CONTAINS
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> Back 1953 Sun Schedule <

1953 SESSIONS 7
July 1, 1953 to July 31, 1953

Studio Session for The Ripley Cotton Choppers, July 11, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Boyd Gilmore, July 15, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Earl Hooker, July 15, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Pinetop Perkins, July 15, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Little Walker, July 15, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Little Milton, July 28, 1953 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 1953

Jud Phillips (formerly involved in artist promotion with Roy Acuff and Jimmy Durante) joins Sun Records to help with the increasing activity in promotion and sales required to build on the success of Rufus Thomas' "Bear Cat". Working closely with Nashville-based Jim Bulleit, Jud begins to get positive reaction with the Prisonaires' "Just Walkin' In The Rain" b/w ''Baby Please'' (Sun 186).

Ike Turner recommences bringing talent to Phillips (i.e. rather than the Biharis) for the first time since 1951, starting with Little Milton and Johnny O'Neal.

Chess Records issues recordings by Joseph Dobbins, probably made in Memphis in June.

Sam Phillips makes his first recordings by a white group for the Sun label. The Ripley Cotton Choppers, who had appeared on Memphis radio for several years.

JULY 1953

United States President Eisenhower informs the Chinese that he would not be afraid to use nuclear weapons or invade China in order to end this, North Korea decides to allow voluntary repatriation. An armistice is concluded at Panmunjom, it provided for a demilitarized zone and a conference to discuss the future of Korea, however, the conference never came to pass. During the Korean War 33,629 US troops, about 3,000 UN troops, about 50,000 South Koreans, and an estimated 1.5 million Communists from China and North Korea died.

JULY 1, 1953 WEDNESDAY

Eleven-year-old Bobby Wright, the son of Kitty Wells and Johnny Wright, has his first recording session for Decca Records.

JULY 3, 1953 FRIDAY

MGM released Hank Williams' ''I Won't Be Home No More''.

JULY 4, 1953 SATURDAY

Kirk ''Jelly Roll'' Johnson is born in Lake Charles, Louisiana. He plays harmonica on Randy Travis' ''Hard Rock Bottom Of Your Heart'', John Michael Montgomery's ''Life's A Dance'' and ''The Judds ''Turn It Loose'', among others.

JULY 5, 1953 SUNDAY

''Old American Barndance'' debuts on TV's Dumas network, with Tennessee Ernie Ford and Pee Wee King as regulars.

Gene Autry and Smiley Burnette rally against a monopolistic Old West supply store in the debut of ''Pack Train''. Steel guitarist Frankie Marvin has a minor role as well.

JULY 7, 1953 TUESDAY

''The Eddy Arnold Show'' begins a short stint as an NBC summer replacement series.

Red Foley recorded ''Shake A Hand''.

JULY 8, 1953 WEDNESDAY

Don Robey wrote to Sam Phillips tanking him for the co-operation.

The singles, Sun 187 ''Feelin' Good'' b/w ''Fussin' And Fightin' (Blues)'' by Little Junior's Blue Flames; Sun 188 ''Tiger Man (King Of The Jungle)'' b/w ''Save That Money'' by Rufus Thomas, and ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'' backed with ''Baby Please'' Sun 186, are released on this day, and a week later the Press-Scimitar ran a third of a page feature at the top of page 32 headlined, "Prison Singers May Find Fame with Record They Made in Memphis''. It recounted anecdotally just how the record had come about, scrupulous assigning roles to everyone from Governor Frank Clement and Warden Edwards to Johnny Bragg and the other Prisonaires, Joe Hill Louis, Red Wortham, Jim Bulleit, and, of course, the ''painstaking Mr. Phillips'', who had insisted that they work ''until the records were cut just right''. Phillips, the story pointedly made clear, ''has established a reputation as an expert in recording negro talent''. There were tentative plans, the Press-Scimitar suggested, ''to take them to New York to appear on big TV shows'' but these were all predicated, the reporter pointed out, on ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'' being as big a hit as Sam Phillips firmly believed that it would be.

JULY 8, 1953 WEDNESDAY

Don Robey's injunction against to Sun Records. The letter reads:

Dear Mr. Phillips,

Enclosed here with, is our copyright agreement (License), between Sun Records and Lion Publishing Company covering the composition HOUND DOG (known as Bear Cat), as recorded by Sam Phillips SUN 181.

I have signed both copies, and you are sign both copies, retain one for your files, and return the other to me.

Thank you kindly for your cooperation in this matter,
Yours very truly
LION MUSIC PUBLISHING COMPANY

Don D. Robey
DDR:mn
Encl:2

JULY 9, 1953 THURSDAY

David Ball is born in Rock Hill, South Carolina. He scores one of 1994's biggest hit with his semi-novelty ''Thinkin' Problem'', returning to hitmaker status in 2001 with ''Riding With Private Malone''.

JULY 10, 1953 FRIDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''Hay Joe'' and ''I've Kissed You My Last Time'' at Nashville's Castle Studio in the Tulane Hotel.

B.B. Watson is born in Tyler, Texas. his 1991 single ''Light At The End Of The Tunnel'' is the first to be released on RCA's subsidiary label, BNA Records.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE RIPLEY COTTON CHOPPERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY JULY 11, 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

"In 1953, after my Sun label really got started", says Sam Phillips, "I would record some country music but I was always still looking for somebody with a little different sound. I felt that there was the basis of a particular style to be found here in Memphis''.

''The Ripley Cotton Choppers came from a little town north of Memphis. They were the first country musicians I issued on the Sun label. They were a damn fine country band. I had some nice cuts on them, but Sun was very much geared to the blues market at that time and we were never able to promote them".

"Silver Bell"/"Blues Waltz" (Sun 190) by the Ripley Cotton Choppers remains one of the rarest records Sam Phillips ever recorded. After two years of releasing nothing but black music, Sam Phillips had decided to broaden his base of operations. In July 1953, he scheduled the first recording session with the Ripley Cotton Choppers, and later that year released Sun's first country record. It had "Hillbilly" stamped on the promo copies so that country disc jockey’s would take a second look and maybe listen.

Raymond Kerby also recalls Phillips' conduct in the studio. "He kept trying to get us to do something we never did understand. He wanted us to play and sing more like a colored man. He kept saying if he could just find him a white boy who...".

Phillips was fairly insistent about this but the Cotton Choppers were never able to cross that maggie line. Nevertheless, the title of the very first country record that Sam Phillips released on Sun still had the word "blues" in it.

An ironic footnote to Phillips' quest is that a year or so before their Sun audition, the Choppers had recorded a rough demo of an original song called "Paint Slinger Blues". It was a simple 12-bar blues written by Kerby, his brother James, and his uncle, Jesse Frost. It was composed spontaneously as the three men sat around after a hard day's work.

Raymond Kerby still had his paint splattered overalls on when the line "I'm an old paint slinger and I sling my paint all day" came into being. Because they never took the song seriously, the Choppers never even auditioned the song for Phillips. As an old acetate shows, "Paint Slinger Blues" comes surprisingly close to the sound and style that Sam Phillips was looking for. Kerby confides that most of his group was not overly impressed with Sam Phillips' operation. "Half of us figured we were wasting our time. We figured Sun Records wasn't big enough. They'll never do anything for anybody".

The Ripley Cotton Choppers came to Sun's attention because Hoyt Wooten, Sam Phillips' old boss at WREC told Ernest Underwood about Sam Phillips. Underwood was the only member of the Choppers who had also played with the original group, and he and Wooten were old friends. A phone call was made and Ernest Underwood and Raymond Kerby drove down to meet Sam Phillips.

When this 78rpm was finally released, it never appeared on 45rpm, Phillips told Kerby, "Now don't quit if this record don't make it. You too good a guitar player". By virtually any yardstick Sun 190 did not make it. It certainly got lots of local action and seems to have been on every jukebox between Memphis and Ripley. Kerby recalls, "We never did see any royalties on it. But you could turn the radio on, sometimes ten or twelve different stations would be playing it at the same time. Bob Neal had a show on WMPS. He used "Silver Bell" as his opening and closing theme".

01 - "SILVER BELL"* - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Edward Madden-Percy Wenrich
Publisher: - Redwood Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 83 Master
The title spelled as ''Silver Bells'' on the record label.
Recorded: - July 11, 1953
Released: - September 1953
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Sun 190-B < mono
SILVER BELL / BLUES WALTZ
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

As a vocal outing during the late forties, "Sugarfoot Rag" became a benchmark hit for Red Foley. It was equally effective as an instrumental by its creator, guitarist Hank Garland, and in time to come several other catchy workouts would follow its thrust. Taking their cue from Bob Wills, the rustic-sounding Ripley Cotton Choppers (famous around Shelby County for their regular radio broadcast) homed in on their neat equivalent, "Silver Bell", for what amounted to an exploratory Sun one-off.

The song itself, composed by vaudevillian Percy Wenrich in 1910, was already a minor standard when the Choppers took it to Sam Phillips. The record is really a showcase for the guitar of Bill Webb who is backed by guitarists Raymond and James Kerby and the driving bass of Pete Wiseman. The back-country charm of the record, one of Sun's rarest releases, compensates for some technical flaws, not the least of which is Webb's slightly out-of-tune instrument. You'd think this wouldn't stand a prayer in the country music world of the 1950s, but in 1955, Chet Atkins and Hank Snow took ''Silver Bell'' to the country charts. The label of Sun 190 states ''Silver Bells'', which is the old Christmas standard).

This side, "Blues Waltz", it features twin guitar work by Raymond Kerby and Bill Webb who played lead. This first country release was hardly typical of Memphis country in the 1950s. Rather, this side harks back beyond the era of the honky tonk to a time when country music was performed at church socials and family gatherings. Only the electric guitar dates it to the 1950s rather than the 1920s or 1930s. This track features Ernest Underwood and Jesse Frost in a vocal duet backed by guitars, bass, and James Haggard's mandolin (an instrument that was not over-represented at 706 Union).

The original 78rpm credited the composition to Mrs. R.M. Lawrence, a resident of Ripley, Tennessee. This record was already doomed to obscurity by virtue of the fact it was twenty years out of date on the day of release but Phillips' lack of experience in marketing country music banished it to a distribution network that barely exceeded the Ripley City limits.

02 - "BLUES WALTZ"** - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Mrs. R.M. Lawrence
Publisher: - Redwood Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 84 Master
Released: - September 1953
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Sun 190-A < mono
BLUES WALTZ / SILVER BELL
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

The primary meeting went well and a formal audition was set up. That went well also and the group's first session was arranged. It produced "Blues Waltz", the vocal side of the Choppers' release. As Raymond Kerby recalls, Phillips had them repeat the song over and over again until he was satisfied with it. "Blues Waltz" featured a harmony vocal by Ernest Underwood and Jesse Frost, now both dead. James Haggard's madoline, the only time this instrument appears on an issued Sun record, is prominently featured.

With a strong female lead, this ''Roses And Sunshine'', a previously unissued song allows us a glimpse of what the Carter Family might have sounded like with an electric guitar. Vocal honours were shared by Jesse Frost and the Ripley heartbreaker, Jettie Cox. The song was a loose adaption of ''Down In The Valley'', itself set to a much earlier tune, ''The Happy Home Waltz''. Indeed, it includes bits of ''Down In The Valley'' (''Roses love sunshine, violets love dew...'' etc.). Tapes of the session have long since disappeared and only a single acetate, stored away by Raymond Kerby, has preserved the moment.

03 - "ROSES AND SUNSHINE"**/*** - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Mrs. R.M. Lawrence
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 11, 1953
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm RLP 126-1-4 mono
COTTON CHOPPER COUNTRY
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-2-16 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-34 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

The session which lasted all night, also produced two unreleased vocal sides called "Roses And Sunshine" and "Pretty Baby". "Roses And Sunshine" features a vocal duet which includes Jettie Cox. This track still exists today on a well-worn acetate. Nothing is known about "Pretty Baby". The acetate is been lost.

04 - "PRETTY BABY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - July 11, 1953

The historical importance of this record cannot be overlooked. It is the first country record issued by Sam Phillips on his fledgling label. It was, to say the least, a curious choice. Their lone Sun single released on September 1953, was probably never distributed more than 100 miles from where it was recorded. It remains one of the rarest Sun releases and one of the least typical of anything bearing the Sun logo.

Despite its title, the record contains not a trace of the blues, although an unissued home recording from 1952 of "Paint Slinger Blues" suggests that the Cotton Choppers did have at least a passing acquaintance with the blues. Sam Phillips and The Ripley Cotton Choppers caught each other's eye at just the right moment in time. Within the next two years, Sam Phillips virtually abandon blues and traditional country music for Elvis Presley and the first generation of rockabillies and The Ripley Cotton Choppers would cease to be a group.

Because the Cotton Choppers came to Sun and were one of the first country groups Phillips recorded, they received a historic offer. Sam Phillips was looking for a backup band to work with his new discovery: a vocalist whom Phillips was sure would put the company on the map and make everybody rich. After their final session, late into the night, Sam Phillips came out of the control room and sat down with the Choppers for one of his patented 'heart to heart' talks. He made his offer: there were no guarantees, but he liked Kerby's picking and thought everybody might benefit from the merger. Were they interested?

It was late that night and Kerby asked if they could think on it a bit. "Sure", said Phillips, "take your time". The sun had already come up by the time the Choppers got back to Ripley, and they had already made up their minds.

The Ripley Cotton Choppers decided not to back up Elvis Presley. He was an unknown, and it would have meant dropping their present vocalist, Kerby's uncle Jesse Frost. In this casual moment, Raymond Kerby passed up his chance at immortality which, as we all know, fell into the nimble fingers of Scotty Moore.

Kerby's memories of Sam Phillips are borne out by information that has since come to light. "He was always saying 'These people in Memphis are making fun of me. They think if you don't play popular music, you ain't playing music. But I'm going to show 'em'".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernest Underwood - Vocal**/** Fiddle***
Jesse Frost - Vocal**/***
Jettie Cox - Vocal**
Raymond Kerby - Guitar
James Kerby - Guitar
Bill Webb - Guitar
James Wiseman - Bass**/***
Pete Wiseman - Bass*
James Haggard - Mandolin**/**

The Choppers did little touring, virtually all of it confined to within 50 miles of Memphis. Kerby recalls playing on a bill with Carl Perkins at the Jackson Armory in 1954. They may have smiled 'hello' backstage, but really never made contact. The last contact Kerby with Sam Phillips was in early 1955. He had run out of copies of his record and called Phillips to buy some more. Kerby still has the shipping box that held a dozen 78rpms. It is postmarked January 10, 1955.

For Biography of The Ripley Cotton Choppers see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Ripley Cotton Choppers' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 13, 1953 MONDAY

Dick Curless has a son, Rick Curless, in Maine.

Blues man Louis Prima marries pop vocalist Keely Smith. As a songwriter, his tune ''Sunday Kind Of Love'' is destined to become a country hit for Reba McEntire.

JULY 14, 1953 TUESDAY

Guitarist/mandolinist Mike Henderson is born in Independence, Missouri. He becomes a linchpin in the bluegrass band The Steel Drivers and plays on two Travis Tritt hits, ''More Than You'll Ever Know'' and ''Where Corn Don't Grow''.

Woodwind player Pat ''Taco'' Ryan is born in east Texas. He joins Asleep At The Wheel, playing with the band on its Grammy-nominated 1977 album ''The Wheel''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

On this day, several recordings were made, among others for Boyd Gilmore, Earl Hooker, Pinetop Perkins, and Walter Horton.

STUDIO SESSION FOR BOYD GILMORE & EARL HOOKER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JULY 15, 1953 (SESSION 1)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01(1) - "BELIEVE I'LL SETTLE DOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Boyd Gilmore
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - August 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30127-B-8 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 12 - UNION AVENUE BREAKDOWN
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-5-19 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Take 2 is the marginally different 1996 box version of the song and also issued on the original LP box.

01(2) - "BELIEVE I'LL SETTLE DOWN" - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Boyd Gilmore
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Charly LP 1060 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - VOLUME 1 - BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-9-10 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

An altogether churchier song than Memphis Slim's 1940s song of the same name, this is the high water mark of one of the Earl Hooker's Sun sessions. A fine rolling blues in the tradition that B.B. King was busy making his very own. Gilmore's vocal, although huskier than B.B.'s, follows the same familiar pattern, and Earl Hooker's guitar contrives to sound like a disciple - or at the very least, a close relative - of "Lucille". There's some fine two-handed piano from Gilmore's childhood buddy, Pinetop Perkins, but the tentative nature of the track is revealed at the end when Gilmore stops singing midway through the last verse, and we get a rather unexpected 4-bar instrumental ending. This take notable because Gilmore forgot the last line. As it turned out, Hooker didn't record again until 1956 and Gilmore never recorded again, as far as we know.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Boyd Gilmore - Vocal & Guitar
Joe Willie ''Pinetop'' Perkins - Piano
Adolph Duncan - Saxophone
Earl Hooker - Guitar
Little Walter - Harmonica
Unknown - Bass
Willie Nix – Drums

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Earl Hooker's Sun recordings are cloaked in some mystery. Sam Phillips' log notes two sessions, on July 15, 1953 and another on August 8. The personnel noted on the first session (above) was Boyd Gilmore, Little Walker (Hooker's warm-up act) on harmonica, Pinetop Perkins on piano, and saxophonist Adolph Duncan, all of whom worked together in Cairo, Illinois.

For the second session, Phillips only noted session bassist Kenneth Banks. Hooker left two tapes mostly full of instruments. Clearly, he was running down his set-list, checking to see if Phillips hear anything he liked. And Phillips liked Hooker enough to offer a one-year contract at the time of the first session, but not enough to release anything.

The second session was marked non-productive, and Hooker never returned. We're figuring that all the titles here except ''The Hucklebuck'' and ''Pinetop's Boogie Woogie'' stem from the first session, which is notable for the presence of an electric bass, an instrument that had only been introduced in November 1951. The bass apparently belonged to Hooker, making him an early adopter.

STUDIO SESSION FOR EARL HOOKER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JULY 15, 1953 (SESSION 2)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Representing the blues men on instrumentals is guitarist Earl Hooker. His Sun recordings remained well concealed until eight tracks appeared on the "Blue Guitar" album in 1989, a short lived compilation. Whilst some of the tracks are of a bluesy nature, the ones selected here are real powerhouse rock and roll, from a guitarist who developed a hard hitting tough style.

There's a lot of energy here, but it resulted in nothing that Sam Phillips could release. In essence, it was two minutes of rejuggled blues cliches interspersed with some gloriously inventive guitar. The structure of the song is similar to Jimmy Rushing's 1937 outing with Count Basie, ''Don't You Miss Your Baby''.. itself a compendium of rejuggled lines. If Phillips had called for an earl Hooker vocal, this is what he got, and this is why he didn't call for another. The playing rates Hooker a mention in the same breath as the Kings (B.B., Freddie, and Albert), but his singing was never that strong. Perhaps that's why Boyd Gilmore was there. In 1953, Sam Phillips had very little money to spare, but he gave a thirty dollar advance to Hooker, another five to his manager, plus $4.75 for whiskey and another three bucks in gas to get them from and to Cairo, Illinois. By this point in the afternoon or evening of July 15, 1953, he must have seen that money slipping through his fingers.

01 - "MOVE ON DOWN THE LINE*" - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Earl Zebedee Hooker
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - 1981
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (S) 45rpm Arhoolie 1066 mono
MOVE ON DOWN THE LINE / STEEL GUITAR RAG
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-5-20 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

As his future records would attest, Earl Hooker spent most of his time avoiding the role of singer - so this performance takes on a little extra significance. Although light and insubstantial its not an unpleasant voice, certainly capable of riding the rocking tempo driven by a drummer some have identified as Willie Nix. The call-and-response choruses which follow beg the involvement of a larger band, with more than just Adolph Duncan on tenor sax.

02 - "THE DRIVE" (1) - B.M.I.
Composer: - Earl Zebedee Hooker
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - September 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30126 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 11 - MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS
Reissued: - 1989 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUN 29 mono
BLUE GUITAR

On the evidence of this track alone, Phillips might have thought about bringing Earl Hooker in to push of those early rockabilly sessions. God knows what kind of hybrid music might have raised the rafters at 706 Union if he had.

03 - "THE DRIVE" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Earl Zebedee Hooker
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-5-21 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES 1950 - 1958
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-6-25 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

As well as his sole vocal excursion, Hooker recorded a number of instrumental features which were left untitled at the time. This is a later, third take of one which other compilers have called "The Drive". In the early takes, Hooker had had some trouble with the introductory riff, which here he simplifies by leaving out a set of repeats.

What follows stays for the most part in the middle register, once again pointing to his awareness of jump band etiquette. Its not known who plays the electric bass on this session: it would be facile to suggest Boyd Gilmore, but he was a capable guitarist. A variation on this theme eventually appeared under Hooker's name on Ace Records in Chicago circa 1961. At that time, it was called ''Blue Guitar'', so that's the title we're using.

The electric bassist is very busy but Hooker is the star of this show. His limpid slide tone is sometimes reminiscent of his mentor, Robert Nighthawk, but make no mistake Earl Hooker was a guitar star in his own right.

04 - "BLUE GUITAR" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Earl Zebedee Hooker
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - 1989 - Not Originally Issued
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 29 mono
BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-5-23 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Earl Hooker had first recorded this tune, his arrangement of "Rock Me Baby", in Florida nine months earlier for King Records, and it was later issued by mistake on his cousin John Lee Hooker's King album as "Who's Been Jivin' You". The purity of tone which he achieves with a slide is the equal of his teacher and mentor, Robert Nighthawk. Later in the piece he alternates slide strokes with finger picket runs on the bass strings, evidence of the fact that he was one of the few guitarists who had no need of retuning his guitar to an open chord.

05 - "MEXICALI SHAKE" - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Earl Zebedee Hooker
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUN 29 mono
BLUE GUITAR

06 - "IRAZORBACK" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Earl Zebedee Hooker
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUN 29 mono
BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - 1997 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8302-18 mono
706 UNION INSTRUMENTALS

07 - "RED RIVER VALLEY (VARIATION)" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Earl Zebedee Hooker
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUN 29 mono
BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - 1997 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8302-19 mono
706 UNION INSTRUMENTALS

In Europe toward the end of his life, Earl Hooker was filmed backstage playing and singing Ernest Tubb's 1941 hit ''Walking The Floor Over You'' and he recorded Bill Monroe's ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky''. Here he's taking a shot at ''Steel Guitar Rag'', Bob Wills'1936 feature for Leon Auliffe. Hooker probably didn't know or care, but ''Steel Guitar Rag'' was originally a blues tune recorded by Sylvester Weaver back in 1923. Hooker undoubtedly thought he was playing a hillbilly song. He takes it considerably faster than Wills, almost treating it like a polka. The electric bass is especially busy, but the whole show falls apart at the end, which was okay with Phillips because he wasn't about to release an instrumental he didn't publish anyway.

08 - "STEEL GUITAR RAG" - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Leon McAuliffe
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - 1981
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (S) 45rpm Arhoolie 1066 mono
STEEL GUITAR RAG / MOVE ON DOWN THE LINE
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 -6-23 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Earl Hooker - Vocal - 1 and Guitar
Joe Willie ''Pinetop'' Perkins - Piano
Little Walker - Harmonica
Unknown - Bass
Willie Nix - Drums

For Biography of Earl Hooker see: > The Sun Biographies <
Earl Hooker's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

One of the few artists in this is still to be working, Perkins grew up around Willie Love and John Lee Hooker, and left Boyd Gilmore's band to join Robert Nighthawk. During the 1940s he took to playing Pinetop Smith's magnum opus - and was accorded the nickname Pinetop for that, and to differentiate him from guitarist Joe Willie Wilkins. His version of "Pinetop's Boogie-Woogie" is unspectacular but competent, with even Earl Hooker confine himself to comping chords of the beat-off.

STUDIO SESSION FOR PINETOP PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JULY 15, 1953 (SESSION 3)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

So what changed between December 29, 1928 when Pine Top Smith recorded the original ''Pine Top's Boogie Woogie'' and when Pinetop Perkins recorded this version? Not much. Perkins had an electric guitar and drums reinforcing the beat, but his tempo and arrangement were much as Smith's. Sam Phillips visited enough disc jockeys and distributors to know that, as charming as this music was, it couldn't compete with Ray Charles and the other top sellers in rhythm and blues circa mid-1953, and so it remained until 1977 when the archivists came calling. Perkins' first recording under his own name wasn't released until 1988. That album, ''After Hours'', included ''Pinetop's Boogie Woogie'', a version that was, if anything, even closer to Pine Top Smith than this/ No one could accuse Perkins of pandering to fads and trends. By the time he died in March 2011, he was one of a handful of jazz/blues fans/musicians to remember the stir Smith's record created in 1929.

01 - "PINETOP'S BOOGIE WOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Clarence Smith
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - August 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30127-B-6 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 12 – UNION AVENUE BREAKDOWN
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-5-24 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Pinetop Perkins - Vocal and Piano
Earl Hooker - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Willie Nix – Drums

For Biography of Pinetop Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Pinetop Perkins' Sun recordings can be heard on his recording on 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LITTLE WALKER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JULY 15, 1953 (SESSION 4)
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01(1) - "(TALKIN') OFF THE WALL" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Walter Jacobs
Publisher: - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
Released: - August 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30127-A-6 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 12 - UNION AVENUE BREAKDOWN
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-5-25 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Here's a mystery that may never be solves. There's an Earl Hooker tape from July 15, 1953, and at the end of the reel, are several takes of ''Off The Wall''. Little Walter (Jacobs) recorded ''Off The Wall'' in March 1953; it charted in April on the flip-side of ''Tell Me Mama'' and charted in its own right in mid-May. Phillips' logbook noted that Hooker's group included Little Walker, and it appears as if Walker was a harmonica player introduced on-stage to play a few of Little Walter's songs and confuse people into thinking that they were seeing the real deal. As far as we know, there's no other recorded evidence of Walker, but according to Hooker's biographer, Sebastian Danchin, he could sound eerily like Walter Jacobs. Much of Hooker's repertoire that day was other people's songs, so ''Off The Wall'' was certainly consistent with that.

Previously this track was issued as by Walter Horton. On May 28, 1953 Horton was in Phillips' studio with Pat hare, Joe Hill Louis, and Albert Williams. The tunes recorded that day were not noted (although $1.28 for food was logged), so it's just possible that Horton recorded ''Off The Wall'' because Little Walter's song was popular then. The guitarist doesn't play enough for us to be sure if it's Hare or Hooker, thereby placing the issue beyond doubt, but we're betting that this was recorded by Little Walker.

01(2) - "(TALKIN') OFF THE WALL" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Walter Jacobs
Publisher: - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - None - Two Incomplete Takes - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 15, 1953
This is the 1990s box version,
or rather two versions spliced together.
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-5-26 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-9-9 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Also present on the tape from this session is the crude combination of two incomplete takes included here to show how the arrangement was developed. The first of these takes runs just over a minute and shows how the drummer - be it Willie Nix or Edward Irvin - had started with Fred Below's machine-gun snare figure. Horton is noticeably less inventive at this stage but Earl Hooker pushes thing along, playing boogie pattens close to the bridge of his guitar. When this take falls apart, another cuts in at a roughly equivalent place. This time Horton is playing with a much more muted tone, whilst Hooker maintains his precise rhythm. The band once again attempt an ending worthy of the musicians they are copying.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Little Walker - Harmonica (? Walter Horton)
Earl Hooker - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Willie Nix – Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 16, 1953 THURSDAY

Singer/songwriter Nanci Griffith is born in Seguin, Texas. Primarily a folk artist, she writes the Kathy Mattea county hit ''Love At The Five And Dime'' and ''Suzy Bogguss' single ''Outbound Plane''.

More than 20 years after the band's leader strated his career in Texas, Bob Wills and His Playboys return to the state, beginning a regular appearance on KGNC radio in Amarillo.

JULY 18, 1953 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley pays $3.98 plus tax to recorded "My Happiness" and "That's When Your Heartaches Begin" at Memphis Recording Service. (See: Elvis Sun Sessions / Elvis 1948-1953 / July 18, 1953).

JULY 26, 1953 SUNDAY

Guitar player Randy Bethune is born. He spends five years as a member of Bill Anderson's Po' Folks Band.

JULY 28, 1953 TUESDAY

Steve Duncan is born. After playing drums for the house band at The Palomino Club in North Hollywood, California, he joins The Desert Rose Band, propelling the twangy country-rock vibe of ''One Step Forward'', ''Love Reunited'' and ''Summer Wins''.

But the promise of a tripartite arrangement, if that was it was intended to be, barely survived the sales-and-promotion trip Jud Phillips and Jim Bulleit took together at the end of July on this day. ''I got back to Nashville this am'', Jud wrote to Sam Phillips after five-day visit to Washington and New York. ''Had a long talk with Jim. I put the fear in him regarding the business''. In fact, Jud, with no apparent authority to do so (he was at this point no more than a minister without portfolio on a salary of roughly $75 a week), had suggested to Jim that perhaps he should just leave the business. To which Jim, with that indefatigable good cheer that had so endeared him to Sam at the start, simply responded that he thought he would stick it out, that, as Jud reported, he continued to believe ''the three of us can make some good money out of the operation''. He didn't even seem to take it amiss when Jud made it crystal clear, with that same combination of brash confidence and disarming charm that he brought to all of his enterprises, that if this new arrangement were to be realized, Jim Bulleit would be under the authority mot just of Sam Phillips but of Jud, too. He would be in charges of sales, to be sure, but with certain very explicitly defined restrictions. It might all work out, Jud concluded his report to Sam Phillips, because now Jim knew ''where he would stand in this matter, and he knows, too, that I know why he acts like he does''.

JULY 28, 1953 TUESDAY

Jim Bulleit taken Jud Phillips out to the Tennessee State Penitentiary to visit with the Prisonaires, who, Jud wrote to his brother, ''are getting from 10 to 25 letters every day from all over the country. They plan to bring all of them to you when they come over to record again the following week. They make me think of a bunch of baby birds. They are fine boys, all of them. I get a great joy out of helping people that I think really appreciate it, and I know you to do''.

JULY 1953

While once he traveled through Mississippi in a jalopy, hustling gigs where he could, Little Milton Campbell now travels North America in a converted Scenicruiser. Chart success has been elusive for some time, but Milton continues to keep a full engagement book. Some of his appearances today may seem half-hearted, the inevitable product of unpacking his guitar and walking out on stage ahead of the Miltonettes a few times too many. At his best, though, Little Milton can still recapture the fire of his youth, and make one believe he is walking the streets crying.

''Big'' Milton was Milton's father, although his parents never married. Milton grew up with his mother and stepfather near Leland, Mississippi, and developed an early fascination for the guitar. ''We lived on the outskirts of Leland'', he told Living Blues magazine. ''The town would close up by . . . 11:00 at night, and most of the black people who could do so would have suppers or juke joints out in the country, even if it was just outside the city limit's where we lived. . . . My mom would put the kitchen table across the door and sell sandwiches, lemonade, corn liquor. My stepfather would have a dice game going and they would hire a guitar player, they'd look around and I'd be standing there, little long drawers
on''.

''Like many rural blacks, Milton's family listened to the Grand Ole Opry as regularly as any other radio program, and Milton still cites such country musicians as Ernest Tubb and Roy Acuff among his favorites. At the age of eleven he got his first guitar from a mail order catalog, eventually parlaying his $14.52 Roy Rogers guitar into a career.

Married at fourteen and single again at fifteen, he started sitting in with the Eddie Cusic (or Kusic) band in Leland. ''My older brother took me to this club in Leland. Eddie was playing there. I picked up his guitar, which was an electric model and sounded much better than my little thing, and I said, 'I'm really gonna get into this'. I'd come into town every weekend and sit in. Finally, the lady who owned the club (who was B. B. King's mother-in-law), she started throwing me a few bucks. Then Eddie hired me for $1.50 a night''.

Milton made his studio debut as a sideman for Willie Love, who recorded for the Trumpet label in Jackson, Mississippi. But it was the ubiquitous Ike Turner who landed Milton his deal with Sun. ''Ike lived seventy-five mites north of me in Clarksdale'', recalled Milton to David Booth. '' We were all playing up and down the Delta; I'd meet him here and there. I'd get into a car on Monday and travel to maybe three towns to set up my gigs, try and get a deposit, you know. Ike was always a smooth operator. He had a lot of ingenuity. He'd act as a talent scout for record companies, and he was solely responsible for getting me onto Sun Records''.

Milton suffered from two problems during his tenure at Sun. The first was that he lacked a unique, identifiable style. His Sun output, considered as a whole, covered virtually the entire spectrum of early 1950s blues styles; among those Milton imitated, with chameleon like adaptability, were Fats Domino, B. B. King, Elmore James, and Guitar Slim. Milton himself admits as much: ''Back then I didn't know who Little Milton was. I was just doing whoever came out with a hit recorded''.

The second problem lay in Milton's writing. His songs were random collections of choruses, without the kind of repetitive hook that would be remembered by listeners. Virtually all of his recordings could have had any one of half a dozen title's (as those who later cataloged Milton's Sun tapes would discover, to their dismay). Yet some of the writing was undeniably good. ''It's got to the place lately where I can't tell that woman what to do'', Milton bemoans in ''Running Wild Blues'', a song that Phillips chose not to release; ''She sticks her anger in my face and says 'I'm working just like you'''. (Milton was so enamored of that cameo of domestic grief that he reprised it word-for-word on ''That Will Never Do'' on Bobbin Records five years later).

His paint-by-numbers approach to the blues nevertheless got Milton three shots on Sun. The principal element to which Phillips responded was undoubtedly Milton's guitar playing. He may have borrowed some licks, but the fire with which he delivered them bore an intensity that emulation alone could never have produced. A master of the use of silence within a solo, Milton played with passion and a sense of drama surpassed by few of his contemporaries at Sun or elsewhere.

Milton's last Sun session was held in March 1954. Like Rufus Thomas, Milton probably returned with new material later in the year, only to and that his place had been usurped by Elvis Presley. Like Thomas, Milton went to Meteor Records, for whom he recorded one single before relocating to St. Louis. ''Ike Turner was up there and was forever saying how good it was'', he told Booth, ''so I finally moved''. Milton recorded for Bobbin Records in St. Louis until Chess bought his contract.

After he moved to Chess, the guitar gradually assumed a lower profile in Milton's work; it certainly never stood front and center again. He finally began to make it with ''So Mean To Me'' in 1962, and he hit number 1 on the Rhythm & Blues charts with ''We're Gonna Make It'' in 1965. Milton subsequently recorded later for Stax and Glades during the 1970s before settling with the keepers of the flame at Malaco Records in Jackson, Mississippi. Little Milton died in Memphis, Tennessee on August 4, 2005 from complications following a stroke.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LITTLE MILTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY JULY 28, 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCED AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER
AND/OR SAM C. PHILLIPS

James Milton Campbell, late of Inverness, Mississippi, was first afforded an audience with Sam Phillips by the keen-eyed Ike Turner. Ike booked the players and together they cut "Beggin' My Baby" unashamed clone of Fats Domino's "Goin' To The River" for the topside of his first Sun single. Some five years later, partnered by one-time Sun musician, Oliver Sain, Little Milton went on to open Bobbin Records in Chicago, before returning to Memphis during the latter days of the Stax label.

''Ike Turner had a little three or four piece band'', Little Milton told Jim O'Neal. ''Himself, Junior (Jesse Knight) who was his nephew, Willie Sims who we called Bad Boy. And I took the saxophone from my band, C.W. Tate. Ike introduced me to Sam Phillips. 'You want to cut a record'? 'Yeah', So start singing and playing'. We had not rehearsed anything, but two or three of those tunes I was doing with my Playmates of Rhythm. Sometimes you'd get in (to Sun) around one or two o'clock in the afternoon and we'd be there all night, sometimes into the next day. Nobody worried about the time. Ike, he'd be playin' piano, showin' you different things. Sam Phillips, he'd be running the board'', said Milton.

01 - "BEGGIN' MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - James Milton Campbell
Publisher: - Memphis Music
Matrix number: - U 92 Master
Recorded: - July 28, 1953
Released: - December 24, 1953
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 194-A < mono
BEGGIN' MY BABY / SOMEBODY TOLD ME
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Milton Campbell was the second most talented performer Ike Turner brought along to Sun Records (Wolf being - unquestionably - the first), and whilst at this stage of the game he didn't possess an identifiable style of his own, he was capable of turning in an amazing range of convincing performances - truly a chameleon of the blues (although arguably, this was just about the last type of artist that lawsuit-prone Sam Phillips needed on his roster).

Here, Milton turns his attention to a barely-disguised version of Fats Domino's "Goin' To The River" - but despite its derivative nature, his performance is totally arresting. From the rolling and melancholy 4-bar piano introduction it was dear that "Beggin' My Baby" was a winner: even Billboard concurred, giving it highest marks and observing on January 23, 1954: "here's a sock rendition of a most melodic new effort by Milton over a pounding backing. The lyric has suspense, and Milton sings it for all he's worth. A solid slicing that could easily break out for the big coin'".

02(1) - "SOMEBODY TOLD ME" - B.M.I. – 2:52
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Memphis Music
Matrix number: - U 93 Master
Recorded: - July 28, 1953
Released: - December 24, 1953
First appearance: - Sun Records 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 194-B < mono
SOMEBODY TOLD ME / BEGGIN' MY BABY
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Once again Milton contributes a highly-charged blues performance, this time deep in B.B. King territory. However, it somehow lacks the impact of his best Sun work, predominantly because he seems constrained by the Mambo rhythm: in fact, Milton's vocal phrasing is clearly ill-suited to the latin rhythm and his guitar does not get the chance to shine, being limited to a supporting role. Fortunately, the band breaks free of the dreaded Mambo during the chorus and extended instrumental break.

Just as fats Domino inspired one side of Milton's first single, so this side ripped from B.B. King's 1953 hit ''Woke Up This Morning''. King used an almost identical arrangement down to the stinging guitar-over-mambo intro, and the switch to 4/4 on the chorus and break.

02(2) - "SOMEBODY TOLD ME" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Memphis Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 28, 1953
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-B-5 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Little Milton Campbell - Vocal and Guitar
Ike Turner - Piano
C.W. Tate - Tenor Saxophone
Jesse Knight - Bass
Willie Sims - Drums

For Biography of Little Milton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Little Milton's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist on 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 30, 1953 THURSDAY

Webb Pierce recorded ''I'm Walking The Dog'' during a morning session at the Castle Studio in Nashville.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©