sun release. In the meantime, they found Lester Bihari happy to give them a shot on Meteor Records. Neither Lester nor the artists were clear about the contractual position, so they used a different name.

Mac Sales was actually Sun's Malcolm Yelvinton and Jake Rules and The Esquire Trio were what had been the Star Rhythm Boys. Malcolm played acoustic guitar, Jake was on bass, and the trio was Frank Tolley on piano, Miles Winn on steel and Gordon Mashburn on lead guitar.

Yelvinton's music always had a compelling energy without any of the histrionics of later rockabilly. His was really a small western-swing outfit looking to play rocking hillbilly music, and they succeeded spectacularly.

''Yakety Yak'' had been mastered as the second release on Sun in January 1955 after Yelvinton's ''Drinkin' Wine'' issued in 1954. ''But we waited on the release and nothing happened'', said Malcolm, ''so one day I was passing along Chelsea Avenue and I saw the Meteor studio and thought I would call in, just to see.

They said to bring the band in, so we went along and re-made the song and Lester liked them. I don't guess the record ever sold anything though - I never heard any more about it from Lester''. Billboard reviewed the disc in October 1955. It made very few waves at the time of release, but has since been hailed as a honky tonk rockabilly classic.

The Meteor disc sold steadily on a local basis but Meteor's distribution system was geared mainly to rhythm and blues. It was a really excellent honky-tonk country record, and deserved a far better fate.

YAKETY YAK
Composer: - Reece Fleming-Gordon Mashburn
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - MR 5035 - Master (2:39)
Recorded: Mid 1955
Released: - October 1955
First appearance: - Meteor Records (S) 45rpm standard single Meteor 5022 mono
YAKETY YAK / A GAL NAMED JO
Reissued: - 2006 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-3 AH mono
MALCOM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

One hot summer's day in 1971 Malcolm Yelvington pulled out his old Martin guitar and sat in his living room on Creston Avenue in Memphis to play through his entire repertoire for Colin Escott and Martin Hawkins. Included was a show- topping ''A Gal Named Joe'' that swung as much as rocket.

Malcolm said, ''I learned most of my style off the radio in the old days. I didn't try to imitate Elvis Presley. That's the one thing I didn't do that all the younger guys came in and did. I had been playing my way for years. I couldn't have changed if I'd tried''.

A GAL NAMED JO
Composer: - Reece Fleming-Lavern Fleming Jones
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - MR 5034 - Master (2:40)
Recorded: - Mid 1955
Released: - October 1955
First appearance: - Meteor Records (S) 45rpm standard single Meteor 5022 mono
A GAL NAMED JO / YAKETY YAK
Reissued: - 2006 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-4 mono
MALCOLM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Malcolm Yelvington - Vocal and Guitar
Jake Ryles - Vocal and Bass
Reece Fleming - Piano
Miles Red Winn - Steel Guitar
Gordon Mashburn - Guitar

For Biography of malcolm Yelvington see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1955

Rosco Gordon leaves Duke Records and returns to Sun after an absence of over two years. His recordings will be released both on Sun and Flip.

Eunice Kathleen Waymon (blues-singer Nina Simone) returns in Atlantic City, New Jersey,at Midtown Bar and Grill. Meet Ted Axelrod. Performance in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at Poquessing Club. Nina made a demo record and released as a bootleg ''Starring Nina Simone'' in 1964; the recording was the subject of a lawsuit.

The popular game show “The $64,000 Question” debuted on CBS-TV. Based on the radio quiz show “Take It Or Leave It,” it was created by Louis G. Cowan who had also created several popular radio quiz shows like “Quiz Kids.” Contestants on the game show boasted specialized knowledge in specific areas of expertise such as spelling or Shakespeare. The suspenseful format of the show meant that they would compete week to week building up their winnings until they reached the final round. The show became extremely popular but the success was relatively short-lived and it ended in 1958 when it was revealed that several popular game shows had been rigged.

JUNE 1, 1955 WEDNESDAY

Patsy Cline has her first recording session in Nashville, cutting ''A Church, A Courtroom And Then Goodbye''.

JUNE 2, 1955 THURSDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''That Do Make It Nice'' at the RCA Studio in Nashville.

JUNE 5, 1955 SUNDAY

During a party celebrating his re-signing with RCA Records, Eddy Arnold, fresh from recording with an orchestra, is asked if he'd ever seen so many fiddles; ''Yes'', he replies, ''but I've never seen so many in tune at the same time''.

Elvis Presley's pink Cadillac is destroyed when it catches fire while traveling between Hope, Arkansas, and Texarkana.

JUNE 6, 1955 MONDAY

Curtis Writh is born in Huntington, Pennsylvania. A member of Vern Gosdin's band in the late-1980s, he becomes a backing vocalist in recording sessions, and writes Ronnie Milsap's ''A Woman In Love'', plus Shenandoah's ''Next To You, Next To Me''.

JUNE 7, 1955 TUESDAY

Pop singer Joey Scarbury is born in Ontario. Best known for the 1981 hit ''Theme From Greatest American Hero (Believe It Or Not)'', he provides background vocals on albums by Dolly Parton, Michael Murphey and Kenny Rogers.

JUNE 8, 1955 WEDNESDAY

MGM chief Frank Walker telegrams Sun Records' Sam Phillips with an offer to buy Elvis Presley's recording contract. It's the latest among a series of offers from Decca, Capitol, Mercury, Chess, Atlantic and Dot.

JUNE 9, 1955 THURSDAY

Studio session with Rosco Gordon at Sun Records, Memphis, Tennessee. Session details unknown. Rosco's Sun contract was dated June 9, 1955 and sent to W. Fay St., Memphis.

JUNE 11, 1955 SATURDAY

Mike Daly, of The Gibson/Miller Band, is born in Cleveland, Ohio. He plays steel guitar on both of the act's early-1990s albums. The band wins the Academy of Country Music's Top New Group or Duo honor in 1994 but breaks up later that year.

JImmy C. Newman appears on the Red Foley-hosted ABC show ''Ozark Jubilee''.

SUMMER 1955

By the summer of 1955, Emerson was booking through the Buffalo Agency in Houston, along with B.B. King and Junior Parker, and he seems to have gained plenty of road work on the strength of ''The Woodchuck'', ''When It Rains' It Pours'' and ''Red Hot''.

In the damp heat of summer 1955, Jack Earls' unnamed quartet practiced every day at various members' homes before they cut their first sessions that fall. Phillips was mostly interested in original songs that his Hi-Lo publishing company could sign up. Earls recalled Phillips telling him, "You know I'd rather have one guy like you that writes his own songs, than ten that don't.' Because material is not easy to come by And back then had more material than I knew what to do with''! The group recorded takes of a few Earls originals, including the superb honky tonk anthem ''I'm A Fool For Lovin' You'', rockin' stroller called ''Hey Jim'' (and another version of it where Earls mistakenly sang ''Hey Slim'', but included a verse that he left out of ''Hey Jim'', and ''They Can't Keep Me From You'', another love song that no doubt inspired more than a few couples to polish their belt buckles while dancing close.

SUMMER 1955

During the summer the Roy Orbison and the Wink Westerners regrouped back in West Texas. When not appearing at local clubs, they would play at the Saturday Night Jamboree in Jal, New Mexico. The band somehow managed to appear, along with other local Country and Western bands, on a Saturday afternoon television show on KMID-TV Channel 2, out of Midland.

In addition to their regular repertoire, they began to play some Rock and Roll numbers including "That's All Right'', "Rock Around The Clock" and of course, "Ooby Dooby" . They were an instant success and as a result were given their own thirty-minute show on Friday nights on KMID.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE JONES BROTHERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY JUNE 11, 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The Jones Brothers were a performing aggregation for at least twenty years before they recorded for Sun Records in the early 1950s. In fact, their four Sun recordings. We always believed that there was just one Jones Brothers session that resulted in one poor-selling single. Now we have to revise that notion backward and forward. There's a version of ''Every Night'', that clearly derives from an undated earlier session, and a newly discovered note inside a tape box suggest that ''Amazing Grace'' and ''Gospel Train'' were recorded nearly eighteen months after the single. The ballsier reverb certainly supports the later date. The modestly applied tape delay reverb on the single has been amped up rockabilly style.

Johnny Prye of the Jones Brothers always insisted that the group recorded with Elvis Presley. We never wholeheartedly embraced this notion because the Jones' only known session was in January 1954, six months before Elvis began recording, but the date inside the tape box for ''Amazing Grace'' / ''Gospel Train'' is June 11, 1955. Elvis was in Shreveport to play the Louisiana Hayride that day, but his datebook noted that he was at Sun on June 12, and no known recording resulted.

Of course, if we could plainly hear Elvis on either of these songs, it would place the matter beyond dispute, but we cannot. Behind the strong lead vocal there's some excellent close harmony, so close in fact that we cannot isolate one voice from another. It's well known that Elvis Presley loved this style of singing and that his first gospel LP ''His Hand In Mine'' blended black and white quartet gospel, but we would need to hear him to believe that he was there.

The story above does not end well. Johnny Prye died several years later and shortly after his death, there was structural damage to his house resulting in the contents of his attic collapsing into a downstairs bedroom. In the course of making the necessary repairs, the contents of Prye's attic, were unceremoniously carted off with shards of plaster, wood and other rubble.

Recording this track, the Jones Brothers resurrected a selection that had become the signature song for the world famous Golden Gate Quartet, In fact, the Gates had performed it during the 1938 From Spirituals To Swing concert at Carnegie Hall. Inspiration for the Jones Brothers' version might have come from closer to home, though. WDIA carried a show titled ''Gospel Train'' and the 1956 program for the station's Goodwill Review mentioned the ''Jones Boys'' as among the station's regular gospel performers. The Joneses turn in a spirited version in a style that owes more to Jubilee than most of their recorded work. As on the Gates' version, there are vocal train effects and, to make the song their own, there is a reference to ''Memphis''.

> GOSPEL TRAIN <
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:16)
Recorded: - June 11, 1955
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Charly Sun Box 105 mono
SUN RECORDS THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - May 1994 Rhino Records (CD) 500/200rpm R271780 mono
THE SUN RECORDS COLLECTION

''Amazing Grace'' is the best known and most widely recorded statement of faith in the world. It also became an unlikely Top 20 pop hit in consecutive years, first for Judy Collins and then a team of bagpipers. From the opening notes of this track, played by an electric guitar, it's clear the Jones Brothers are from a different gospel tradition. There is certainly vocal blending, but the lead vocalist has been listening to gospel shouters. There is little of the Jubilee harmony style here, despite the fact that the group's arranger, Johnny Prye, purported to be strongly influenced by the Golden Gate Quartet. The Jones Brothers' reading of ''Grace'' is done entirely in free-meter. During the first verse the group stays close to the original material. However, things change radically during the second verse, when their performance loses its debt to the classic hymn. It is nearly as free of traces of ''Amazing Grace'' as it is of meter. Rather than singing any of the lyrics from Dr. Newton's original (and there were verses galore), the singer chants a personal testimonial about calling on God in the midnight hour.

> AMAZING GRACE <
Composer: - Public Domain
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (3:27)
Recorded: - June 11, 1955
Released: - 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16387-28 mono
SUN GOSPEL

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Jones Brothers consisting of:
William Gresham - Vocal
Jake McIntosh - Vocal
Charles Jones - Vocal
Eddie Hollins - Vocal
Johnny Prye - Vocal
James Rayford - Vocal
Charles Bishop – Guitar

For Biography of The Jones Brothers see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Jones Brothers' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1955

Most of Gene Simmons Sun recordings are on the CD5 from the Sun Rock Boxset (BCD 17313) these songs probably date from his 1955 audition and a home-made tape. The Johnnie & Jack-inspired ''Down On The Border'' certainly sounds like a studio recording, but ''Shake Rattle And Roll'' doesn't. Taken together, they capture hillbilly music becoming rockabilly before our ears.

JUNE 15, 1955 WEDNESDAY

Singer/songwriter Billy Mize recorded ''Who Will Buy The Wine''. Five years later, it becomes a hit for Charlie Walker.

JUNE 17. 1955 FRIDAY

Tommy Collins recorded ''I Guess I'm Crazy'' and ''You Uoghta See Pickles Now''.

JUNE 18, 1955 SATURDAY

Faron Young's signature hit, ''Live Fast, Love Hard, Die Young'', reaches number 1 on the Billboard country chart.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1955

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Gene Simmons was no stranger to microphones. He sang into them at 706 Union Avenue in Memphis, and on lots of stages at local clubs and in makeshift studios at radio stations. During the early years, if a friend had a halfway decent home tape recorder, Gene sang into that as well. When they were kids during the late 1940s and early 1950s, Gene and his older brother Leon entertained strangers in the town courtyard for spare change. Even though they were more involved in agricultural work than the music business, Gene and his brothers (by now Carl had joined them) did their share of singing into make believe microphones that were crafted out of tree branches, picked up in the fields they were plowing. Singing into tree-branch microphones was an image Gene shared with more than one interviewer long after his recording "Haunted House" hit the pop charts in 1964.

From the myopic point of view of most music journalists, Gene is a good example of a One-Hit-Wonder. He sort of came out of nowhere in the fall of 1964, scraped the Top 10 with his version of the Johnny Fuller song, Hauted House", and disappeared again. His follow-up record, "The Dodo", put in a three-week token appearance at number 83 on the Billboard charts, and then it was all over. To begin with Gene Simmons had already been at it for nearly ten years when "Haunted House" hit the charts.

Not just at it singing into make-believe microphones and tree branches. But at it singing on the radio, at local clubs and - most of all - traveling to Memphis, spending whatever time he could auditioning for and, finally, recording in that little hole-in-the-wall studio on the corner of Union and Marshall.

It was the same studio in which Mr. Phillips had discovered another unknown singer from Tupelo named Elvis Presley. Like Gene after him, Elvis had also done his share of singing into make-believe microphones and a few real ones when Sam Phillips finally got serious about experimenting with him in the studio. That was all Gene was asking for. Just a chance to show what he had.

According to Gene, it was Elvis Presley who, one way or the other, got him interested in Sun Records. Gene recalled, "Growing up in Tupelo, I never actually met Elvis. We never knew each other as kids. Right before his first record came out, we kind of crossed paths. Me and my kid brother Carl, had a radio show in Tupelo. There weren't many places to play. You'd play the Moose Club or you wouldn't play at all. Or you'd go down to Betty McKissick's house on Saturday afternoon for a jam session. She was a distant cousin of Elvis. So we're all down there and in walks Elvis. He had hitchhiked down from Memphis to spend a weekend with his grandmother in Tupelo. So Betty introduces us and tells us he can sing some too. So I hand him my guitar and he says, 'No. I don't really do it in public. I just play and sing for myself. 'Kinda shy, very polite, but I remember how weird he looked. Very greasy-like. Pink stripes his pants".

"A few months later, I heard his first record out on Sun and Betty tells me it's the same guy I had met back at her house. A while later I was at the radio station and Bob Neal, who had started managing Elvis, calls up and says, 'You have a radio show down there. This new boy is local and I'd like you to help promote him. You boys can play on his show. So that night I really got to meet with him and see him in action. I asked him, 'Can you get us an audition with that record label?. So he agreed to and a while later we went up there and met Sam Phillips".

In all likelihood, the show on which Gene appeared with Elvis and helped to promote on the radio was the June 15, 1955 date in Belden, Mississippi. It was held at the local high school gymnasium. Local disc jockey and promoter Bobby Ritter was on hand to MC the show of their earliest visits to Sun. Indeed, Ritters name appears on a tape box holding multiple takes of "Down On The Border", the very first song Gene auditioned at Sun Records. This suggests that Ritter may have been there as more than a casual friend from Tupelo, making the drive to Memphis for the fun of it.

> DOWN ON THE BORDER <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 2544 – Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (1:53)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1955
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 106-5/11 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - ROCKIN' WITH MY BABY
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-9 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

> DOWN ON THE BORDER <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 2544 - Take 2 – Not Originally Issued (1:54)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1955
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-23 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Simmons - Vocal and Mandolin
Jessie Carter - Upright Bass
John Green - Fiddle

Gene may have been eager to show what he had, but, at least initially, it was not exactly what Sam Phillips was looking for. Gene's brother Carl, who would become a spectacular lead guitar player, recalls those early years with a wistful smile. "We were really a bluegrass band when we first went up there. I wasn't even playing guitar. I brought my mandolin to the first audition. Sam Phillips told us, as politely as he could, that he wished we'd just lose the mandolin.

Actually Sam's exact words were, 'Wrap the mandolin around a telephone pole and pick up a guitar'. Back then, he was God so you did what he told you. All the musicians I knew wanted to go up to Sun Records and record''. ''I didn't actually wrap the mandolin around a telephone pole, but I did put it down and buy me a guitar. My first electric was a Kay". "I also had a Harmony at about the same time.

All the stuff I recorded at Sun was on one of those two guitars. I graduated to a Chet Atkins Gretsch after than and then, later on, I got really uptown and bought a Fender Telecaster.

Sam Phillips probably also told the boys to take the fiddle they had brought, played by John Green, and wrap it around the same telephone pole. Sam Phillips was just not looking for a pure hillbilly band, no matter how much dust they might kick up on a Saturday night dance floor. Phillips was not making a documentary about life in the rural honky-tonks in 1955. He was trying to sell records and that meant finding something different. Presley had been different. Carl Perkins, another soldier in the honky tonk wars, had been different. Could Phillips work his magic once again? Was there anything here he could work with?

Fortunately, we have samples of just what Phillips was listening to. You can almost feel Sam Phillips' presence as he tries to push the group beyond their familiar music into what they might become. The earliest recordings, like "Down On The Border", reveal the truth of Carl Simmons' words. They really were a bluegrass group. With Carl on Mandolin, John Green on fiddle, Gene on acoustic guitar, and Jessie Carter taking his first tentative steps on upright bass, these guys were raw and very country. The song itself is kind of catchy, but it would have been in alien territory in the Sun catalogue. Sam was right to have passed. He listened, even recorded several takes, but then uttered the immortal words, "What else you got?".

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <
Gene Simmons' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1955

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY JUNE 18, 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The sound on this session clearly echoes the recordings that Sam Phillips was making with Elvis Presley at the same time. Bass player Jessie Carter recalls those days and the price of insistence. ''Getting into the studio to record, that was the toughest nut to crack. You just don't know what it was like. We'd get up early in the morning, leave Tupelo, drive to Memphis, do a 3 or 4-hour session, pack up, drive back to Tupelo. It'd be 10 or 11 at night before we'd get back home. No expressways in those days. Country highways. Sometimes Sam would call at the last minute and have to cancel. Said, 'I've got something else come up. I'll give you a call next week'. Sometimes we wouldn't hear from him for 2 or 3 weeks. Maybe have to call him again, remind him...''.

> MOM AND POP <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 2550 - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (1:38)
Recorded: - June 18, 1955
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1019-5 mono
ROCK-A-BILLY BLUES
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-3 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

> MOM AND POP <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 2550 - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (1:39)
Recorded: - June 18, 1955
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-19 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
Reissued: - Mid Century Music (CD) 500/200rpm 6003-17 mono
GENE SIMMONS - 706 UNION AVENUE AND BEYOND

> DRINKIN' SCOTCH <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 2547 - Not Originally Issued (3:02)
Recorded: - June 18, 1955
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1019-4 mono
ROCK-A-BILLY BLUES
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-5 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16

"Drinkin' Scotch" was a prototypical version of "Drinkin' Wine", a song that Gene Simmons recorded in 1956 but wasn't released until August 1958.

> BLUES AT MIDNIGHT <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 2548 - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:33)
Recorded: - June 18, 1955
Released: - 1985
First appearance: Sun England - (LP) 33rpm 1019-1 mono
ROCK-A-BILLY BLUES
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-8 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

The group carried another lead guitar player early on named Talmadge Hester. You can hear his work on "Blues At Midnight". There's nothing particularly distinctive about the song. It's a standard, if a bit more melodic than most, 12-bar blues. It is Hester's work that marks the group, indeed the recording, as ordinary. The timing is ragged and the lead guitar work, if one can call it that, sounds like a guy who was busy learning his instrument. (Jessie Carter recalls, ''We found out after just a few weeks that Carl was a much better guitar player than Hester was''.) Gene added that Hester's lead guitar role probably occurred at the very time that Carl was making the transition from mandolin to electric guitar.

Perhaps Hester would develop into a competent musician, but there's no evidence of it here. Sam Phillips was operating on blind faith at this point. As Carl adds, ''We were obsessed with going in there''. The group made many trips to Memphis: sometimes to record, sometimes simply to watch and listen and mingle.

> BLUES AT MIDNIGHT <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 2549 - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:34)
Recorded: - June 18, 1955
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 106-7-1 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - THE CHAINS IN LOVE
Reissued: - Mid Century Music (CD) 500/200rpm 6003-16 mono
GENE SIMMONS - 706 UNION AVENUE AND BEYOND

A lot of tunes, some of them forgettable, some intriguing, most not fully realized, were committed to tape at Sun. Most of them just sat in tape boxes waiting for discovery decades later. Gene described them collectively in 2006 as ''novelties and fun songs''.

"Juicy Fruit", fifty years after the fact, some of these titles had become a little vague to Gene, Jessie and Carl. But one that stood right out a half a century later to all three men was Gene's good-natured opus to lust, "Juicy Fruit". Maybe everyone remembered it because they had sung together on the chorus (live during the take and no overdubbing). But more likely, it was the lustfully zany lyrics.

Back in 1956 you could make a little money naming a song after a popular confection, and "Juicy Fruit" was one of the bestselling chewing gums in teen land. But the lyrics here were just a little bit over the top for airplay.

Sam Phillips must have known that, even as he was recording take after take of the catchy song. "Have a lollipop, baby, 'cause you're my Juicy Fruit". Yeah, that was bound to get heavy airplay in the Bible Belt.

> JUICY FRUIT <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 2552 - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:50)
Recorded: - June 18, 1955
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1025 mono
HOT FLOP AND FLY
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-16 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

> JUICY FRUIT <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 2552 - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:47)
Recorded: - June 18, 1955
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 106-7-4 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - THE CHAINS IN LOVE
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-4 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

> JUICY FRUIT <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 2552 - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued (2:49)
Recorded: - June 18, 1955
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-25 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

> YOU CAN'T BREAK THE CHAINS OF LOVE <
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 2553 - Not Originally Issued (2:36)
Recorded: - June 18, 1955
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1024-1 mono
HOT SOUTHERN BOPPERS
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-11 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

"Chains Of Love" is somewhat unusual fare in the Simmons catalogue. There is a decidedly swinging feel to this side that steers it from rockabilly toward pop. It isn't just the chorus that works this effect. It is largely the tempo. Indeed, you can hear Simmons taking surprising liberties with both the lyrics and his phrasing. On the other hand, the extended guitar breaks contain their share of stinging high note work, which brings things back to familiar territory. Was this track intended for release or simply to serve as a demo for fellow Tupelo residents, The Miller Sisters? In any case, Millie and Jo did record this Simmons tune in July 1957. Their version also went unissued.

"Chains Of Love" was never issued on the original Sun label, although it has found its way into release during the past 35 years of Sun archeology. Gene, himself, recorded at least two versions of the title during his visits to the Sun studio as well. Carl Simmons recalls it being "an old country song that we just kind of worked up". We have found no information to date to confirm this possibility.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal
Jessie Carter - Bass
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Talmadge Hester - Guitar

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <
Gene Simmons' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

THE TRUE STORY ABOUT GENE SIMMONS - When Gene Simmons was a teenager in Tupelo, Mississippi, in the early 1950s, his two sisters brought home an old guitar. He could not stop smacking its strings. In a few months, he was strumming them sweetly and performing on the radio and at dances with his brother in the Simmons Brothers band. Simmons' career has taken him from Tupelo to the world, from obscurity to fame, and from fame to relative obscurity again.

Yet the man who started recording for Sun Records as a rockabilly artist in the 1950s finally succeeded with "Haunted House" on Hi Records in 1964. "One day, I guess it was about 1954," Simmons recalled, "I was visiting a cousin of Elvis Presley. I didn't know who this Elvis fellow was at the time, but everybody said he played the guitar, so I handed him one. He just smiled. He was real shy. He said, 'I only play by myself'. Personally, I thought the guy looked weird.

Greased back hair, tight pants, all that. Yeah, this guy was 'weird' all right; hipper than we country boys. Well, one day a short time later I had the opportunity to hear his first record on the radio. I said to my brother, 'Hey, is that the guy I met? I'd sure like to hear more about this record deal'.

So a few weeks later a guy named Bob Neal called and said he wanted to book Elvis back in his old hometown of Tupelo. Neal asked our band to play with Elvis on his date. That's really how my career got started". Eventually, Simmons approached Presley about getting in to see Sam Phillips, the owner of Sun, about a contract. "I can arrange an audition", Presley told Simmons, "but I'm afraid that's all I can do for you boys. The rest is up to you". Phillips apparently liked what he heard, for he took Simmons into the little Memphis studio to record eight sides. But Sun was too involved with other artists and projects at the time, and Jumpin' Gene Simmons - called that because of his antics on stage - got only one release. "So I just left to go on tour all over the country", he recalled. "In Canada I met a woman who later became my wife. When I brought her to Memphis with me, vocalist Ray Harris got me on the Hi label. At the time, in the early 1960s, Bill Black's group needed a vocalist, so I started singing for him. In all, I had releases on Hi in 1961, 1962, 1963 - but no hits. I looked around and saw my buddies 'having hits, and I started to think that maybe this was just not meant to be for me. By 1963, I was ready to hang it up.

Then I found a guy named Domingo Samudio - you'd probably know him better as Sam The Sham - playing in the clubs with me. All the pickers laughed at me for saying so, but I thought Sam had such a different stage presence. I cut the first record on him on a Tupelo label, a record called 'Betty Ann Dupree', but nothing happened. About that time Sam was singing a song that had been recorded unsuccessfully before called 'Haunted House'. I liked it. Sam got a wild reaction when he played it in the clubs. Well, the folks over at Hi asked me to ask Sam if he would record it for them. Sam didn't like Hi for some reason, and he said to tell them that he would make the record on his own. Anyhow, the man over at Hi said, 'Look, Gene, we're gonna make that record anyway. Would you like to cut it?' I said, 'Hey, why not?' My contract with Hi had already expired, though, and they had to make arrangements for me to record again. But what Sam turned down I had a hit on. It was all so unlikely". Simmons said the session was not like his others in that everyone involved had fun. The label president called his distributor in New York City and said Hi was putting out a new Gene Simmons record. "Man", the distributor complained, "we've got that guy's records stacked up to the ceiling now, and they aren't doing a thing", "Well, get ready for a stone smash", the president said. By August, 1964, "Haunted House" had rested at number eleven on the Hot 100, and the Hi executive seemed to be a teller of fortunes.

In a time when disc jockeys seemed obsessed with English bands, "long" hair, and a new sophistication in music, a Memphis label came along with a novelty record about a man who refuses to leave his new house just because it's haunted. "Actually, the English thing helped me", Simmons said. "The DJs were sort of tired of all that stuff, I think, and my record was a refreshing one because it had a funky beat that you could dance to. I was just happy to be on the charts. Later, I got tagged as a novelty act. I couldn't find anything nearly as good as 'Haunted House' and I never had another big national hit". He didn't mind all that much, however, for he had always wanted to be a country singer. Yet Simmons was not like his contemporaries in country or rockabilly because he could sing a variety of music and sing with soul. He was an excellent vocalist in an era when many singers were mediocre. "I started out singing country and I was happy with it", he said. In recent years Simmons has been performing as a country-rockabilly artist and producing, writing and publishing music, He even recorded a less frenetic version of "Haunted House" on a local label called Deltune Records. But the big national hits have stopped coming for now, and Simmons has moved from Tupelo to the Nashville area to work for a music publishing company. He said he will keep singing country music as long as somebody wants to hear him. "That's where my heart is", he said.

Tupelo, Mississippi, February 1987

ON THE ROAD WITH JESSIE CARTER – ''One morning I was listening to the local radio station, WTUP, and Gene had a program on at that time. I think it was just him and Carl. This is probably around 1953. I had been playing the guitar a little myself so I decided to go over there one Saturday morning to check them out. The first time I went over, I just listened. The second time I asked if I could play with them on the shoe. He said, 'Yeah, man. Bring your guitar and come along'. And so I joined the band''.

''Then this guy I had gone to school with named John Green, a fiddle player, he comes along. The this other boy comes along named Talmadge Hester. And he plays the guitar. So now we have three guitar players: me and Gene and Hester''.

''We decided three guitars was too much and somebody had to go to playing bass. So I went down to Witt's Music Store in Tupelo and got me an old upright Kay bass. I got pretty good on the thing and that started my bass playing days''.

''The group got pretty good. We had been playing together about two or three years and there really weren't many bands around Tupelo that could touch us. One of the first thrills we had was they were booking Elvis and Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins in the National Guard Armory, Mississippi (The actual date appears to have been December 12, 1955). We opened that show up with ''Truck Driving Man''. We felt so good afterwards; we got as good a hand as Johnny cash. Now Perkins and Elvis, that was something else again. But they brought us back out on stage. For a bunch of old country boys just starting up, that felt pretty good. We just went on from there. It gave us a lift we really needed''.

''Gene was real creative when it came to writing. He was always thinking. We could be just going down the road and he'd think of something. 'Give me a piece of paper, give me a pen'. Gene and me and Carl, we lived close together. We were together at least 60 hours a week. We were all the time playing, coming up with stuff. If they weren't at my house, I was at their house''.

''Carl and I and Gene were part of those tours through Ontario, Canada back in the late 1950s. We were playing in Toronto, Kitchener, London, Hamilton, Windsor... Clubs like the Brass Rail, The Coq d'Or, the Flamingo Lounge. I remember we finished about a week before Conway Twitty so we drove over to Hamilton to see him at the Flamingo and we sat in with him. We had the best time... just tore that place up. A lot of us from Sun made that tour. Riley was there too. When we got black, I played with guys like John Hughey – a fine steel guitar player and a good old country boy. He was with Slim Rhodes at the time but me and him used to do side jobs together. WE played out at the Naval Base together. Reggie Young is another guy I played with for three or four years. He's a tough guitar player. I also played a lot at Hi''.

''I was playing clubs with Carl. We played in Memphis at a place called Little Abner's Supper club. At the time, Joe Cuoghi, who owned Hi Records told Ace Cannon that he was going to release a single on him (''Tuff'') and he ought to be looking to put together a band of his own. Ace came into the club and listened to me and Carl for about two hours. Then he told us he wanted to hire us to go on the road with him. That's when Carl and I left Gene and went off with Ace Cannon. Gene worked as a single, playing with house bands in Memphis. He did a lot of singing with the Bill Black Combo and he also came and sang with us after me and Carl had been with Ace for about a year or so. The bookings would say ''Gene Simmons and the Ace Cannon Combo''. I stayed on the road with Ace for quite a few years''.

''When we left Sun back then as kids, we had nothing to show for it. No paperwork. No recordings. If something didn't come out on a single, it just stayed in the can. We didn't even leave with an old 78 acetate. When someone comes into my studio today I make sure they leave with something. I'll burn them a CD whether they have any more or not. I've gotten a lot from this business and I want to give something back''.

LIFE IN THE MUSIC BUSINESS BY CARL SIMMONS - ''I had really been around a guitar all my young life. I was only about 15, maybe a little younger, when I got my own guitar. Both my sisters were musicians. Agnes played rhythm guitar and Izetta played mandolin. My sisters were actually playing on the radio when I was a kid. I picked the mandolin up first by my sister Agnes taught me chords on the guitar so I knew a little something even before I got my own. I was listening to a lot of different music. I spent plenty of time listening to the Opry and the country stars, but I also liked big band music. I loved Les Paul and Chet Atkins. My heroes are really guitar players''.

''It was mostly Sam who recorded us. Jack Clement did a couple of the later sessions but it was really mostly Sam. We were up at Sun during a lot of other people's sessions. We were there when Jerry Lee recorded ''High School Confidential''. It was a pretty basic studio, not very sophisticated, but it sounded great to us''.

''Sam was pretty impatient with us. We were more or less a bluegrass band when we went up to Sun. We had our own radio show. But Sam just didn't think he could sell it. He was very successful and nobody can have that much luck. He knew what he was doing. He couldn't necessarily tell you what he wanted, but he sure knew it when he heard it. I remember Sam playing us a very early session he had cut on Johnny Cash. (Note: ''Cry Cry Cry'' (Sun 221) was cut in May 1955). He was very excited about it. He told us, 'This guy is going to be as big as Hank Williams'. We didn't think it sounded so good at the time, but he was right''.

''We did a lot of shows with Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins. We did shows with Elvis, Charlie Rich. I worked with Charlie personally myself for a while. Sam told me that one of his biggest disappointments was never really getting a big hit on Charlie Rich. He had ''Lonely Weekends'' but he believed there was much more there''.

''I was on the road with the Bill Black Combo for about a year and did sessions with them at Hi Records. I probably played on 60-70% of the sessions he did. Me and Reggie Young, he was the other guitar player they used. Gene was working as a vocalist with the Bill Black Combo when we were on the road. I recall a package tour we were all on with Brenda Lee, Fabian, Chubby Checker..''.

''Hi Records was actually a lot like a family. There'd be disagreements or a bit of jealously here and there. Bill Black got upset with Ace Cannon when he had that big hit record on ''Tuff''. Ace had been Bill's sax player but after that hit record, Ace left Bill and went out on his own. I worked with Ace on the road for about four or five years and on all his sessions''.

''Joe Cuoghi wanted to cut ''Haunted House'' using Sam the Sham and the Bill Black Combo. Sam wouldn't do it for some reason and Ray Harris asked for Gene. So Gene came in with Bill's combo, they set up and did it in two takes. And it's a million seller. That's the way things happen sometimes''.

''Almost anyone can be made to sound good today, at least in the studio. It's a little different out on the road. It's harder to cover up all the flaws out there. Although today the sound system are getting more and more elaborate. You can fill a whole tractor trailer with equipment to put on the stage. When we were recording, it was live off the floor and when we were out on the road, it was just a station wagon with a guitar, a bass and a couple of amps. I remember being on the road with Elvis. Him and Scotty and Bill with a guitar in the car and the big bass out on top of the Cadillac. That was it. The whole band''.

JUNE 20, 1955 MONDAY

The movie ''Webb Pierce And His Wonderin' Boys'' debuts in theaters. Hank Penny, Sue Thompson, Red Sovine and Johnny Burnette also appear in the film, which includes rendition of ''Slowly'' and ''In The Jailhouse Now''.

Red Hot was issued on Sun 219 on 20 June 1955 and it received favourable reviews though Sun's limited promotional efforts were being put behind Johnny Cash's first hit Cry Cry Cry, released the next day.

JUNE 21, 1955 TUESDAY

"Cry, Cry, Cry" backed with "Hey! Porter" (Sun 221) is released under the name Johnny Cash. Cash had been christened simply "J.R" and had been dubbed "John" later in life. It was Sam Phillips who coined "Johnny". Luther Perkins and Marshall Grant were dubbed the Tennessee Two. They agreed to divide the royalties on an equal three way split. The original compositions were credited solely to Cash although the substance of a lawsuit brought by Luther Perkins' family and Marshall Grant was that they had contributed to almost every composition during the endless rehearsals. It was one of the biggest thrills of his life, Cash often said, to hear his record played on the radio for the first time. For the first time, too, he was beginning to think, ''I might can make a living at it, and I won't have to do all those other things I don't want to do, like be a policeman or work as a disc jockey or a salesman, maybe, you know, by the end of the year I might make enough to pay the rent''. But when Cash took a promotional copy to Elvis' manager, WMPS disc jockey Bob Neal, and Neal dropped it and broke it, ''I thought my world had ended. I didn't think they'd make another one!''.

Also this day, the singles Sun 219 ''Red Hot'' b/w ''No Greater Love'' by Billy Emerson (Sam Phillips wrote to West Coast pressing plant operator Nate Duroff, was ''taking off big and going white, even though, other Emerson releases have been strictly for the Negro trade''); Sun 220 ''Homesick For My Baby'' b/w ''Lookin' For My Baby'' by Little Milton and Sun 222 ''Don't Do That!'' b/w ''Sittin' By The Window'' by The Five Tinos are released.

JUNE 22, 1955 WEDNESDAY

Carl Smith recorded ''Don't Tease Me'' during an evening session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

Hank Thompson recorded ''Don't Take It Out On Me'' during an evening session at the Capitol Studios on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.

JUNE 25, 1955 SATURDAY

Wade Moore and Dick Penner are on the Big D Jamboree in Dallas, Texas, singing ''Hey Miss Fannie'' and ''Dance With Me, Henry'', appearing alongside Charline Arthur, Sonny James, and Jimmy Patton.

JUNE 26, 1955 SUNDAY

Patsy Cline opens for Ernest Tubb at a free concert beneath the Parthenon in Nashville's Centennial Park. The show draws 15,000 people.

JUNE 27, 1955 MONDAY

Capitol released a double-sided Faron Young single, ''All Right'' and the flip-side ''Go Back You Fool''.

Decca released Kitty Wells' double-sided ''There's Poison In Your Heart'' and ''I'm In Love With You''.

JUNE 30, 1955 THURSDAY

The movie ''Wichita'' opens with Joel McCrea, Vera Miles, Lloyd Bridges and Peter Graves in starring roles. Tex Ritter sings the title track.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Country and rockabilly singer, disc-jockey, promotor, radio and television station impresario, song-writer, charity worker and law enforcement officer, all parts of the multi-faceted person that is Eddie Bond. For over forty years now he had been completely immersed in the southern musical culture that spawned the likes of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison et all. Whether he is performing in Memphis, Tennessee, Drew, Mississippi or Prudhoe, Tyne and Wear, England, Eddie Bond continues to be a living embodiment of the traditional sounds of country and authentic rockabilly music.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BOND
FOR EKKO RECORDS 1955

MURRAY NASH ASSOCIATES STUDIO
CUMBERLAND LODGE BUILDING, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
EKKO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – RED MATTHEWS

Following failed auditions at Sun and Meteor Records in Memphis, Eddie Bond secured a recording deal with Ekko Records which, although an Los Angeles company had a Memphis office which was located at 36 North Cleveland in Memphis. Although not certain, Eddie now believe the Ekko session was held at Murray Nash Studio in Nashville. Celebrated pickers were brought in by artist and repertoire man Red Matthews, who supervised the session, resulting in two singles releases at the tail-end of 1955. ''Double Duty Lovin''' was coupled with ''Talking Off The Wall'', ''Love Makes A Fool (Every Day)'' being paired with ''Your Eyes''. No fabulous sales were achieved but they formed the basis for the next session which saw Eddie move further towards the big-time and a major label deal, Mercury Records.

DOUBLE DUTY LOVIN'
Composer: - V. Claude
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Jari Music
Matrix number: - 1015BB - Master (2:12)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1955
Released: - August 1955
First appearance: - Ekko Records (S) 45rpm Ekko 1015-B mono
DOUBLE DUTY LOVIN' / TALKING OFF THE WALL
Reissued: 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1/1 mono
EDDIE BOND – ROCKIN' DADDY

TALKING OFF THE WALL
Composer: - E. Brooks
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Jerl Music
Matrix number: - 1015AA - Master (2:32)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1955
Released: - August 1955
First appearance: - Ekko Records (S) 45rpm Ekko 1015-A mono
TALKING OFF THE WALL / DOUBLE DUTY LOVIN'
Reissued: 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1/2 mono
EDDIE BOND – ROCKIN' DADDY

LOVE MAKES A FOOL (EVERY DAY)
Composer: - Hews-Kuchie
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Jerl Music
Matrix number: - 1016A - Master (2:09)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1955
Released: - September 1955
First appearance: - Ekko Records (S) 45rpm Ekko 1016-A mono
LOVE MAKES A FOOL (EVERY DAY) / YOUR EYES
Reissued: 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1/3 mono
EDDIE BOND – ROCKIN' DADDY

YOUR EYES
Composer: - Hews-Carver
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Jerl Music
Matrix number: - 1016B - Master (2:33)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1955
Released: - September 1955
First appearance: - Ekko Records (S) 45rpm Ekko 1016-B mono
YOUR EYES / LOVE MAKES A FOOL (EVERY DAY)
Reissued: 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1/3 mono
EDDIE BOND – ROCKIN' DADDY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bond – Vocal
Walter Hank Garland – Guitar
Edward Eddie Hill – Rhythm Guitar
Jerry Byrd – Steel Guitar
Floyd T. Chance – Bass
Murray M. Buddy Harmon – Drums
Marvin Hughes - Piano

For Biography of Eddie Bond see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1955

Sometime in late June 1955 the Marigolds (Prisonaires) took their first trip to the recording studio Ernie Young had set up in his record warehouse on Nashville's Third Avenue North. They recorded four songs: ''Two Strangers'', ''Love You, Love You, Love You'', ''Pork And Beans'', and ''Front Page Blues''. The group's members had changed again because William Stewart and Ed Thurman were released in April 1955. All of the original Prisonaires had now been released except Johnny Bragg, although Junior Drue was temporally back in the fold. On this session Bragg and Drue were joined by Hal Hebb, Willy Wilson and the new member, Alfred Brooks, who had been given life at age 17 for killing a schoolteacher. And it was only the singers who were different. This time the singers were backed by one of Ernie Young's house bands, people Bragg described to Bill Millar as being ''from the free world''. The band was the Freddy Young combo with Young on alto saxophone, pianist Skippy Brooks, bassist Clifford McCray, and drummer Kid King.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE MARIGOLDS/SOLOTONES
FOR EXCELLO RECORDS 1955

NASHBORO RECORDING STUDIO
177 THIRD AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
EXCELLO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE JUNE/JULY 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – ERNIE YOUNG

By the end of July all four of the songs from this session were on the marked. The Marigolds's second disc appeared as Excello 2061 and featured ''Two Strangers'', a slow ballad that Bragg reads off in a conversational voice with understated support from the group and the band. Freddy Young took a plaintive, distracted-sounding solo and Bragg finished the song with his trademark falsetto.

''Love You, Love You, Love You'' starts as a solid mid-paced ballad sung strongly by Bragg with the group building up the intensity of the vocal riffs behind him until Freddy Young leaps out with an exciting sax solo. This was an impressive record, given a spotlight review in Billboard on August 13 as: ''An unusual coupling by a versatile group. ''Two Strangers'' is a quiet, intimate and completely absorbing ballad, while the flip is an exuberant shout. The first is quite original while the flip rides on a great performance''. The record was issued in the same batch of discs with Excello 2060 which the company's trade paper ads of August described as ''introducing a new group, the Solotones, singing ''Pork And Beans'' and ''Front Page Blues''. Despite the relative success of ''Rollin' Stone'', Ernie Young had evidently decided that the Marigolds were not necessarily the best vehicle for Johnny Bragg's talents and he put two of Bragg's eggs into a different basket, the Solotones name capturing quite well the notion that this was a group but with one very strong lead voice. Why he did not just use Bragg's name is unclear. Whatever, it was a wonderful record, introduced by Skippy Brooks's piano notes, kicked on by a solid rhythm section and with horns careering around in the background, ''Pork And Beans'' was a jokey homage to the singer's idea of the perfect food song. ''Front Page Blues'' was just that, a blues about the gloom brought to the singer when he sees a photo of his girl marrying someone else. Freddy Young takes another expansive alto sax solo and the band of Excello musicians is on fine form. The Marigolds play a larger part on this side, with specific parts for the group and the bass voice.

PORK AND BEAMS
Composer: - Johnny Bragg
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Excellorec Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Master (2:52)
Recorded: - Unknown Date June/July 1955
Released: - July 1955
First appearance: - Excello Records (S) 45rpm Excello 2060-A mono
PORK AND BEANS / FRONT PAGE BLUES
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-18 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

FRONT PAGE BLUES
Composer: - Robert Riley-Leon Luallen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Excellorec Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Master (2:39)
Recorded: - Unknown Date June/July 1955
Released: - July 1955
First appearance: - Excello Records (S) 45rpm Excello 2060-B mono
FRONT PAGE BLUES / PORK AND BEANS
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-17 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

TWO STRANGERS
Composer: - Robert Riley
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Excellorec Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Master (2:37)
Recorded: - Unknown Date June/July 1955
Released: - July 1955
First appearance: - Excello Records (S) 45rpm Excello 2061-A mono
TWO STRANGERS / LOVE YOU, LOVE YOU, LOVE YOU
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-19 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

LOVE YOU, LOVE YOU, LOVE YOU
Composer: - Johnny Bragg
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Excellorec Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Master (2:53)
Recorded: - Unknown Date June/July 1955
Released: - July 1955
First appearance: - Excello Records (S) 45rpm Excello 2061-B mono
LOVE YOU, LOVE YOU, LOVE YOU / TWO STRANGERS
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-20 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Bragg - Lead Tenor Vocal
John Drue - Tenor Vocal
Harold Hebb - Tenor Vocal
Alfred Brooks - Tenor Vocal
Willy Wilson - Bass Vocal
Freddy Young - Saxophone
Skippy Brooks - Piano
Kid King - Drums
Clifford McCray - Bass
Unknown - Guitar

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE FEATHERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1955

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SUNDAY JUNE 24, 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS

4 uknown titles were recorded at this session
Session details unknown

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Feathers - Vocal & Guitar
Quinton Claunch - Guitar
Bill Cantrell - Fiddle
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Bill Diehl - Bass

On this date, there was a follow-up session for Charlie feathers, but unfortunately, his prolificacy coincided with near bankruptcy at Sun Records Sam Phillips completely recorded over the session tapes. All the unissued titles from this session have been lost.

For Biography of Charlie Feathers see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Feathers' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Both of these girls (above) were worked at the telephone company and were in of Charlie Feathers fan club. The name of the girl on the left is not identified but the one on the right of the photo is Shirley Richardson, she was the president of the fan club and this was at her house where several of these girls all lived and shared paying the rent. Charlie Feathers, Jerry Huffman and Jody Chastain would sometimes practice there songs and music there.

1979 CHARLIE FEATHERS SPEAKS
In Charlie's Words 1

I was seventeen years old when I first came to Sun Records. Sam Phillips was just recording black artists. He was selling ten or fifteen thousand of some of the records. He didn't have no idea then about findin' a white man who could sing like a black man. I met Elvis way before he came to Sun. He was livin' on Alabama Street. A lot a poor people was livin' on Alabama at that time.

Elvis and I had this sorta fan club who were telephone operators. In the picture where I'm holding the guitar, Elvis was sitting right beyond the girl dancing on my left. It's funny there ain't no pictures of him there because he spent a lot of time there. But I bet you sure could find out from those telephone operators that he was there.

Elvis dyed his hair black and kept it black. He did it 'cause Tony Curtis' hair's black, and Tony Curtis was Elvis' idol. I seen him in a movie last night; had his hair just like Tony Curtis. You know the RCA Elvis wasn't the Elvis I knew. They didn't know what they got when they got 'im. They didn't believe he was being recorded with just three pieces, so they send Webb Pierce down to see him, and he blew 'em right off the stage with them three pieces. They had to sign him.

Johnny Cash is from Diaz, Arkansas. Carl Perkins come from Jackson, Tennessee. Johnny Burnette might've originally been from Arkansas or Mississippi, but he had lots a kin folks in Memphis. Of course Elvis come from Tupelo, about 40 miles down the road in Mississippi where I'm from. Warren Smith's from Greenwood, Mississippi. Sonny Burgess is from Newport, Arkansas, Conway Twitty is from Helena, Arkansas which is practically right across the bridge. As the label (Sun) got more popular, one or two came from Louisiana. Jerry Lee come from Louisiana.

Buddy Holly came to Memphis and never could get himself recorded. He used to come out to the club where I was singing, and I used to sing a song I got on this album called "Done gone." Buddy Holly heard me singing it that way, and he went back to New Mexico and cut a thing called "Peggy Sue." Oh! it's mighty fine - it's rockabilly. Elvis was the King of Rockabilly, but now, well Chuck Berry was the King of Rock and Roll. Fats Domino was pop, he wasn't really rock, 'cause anytime you cut a pianist up in there you're doin' pop. Now Little Richard - now I'm gonna tell ya - him, with that high singing - hitting stuff up there is kin to opera. Little Richard came from the opera!

Rockabilly is the only thing that ever really came outta Memphis. These guys here just happened 'cause it was great. What they were doing was so different that it was the turn of the century in music. The first rockabilly that was ever recorded was in 1949. It was called "Tongue-Tied Jill." There was a store on Chelsea Street that had a recorder in the back room. I cut the song there as a demo. Later, something like 1955, the guy asked me if I minded if he released it on his label which was called Meteor. I said alright, and the bootleggers have had it ever since.

In 1956 I cut eight songs for king Records in Cincinnati. I recorded four of those at their studio in Cincinnati. ("Bottle to the Baby." "One Hand Loose," "I Can't Hardly Stand it," and "Everybody's Loving My Baby.") I cut the other four songs for King at the RCA Victor studio in Nashville. Since Elvis was using the Jordanaires as a back-up group, I used a group that had put out a big seller on Sun called "Just Walkin' in The Rain. They were called the Prisonaires, and they were one of the finest groups to work with I have ever known. The tunes we recorded were; "When You Decide," "Nobody's Woman," "Too Much Alike," and "When You Comin' Around?"

The bootleg records are the things I did on Sun and King. I still got contracts, but the man at King is dead, and I don't know who owns it. You call and catch up with 'em and ask'em something about it, and they always tell you it's another label or something like that. I don't draw anything from 'em. I don't know how many there are. I have no idea. The Sun Museum's a fake. I mean the studio was there, but the recording equipment isn't what Elvis cut on. Sam didn't think the stuff was no good so he gave it to some friends, guys who had played on a lotta tunes for him, and he got new stuff. Now maybe some of the stuff, but not Elvis or myself, 'cause we left there and never did come back.

They got all kind of pictures on the wall - even Hank Williams and he never did record there. My picture isn't on the wall. Though I never did have a big record outta there. I did write "I Forgot To Remember To Forget" which was Elvis' first million seller. Now, no one would admit that it was a million seller in those days cause RCA wanted to have the first million seller on him. So Sam went along. He didn't mind not having to pay people as much. So "Heartbreak Hotel" is supposed to be Elvis' first million seller. "I Forgot To Remember To Forget" was at the top of the charts for 43 weeks! You mean to tell me that ain't a million seller?

You know, in the later years I didn't keep up with Elvis and them people. I think there's a lot of people that did not know Elvis, but they know him now! There's some boogie-woogie people out there making up a lotta stuff. You have to be a fan to buy something, but you do not have to be a fan to sell it. Now they got people over in front of Elvis' house trying to tell you they got a leaf that fell off a tree in his yard and he kissed it!

Part of the idea of all this is not to get bootlegged. The people that buy 'em, they are good people, but it's a rip-off the way the people is doing the selling. I've had people mail me a dollar bill and said, "I know the record was a bootleg record, but I wanna see you get your part Charlie."

In Charlie's Words 2

I was fiddlin' with a guitar when I was nine years old. I seen Bill Monroe play once, and I really liked what I heard, but I couldn't play that type of music, cause I wasn't around that type a music. I was around the colored guys workin' on a farm. Weekends they'd play the cottonpatch blues. The churches had an influence on my music. I used to go to colored people's, or black people's - man we called 'em colored people. . . . I'm colored, I'm white.

They's black, we' colored - The churches'd have picnics on the weekends, and doin' all kinds a things; shootin' dice and one thing an' another and getting to rappin' on guitars....the cottonpatch blues. I loved what I heard.

The cottonpatch blues never did make it, nobody knows what it is. They might think its somebody jammin' on a guitar . But if you learn it....OH! it's got a message and you get ....OH MAN!

It's a Damned Disease! You don't wanna get into it, it hurts you. You can't go no further in music, the other damned music jus' .... this music'll kill you. When the music hits you man, it'll do somethin' to your mind, you won't wanna hear nothing else.

Obie Patterson wouldn't even pick a guitar now. He asked God to take it away from 'im, cause he said he'd play a tune so hard he knew it was gonna wreck a person's mind when they heard it. He hasn't picked up a guitar since. Now I've played all over the world man, and the best guitar player in the world is an old black man down in Mississippi called Junior Kimball. They tried to record him here in Memphis over at Stax, but they wasn't able. The session men said it was them! They couldn't keep up with him! Do you play guitar? I guarantee you it came from Junior Kimball. Hey you got a have a teacher somewhere.

Playin' music is usin' whatever you can remember in your mind. When I'm playing I remember these old guys from where I grew up. The real basic things came from them. Some times the old black man used to come up to visit, and I'd let some of it rub off on bubba too. Man I can show my kids what to do and they understand it. They help me. I've tried to pick up other guys, and they might be better pickers, but these kids got what I can't get nowhere else....the feeling.

Now, I liked bluegrass, ya know Bill Monroe, and Hank Williams, but bein' raised up on the farm like I was, I couldn't pick bluegrass, but I added what I could, and started doing these licks, and it was my type a music. Rockabilly is got a blues about it. It's got some black in it, you can rear back an' holler WELL. It's like someone sittin' around talkin' to theirselves their minds so occupied.

I always thought that when you're recording something, you wanted to get exactly what the man is doing out there....breathing, slapping his leg, patting his feet, clapping his hands, and that you sometimes got to mic a guy in more than one place. That is true sound. That is the sound of this man. It seems awful to me you can't record someone sweatin'....if you don't get the sounds of a man's body, hell! That's why Elvis was the best rockabilly singer, because he was the first one that ever done that.

Elvis wasn't satisfied with "Heartbreak Hotel." He hated it. I mean hey man how do you change a singer? Most studios cut in a certain way, an' so some people get cut off that way. Knowing how to set the mics is one thing, but sometimes a singer might be doin' something he is not even aware of, and its with the rhythm, and it causes some action back in the control room and make some people wonder how in hell one man can be makin' that much sound. "Don't Be Cruel," "Hound Dog," and "One Night With You" are the only things Elvis done on RCA that I liked. The rest of 'em you can have 'em. Those was natural....something we would have done at Sun.

I'm recording now, after all these years, cause there is some things that I feel, and I've always felt 'em so that they are down in a deep part a me man, and if you get the chance to do them kind of things you will do them. I think one track recording had more sound to offer than they have today with all these separate tracks. You had to play, and just be yourself. You couldn't just reach back later and pull something out or turn something down. You had to feel and know it so well that you got to capture it while it's there. You won't get the perfection you'd get if you were reading music, but they don't get the feeling, and that's what rockabilly is all about....feeling. MUSIC.... I play it. If I'm not recordin' I play it. If I'm not playin' out nowhere I play it. I've enjoyed myself more sittin' in my livin' room at home playing, than I have any day.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE FEATHERS AND STAN KESLER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1955

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: POSSIBLY JUNE OR JULY 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Stan Kesler first joined the Snearly Ranch Boys as a steel guitarist but the band quickly realised that he could play bass and guitar too and also write songs. He penned several impressive songs at Sun, recorded by Smokey Joe, Warren Smith, Jerry Lee Lewis and others. But one of his first was the best and most lucrative, ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'', recorded in the summer of 1955 by Elvis Presley. Maybe the clincher for those inclined to give Charlie Feathers the nod is one inescapable fact: it was "I Forgot To Remember To Forget" (Sun 223), a song Charlie Feathers fashioned with Stan Kesler, which really put Presley on the map when it topped the country chart in September 1955 and stayed in the listing for a phenomenal forty weeks.

Taking the theme of a clever contradiction as a formula Kesler could use, he also came up with the notion of ''We're Getting Closer To Being Apart''. Perhaps this was also destined to go to Elvis, but first Stan needed a demo of the song. He had a go at singing it himself but quickly decided that he would have a better tape if he gave part of the song to Charlie Feathers if Charlie would sing it. Charlie's version may be on this session. What we hear here is Stan's original demo.

With just his own rhythm guitar for company he steps hesitantly into his title lyric and proceeds to sing just one verse, twice. There is something of the Feathers style on lines like ''closer to be-hing apart'' and ''if there's someone else''. Perhaps it was destined for Charlie and not Elvis after all?. Either way, it wasn't released on Sun by anybody.

> I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET** <
Composer: - Charlie Feathers-Stanley Kesler
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:23)
Recorded: - June or July 1955 / Songwriters Demo
Released: - 2005
First appearance: - 2005 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SNAP 230-17 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - GONE, GONE, GONE
Reissued: - 2008 Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm CED 332-14 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THE WILD SIDE OF LIFE

> WE'RE GETTING CLOSER TO BEING APART* <
Composer: - Charlie Feathers-Stan Kesler
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (1:20)
Recorded: - June or July 1955 / Songwriters Demo
Released: - February 15, 2013
Reissued: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-2/31 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

It seems as though the Sun vaults never ceased yielding up treasures. This sat for over thirty years on a quarter track tape marked Stan Kesler that featured, among other things, Stan's own attempts at singing. Stan realised that if he was to stand a chance of selling his material, he needed to have a good demo, so he enlisted the help of Charlie Feathers and gave him 50% of both this song and ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' in exchange for singing the demo. Feathers certainly earned his cut on this song. It is a beautiful hillbilly lament, despite the contrived title, and Feathers handless it to perfection. His phrasing on ''please tell me...'' during the chorus is wonderfully bizarre. The chorus is followed by Stan Kesler's hesitant attempts at playing the fiddle. Little gems such as this help to compensate to a small degree for the many Feathers cuts that were recorded-over during 1954 and 1955. Interestingly, Feathers remembered the song and recorded it for Vetco twenty years later. As similar as it was to ''I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone'' it's entirely possible that this was designed for Elvis Presley's ears.

> WE'RE GETTING CLOSER TO BEING APART** <
Composer: - Charlie Feathers-Stan Kesler
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:42)
Recorded: - June or July 1955 / Songwriters Demo
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-5/5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950-1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013, Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-3/16 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Feathers - Vocal** and Guitar**
Stanley Kesler - Vocal*, Guitar* & Fiddle**
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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