CONTAINS
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1956 SESSIONS (8)
August 1 to August 31, 1956

Studio Session for Slim Rhodes, August 14, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Dean Beard, August 26, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Warren Smith, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Warren Smith, August 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, August/September 1956 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Playlists of the Artists can be found on 706 Union Avenue Sessions of > YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SUMMER 1956

In the summer of 1956, Pee Wee Maddux had taken future Sun artist Ernie Chaffin into his own small studio in Long Beach, just outside of Gulfport and recorded several acoustic guitar demos including "Lonesome For My Baby". The tape was sent to Sun in August 1956, where it made its way to producer Jack Clement, sufficiently impressing him to get Chaffin and company their all-important first session.

Plans were set in motion and when Ernie Chaffin, along with steel player Ernie Harvey and bassist Leo Ladner, arrived in December 1956 in Memphis to record, the magic began almost immediately.

Between 1954 and 1956 Roy Hall appeared on a major radio and TV show from Missouri. ''I was on the Ozark Jubilee show with Red Foley. I played accordion as well as piano; used the accordion on some of that sacred stuff he used to sing''. ''Peace In The Valley'' and such''. In 1956, while Roy was still running his night club, he took on the job of road manager and bandleader for one of the stars of country music, Webb Pierce. He had known Pierce on and off for a couple of years, saying, ''I met Webb Pierce for the first time in Detroit. I had a little band up there, playing in a club, and Pierce came through town. He had just recorded a big song, an old country Cajun song called, ''Wondering''. We got on well and we continued to get together when O moved back to Nashville. And he needed someone to travel with him and run a band, so I went to work with him for quite a while there in the 1950s. I spent two years on the road as a staff pianist and roadman''.

During the mid-1950s, Roy Hall toured with Webb Pierce and backed up many of the greats of country music, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Marty Robbins, and Patsy Cline included. It seems that Hall gave this up as a reguler job around 1958, but he continued to play shows with Pierce and others for many years into the 1960s. The connection extended beyond records and live shows, too. Hall appeared in the western movie, ''Buffalo Gun'', alongside Webb Pierce, Carl Smith and Marty Robbins, and as late as 1966 in ''Music City USA'' with a similar cast of country music stars.

AUGUST 1956

At this time Sonny Burgess and the Pacers were managed by Gerald Grojean, the assistant manager of a local radio station, KNBY. On one of their early trips to Memphis, the Pacers went to see Bob Neal, who held the promise of broader horizons and promised to get them on tour with Elvis Presley. "We come back home", remembered Sonny Burgess, "and about a year later we hadn't heard nothing so we went back and saw him again. He said that Gerry Grojean had got on the phone crying, saying 'You can't take them away from me'.

Bob said he didn't need all that crap and told Gerry he could keep us". Grojean, who knew little more about the business than the Pacers themselves had no idea how to expose the group outside Newport during a critical stage in their career.

Bob Neal took over the Pacers' bookings. Now outsted from Presley's camp, Neal placed the Pacers on his treks through the hinterlands, usually in support of Johnny Cash and Roy Orbison.

Burgess and Orbison's amp on the road; it was one of the few built by Ray Butts in Cairo, Illinois with a tape loop giving built-in slapback. Scotty Moore had bought one of the first (and paid $500 for it); Roy Orbison and Carl Perkins went to get one each, paying $600 apiece. "It was the best-sounding amp I ever heard", assert Sonny. "I've used digital equipment that can't get anything close to that sound".

The Pacers developed a frantic stage act, forming a pyramid on top of the bass player and jumping into the audience. "We were young, crazy and wild. Hot and cold running women", recalled Jack Nance. "I remember one time we drunk more than we should have and woke up in our car in a field. A tractor had plowed all around us and the farmer charged us $10.00 to pull us out. Sonny never drank as much but he was a good athlete - an exceptional baseball player - so there was a lot of energy there that he used onstage".

AUGUST 1956

One of Warren Smith's tasks on the early Stars Inc. tours was to lead Roy Orbison, who was almost sightless without his glasses, to the microphone much as Blind Lemon Jefferson had been led on stage. In addition to the Stars Inc. tours, Smith also played a monthly spot on the Big D Jamboree in Dallas and made regular guest appearances on the Louisiana Hayride. He and his band were often working seven days a week with matinee and evening shows on weekends. ''Every now and again, Warren would slip in a Ray Price number, recalled Jimmie Lott, ''but he thought that rock and roll was where the money was. He wanted to make a name for himself. But when Warren sang a Ray Price song, Ray could have learned from him. He made my spine tingle when he got into that style''.

AUGUST 1956

The Republican National Convention and Democratic National Convention, where each party nominated their respective candidates, were held during August of 1956. The Republicans chose incumbent President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Vice President Richard M. Nixon to run in the upcoming 1956 Presidential election. The Democrats chose the former governor of Illinois, Adlai Stevenson, for President and Estes Kefauver, a U.S. Senator from Tennessee, for Vice President. The Republican National Convention was held in San Francisco, California, while the Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago, Illinois. Eisenhower would be re-elected in November.

AUGUST 3, 1956 FRIDAY

The singles, Sun 246 ''Rockin' With My Baby'' b/w ''It's Me Baby'' by Malcolm Yelvington; Sun 248 ''Jukebox Help Me Find My Baby" b/w ''Fiddle Bop'' by the Rhythm Rockers; Sun 249, Carl Perkins ''I'm Sorry, I'm Not Sorry'' b/w ''Dixie Fried'' and Sun 255 "Ten Cats Down" b/w ''Finder Keepers'' by the Miller Sisters; Sun 247, Sonny Burgess ''Red Headed Woman'' b/w ''We Wanna Boogie'' all issued. When Sonny Burgess single came out, Billboard deemed it a ''jumping, pounding boogie... shouted and orked with plenty of spirit that should get plenty of Southern action, rhythm and blues-wise'', and while it never charted, Sonny was soon out on the road with an all-star Stars Inc. package. There his true genius manifested itself, as he and his band the Pacers perfected an act that, as Sam Phillips suggested, reflected the very essence of rock and roll.

Ray Price recorded the Don Gibson-penned ''Wasted Words'' in a midnight session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

AUGUST 4, 1956 SATURDAY

Jimmy C. Newman joins the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee, the same night that George Jones debuts on the show.

AUGUST 6, 1956 MONDAY

Columbia released Marty Robbins' ''Singing The Blues'' and its Top 10 B-side ''I Can't Quit (I've Gone Too Far)''.

Production begins on "Rock, Rock, Rock" a rock and roll movie starring Alan Freed, Bill Haley and His Comets. Also appearing are Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers, Chuck Berry, the Flamingos and LaVern Baker.

AUGUST 7, 1956 TUESDAY

''The Gene Autry Show'' makes its final prime-time appearance on CBS-TV, with ''Back In The Saddle Again'' serving as the theme song.

AUGUST 8, 1956 WEDNESDAY

As he turns 30, Webb Pierce agrees to return to the Grand Ole Opry, which he left the previous year.

Faron and Hilda Young close on a house at 4001 Brush Hill Road in Nashville.

AUGUST 10, 1956 FRIDAY

After seeing his matinee show in Jacksonville, Florida, judge Marion Gooding tells Elvis Presley if he repeats the afternoon's moves in his two evening performances, he'll be arrested for indecency. Presley does both shows wiggling only his pinky.

AUGUST 11, 1956 SATURDAY

Painter Jackson Pollock dies in an alcohol-related accident in Springs, New York. Noted for his abstract work, he's recognized nearly 60 years later in the Erik Church country hit ''Mr. Misunderstood''.

Johnny Cash played his third appearance at the Big D. Jamboree for the ''Saturday Night Country Style'' broadcast opening with early Sun Records hit, ''So Doggone Lonesome''. The performance finds Cash, guitarist Luther Perkins and bassist Marshall Grant in rare form, riding high on the success of hit, ''I Walk The Line'', though the Big D. audience seems as interested in hearing him and the Tennessee two plow through the rocking ''Get Rhythm''.

Though the Big D. Jamboree was never as prominent as either the Grand Ole Opry or the Louisiana Hayride shows, it was important in Texas and served as a springboard to fame for many as 5,000 attending patrons and countless radio listeners within KRLD's 50,000-watt broadcast range, which could reach listeners in forty states. During its peak, the show aired four hours each Saturday night and featured between twenty and fifty performers a week.
''Big D. Jamboree'' liner notes by Kevin Coffey

AUGUST 12, 1956 SUNDAY

The Platters guest on "The Ed Sullivan Show"

Pee Wee Maddux mailed Jack Clement, producer at Sun Records, a demo tape of Ernie Chaffin's work including "No Fool Like An Old Fool" and "My Heart Tells Me".

Webb Pierce recorded ''Teenage Boogie'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville. He also makes his first pass at ''Cryin' Over You'', though he discards it in favor of a version he recorded in November.

Danny Shirley is born in Chattanooga, Tennessee. He fronts Confederate Rialroad, whose mix of country and Southern rock gives them a biker image and a handful of 1990s hits, including ''Trashy Women'', ''Daddy Never Was The Cadillac Kind'' and ''Queen Of Memphis''.

AUGUST 14, 1956 TUESDAY

Hound dogs need friends, too: Washington, D.C., disc jockey Bob Rickman founds the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Elvis Presley.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SLIM RHODES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY AUGUST 14, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

By the summer of 1956, Elvis Presley's domination of the American charts was casting a mesmeric sway over the way in which pop recordings were being crafted. With this issue in mind, the Slim Rhodes band set out to freshen up its rube-like profile by introducing a husky new vocalist named Sandy Brooks. Whilst the exercise didn't quite generate a hepcat image, it nevertheless heralded the crux of the band's Sun inventory. The angst wrought from this torturous ballad "Take And Give" is proof itself.

The relationship between country band leader Slim Rhodes and Sam Phillips goes back to the dawn of The Memphis Recording Service in 1950. Rhodes was nothing if not a survivor. Working local gigs and a popular Memphis television show, Rhodes had a close-up view of musical trends. In 1956 it was clear to everyone (especially in Memphis) that the look and sound of Elvis Presley were serious business. There was no one in his regular aggregation who could fill the bill, so Rhodes brought in Roy Hesselbein from Neighboring Mississippi. Hesselbein had the right look and sound, but the wrong name. And so Roy became Sandy Brooks.

> TAKE AND GIVE <
Composer: - Ronny Hesselbein-E.C. Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 216 - Master (2:20)
Recorded: - August 14, 1956
Released: - November 21, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 256-A mono
TAKE AND GIVE / DO WHAT I DO
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3/5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Slim Rhodes was really a misnomer on the Sun label. Sandy Brooks, aka Ronnie Hesselbein, is the artist of note. Slim was nothing if not a survivor. Here, his aggregation makes a valiant effort to come to terms with country music's crossover into pop ballads and rockabilly. Although Brooks offers credible emotional and breathy warbling on this both sides of the record, the band's capacity for teen music is streched to the breaking point. The ballad side, "Take And Give", reveals steel player John Hughey, who later joined forces with Conway Twitty, to be an engaging and inventive musician. Drummer Johnny Bernero adds a wonderful, if underrecorded shuffle rhythm to the proceedings, and contributes a memorable rimshot just before the first steel solo. Few Sun records employed as many minor chords as "Take And Give".

The record itself has a commanding presence from its driving intro to the final major 7th chord. It features a surprisingly pounding rhythm, virtually none of which is due to the drumming! What the drummer does contribute is a memorable but almost throwaway rimshot on the snare right before the first steel solo. The steel playing throughout is delightful, with swelling chords complementing Brooks' vocal. The song features an almost completely expendable lyric, but a full assortment of 6-minor chords to give it that haunting quality that might have carried it over into popular success.

For some reason, Billboard was quite unimpressed with both sides, calling the material "ordinary" and "quite thin". These sides made the Memphis charts with little effort, but evaporated into obscurity outside the limits of Rhodes TV show. These days, Hesselbein sell tires in Jackson, Mississippi.

> TAKE AND GIVE <
Composer: - Ronny Hesselbein-E.C. Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued (2:16)
Recorded: - August 14, 1956
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Bopcat Records (LP) 33rpm Bopcat 400-5 mono
GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS
Reissued: - August 2000 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-19 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

''Do What I Do'' is out-and-out rockabilly. Sandy Brooks contributes another strong vocal and Brad Suggs turns to the Carl Perkins guitar manual for his solo. Slim was obviously intent upon being a survivor and he was probably featuring rockabilly acts ob his new WMC-TV show. This is unrecognisable as a Slim Rhodes record of yore but, taken on its own terms, is a fine record for its time and season. It was the last time the names Slim Rhodes or Sandy Brooks appeared on a Sun record. The last anybody checked, Ronnie Hesselbein had gotten into the family business selling tires in Mississippi, a concern that has since expanded to include franchises in Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana. There turned out to be a lot more money in selling tires than singing rockabilly.

> DO WHAT I DO <
Composer: - Slim Rhodes-Ronny Hesselbein
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 217 - Master (2:29)
Recorded: - August 14, 1956
Released: - November 21, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 256-B mono
DO WHAT I DO / TAKE AND GIVE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3/6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

The alternate take of ''Do What I Do'' reveals that Brooks' song began life in a style far more country than the released version. The slower, more deliberate tempo and countryish finger picking during the instrumental solo offer a new glimpse at a song most of us have only heard in its breakneck rock and roll arrangement. Brooks offers one vocal difference here during the last release, singing the line "When you know" an octave above his take on the single. In many ways, this version works better than the original single, although it was plainly passed over in the interest of surviving in the rock and roll marketplace in 1956.

> DO WHAT I DO <
Composer: - Slim Rhodes-Ronny Hesselbein
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued (2:39)
Recorded: - August 14, 1956
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Bopcat Records (LP) 33rpm Bopcat 400-5 mono
GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS
Reissued: - August 2000 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-7 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ethmer Cletus ''Slim'' Rhodes - Guitar
Sandy Brooks - Vocal
Luther Bradley ''Pee Wee'' Brad Suggs - Guitar
John Hughey - Steel Guitar
Gilbert Ray ''Speck'' Rhodes - Bass
Johnny Bernero – Drums

 For Biography of The Slim Rhodes Band see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Slim Rhodes Band's Gilt-Edge/Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

AUGUST 15, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Cashing royalty check of Jack Earls for ''Slow Down''/''A Fool For Lovin' You''.

After cashing his royalty check, Earls bought a new Indian Chief motorcycle. "I got it out there on Poplar Avenue ... They brought it out and showed me how to ride it. I'd ride that thing for a little while, and then the motor would quit''.

''Man, I rode that thing for hours, until/got to where t could ride it pretty good. My wife was working at a potato chips company, and I picked her up and brought her home. Then I wound up buying a Harley from the same place where Elvis bought his''.

AUGUST 15, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Warren Smith went to Sun Records to pick up his first royalty statement of his "Rock And Roll Ruby". The single had sold 68,277 copies up to June 30 and was still going strong. Smith was owed over $1600 in royalties. Not even Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash or Carl Perkins had done as well with their first record. Warren Smith though his place in the pantheon of rock and roll greats was assured.

There was either an implicit or explicit agreement that Warren Smith would share royalties and billing with the Snearly Ranch Boys and that they would become his band. Smith reneged upon the deal shortly after "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby" broke. Stan Kesler recalled: "When Warren arrived in Memphis we didn't really need him because we had singers and pickers but Clyde gave him a little work and put him up in a boarding house, paid his rent and food for about six months. Then, after "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby" hit, Warren just informed us that he was putting his own band together. With hindsight, I can see that the co-op deal we anticipated between Warren and us would never have worked but there was a lot of bad feeling about it at the time".

Sonny James recorded ''The Cat Came Back''.

AUGUST 16, 1956 THURSDAY

The day he turns 17, singer Billy Joe Shaver enlists in the Navy.

AUGUST 18, 1956 SATURDAY

Charlie Feathers recorded ''One Hand Loose'' with steel player Jody Chastain and guitarist Jerry Huffman at the King Recording Studio in Cincinnati. It ranks among country 500 greatest singles in a Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By Number''.

Merle Travis' wife, Bettie Travis, is taken to North Hollywood Receiving Hospital with a overdose of tranquilizers.

AUGUST 21, 1956 TUESDAY

Geraldine Price, referring to herself as a common-law wife, files for divorce from Ray Price, saving he has told her he's ''tired of being married'' and that he has started seeing another woman.

AUGUST 22, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Elvis Presley begins filming his first movie, "The Reno Brothers'' for 20th Century Fox in Los Angeles. By the time of its release, it's re-titled ''Love Me Tender''.

Faron Young recorded ''I'll Be Satisfied With Love'' and ''I'm Gonna Live Some Before I Die'' at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

AUGUST 23, 1956 THURSDAY

A dozen years after he appeared on the Billboard country charts, Nat ''King'' Cole addresses the Republican National Convention at the Cow Palace in San Francisco.

AUGUST 24, 1956 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley recorded ''Love Me Tender'' at the 20th Century Fox Studios in Hollywood.

AUGUST 25, 1956 SATURDAY

George Jones joins the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee, for the first time.

Hank Locklin guests on the ABC-TV music series ''Ozark Jubilee'', hosted by Red Foley and Porter Wagoner.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

One of the two Sun sessions, Dean Beard told Wayne Russell that he recorded with Jimmy Seals on saxophone, Johnny Bernero, and Johnny Black. Asked why he didn't see a release, Beard said that he ran around town with Sam Phillips' girlfriend, Sally Wilbourn, thereby ensuring that his sessions would remain in the can. The truth might have been more prosaic: the recordings weren't that good. The songs were undistinguished and if it's Seals saxophone he sounds like an angry goose.

Sam Phillips had many options at the end of 1956, and Dean Beard simply wasn't the best one. One of the Sun recordings ''Rakin' And Scrapin''', was cowritten with Ray Doggett, who later wrote one of Kenny Rogers' earliest hits and became a rockabilly cult hero.

STUDIO SESSION FOR DEAN BEARD
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SUNDAY AUGUST 26, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

> LONG TIME GONE <
Composer: - Dean Beard
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued (2:50)
Recorded: - August 26, 1956
Released: - 1982
First appearance: Sun England (LP) 33rpm CFM 10 512-1 mono
THE SWINGIN' BLAST
Reissued: - 1999 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8352-26 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 6

> RAKIN' AND SCRAPIN' < 
Composer: - Dean Beard-Slim Willet-Ray Dogget as Elmer Ray in the credits.
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (1:56)
Recorded: - August 26, 1956
Released: - 1982
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm CFM 10 512-2 mono
THE SWINGIN' BLAST
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-31 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

> RAKIN' AND SCRAPIN' <
Composer: - Dean Beard-Slim Willet-Ray Dogget
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:16)
Recorded: - August 26, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1021-4 mono
ROCK POP BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1996 Encore Japan (CD) 500/200rom ECD 193587-16 mono
DEAN BEARD - ROCK AROUND THE TOWN

> WHEN YOU'RE GONE <
Composer: - Dean Beard
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:39)
Recorded: - August 26, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1021-6 mono
ROCK BOP BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1996 Encore Records (CD) 500/200rpm ECD 193587-15 mono
DEAN BEARD - ROCK AROUND THE TOWN

UNFAITHFUL HEART
Composer: - Dean Beard
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - August 26, 1956

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Dean Beard - Vocal and Guitar
James Steward - Guitar
Jimmy Seals - Saxophone
Johnny Black - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums

 For Biography of Dean Beard see: > The Sun Biographies <
Dean Beard's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WARREN SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Stan Kesler recalls(?) that Warren Smith was working on "Old Lonesome Feeling" shortly before he left Sun Records, which is born out by the fact that he recorded it shortly after arriving at Liberty Records. The presence of the electric bass would also appear to date the session to 1957 or later.

> OLD LONESOME FEELING <
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Incomplete Take - Not Originally Issued (0:55)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15514-17 mono
WARREN SMITH - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959
Reissued: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rom Charly 81119 mono
WARREN SMITH - ROCKABILLY LEGEND

Warren Smith or someone in his camp probably discovered ''Tell Me Who'' on the flip-side of Big Maybelle's 1955 hit ''Mean To Me''. His treatment is a very tasty excursion into early rockabilly that veers back into the country by virtue of some deftly executed steel guitar work. The empathetic drumming seems to suggest that Johnny Bernero sat in on this session, which would also tend to date it from 1956. Smith dispenses with Maybelle's growls and drum rolls and delivers a very straight reading of the song. Incidentally, the composer Billy Myles, later scored a huge with ''The Joker''.

> TELL ME WHO <
Composer: - Billy Miles
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:06)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - May 1975
First appearance: - Hallmark Records (LP) 33rpm SHM 864-A5 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - KINGS OF COUNTRY VOLUME 2
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-7/6 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4/22 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

The writer and one-time rockabilly Ray Scott submitted a demo tape to Sun and Sam Phillips wrote for ''Tonight Will Be The Last Night'' ''Ray Scott - good song'' on the tape box. When it came time for the next Warren Smith session, Phillips played the tape of this song, which he had already identified as the best of the crop. Smith and the band worked up a very decent arrangement with twin lead guitarist that must have been a serious contender for release in 1956 or 1957. The real surprise is that Phillips did not overdub tracks like this and issue them when Smith finally gained a measure of success in the country market in the early 1960s.

> TONIGHT WILL BE THE LAST NIGHT <
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (1:59)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30132-12 mono
WARREN SMITH - THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-7/5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4/21 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown group, probably including Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar and Electric Guitar

 For Biography of Warren Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Warren Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1956

Warren Smith lost no time in recruting his own band, which included guitarist Al Hopson (a friend since their school days in Mississippi), bassist Marcus Van Story (whom he had met while he was still working with the Snearly Ranch Boys), and drummer Jimmie Lott, who had played on Elvis Presley's first session with drums at the tail end of 1954.

(For a while they used Johnny Bernero on drums, but Bernero had been unwilling to travel with Elvis Presley and was certainly unwilling to jeopardise his day job at Memphis Light, Gas & Water to tour with Smith).

After Bob Neal formed Stars Incorporated in May 1956, Smith saw that he would be working tours and began to cast around for a regular drummer. Sam Phillips suggested Jimmie Lott whom he had used on Elvis Presley's sessions).

"I had a knock on the door one night", recalled Jimmie Lott, "and three dubious looking guys were there. They identified themselves as Warren Smith, Marcus Van Story and Al Hopson. They said, 'We're looking for a drummer and Sam Phillips said you might be interested'. I said I might and we went over to Warren's attorney's house in east Memphis. We had an audition in the den and Warren hired me".

"One of the first gigs we played was at the Club Zanzibar in Hayti, Missouri. The place was full of rednecks and I was maybe seventeen years old, hanging onto Warren's coat-tail. I said, 'Are we gonna be alright tonight?'. Warren said, 'Don't worry 'bout it, drummer'. He was raised in Greenwood, Mississippi and had a real good rapport with these people. He was one of them".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Sun was truly in its golden era. Most releases in the 250 series represent second or third releases by artists whose rockabilly promise had been established within the last six months.

The influential trade paper Billboard had caught on and was beginning to refer to the "Sun Sound" in its reviews. Eyes were turning to Memphis as it became obvious that Elvis Presley was not a unique phenomenon.

Something was stirring at 706 Union Avenue. Lineups of guitar strumming truckdrivers and farmers were forming at the intersection of Union and Marshall. Young men, looked longingly at Sun records, eager to trade the sentiskilled drudgery of their lives for a moment in the spotlight.

While Warren Smith was assembling his new band, he returned to the studio to record a follow-up to "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby". Once again, he coupled a hillbilly song with a rock and roll novelty.

STUDIO SESSION FOR WARREN SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE AUGUST 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

"After "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby" about 6 months later Sam called me for another session", recalled Warren Smith. "I met Charles Underwood who was also in Memphis. Well he had a song he wrote called "Ubangi Stomp", and Sam said give it a listen. I did, and seemed like the more I heard it the more I liked it. We cut it and it became a fair hit too, I guess you could call it a hit".

Once again, Sam Phillips hedged his bets by coupling a rockabilly anthem with a hillbilly tune. Reportedly originating in Scotland circa 1600, ''The Gypsy Laddie'' began: ''The gypsies they came to my lord's castle/And O but they sang so bonnie/They sang sae sweet and soe complete/That down came our fair ladie''. And of course off went the lady. The first to chronicle the song's tortuous history was Francis James Child in his nineteenth century tome ''English And Scottish Popular Ballads''. After crossing the ocean with the early settlers, it changed in the hollows of Appalachia. Bits of another song called ''Seventeen Come Sunday'' were added as the woman lost her nobility along with her virginity. The first recording was by a folklorist, Professor I.G. Greer and his wife, in 1929. Another folklorist, John Jacob Niles, recorded ''The Gypsy Laddie'' for RCA in 1939. Cliff Carlise cit it that year, although he said he learned it from T. Texas Tyler, and Tyler copyrighted it in August 1939, one month after Carlise's recording. The Carter Family recorded it in 1940. Tyler's adaptation became the first post-War recording, and probably led to Warren Smith's recording. While unaware of the song's origins, Smith was undoubtedly aware that it was far from original. In fact, his lyrics were considerably less salty than the Carter Family's. In a 1956 interview in the Memphis Press Scimitar' Smith hurriedly pointed out that, even though ''Black Jack David'' was a rake and philanderer, ''the lyric is fixed so there's time enough that she could have gotten a divorce or something before she goes with him''. Of course, Warren. This is a stellar performance that needs no apologies. Sparse, achingly pure, and haunting in the best tradition of hillbilly music. A standout cut on every front. And, as on Johnny Cash's ''Folsom Prison Blues'', the hook is provided by a repeated guitar solo, in this case played by Bradd Suggs or Buddy Holobaugh.

On "Black Jack David", Smith takes the old folk ballad for an unexpected bluesy hillbilly ride. The bass string guitar figure had nascent pickers running for their instruments, sure they could duplicate what they heard. Smith's vocal is powerful throughout, and the drummer - although listed as "unknown" - sounds alone like Johnny Bernero. Who else went so effortlessly from the 4/4 backbeat of the instrumental breaks to the delicious shuffle beneath Smith's singing?

> BLACK JACK DAVID <
Composer: - Warren Smith
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 218 - Master (3:08)
Recorded:- Unknown Date August 1956
Released: - September 24, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 250-A mono
BLACK JACK DAVID / UBANGI STOMP
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2/19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Charles Underwood, then a student at Memphis State University, contributed "Ubangi Stomp". ''I didn't like it, you know'', recalled Warren Smith. ''Then one night we were cutting, it was around 12:30 at night and I was up against the wall, really biting the bullet trying to find the fourth song. Charles came through the door and he changed four or five things I didn't like in the song and we went to work on it''. In a later era, Charles Underwood became a producer at Sun and, even later, engineered ''The Monster Mash'' and Herb Alpert's debut hit ''The Lonely Bull''. In 1956 he was a struggling student. He seems to have cheerfully assigned a common dialect to American Indians and Africans (''...heap big jam session'') and in all honestly, the song is as close to denigrating as anything released on Sun. However, it entered the Memphis charts and helped to sustain the momentum of ''Rock 'N' Roll Ruby''. Rather than make a big splash, it appears to have sold over 100,000 copies throughout an eighteen month period. The guitarist is Brad Suggs, stalwart of the Slim Rhodes Show, and the drummer is Johnny Bernero. Other musicians are somewhat unclear although the bassist may be Jan Ledbetter. Smith's interpretation of the song has all the contagious enthusiasm of pure rockabilly which has enabled it to survive the years well, and even survive a beleaguered and belated cover version from Alice Cooper.

With "Ubangi Stomp", Warren Smith showed what he could do with the right material. This tune offered the singer a fine piece of politically incorrect rockabilly and despite the group's misgiving about making "nigger music", Smith and his tight little band drove this ditty for all it was worth. The October 6, 1956 Memphis charts showed Smith's efforts in second place, eclipsed only by Guy Mitchell's "Singing The Blues".

> UBANGI STOMP <
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 219 - Master (1:58)
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1956
Released: - September 24, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 250-B mono
UBANGI STOMP / BLACK JACK DAVID
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2/20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Marcus Van Story recalls, "I used to hang a small skull from my bass when we did "Ubangi Stomp" and everybody wants to know what I did with it. Well I put it away in the closet but I still have it". "People used to mistake Bill Black and I for each other you know. Yea, him and I was like twin brothers. I was playing bass before Bill was, and we'd be playing some of the honky tonks around, and after the people got loaded dancing and drinkin', Bill'd say 'Let me have that bass for awhile, I wanna learn to play that thing like you do', besides, that'll give you a chance to get a drink and dance with some of the good lookin women! So Bill and I had a great time down through the years. A lot of records have been recorded and well, some people think Bill did them, and others think I did. So you would never really tell who was playing that big "Bull Fiddle" and I'm really proud to say that Bill was a darn good friend of mine".

Johnny Bernero played here on ''Ubangi Stomp'' just about one year after he backed Elvis Presley on ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget''. During that year, when rock and roll took over American popular music, Bernero showed that he could be a rock and roll drummer in addition to his more country work. halfway through that year, he played on Warren Smith's ''Rock 'N' Roll Ruby'' and moved some distance toward rock and roll from his country starting point.

By the time of ''Ubangi Stomp'', those Western swing band origins are thoroughly subordinated to the new style. Here, Bernero is aggressive in a way very different from what he did behind Elvis. He creates a stop rhythm for the introductory guitar lines and a drum roll takes us into the song. During the song, Bernero inserts occasional brief decorative rolls and, especially during the guitar solos, he puts some variation in the rhythmic accents. And for the vocal line ''Heap big jam session 'bout to begin'' he beats the tom-tom appropriately for a cowboys-and-Indians movie. And a few times (the first comes after the line ''I seen them natives doin' an odd-lookin' skip'') he gets to play a one-stroke drum solo.

Sam Phillips was slow to adapt to having drummers as a cornerstone of the music he produced and often did not record drummers well. That sadly deprives us of getting to hear clearly just how Bernero added some drama with the crash cymbal in the reprise of the intro that ends the record.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Al Hopson - Guitar
Marcus Van Story - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Smokey Joe Baugh - Piano

For Biography of Warren Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Warren Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

AL HOPSON - Al Hopson worked for Warren Smith, whom he had known from schooldays in Mississippi. At that point, Hopson had more professional experience that Warren Smith. He had begun his career in 1949 with Bill Nettles in Monroe, Louisiana and claims to have played on Nettles' smash hit, "Hadacol Boogie". After splitting from Nettles, Hopson returned to Lexington, Mississippi before moving to Jackson to play fiddle with Slim Scoggins for a year.

From there he moved to New Mexico with his own group and then joined Hoyle Nix and the West Texas Cowboys in Big Spring, Texas. Hopson played with Nix between 1953 and 1954 before returning to Canton, Mississippi to host the Saturday afternoon Jamboree on WDOB. Warren Smith joined them on at least one occasion before he headed for Memphis.

Smith met Hopson again in Greenwood. "Warren knew I could play", asserted Hopson, "and we'd talk. I was playing with some local boys at the baseball park in Greenwood on the same bill as Warren, Eddie Bond, Roy Orbison and Johnny Cash. Warren was by himself then and he asked me to come pick with him".

A NOTE FROM AL HOPSON - ''To me it only seems like a short time back to the Sun Records heyday and all the great artists that came from that era. As all my friends know, I played lead guitar with Warren Smith and he also recorded two of my songs, ''I Fell In Love'' and ''Uranium Rock''. Even now though the one that gets the most comments is ''Miss Froggie''. My guitar work seems to have help up very well on that one. The only band that Warren ever had (that I knew of) consisted of myself on lead guitar, Marcus Van Story on bass and Jimmie Lott on drums. We were on many tours and shows with all the Sun stars at that time such as Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash and Ray Orbison. But I would have to say I really liked to be around the Carl Perkins bunch as there was never a dull moment''.

MID-1956

NEWSPAPER LINED - New Memphis 'Rock-a-billy' Recording Star Rising Billboard, the show business trade paper, has coined a new word to describe a type of music for which Memphis has been the hotbed. The word is "rock-a-billy", and Billboard used it in giving its "Review Spotlight" to a new record by a young Memphis singer Warren Smith. Smith's record, while it is being played widely on rock and roll disc jockey shows, is cataloged by Billboard in the country and western field.

The record is "Ubangi Stomp", backed by "Black Jack David", and it already has gotten off to a good start. Billboard says of it' "Another disk to keep the Sun label near the top of the rock-a-billy heap. Smith really blasts with "Ubangi Stomp" and rocks with rhythm backing that produces excitement".

Warren, 24, who formerly lived in Greenwood and Jackson, Mississippi, moved to Memphis when he became a Sun recording artist with "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby", his first click, and now lives in Holiday Towers. He drives a Cadillac, has somewhat less than Elvis-length sideburns.

"Ubangi Stomp" was written by Charles Underwood, a 19-year-old Memphis State student who intents to make a career of song-writing. Warren himself wrote the other tune, "Black Jack David", adapting it from a folk song he heard as a boy, and he thinks perhaps it has the best chance of hitting big. "Black Jack David" is a sort of folklore hero, not too scrupulous, who entreats a pretty woman he meets in his wanderings to leave her husband and baby and come with him. But, Warren hurries to explain, "the lyrics is fixed so there's time enough that she could have got a divorce or something before she finally goes with him".

Warren, formerly a machinist, served two years in the Air Force. He is now managed by Bob Neal and has been touring with Carl Perkins, He'll appear with the Grand Ole Opry show which Neal is presenting at the Auditorium at 3 and 8 p.m. Sunday, alone with Faron Young, Johnny Cash, Johnny Horton and others.

MID 1956

One of Warren Smith's tasks on the early Stars Incorporated tours was to lead Roy Orbison, who was almost sightless without his glasses, to the microphone much as Blind Lemon Jefferson was led on stage. Smith also played a monthly gig on the Big "D" Jamboree in Dallas, Texas, and had a regular guest shot on the Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport, Louisiana. He and his band were often working seven days a week with matinee and evening shows on the weekends.

Johnny Bernero recalled that Warren Smith played primarily country music on his live shows but Jimmie Lott and Al Hopson recall that, although Warren loved country music, his stage shows were mostly rock and roll.

"Every now and again, Warren would slip in a Ray Price number", recalled Lott, "but he thought that rock and roll was where the money was. He wanted to make a name for himself. But when Warren sang a Ray Price song, Ray could have learned from him. He made my spine tingle when he got into that style".

AUGUST 27, 1956 MONDAY

Stephanie Winslow is born in Yankton, South Dakota. She nothes a hit in 1979 with her remake of Fleetwood Mack's ''Say You Love Me''.

Columbia released Carl Smith's two-sided hit, ''Before I Met You'' and ''Wicked Lies''.

Capitol released The Louvin Brothers' double-sided hit ''You're Running Wild'' backed with ''Cash On The Barrel Head''.

AUGUST 29, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Keyboard player Dan Truman is born in St. George, Utah. He joins Diamond Rio, whose tight harmonies and positive values combine in a series of hits, including ''Meet In The Middle'', ''I Believe'' and ''One More Day''.

Carl Perkins wrecks the Cadillac Sam Phillips presented him in April while speeding near Brownsville, Texas.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Instead. Hayden formed a new more rocking band called the Dixie Jazzliners, presumably named in connection with the 'Dixieland Jamboree' show and Bolton's Dixie Talent through whom they were booked. Quite how the jazz element figured, no-one remembers, least of all Hayden, but it may have been a compromise by a promoter who wanted to recognise that this was new-sounding music but was shy of calling it rock and roll in case it didn't last. Marlin Grissom switched from bass to play guitar in the new group but the other Jazzliner musicians were new.

According to Hayden, "We had a friend in Booneville who had connections with theater circuits in several states. The Dixie Jazzliners played that circuit for quite a few months there in 1955 and 1956. It was a little different from what the Sun recording artists were doing: people like Carl Perkins.

Johnny Cash and Charlie Feathers, they were playing in package shows with several artists on the bill. What we did was to tour movie theaters and give a show billed jointly with a featured movie. mainly ''Rock Around The Clock''. We would do our show. then they'd play the movie, then we'd give another show. that was how it worked''.

It was the movie package tour that eventually took Hayden Thompson to Memphis and to Sun Records. "We played the theater show in West Memphis for about or 'lights over a weekend sometime in the simmer of 1956. Jack Clement was the studio engineer at Sun Records and he saw my show over the river there in Arkansas''.

''He said, ''why don't you come across to Union Avenue and we'll see what we can do as far as making some records. I said 'sure' and shortly after that we went back to Memphis for our first session at Sun''.

The Southern Melody Boys: front row from left: Clyde Hill, Perry King; back row from left: Junior Johnson, Cricket Grissom, Hayden Thompson, possibly Charles Bolton, Marvin Grissom >

''That was me and the Dixie Jazzliners, who at that time were Jimmy Hill on guitar, Bill Hurt on bass,and Bill Gunter on drums. It was our only session together and Jack set the tapes going while we ran through some songs. We had ''Blues, Blues Blues'', ''You Are My Sunshine'', ''Fairlane Rock'', and ''Oh Mama'', which was also known as ''Mamma Goose Is Rocking''. In fact, Marlin Grissom from the Southern Melody Boys may still have been with the Jazzliners: on ''Fairlane Rock'' it is clear that Hayden calls his name as an introduction to the Scotty Moore styled guitar solos on the session.

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION : AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

Hayden Thompson is one of the last active (2008) performers from the first of white rock and rollers, those mid-South movers and shakers dubbed rockabillies by Billboard, the music trade paper, in 1955. He has also been among the most impressive of the American artists on the European rockabilly revival tours since he first signed up for them in 1984. What he did have were credentials and style. He had been there at the epicentre of rockabilly back when nobody knew quite what it was or what to call it.

He was born within a few miles of Elvis Presley, he made his first record within a few months of Presley, and he was on the legendary Sun Records, or at least the subsidiary Phillips International, where he recorded one of the acknowledged classic of rock and roll "Love My Baby".

Like Elvis Presley, Hayden had a good voice that, crucially, was adaptable. He was billed on his first record as "the Souths most versatile singer" and if that was a little optimistic a claim for a sixteen year old, the analysis was headed in the right direction. He was capable of a good Elvis imitation - in fact he and Johnny Cash were probably the first to feature such an imitation in their early acts - but he came out of a pure country band, he listened to rhythm and blues radio at night, and he could turn his hand to popularstyle ballads, folksy sagas or post-Nashville Sound country as the sounds of the 1950s gave way to those of the 1960s.

It was that vital three-year age difference behind Presley that accounted for Hayden's initial lack of chart success - the reason he didn't have that hit to revive - because by the time he got to Memphis the pure rockabilly sound he was so smitten with was already giving way to smoother, more produced, rock and roll. But it was the versatility,trumpeted on his first disc, that enabled him to adapt over the years and to fight on and on for the hit that unfortunately - and probably it does just come down to fortune - never came.

Hayden Thompson hung around the Sun studio for nearly a year beginning in late 1956, and everything he committed to tape during this period has since been reissued.

As Elvis Presley did on "Mystery Train", Thompson and company borrow "Love My Baby" from Sun bluesman Little Junior Parker and turn it into a first rate rockabilly rave-up. In truth, Presley's theft was far more impressive. Parker's original of this tune, especially its guitar figure, was considerable closer to the spirit and sound of rockabilly than was "Mystery Train". In any case, as Sam Phillips was fond of explaining to all assembled guests, there was nothing sweeter than recycling your own copyrights.

Martin Grissom from the Southern Melody Boys may still have been with the Jazzliners on "Fairlane Rock" it is clear that Hayden calls his name as an introduction to the Scotty Moore-styled guitar solos on the session. Although nothing came of Hayden's first Sun session, "Fairlane Rock" was the contender from among the four songs recorded. It's a driving rockabilly number, mixing nursery rhyme lyrics with references to iconic things like "Blue Suede Shoes" and twin exhausts. Vocally, the Presley style is not too evident and the influence of Gene Vincent, whose "Be-Bop-A-Lula" was riding the charts all that summer, is possibly more evident in the little asides and the slurred vocals that seem to slide in almost apologetically in places.

> FAIRLANE ROCK <
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued (2:28)
Recorded: - August/September 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15263 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - FAIRLANE ROCK
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-3 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

FAIRLANE ROCK" - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued (2:28)
Recorded: - August/September 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15263 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - FAIRLANE ROCK

FAIRLANE ROCK/BLUES BLUES BLUES
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Not Originally issued (2:39)
Recorded: - August/September 1956
Released: - May 29, 2013 / Released by Mistake
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-5/14 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

"Blues, Blues, Blues" was an atmospheric rockaballad where he laments that his "baby don't treat me right". Apart from the occasional hiccupped "baby", Hayden seems to have very much his own style here, and there is a short but classic rockabilly take-off guitar solo. Hayden said: "I took some of my style from the blues. I was hearing a lot of blues around then. I got my blues from WLAC radio in Nashville. I used to listen to Gene Nobles and John Richbourg who would play late night rhythm and blues record shows".

> BLUES, BLUES, BLUES <
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:01)
Recorded: - August/September 1956
Released: - Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm 270131-2\3 mono
LOVE MY BABY

> BLUES, BLUES, BLUES <
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:24)
Recorded: - August/September 1956
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm 270131-2-32 mono
LOVE MY BABY
Reissued: - Emusic Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Charly 11312766 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 6

> BLUES, BLUES, BLUES <
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued (2:13)
Recorded: - August/September 1956
Released: - May 29, 2013 - Released by Mistake
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-5/14 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

> OH MAMA (MAMA, MAMA, MAMA) <
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (1:46)
Recorded: - August/September 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm CR 30262-9 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - ROCKABILLY GUY 1954-1962
Reissued: - 1997 Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm 270131-2/6 mono
LOVE MY BABY

"Mama, Mama, Mama", down the years, obscuring the song's construction around rocked-up nursey rhyme verses. This recording has the most attacking guitar solo's on the session, but probably the feeling at Sun was that it did not have enough lyrical impact.

> OH MAMA (MAMA, MAMA, MAMA) <
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (1:48)
Recorded: - August/September 1956
Released: - 2008
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-6 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Trying a different tack, the band recorded an interesting version of the old Jimmie Davis country hit "You Are My Sunshine". This is the closest yet to the Presley sound, particularly in guitar style and in its build up to a fast pace from an almost whispered intro in the manner of Presley's version of "Milk Cow Blues". Again, though, there is more evidence of Hayden's as his own man than there is of him using Presley as a vocal blueprint.

On this side, Thompson provided Knox Music with some original material of his own. Starting with a deceptive Latic rhythm. Thompson soon breaks free into 4/4 rhythm, much as his hero Elvis had done in this same studio just two years earlier on "Milkcow Blues Boogie".

> YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE <
Composer: - Davis-Mitschell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Peer Southern
Matrix number: - None – Master - Not Originally Issued (2:38)
Recorded: - August/September 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm CR 30262-8 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - ROCKABILLY GUY 1954-1962
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-7 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson - Vocal and Guitar
Jimmy Hill - Guitar
Bill Hurt - Bass
Bill Gunter - Drums

For Biography of Hayden Thompson see: > The Sun Biographies <
Hayden Thompson's  Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©