CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS (5)
May 1, 1958 to May 31, 1958

Studio Session for Charlie Rich, Early 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Emerson, May 1958 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Buddy Blake Cunningham, May 3, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bond, May 5, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, May 13, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, May 13, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, May 15, 1958 (1) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, May 15, 1958 (2) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, May 15, 1958 (3) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, May 21, 1958 / Brunswick Records
Studio Session for Jesse Lee Turner, May, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, May 28, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Don Hosea, May 28, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for George Klein & Jack Clement, May 30, 1958 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE EARLY 1958
PRODUCER - BILL JUSTIS AND/OR CHARLIE RICH
RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

''Raunchy'' became a number 3 pop hit in the early weeks of 1958. one of the first big rock and roll instrumentals. Bill Justis took to the road, reluctantly, with a cap or a wig covering his balding head and he registered a smaller hit with ''College Man'' in spring 1958 before giving up on being a star. Bill Justis remembered, ''My job at the studio didn't alter after that record hit. I had to turn down a lot of lucrative tours in order to fulfill my commitments in the studio. I did do some TV shows, though. ''Bandstand in Philadelphia and things like that''. He also said that he preferred to work with talented people, like Charlie Rich at Sun, than the teen idols he encountered on tour. ''To tell you the truth, I don't like vocal records much. You'd be surprised how many records by Sammy Superster are put together by clipping eight bars here, eight there, and sticking them altogether = because Sammy can't sing in tune or remember the words for more that sixteen bars. I like good singers... and authentic singers... but I don't have much time for Sammy Superstar''.

Justis did have a lot of time for one of his band members though. ''Charlie was a jazz player and I used him in my band dates around town.. One session, the trumpeter insisted that Charlie be allowed to sing and he was OK. Later, Charlie's wife came by the studio and she had some vocal tapes of him. I listened but they were too good, too smooth, so I said for him to come in one day and we'd see if we couldn't hash the thing over. A few days later I gave him some Sun records and explained what we were after, told him to go away and see how technically bad he could get. So he came back with some original tunes - he'd gotten dome of the jazz out of his bones and I thought he wrote good songs and sang well too, so I talked Sam into a contract. He had a five years writing, recording and session contract.

01 - "THANKS A LOT" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1958
Released: - September 1985
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDX 10 mono
ORIGINAL HITS & MIDNIGHT DEMOS

02 - "SEVEN DREAMS" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1958

03 - "PORTRAIT OF MY LOVE" - B.M.I. - 1:29
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-32 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

This is one of the simplest and most enjoyable of Rich's early attempts at rock and roll. He plainly was a man at odds with a genre here, essentially clueless and striggling to work even the squirrels in the pork into his teen love song. You can decide for yourself whether this brief demo works better with Charlie's piano or Jack Clement's acoustic guitar in support. Incredibly, Shelby Singleton included the piano version of this tune on his second Sun International Rich LP.

04(1) - "BABY I NEED YOU" - B.M.I. - 1:29
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-29 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

04(2) - "BABY I NEED YOU" - B.M.I. - 1:38
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-8 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

05 - "THE WAYS OF A WOMAN IN LOVE"- B.M.I. - 1:20
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-21 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

No doubt about it, this is a good song. Charlie Rich wrote it for Johnny Cash and got it recorded in July, 1958, just before the singer departed for his first major label deal. The demo here (abetted by Jack Clement's acoustic guitar) is almost humorous. Like "Thanks A Lot", which shares a similar history, you can tell that Rich has the target in sight, but manages to shoot a bit wide at times. On "Ways" he almost blows the game with that line "the guy who's got you all worked up". And on "Thanks A Lot", the whole bit about the lawyer suing him for everything he's got was also a bit much. By the time Cash got his hands on the material, some cooler heads had prevailed and toned down Rich's lyrics.

Nevertheless, both are good songs, with the nod plainly going to "Ways". In fact, Rich took this tune with him to RCA and recorded a killer version on his first LP. The material plainly had life and depth beyond what Johnny Cash could do with it.

06 - "IT HURT ME SO" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1958

07 - "WAITING FOR THE ONE I LOVE" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano
Jack Clement - Guitar

For Biographies of Charlie Rich and Jack Clement see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich & Jack Clement's Sun recordings can be heard on their playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1958

Alan Freed is indicted by Boston authorities for inciting a riot at a recent rock and roll show he promoted where the audience stormed the stage during both Jerry Lee Lewis and Chuck Berry's closing sets.

MAY 1958

Don Kirshner opens offices at the Brill Building located at 1619 Broadway, just off Times Square in New York City. From the late 1950s through the mid-1960s, this building, as well as some neighbors (particularly 1650 Broadway, the home of Alden Music), was home to numerous songwriters and producers who helped make the transition from the rough-hewn sound of the fifties to the more sophisticated pop of the sixties.

Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller could well be called the fathers of the Brill Building Sound. Originally based in Los Angeles, the duo, who met when they were only eighteen, began their career writing songs for blues singers like Willie Mae ''Big Mama'' Thornton (''Hound Dog'') and vocal groups like the Robins. In the late fifties, Atlantic Records signed them to the music business first independent production deal.

They moved to New York and, working with the Coasters (who included former members of the Robins), began creating songs, like ''Searchin''', ''Young Blood'', and ''Yakety Yak'', that were mini-operas, unlike any other pop music being made at the time. Leiber and Stoller went on to write numerous hits for other artists, including Elvis Presley and the Drifters (with whom they recorded the first rhythm and blues hit with strings, ''There Goes My Baby''. Throughout, Leiber and Stoller took both popular songwriting and record production to new heights.

Don Kirshner was paying attention to this new direction that rock and roll was taking and, in 1958, he and Al Nevins opened Alden Music, a management and publishing company. After scoring hits with Bobby Darin and Neil Sedaka, Kirshner set his sights on creating a songwriting empire. He signed up numerous young songwriters and began churning out hits for a teen audience that, thanks to the Baby Boom, was growing in size and, in an economically prosperous America, had a good deal of disposable income. By the early sixties, Aldon boasted three first-class songwriting teams: Carole King and Gerry Goffin, Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield, and Barry Mann and Cynthia Well.

Meanwhile, Leiber and Stoller had taken another team – Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry – under their wing, while former rhythm and blues singer Jerome ''Doc'' Pomus and Mort Schuman had become the hottest songwriters at Hill & Range Music, the Brill Building company that oversaw Elvis Presley's publishing.

From the late fifties through the early years of the British Invasion, these songwriters, along with other Brill writers, were responsible for hundreds of classic pop songs.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

It was May 1958 when the first Chess session was held, producing four sides that made up both sides of two singles for the label. Former Sun Records icon Billy Emerson was again working with a house band, featuring McKinley Easton and Willie Dixon, and an arranger and producer, who he recalled was Riley Hampton.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY EMERSON
FOR CHESS RECORDS 1958

RECORDING STUDIOS INCORPORATED
2120 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
CHESS SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE MAY 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – WILLIE DIXON

01 – ''BELIEVE ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Tollie Music
Matrix number: - U 8801
Recorded: - Unknown Date May 1958
Released: - November 1958
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Chess 1728-A mono
BELIEVE ME / HOLY MACKEREL BABY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-28 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

''Believe Me'' was an introspective late night blues that goes back to Emerson's professed liking for the sophisticated styles of bigger rhythm and blues bands like Buddy Johnson or classy pianist singers like Ivory Joe Hunter. In contrast, ''Holy Mackerel Baby'' is a curious song, almost a teenage love song, that seemed to have its hook line, derived from a well-known comedy duo, welded on as an afterthought.

02 – ''HOLY MACKEREL BABY*'' – B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - William Robert Emerson-A. Androzzo-C.Carter
Publisher: - Tollie Music
Matrix number: - U 8802
Recorded: - Unknown Date May 1958
Released: - November 1958
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Chess 1728-B mono
HOLY MACKEREL BABY / BELIEVE ME
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-29 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03 – ''GIVE ME A LITTLE LOVE*'' – B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Arc Music
Matrix number: - U 8803
Recorded: - Unknown Date May 1958
Released: - November 1958
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Chess 1711-A mono
GIVE ME A LITTLE LOVE / WOODCHUCK
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-26 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

From the opening moments of ''Give Me A Little Love'', it was clear that Emerson was now at the city's premier blues label. A strong loping city blues beat defines the basic context for the song, even though it then develops into something more, with organ in place of piano and an interesting mix of blues and pop influences in the band. Emerson sings as strongly and pleadingly as he ever has.

The Chess version of ''Woodchuck'' is announced with a stinging guitar intro but it is more self-conscious and produced than the Sun version, melding a complex mix of horn riffs, drumbeats and guitar solos. Emerson felt, ''I really did that number better for Chess than I did for Sun. We did it with this double beat to it, this New Orleans beat. I used to tear a house up with that number

In November 1958 Chess 1711 appeared, coupling ''Woodchuck'' and ''Give Me A Little Love''. When the decision to release the song again, just a few years after the Sun version, was being made Emerson had discussed publishing arrangements with Willie Dixon, who had told Billy that the rights would have reverted to him by now. Billy told Jim O'Neal, ''He told me that so that I would mess myself up with Leonard. When they asked me who's the publisher I said 'I don't know'and the secretary just put it their publishing, Arc Music. Leonard didn't know I had recorded the song for Sun. I think Sam Phillips wanted a cut. That's why Leonard pulled ''Woodchuck''. In fact, ''Woodchuck'' was not removed from sale, but perhaps it was not promoted so enthusiastically by Chess as it otherwise might have been.

04 – ''WOODCHUCK'' – B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 8804
Recorded: - Unknown Date May 1958
Released: - November 1958
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Chess 1711-B mono
GIVE ME A LITTLE LOVE / WOODCHUCK
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-27 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

By the time of the May session, Billy had talked his way into a wider role with Leonard Chess. He recalled that one of Chess's main musicians and writers, Willie Dixon, had started working with the rival Cobra label so ''Leonard had me doing the job Dixon had been doing''. Dixon soon returned though and there were a number of uneasy Emerson and Dixon songwriting and production collaborations until the deal fell apart over some advice about Emerson's song the ''Woodchuck''.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
William Robert Emerson – Vocal & Piano
With Willie Dixon Band
William ''Lefty'' Bates – Guitar
Matt Murphy - Guitar
Quin Wilson – Bass
Al Duncan – Drums
Clarence Anderson – Organ*
McKinley Easton – Baritone Saxophone
Cliff Davis – Tenor Saxophone
George ''Sonny'' Cohn – Trumpet

At the end of 1958, Emerson appeared with Chicago disc jockey Sam Evans, from WGES, at a number of records hops with The Dells and The Spaniels. Then came another disc, Chess 1728, coupling the two other songs from the May session, ''Holy Mackerel Baby'' and ''Believe Me''.

Again, Billy had high hopes for ''Holy Mackerel Baby'', saying ''I came up with another record called ''Holy Mackerel There Baby'' and, man, that was something. I was doing that thing just like Amos 'N' Andy. Could have been a tremendous record''. But once again there was some controversy between Billy and his record companies. He told, ''I got double-crossed at Chess. That was where my career really got hung up. I did a whole lotta rocking at Chess and I should have done real well there''. He elaborated on this to Jim O'Neal saying, ''VJ told Chess the track I was using (for ''Holy Mackerel'') was their track. I had recorded a song for them with the same arrangement, but that was my arrangement. They created enough stink with Leonard that he didn't have to fool with me, he had a hundred other artists. So he canned that record. That's been the story of my life''.

For Biography of Billy Emerson  see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1958

Barbara Barnes job at Sun Records had many facets, but her chief function was to be a salesperson. Her task was to get records noticed and played in as many ways as she could devise, using her telephone and typewriter. A new means of publicity was launched in Mat 1958 with the debut of ''Sun-Liners'', a one page monthly news sheet that contained information about the current Sun releases. Sam Phillips as always had given Barbara a free hand with content, saying she could include whatever she chose to feature, including mention of other label's records. She laid out several boxes, with one devoted to a disc jockey spotlight, a couple mentioning new records (Cash and Lewis for the first issue), and a column of short news notes about Sun's people, the industry at large, and whatever news she could find about disc jockeys, stations, or others in orbit. She even mentioned Roy Orbison's tune ''Claudette'' coming out on Cadence recorded by the Everly Brothers.

Tucked into the miscellaneous column was a note about Sam's appearance before a Senate committee looking into alleged abuses in TV and the recording industry. As it pertained to manufacturers, the issue was a practice known as payola, a term coined at the time to describe ''pay for play'', especially money paid to radio disc jockeys to play certain records.

Two senators, John McClelland and John Pastore, were prominent in the investigation, which was instigated in part by the music-licensing agency ASCAP, which alleged possible corruption and collusion between broadcasters and music publishers licensed through ASCAP's rival, BMI. ASCAP had long monopolized popular-music publishing, but with the growing importance of ''fringe'' music like hillbilly, blues, and especially rock and roll, ASCAP was being left behind. Some in the organization were said to attribute the decline of their more traditional popular music to rock and roll, which they saw as fad that could be explained only by money, not popular acclaim.

Chairman Pastore accused several independent labels, including Aladdin, Chess, King, Modern, and Specialty, of engaging in payola. The hearings revealed that Syd Nathan of King Records and Leonard and Phil Chess of Chess Records entered their payoffs on their books and deducted them as business expenses. Most of the perks that the small disc jockeys had enjoyed were modest, a bottle of whiskey here, fifty dollars there. The 1958 hearings centered on proposed legislation to outlaw payola, and they continued in 1959 with the involvement of another congressman, Oren Harris. Hearings were resurrected in 1960 after a notorious disc jockey convention in Miami.

The person who came off worst as a result of the hearings was Alan Freed. The Chess brothers had for a time kept him on their payroll as a ''consultant'', and Jerry Wexler of Atlantic Records had been delivering $500 a week to Freed at the Brill Building in New York in exchange for Freed's giving their records his ''consideration''. It was revealed that Bobby Darin had paid him $400 to be on a show Freed organized. The disc jockey-entrepreneur also was heavily into related ventures assuring him a cut of the profits of hit records. In 1958 twenty-four disc jockeys were cited, and others were called to testify at various times. Strangely or not, none of those who made the news were ones Barbara Barnes cultivated in her time at Sun.

Sam Phillips's 1958 testimony stressed that, even though Sun artists most often recorded BMI-licensed tunes, his radio station, WHER, played mostly ASCAP music. The only BMI company in which Sam's eleven corporations shared an interest was Jack Music, in which songwriter and Sun-producer Jack Clement had a 25 percent interest.

Sam Phillips was very indignant about the whole issue and volunteered to appear so he could testify that Sun hadn't given payola and that the industry as a whole was clean. Sam had been involved in payola, not only because of principle but because he wasn't inclined to give away money. Also, there were great artists and hits at Sun, and the records from artists not so talented never made it to the charts. The issue of payola never once came up in many, many phone calls with disc jockeys and distributors.

Jud Phillips was very close to the Dick Clark organization, but never heard of any allegations of collusion there. Dick Clark did divest some of his related companies as a result of the hearings, however, Jud had once told Barbara Barnes he would occasionally peel off a hundred-dollar bill for a favorite disc jockey when they were out drinking. But, he said, ''The jock would think 'Old Jud is drunk' and not consider the money a bride''. Some time later they did issue a record that Alan Freed had a publishing interest in, but it bombed, so what did that prove? Actually, payola was not illegal when the hearings of 1958 and 1959 took place, so it turned out that tax-evasion charges were the only serious legal ramifications of the hearings. The hearings had no effect on ASCAP or BMI, and the future would prove that rock and roll was indeed not a fad but a trend.

MAY 1958

SUN-LINERS - SUN-LINERS - SUN-LINERS

SUN STARTS SCANDAL SHEET - This is Volume 1, number 1 of an official publication of Sun Records Company. We frankly admit being blased - since we expect to plug our news releases in said sheet. However, we're just as interested in featuring news about disc jockey's distributors, other manufacturers and persons otherwise connected with the recording industry.

If you have an item - the editor, Barbara Barnes, would like to hear from you. Her address is 706 Union, Memphis-phone Jackson 7-7961.

COMMENT-ABLE ITEMS - Congratulations to Roy Lamont of WRVA-TV, Richmond, who recently celebrated his second anniversary as M.C. of a very popular TV record hop. Roy tells us he's starting a new show - teaching dancing via TV... Also, congrats to KIOA on their first anniversary of broadcasting - they've achieved a lot in one short year... And best wishes to Ted Randle, KPIX-TV, in San Francisco, on his new dance part... At press time, Lew Chudd, Imperial president, was slated for a May 6 appearance before the committee considered the Smathers Bill. His position - that the public is not being maligned by a conspiracy among publishers, recording companies, and stations - is much the same as that taken by Sun president Sam Phillips, when he testified last month.

The particular weight of Sam's testimony was this: his radio station, WHER in Memphis, was playing 79 per cent A.S.C.A.P. music during their last audit in November 1956. And the policy hasn't changed... Memphis is one of the cities Jerry Shifrin visited during a recent sales tour for Roulette, in connection with his duties as national sales manager. We enjoyed having him in the city... Dick Biondi (WHOT, Youngstown) is one of the most enthusiastic supporters of a new Sun artist Edwin Bruce - and we love him. Ed's new release (SUN 292) is "Sweet Woman". We'd like to have your opinions on this one... Roy Orbison - who's under recording contract with Sun - is understandably elated over the success of his tune "Claudette", recorded by the Everly Brothers on Cadence.

NEW SOUND - Jack Clement makes his debut as a recording artist on SUN 291 "Ten Years" b/w "Your Lover Boy". A couple of weeks ago, we package up the records, sent them out, without saying too much about Jack - and much to our delight, "Ten Years" is getting a lot of reaction about the country. mostly in the medium-sized markets. Its hard to tell if Jack is a country artist who sounds sort of pop, or a pop artist who sounds sort of country. At any rate, we're counting on Jack to make it as an increasingly popular artist.

As a songwriter, Jack has already acchieved a lot of prominence. He wrote both the tunes he recorded, and in addition has written a lot of Jerry Lee Lewis' material (including "Fools Like Me" - back side of "High School Confidential", SUN 296). He also wrote Johnny Cash's biggest seller to date - "Ballad Of A Teenage Queen" (SUN 283) and penned Johnny's latest release, "Guess Things Happen That Way" (SUN 295). Imperial Records reports that Ricky Nelson is recording Jacks' "I'm Feeling Sorry". So - the boy doesn't really HAVE to sing - he just likes to!

A WORD OF SPECIAL CONGRATULATIONS TO MILT GRANT - WTTG-TV personality, for his many successful activities in fields allied to the record industry. Particularly do we salute him for the work in combatting juvenile delinquency which won for Milt this month an award from the American Legion. A person such as Milt, who commands the attention and devotion of so many young people, is to be commended for channeling his efforts in such a constructive way.

For such a young man, Milt is a broadcasting veteran. He was in radio seven years before joining WTTG-TV in 1955. His Milt Grant TV record show was a pioneer show of its type and has copped a terrific rating. Milt's record hops have grown to gigantic proportions, covering Washington and surrounding area for a radius of 150 miles.

JERRY LEE LEWIS AND JOHNNY CASH STYLE - Latest release on the Sun label is Jerry Lee Lewis' rocking number "High School Confidential" (Boppin' at the High School Hop) (SUN 296). It gets its title from the MGM movie of the same name, in which Jerry appears in a featured role. None of us in Memphis have previewed the film - but Charles Felleman, who's coordinating promotion of the movie in New York - says Jerry plays his role to the hilt and comes through strong. To be world-premiered at Atlantic City, May 29.

Flip side is a sentimental ballad, "Fools Like Me". This number is one of eight picket for Jerry's forthcoming LP. By the time you read this, the album should be on the market. By the way, if you have any inquiries about the Jerry Lee Lewis National Fan Club, they should be addressed to Miss Regina Reese, 706 Union, Memphis.

Looks like Johnny cash is in solid, judging from orders on his new ballad, "Guess Things Happen That Way". This number is genuine Cash material - simple, sort of philosophical, with a lonely quality. The other side is "Come In, Stranger" (SUN 295).

MAY 1, 1958 THURSDAY

KLLL signs on the air in Lubbock, Texas. Among its disc jockeys in its first year of operation, Waylon Jenning.

MAY 3, 1958 SATURDAY

Police turn the house lights on before the and of Jerry Lee Lewis concert at the Boston Arena. When a riot erupts, mayor John Hynes bans rock and roll from the city. Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly are also on the Alan Freed promoted bill.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BUDDY BLAKE CUNNINGHAM
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MAY 3, 1958
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

01 – ''FACE IN THE MIRROR''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 3, 1958

02 – ''STARRY EYED''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 3, 1958

03 - ''I CAN'T LOVE YOU ANY MORE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 3, 1958

04 – ''CRAZY MIXED UP BLUES''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 3, 1958

05 - ''WALKIN'''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 3, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Buddy Blake Cunningham – Vocal
Roland Janes – Guitar
Sid Manker – Probably Guitar
Stan Kesler – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

For Biography of Buddy Blake Cunningham see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BOND
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY MAY 5, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01 - "SHOW ME" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Eddie Bond
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 5, 1958
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1-22 mono
EDDIE BOND - ROCKIN' DADDY

02 - "THIS OLD HEART OF MINE"
Composer: - Eddie Bond
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 5, 1958

03 - "BROKE MY GUITAR''
Composer: - Eddie Bond-Jacke Clement
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 5, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bond - Vocal and Rhythm Guitar
Reggie Young – Lead Guitar
Ellis Mize – Bass
Johnny Fine – Drums
Jimmy Smith – Piano
Johnny Ace Cannon – Tenor Saxophone

Unknown - Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Eddie Bond see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 6, 1958 TUESDAY

Ray Price recorded Roger Miller's ''Invitation To The Blues'' during a midnight session at Nashville's Bradley Studios.

MAY 7, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Conway Twitty recorded ''It's Only Make Believe'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

MAY 8, 1958 THURSDAY

Bill Phillips signs his first recording contract, with Columbia Records.

Mel Tillis recorded ''A Violet And A Rose''. The song becomes a hit for Little Jimmy Dickens in 1962.

MAY 12, 1958 MONDAY

Decca released The Kalin Twins' ''When''.

MAY 13, 1958 TUESDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis and his second wife, Jane Mitcham, are officially divorced. Lewis is already married to his third wife, 13-year-old cousin Myra Gale Brown.

Chet Atkins and Carl Smith are featured on the Red Foley-hosted ABC series ''Country Music Jubilee''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY MAY 13, 1958
PRODUCER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The assertively-titled "You Made A Hit" was supplied by Walt Maynard, a jobbing songsmith from the Claunch/Cantrell writing camp - a team who regularly supplied material to Memphis-based recording artists. The session itself combined Smith's own guitarist, Stanley Walker and Dean Perkins with Sun's house rhythm section.

01 - "YOU MADE A HIT" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Walt Maynard
Publisher: - Buna Music - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 329 - Master
Recorded: - May 13, 1958
Released: - October 25, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 308-B < mono
YOU MADE A HIT / WHY WHY WHY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"You Made A Hit" is a fine, energetic rockabilly performance. The vocal bristles with energy and the instrumental work is especially memorable. Because Smith often used his touring group on sessions, it has become difficult to identify musicians on his record. Whether the lead guitar here is by Stanley Walker or Dean Perkins, the style gets rave reviews from the rockabilly cognoscenti.

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Dean Perkins – Guitar
Stanley Walker – Guitar
James Webb – Bass
Gary Diamond – Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano

For Biography of Ray Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ray Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY MAY 13, 1958
PRODUCER - SAM C. PHILLIPS,
BILL JUSTIS AND/OR CHARLIE RICH
RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01 – "REBOUND/LONELY WEEKENDS" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 13, 1958
Released: - November 1986
Fragment Count-In of ''Lonely Weekends'' released by Mistake
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-8-9 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN'
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-5-33 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

02 – "STAY / CHATTER" - B.M.I. - 3:18
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 13, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-7 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

Three different version of "Stay" recorded by Charlie Rich to show the extent to which studio time was invested in this song. Three entirely different sessions were held, each with its own arrangement. Was it a jazz tune - part of his club performance days. Was it a ballad with deep support from a male chorus. Or was it a pretty country ballad. Ultimately, the latter choice won out for original release, but alternate contenders remained unreleased in the vaults for nearly 40 years.

Charlie Rich began laying down demos of "Stay" as early as March 1958. Five months before his first single was released. The single version appeared in August 1960 and it is hard to know at this point just how many sessions went into developing the song. As we now learn, that simple country ballad was also tried as a jazzy pop tune and a ballad with a virile male chorus. The tune, with its pleasant cyclic chord changes remained an important part of Rich's repertoire for many years and it is easy to see why. The arrangement on both of the alternatives issued now, for the first time features a striking flatted-7-chord during the last verse. a device missing from the originally issued single.

Ironically, of course, the record didn't sell worth a damn anyway, but nearly 40 year later its a lot nicer to listen to than it would have been with sweetening. Reflecting on Charlie Rich's astonishing talent, many of his colleagues at Sun remain undecided whether it was his singing, playing or composing that most impressed them. "Stay" makes a strong case for the last. It is a beautiful composition, striking in its lyrical simplicity and chordal structure. Recent research into the Sun vaults to prepare a deeper look at Charlie Rich reveals that "Stay" was recorded in several different styles before this version was selected for release. The song also exists in near doo-wop style with a virile sounding male chorus, as well as a more jazzy ballad format.

03 - "OH LONELY DAYS" - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 13, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-30 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

04 - "DEEP FREEZE" - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 13, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-22 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

Although the title existed in discographies for years, there was no trace of this tape until very recently. It was finally found, sitting in its own poorly labelled tape box with a crudely typed lyric sheet and the words demo for Ray Smith' folded neatly at the bottom, undisturbed for nearly 40 years.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano
Unknown Group

For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1958

More sessions were held for Johnny Cash to work off Cash's commitments to the label. Three sessions on May 15, 1958 resulted in eleven masters being recorded including five from the pen of a country music legend.

MAY 15, 1958 THURSDAY

Release date of Jerry Lee Lewis' first album (SLP 1230), also issued as three EPs.

Kenny Rogers marries his first wife, Janice Gordon.

Johnny Cash recorded ''You're The Nearest Thing To Heaven'' at Memphis Sun studio. Cash and his two-piece band were back in the studio on this day under different circumstances. Sam Phillips had recently learned that Johnny Cash intended to leave the label when his contract expired at the end of the year. Phillips was hurt and angry and felt betrayed by Cash's backroom negotiations with Don Law of Columbia Records. Worse yet, when Phillips confronted Cash with his suspicions, the singer denied everything. When Colin Escott and Hank Davis discussed the episode with Sam Phillips 25 years later, he still seemed visibly upset: ''The only damn lie Johnny Cash ever told me. As soon as he opened his mouth, I knew he was lying to me''. Johnny Cash worked off his recording commitments to Phillips before leaving the label for the forthcoming Columbia sessions.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

On this session the alternate version of ''Sugartime'' benefits from the lack of vocal overdubs as does the undubbed master of ''Born To Lose'' which is preceded by a couple of false starts. ''You're The Nearest Thing To Heaven'', the final song taped at the first session, is also minus the vocal overdubs but does feature a double-tracked bass vocal by Cash. This wasn't the first time this had been done as it was used to good effect on ''Port Of Lonely Hearts'' recorded a few years earlier.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SESSION 1 - THURSDAY MAY 15, 1958
SESSION HOURS: 10:30-13:30
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

From a strictly technical point of view, the release of Sun 302 by Johnny Cash contained two of the strongest songs he ever recorded. It was also his last single as a contracted Sun artist, although far from his last Sun single. Lyrically and musically, these are highly competent examples of country music craftsmanship. That's the good news. The more realistic picture is that in keeping with the need to sweeten releases for the lucrative crossover market, the results were embalmed with choral overdubs that all but sank the proceedings.

01(1) – "SUGARTIME" - B.M.I. - 1:42
Composer: - Charlie Phillips-Odis Echols
Publisher: - Nor Ya Jak Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 103-4 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-3-1 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

The alternate version of "Sugartime" benefits from the lack of vocal overdubs as does the undubbed master of "Born To Lose" which is preceded by a couple of false starts.

01(2) – "SUGARTIME" - B.M.I. - 1:46
Composer: - Charlie Phillips-Odis Echols
Publisher: - Nor Ya Jak Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 445 - Overdubbed Master with Chorus and Handclaps *
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - May 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > SUN 363-A < mono
SUGARTIME / MY TREASURE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

"Sugertime" was barely cold on the pop charts when Johnny Cash and Company decided to tackle it as a way to help fulfill their contractual obligations to Sun in 1958. An odd choice of material, to be sure, for the king of brooding melancholia. In interviews since, Cash has suggested that he recorded it precisely because he thought Sun would never release it. How wrong. The fact that all the lyrics were in place suggests that at least "some" planning went into the recording. The song itself is something of a parody. It actually began life as a hillbilly opus, recorded by its composer Charlie Phillips, however, that took it to the top of the charts in 1957.

No one would ever accuse the squeaky clean McGuire Sisters of being purveyors of smut, yet this song is surely about someone who, in John Lee Hooker's immortal words, "wants his sugar three times a day". The heavy choral support, including the handclapping gimmick during Luther's solo, works surprisingly well. In fact, the dreaded Gene Lowery Singers may never have been used to better effect on a Johnny cash record. Their slightly delayed entrance on the word "sugar" and their premature appearance on the final "all the time" add to the record's impact.

02(1) - "BORN TO LOSE" - B.M.I. - 1:12
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-23 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

02(2) - "BORN TO LOSE" - B.M.I. - 0:20
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None - False Start Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-25 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

02(3) - "BORN TO LOSE" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 103 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-3-2 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

02(4) - "BORN TO LOSE" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - U 472 - Overdubbed Master Take 3
with Chorus Before Release*
Recorded:- May 15, 1958 - Additional Echo Added
Released: - April 27, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > SUN 376-B < mono
BORN TO LOSE / BLUE TRAIN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Cash's somber reading of "Born To Lose" fits the mood of this country standard like a glove. Composer Ted Daffan could have retired on the royalties he earned from all the versions of this tune since its 1942 copyright. Cash's relatively workmanlike vocal has been engulfed by a sea of echo, and the chorus liberally applied. All things considered, this was not an unreasonable entry into the 1962 country sweepstakes, along with Ray Charles' mega-selling pop version.

03(1) - "YOU'RE THE NEAREST THING TO HEAVEN" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Johnny Cash-Hoyt Johnson-Jimmy Atkins
Publisher: - E&M Publishers
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-26 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

"You're The Nearest Thing To Heaven", the final song taped at the first session, is also minus the vocal overdubs but does feature a double-tracked bass vocal by Cash. This wasn't the first time this had been done at it was used to good effect on "Port Of Lonely Hearts" recorded a few years earlier.

03(2) - "YOU'RE THE NEAREST THING TO HEAVEN" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Johnny Cash-Hoyt Johnson-Jimmy Atkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 317 – Overdubbed Master with Chorus**
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - May 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 302-B < mono
YOU'RE THE NEAREST THING TO HEAVEN / THE WAYS OF A WOMAN IN LOVE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Its hard to listen to "You're The Nearest Thing To Heaven" and not come away with the impression that this is poetry. Someone, actually three someones, sweated over these lyrics. The images are sharp and fully expressed, but the song is perhaps too romantic, too positive for Johnny Cash. His best work for Sun remains in the stark, moody, melancholy mold. There's no longing here, no pain. This is a deeply romantic love song. It is not an ideal vehicle for Johnny Cash or his instrumental sound.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson – Piano

* - Overdubbed session probably March 27, 1961, Phillips Studio, 317 Seventh Avenue, Nashville, Tennessee.

* - Gene Lowery Singers - Vocal Chorus

** - Overdubbed session probably July 9, 1958, Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee

** - The Confederates, were a barbershop quartet that performed in the 1950s and 1960s. The group formed in September 1953 at a SPEBSQSA chapter meeting in Memphis, Tennessee.

They consisting of
George Evans - Tenor
Dave LaBonte - Lead
Bill "Buz" Busby – Baritone
Wally Singleton - Bass

The Confederates took first place in the 1956 SPEBSQSA International Quartet Championship after finishing second the year before. They were notable not only for their championship-caliber harmonies, but also for performing in Confederate officer uniforms. The group stopped performing in 1969.

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SESSION 2 - THURSDAY MAY 15, 1958
SESSION HOURS: 14:00-17:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

This second session produced "The Story Of A Broken Heart", a song that Sam Phillips felt was ideal for Cash. We have included all the studio chat and false starts that exist and it shows how the song changed tempo before release. You can hear Cash, Clement and Phillips discussing the tempo.

01(1) - "THE STORY OF A BROKEN HEART" - B.M.I. - 0:50
Composer: - Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Starts Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-27 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

01(2) - "THE STORY OF A BROKEN HEART" - B.M.I. - 6:04
Composer: - Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Complete Take 2 & False Starts
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-28 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

01(3) - "THE STORY OF A BROKEN HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP-1255-10 (stereo)
NOW HERE'S JOHNNY CASH
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-3-6 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

01(4) - "THE STORY OF A BROKEN HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Tommy Blake-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Starts - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - November Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-10-4 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-6-4 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Blake's ''Ballad...'' had by now become the ''Story'' of a broken heart and there were a couple of other changes but Cash obviously did not have the commitment or the time to change too much. The sale of the song to Phillips must have taken place sometime between its first appearance on a single in 1960, when it was credited to Blake, and its mid-1960s appearance on a budget LP, when it was credited to Sam Phillips.

01(5) - "THE STORY OF A BROKEN HEART" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Tommy Blake-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958

01(6) - "THE STORY OF A BROKEN HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Tommy Blake-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 404 - Overdubbed Master with a Vocal Chorus
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - July 14, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 343-A < mono
THE STORY OF A BROKEN HEART / DOWN THE STREET TO 301
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Tommy Blake (who recorded two singles for Sun and a plethora of singles for labels great and small - mostly small) wrote "Story Of A Broken Heart" for Johnny Cash. An awful lot of work and numerous takes were attempted but the results seem to have ultimately disappointed Sam Phillips and the project was scrapped. It finally saw release under fairly anonymous conditions, dumped on the marked some two years after Cash's departure. By then, Sam Phillips had bought the copyright from Blake in one of Blake's many moment of need. The delay in issuing "Story Of A Broken Heart" is something of a surprise. The material itself was ideally suited to Cash's style and persona: the long suffering loser, humming his way through simple chord changes. The record buying public had plenty of Cash records to choose from in the summer of 1960, and this one slipped into undeserved obscurity.

02(1) - "ALWAYS ALONE" - B.M.I. - 1:34
Composer: - Ted Daffan
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Incomplete Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 103 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

Other than the released version of "Always Alone" there only remains a few incomplete takes of the song all of which are included here. None of these get past the instrumental break. Luther seems unable to concentrate, playing in the wrong key, which obviously frustrates Cash. He can be heard admonishing Luther with the words "What are you doing Luther? What're you doing? Ket of A, please, key of A".

02(2) - "ALWAYS ALONE" - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Ted Daffan
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Take & False Starts - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1275-1 (stereo)
ORIGINAL SUN SOUND OF JOHNNY CASH
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-3-7 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 – 1958

02(3) - "ALWAYS ALONE" - B.M.I. - 1:09
Composer: - Ted Daffan
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-30 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

02(4) - "ALWAYS ALONE" - B.M.I. - 1:10
Composer: - Ted Daffan
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-31 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

03(1) - "YOU TELL ME" - B.M.I. - 0:06
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-232 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

There are no surviving alternate takes of "You Tell Me' and these two very short false starts are all that remain. The issued version, which is included due to the lack of any complete outtakes, is not a bad performance but the incredibly short running time of just 1 minute 16 seconds is the most likely reason for it not being released as a single or why no further overdubs were added.

03(2) - "YOU TELL ME" - B.M.I. - 0:26
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-33 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

03(3) - "YOU TELL ME" - B.M.I. - 1:17
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 378 - Master
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 331-A < mono
YOU TELL ME / GOODBYE LITTLE DARLIN'
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

It is likewise hard to tell what sort of intentions surrounded "You Tell Me: when it was recorded in May 1958, shortly before Cash's departure. The track is quite engaging, but its brief running time made it a poor contender for airplay or sales.

04(1) - "LIFE GOES ON" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Jack Clement-Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Jack Clement Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 428 - Master
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - December 10, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 355-B < mono
LIFE GOES ON / OH, LONESOME ME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

05(2) - "LIFE GOES ON" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jack Clement-Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Jack Clement Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958

"Life Goes On" is a credible, vintage-sounding slice of sorrow that might have barked at the heels of "I Walk The Line" had it been released four years earlier. The song contains a powerful musical hook, lifted directly from "I Walk The Line". Even though we know what its going to sound like and when its going to happen, it still manages to propel the song forward with surprising power. Cash and Jack Clement collaborated on this one, and its obvious that there was more Cash than Clement in the final product. If you like vintage sounding Cash on Sun recordings, its hard to be critical of this outing, which must have pleased a lot of starved Sun-ophiles in 1960.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums*
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

Possibly dubbed on May 27, 1958
Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt, Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Wanting to keep his best material Cash would cover other artists material during these sessions and at the final session on May 15, he recorded five songs from the Hank Williams songbook. Four of these, "I Could Never Be Ashamed Of You, "You Win Again", "I Can't Help It", and "Hey Good Lookin' were all issued on the June 1958 release Johnny Cash Sings Hank Williams (EPA-111). For that release they were subject to unnecessary overdubs including piano, drums and vocal chorus from the Gene Lowery Singers which, along with added echo, added little to the basic recordings.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SESSION 3 - THURSDAY MAY 15, 1958
SESSION HOURS: 17:00-20:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

Jack Clement, speaking in 2004, remembered these sessions in a conversation with writer Peter Lewry, and Clement provides a rare insight into what transpired in the studio. "One day we were trying to get some songs and he was in a hurry and there was this Hank Williams songbook on top of the playback speaker out in the studio and I said sing me five Hank Williams songs real quick. Just you and the boys and I'll keep the band real low and you sing them and I'll get some people later to fix the music. I said we could do them in forty five minutes so that's what we did. And he cut these five songs and I kept Luther and Marshall back cause they weren't that quick at learning songs. I just wanted to get them down and I figured I'd get some other guys in later and fix up the music. That's exactly what I did. We couldn't erase the band we had to keep and add stuff to it. They weren't the greatest things but they weren't that bad".

The recordings focused on Cash's vocals, with Luther and Marshall (guitar and bass) mixed way down. The original recordings came close to a cappella performances ans are as stark as anything. While Clement told Cash not to worry, that he'd bring in other musicians once the boys completed the bed tracks, what he may not have told Cash is that those later overdubs would include the dreaded Gene Lowery Singers. There was little Cash could do he left the studio.

They are presented here in two different versions. With the additional instruments and echo, but no vocal overdubs and also dry with no echo or overdubs. There also included some studio chat and false starts preceding some of the songs.

01(1) - "YOU WIN AGAIN" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Hiriam Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958

01(2) - "YOU WIN AGAIN" - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Hiriam Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-2 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

01(3) - "YOU WIN AGAIN" - B.M.I.- 2:15
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Hiriam Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 33rpm EPA-111-2 mono
JOHNNY CASH SINGS HANK WILLIAMS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-3-13 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

01(4) - "YOU WIN AGAIN" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Hiriam Music
Matrix number: - None - False Starts - Take 3 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE OUTTAKES
Reissued: 2019 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17504-9 mono
SUN SHINES ON HANK WILLIAMS

01(5) - "YOU WIN AGAIN" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Hiriam Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958

02(1) - "I COULD NEVER BE ASHAMED OF YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-37 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES
Reissued: 2019 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17504-4 mono
SUN SHINES ON HANK WILLIAMS

02(2) - "I COULD NEVER BE ASHAMED OF YOU"* - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 33rpm EPA-111-4 mono
JOHNNY CASH SINGS HANK WILLIAMS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-3-14 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

03(1) - "HEY GOOD LOOKIN'" - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-39 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES
Reissued: 2019 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17504-26 mono
SUN SHINES OF HANK WILLIAMS

03(2) - "HEY GOOD LOOKIN'" - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 33rpm EPA-111-3 mono
JOHNNY CASH SINGS HANK WILLIAMS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517 EH-3-15 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

04(1) - "I CAN'T HELP (IF I'M STILL IN LOVE WITH YOU)" - B.M.I. - 1:44
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-3-2 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES
Reissued: 2019 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17504-22 mono
SUN SHINES ON HANK WILLIAMS

04(2) - "I CAN'T HELP IT (IF I'M STILL IN LOVE WITH YOU)" - B.M.I. - 1:43
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 33rpm EPA-111-1 mono
JOHNNY CASH SINGS HANK WILLIAMS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-3-16 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

05(1) - "COLD COLD HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Sunnyvale Records (LP) 33rpm SUN 9330-901-3 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 1 - JOHNNY CASH
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-3-17 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

"Cold Cold Heart" was also recorded but did not make it onto the Sings Hank Williams EP 111 and it was several years before it finally gained a release. It would suffer the same fate as the other Hank Williams tracks with similar overdubs and, like the other four tracks, is included here in its dry format.

05(2) - "COLD COLD HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 15, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

* - Overdubbed with drums, piano and chorus in various combinations before release on EPA 111. The original dry (ie. without echo) and undubbed masters are available on Sunbox 103. The versions on the Bear Family CD box feature echo, and drum overdubs and possibly electric bass.

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MID MAY 1958

On this time, Sonny Burgess held down a day job with his brother-in-law in a sporting goods store before reconstituted his band the Pacers with J.C. Caughron on guitar and Bobby Crafford on drums. They continued to tour in support of Johnny Cash, playing Town Hall Party and the western country circuit. After their initial confusion on the L.A. freeway system, Sonny came to like California, but - once again - wasn't tempted to move there.

Shortly before the stripped-down Pacers toured out west, Sonny decided he would create a bigger splash on-stage if he dyed his black hair blonde. Unfortunately, black + blonde = red, and Sonny Burgess was left with flaming ginger hair. His problems mounted on the road. They'd played Tucson, and were heading across the mountains towards Albuquerque.

"We were driving two Cadillacs", he remembered, "and we had a blow-out, so me and Kern and Orbison got in the car with Luther and Marshall, and headed on to Albuquerque without our equipment. We were heading down the highway at 120 miles an hour. Luther was driving. Then here comes this bunch of cattle across the highway. Luther headed off the road, through the brush, across the sand, circling them cows, and got back on the highway. Scary, boy! Then we went on without our stage clothes. they had a western swing band to back us. You never heard such a mess in your life. When we were leaving, ray said, 'Man, they'll always remember us in Albuquerque as the Wink Parrot and the Red Clown'". (Its worth noting that in Orbison's oft-quoted version of the story he was the "Wink Wildcat").

EARLY 1958

Billy Riley stayed on at Sun Records until sometime in 1958 when his growing frustration with Sam Phillips putting all (or most) of his promotional resources behind Jerry Lee Lewis and not Billy Lee got the best of him. Several volatile encounters between Sam and Riley occurred. Riley recalled, ''Sam Phillips and I both had respect for each other, but we didn't get along too well at times. Mostly it was just words, but I did get a little riled one time and tore his studio up a little''.

MAY 17, 1958 SATURDAY

Ferriday, Louisiana, celebrates Jerry Lee Lewis Day and gives the singer the key to the city, following a parade.

Marty Robbins joins host Red Foley on ABC-TV's ''Country Music Jubilee'', originally called ''Ozark Jubilee''.

MAY 20, 1958 TUESDAY

Guitarist Jane Wiedlin is born in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. She joins the 1980s pop band The Go-Go's and later co-writes Keith Urban's ''But For The Grace Of God'' with Urban and fellow Go-Go Charlotte Caffey.

MAY 21, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Willie Nelson Jr., better known as ''Billy'' is born in Fort Worth. He dies in December 1991 from an apparent suicide.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Billy Riley summarily quit Sun Records and signed a one-off deal with Brunswick which resulted in the Owen Bradley produced single ''Rockin' On The Moon'' and ''That All To The Ball Mr. Hall'' (Brunswick 55085). The awkward contrivance of the Brunswick single was in marked contrast to the spontaneity and vitality of even Riley's least distinguished Sun recordings.

Not even the change in label could spark a little action in Riley's career, although expressions of interest were coming from some unlikely quarters.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
FOR BRUNSWICK RECORDS 1958

BRADLEY FILM & RECORDING STUDIO
804 16TH AVENUE SOUTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
BRUNSWICK SESSION: WEDNESDAY MAY 21, 1958
SESSION HOURS: 18:30-22:30
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – OWEN BRADLEY

01 - "ROCKIN' ON THE MOON" - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Vic McAlpin
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - NA 10283 - 105211
Recorded: - May 21, 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Brunswick Records (S) 45rpm Brunswick 55085-A mono
ROCKIN' ON THE MOON / IS THAT ALL TO THE BALL (MR. HALL)
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-1-9 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

02 – "IS THAT ALL TO THE BALL (MR. HALL)" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Curtis-Lewis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - NA 10284 - 105212
Recorded: - May 21, 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Brunswick Records (S) 45rpm Brunswick 55085-B mono
IS THAT ALL TO THE BALL (MR. HALL) / ROCKIN' ON THE MOON
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-1-10 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

In mid 1958 Dick Clark brought Riley to Philadelphia with a view to recording him for Swan (one of the labels in which Clark had a covert interest that he was forced to divest before and during the payola hearings). A little later, Steve Sholes, RCA's corpulent head of A&R, approached Riley with the prospect of recording for RCA in Toronto, presumably during Riley's extended engagement at the Flamingo Lounge in Hamilton, Ontario.

On both occasions, Riley left town without cutting anything. ''We were going to the studio to cut for Dick Clark'', recalled Riley to Bill Millar, ''and I said, 'Aw, let's go back to Sam. He’s the only one that understand us'. I just didn't trust people from the North''. Similarly, Riley was booked on the Arthur Godfrey Show but failed to show up.

''I don't understand why I did those crazy things'', said Riley, trying to account for the fact that he was becoming his own worst enemy, a trait that would gather momentum. At the end of 1958, Billy Riley going back to Sun Records. Riley soon defined the groove in which he remained for the balance of his tenure at the label.

03 – "SPOOK" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - NA 10285 - 105213
Recorded: - May 21, 1958
Released: - Brunswick Unissued/Tape Los

04 – "TRANQUILIZER" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - NA 10286 - 105214
Recorded: - May 21, 1958
Released: - Brunswick Unissued/Tape Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Guitar
Pat O'Neill - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Martin Willis - Tenor Saxophone

For Biography of Billy Riley see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 21, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Scheduled to play thirty-two days in the United Kingdom, Jerry Lee Lewis left Memphis for New York with his wife Myra, his sister Frankie Jean, drummer Russ Smith, bass player Jay W. Brown and his wife Lois and son Rusty, Myra's brother. Next day they flew to London Heathrow and on arrival at the Westbury Hotel immediately met with the British press.

MAY 22, 1958 THURSDAY

This day brought a momentous event that had enormous repercussions for Sam Phillips, Sun Records, and all the employees who were in any way associated with the record company. The news that Jerry Lee Lewis had bigamously married his thirteen-year-old cousin, a story that had just broken in the British press, was the turning point that to believe eventually brought the little world of fun and music to a halt and scattered to the four winds. The damage didn't appear irreparable at first, and things went on as usual for some time, but Sun never had a major star after this fiasco.

That morning, the Sun crew got to work about 8:30 and immediately the phone rang, and it was Jud Phillips calling from New York. He was already in the bar at the Manhattan Hotel, his home away from home. He said he had a call late the night before from Helen Bolstad, a freelance popular music writer, who got the news from London as soon as the Jerry Lee scandal broke. She came down to the hotel to find out the truth of the matter from Jud. She had often written about Sun artists, had been to Memphis visiting Sun, and they were supposed friends all around.

Trying to avoid giving her the story she had come to ask about, Jud said with a rueful laugh, ''I got poor old Helen drunk and then sent her back to her apartment in a taxi''. The news was already breaking in the British tabloids, and it would soon be all over the United States media. Jud said reporters would quickly begin besieging by phone for a statement. Even there, the phone rang almost immediately, but it was Sam Phillips. He said that the staff of Sun needed to get together and write an open letter to the industry. They would buy space in Billboard and present Jerry in a better light. Sam explained more of what he had in mind, punctuating the reasonable content of his call with outbursts against ''those hypocrites – those limeys'' who had brought all this to pass.

Over the next week, Sun composed a contrite explanation and appeal for understanding, which ran June 9, but the few comments Jerry Lee Lewis had made before they got to him cancelled out any good will the ad might have engendered. In England, when asked about Myra Gale's age, he said, ''She may be young, but she's a whole lot of woman''. Just enough of an echo of ''Whole Lot of Shakin''' to set off vivid images in the minds of some.

Jerry Lee told another reporter that he was in love with Myra and it was against his religious beliefs to have sex outside of marriage. Never mind that he had already had two wives, one of whom he married, with a metaphorical shotgun in his back, a little less than a month before his first divorce was final. Then he married Myra just before his second divorce came through. In the eyes of the law, he was a bigamist, an issue that eventually had Sam in the Memphis courts in Jerry Lee's behalf while Jerry was making his supposed-to-betriumphal tour of England.

It wasn't just Myra's age that outraged the public, it was the incest angle, a cousin. People felt that the ''courtship'' of the two young people could have hardly taken place without his complicity. Add to that the fact that, when Jerry Lee started living with J. W. and his wife, Lois, Jerry's second wife and their son were also there with him. Myra was the babysitter. If the press and general population needed greater confirmation of the decadence of rock and roll, it needed look no further. Here was Tobacco Road, in living color, before the eyes of all to see.

Jerry Lee Lewis went on for the first three scheduled performances, he was contracted for thirty-sen nights, but was booed off the stage at each. So right away, Jerry and Myra winged it back to Memphis, where he was again met with an onslaught of press at the airport. He went into seclusion with the Browns.

Blame for the incident was rampant. Sam Phillips of course blamed the press. Jud Phillips baled Jerry Lee and his manager, Oscar Davis. Oscar had elected to meet Jerry Lee in London after a leisurely trip via luxury liner to London rather than flying with his charge. Jud had misgivings about this potentially explosive situation since Jerry and Myra had walked blatantly through the lobby of the Manhattan Hotel some weeks earlier. ''Even my kid Juddy could have done better in bringing a woman into a hotel than Jerry Lee Lewis'', Jud raved. He had warned Jerry not to take Myra to England and thought Oscar should have prevented Myra from going and should have chaperoned Jerry Lee whenever he was in the public eye.

Since Jerry Lee had secretly married Myra in a Mississippi ceremony (she said she was twenty) the previous December, he was convinced he was doing nothing wrong or even indiscreet in taking her to the New York hotel or even to England. He never seemed to acknowledge that there was anything weird about his marriage, and Myra herself stated later that she was more mature than her husband when they married. Besides, Jerry Lee pointed out, she was really fourteen (lacking a couple of months), not thirteen, as the papers reported. He knew he was a celebrity, but he didn't know he could be brought down by public opinion.

In the meantime people was wondering what mixture of arrogance and ignorance caused Jerry Lee's downfall. Some of both, they decided, spawned by his upbringing in the poor and uneducated Lewis family in remote and impoverished Ferriday, Louisiana, the only world he really knew. He had no notion of what middle-class society considered proper, and even in Ferriday had not shown respect for convention or law, because aside from bigamy, he had committed other legal offenses in his youth. That was why his mother had sent him off to Bible college in Waxahachie, Texas, but obviously the seminary and Jerry Lee Lewis' raucous piano playing couldn't get along. He was soon back in Ferriday, then on to Memphis, fame, and this debacle.

MAY 22, 1958 THURSDAY

Shelly West is born in Cleveland, Ohio. The daughter of Dottie West, she shares the Country Music Association's Vocal duo of the Year honor with David Frizzell in 1981 and 1982, and earns three solo hits in 1983, led by ''Jose Cuervo''.

MAY 23, 1958 FRIDAY

Two weeks after the riot-plagued Allen Freed tour ended, Jerry Lee Lewis, his sister, Frankie, and his wife, Myra, arrived in England to begin a short promotional tour. The opening was in Edmonton, a suburb of London, for which Jerry wore a bright red suit with black velvet collar and diamante trimmings . A member of the press picked up a chance remark from one of Jerry's entourage about his wife being rather young.

As Jerry and Myra went shopping the following day, members of the press who followed him because suspicious, and asked exactly how young. Jerry's answer, that Myra was fourteen (which was two months short of the truth) "and might look young and be young but is growed", provoked a howl of outrage from the British press. Hounding a rock and roll singer who sported a redlined black jacket trimmed with ocelot fur was welcome relief for Fleet Street journalists jaded by their diet of lying politicians and embezzling clergy. Within days Jerry, a new targed for their big guns, was being greeted with howls of derision at his concerts.

An investigation was launched to determine how Lewis and his underage bride came to be allowed into the country. it was found that the immigration officer had shown a degree of compassion that was otherwise absent from Lewis' treatment in England. It "seemed to be an unusually young age for a married woman", said the report of the immigration officer, "but since both parties came from the southeastern part of the United States, where the legal age for marriage is lower than in other parts of the world, no action on my part seemed to be called for".

MAY 25, 1958 SUNDAY

On May 25, Whit Monday, saw the second show, at the Gaumont State Theatre in Kilburn; this time Jerry dressed in a black suit with ocelot collar. According to Terry Adams, ''The poster in the foyer of the Gaumont State Theatre said 'Jerry Lee Lewis - Live on Stage''. I thought at last! I was going to see my idol perform his brilliant records right before my own eyes; and what a show it proved to be. I could not believe it, but in live performance he was even better than on the records. He came out on that Gaumont Stage in Kilburn and he personified American Rock And Roll''.

''Immediately after the show, I met Jerry personally. What a privilege! He was courteous, kind and patient with this thirteen-year-old fan. Taking the time to talk with me, and sign an autograph. It was a night I will never forget, and it made a lasting impression on my life. I am and always will be one of Jerry's biggest fans; in my opinion he is the greatest live performer! And whether he is on a public stage or in the studio, Jerry is always giving a truly live performance. We are very fortunable that so much of the material he recorded at Sun has survived and will be with us forever''.

On May the third show took place at the Tooting Granada. At this, which proved to be the final show of the aborted tour, Jerry Lee donned a yellow suit with black bands on collar and pockets. The remainder of the tour was cancelled on May 27 for well known reasons; Jerry, Myra and the others went to the airport early in the afternoon and, after a long wait, they boarded the plane back to New York, landing the following day. Jerry and Myra were interviewed on arrival, and flew on to Memphis later the same day.

The promoter, J. Arthur Rank, took Jerry Lee Lewis off the tour and replaced him with a local teenager, Terry Wayne, too young to have committed any indiscretions. The scandal even raised the collective eyebrow of the British House of Commons. Sir Frank Medlicott asked if the Home Secretary were not aware that "we have more than enough rock and roll entertainers of our own without importing them from overseas". Home Secretary Iain Mcleod repliet that it was indeed a "thoroughly unpleasent case which had been ended by... the disappearance of the man".

Scanning the morning papers as Jerry left England under a cloud, Jerry remarked, "Who is this DeGaulle? He seems to have gone over bigger'n us".

Jerry Lee Lewis and his entourage had expected to arrive back in the United States to find that the disclosure of Myra's age - and the more recent news that Jerry's divorce from his previous wife had not been finalized when he married Myra Brown - would have no effect on his burgeoning career. There were wrong.

The first to disown Jerry Lee Lewis was Dick Clark, who almost tripped over himself in his hasty cancellation of Jerry's bookings. Alan Freed defended Lewis, saying that jazz musicians and the Hollywood crowd were far worse. "Jerry's a country boy", added Freed, "and Tennessee boys get married quite young". It was courageous of Freed to defend Lewis, although his defense missed the point - it wasn't Jerry's age that shocked people. Elvis Presley, who within a few years would be cohabiting with an underage woman himself, offered a limpwristed defense, saying only that "if he loves her, I guess it's all right".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jesse Lee Turner's career is surprisingly undocumented for someone with a Top 20 hit. If he's still in Galveston, he hasn't strayed far from home. He was born 1938 in Addicks, Texas, and grew up in Boling, which is more a crossroad than a town. Jesse Lee Turner had a strong rock and roll voice, with an Elvis-like quiver. Unfortunately, this side of Turner can be heard on only a few of his discs. He had the misfortune that his only hit was a novelty number and that fact kept haunting him for the rest of his recording career.

A cousin of Nashville session musician and RCA artist Floyd Robinson, he somehow hired on as Jerry Lee Lewis' driver in 1957. He was certainly driving for Jerry Lee on the day of the Homecoming in Ferriday, Louisiana. Jerry Lee was late, so Jesse Lee and Jerry's sister, Frankie Jean, sang some duets.

He recorded "Put Me Down" as a demo for Sun Records (now available on at least six different CD compilations). It was written by Jerry Lee's guitarist Roland Janes, and Jerry Lee was sufficiently impressed to record the song himself, for his first album. Turner's career as a recording artist zoomed into orbit with his first real release. Roland says that he remembers playing the song for Jesse Lee in the touring sedan, but he's pretty sure Jerry Lee cut it first. Jesse Lee probably quit Jerry's retinue after the debacle in England.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JESSE LEE TURNER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

01 - "PUT ME DOWN" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Roland Janes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: August 1977
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-28 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14
Reissued: 1998 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jesse Lee Turner - Vocal and Guitar
Probably Roland Janes - Guitar
Other musicians unknown

For Biography of Jesse Lee Turner see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jesse Lee Turner's Sun recording can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1958

One morning the postman brought a large flat envelope from Grelun Landon at Hill and Range Songs that looked interesting. It turned out to be the first sample of their sheet music that they'd sent to the office of 706 Union, and it was of Jack Clement's ''Katy Too''. There was a picture of Johnny Cash on the flashy orange-and- white cover, with a notation ''as recorded by Johnny Cash on Sun Records''.

Hill and Range had been publishing all the original music that came out of Sun ever since signing away Elvis Presley. Their logo, which was in the lower right-hand corner of the sheet music, showed a cowboy with a backdrop of a mountain range. Hill and Range was cited as the sole selling agent for Jack Clement's Music, Inc., which was one of the many subsidiaries of Sun. This was a corporation Sam Phillips had set up for Jack Clement to have a slice of the publishing royalties apart from his writer's royalty.

On the back of the sheet were listed songs from ''America's Greatest Western and Folk Artists''. These collections were made of songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Red Foley, Hank Thompson, Ernest Tubb, Hank Snow, Eddy Arnold, and many other current artists, including Mahalia Jackson, advertised here as ''the
world's greatest gospel singer''. Though their address on Broadway was far from the origins of this music they were selling, it was a major center for the dissemination of the music of the South, where the ''folk'' lived.

MAY 24, 1958 SATURDAY

''American Bandstand'' host and future Academy of Country Music awards producer Dick Clark appears on the cover of TV Guide.

Ferlin Husky is featured on the week's edition of ''Country Music Jubilee'', an ABC offering hosted by Red Foley.

MAY 28, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Ernest Tubb and his second wife, Olene, have their second son, Larry Dean Tubb, at Nashville's Vanderbilt Hospital.

Buddy Holly receives his draft notice, although a stomack ulcer and poor vision prevent his acceptane by the military. Holly mentors Waylon Jennings and his ''True Love Ways'' becomes a country hit for Mickey Gilley.

Johnny Cash recorded ''Kathy Too'' at the Sun studio in Memphis, Tennessee.

Ricky Nelson sings ''I'll Walk Alone'' and ''Shirley Lee'' on ABC-TV's telecast of ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY MAY 28, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
DOUBLE SESSION FILED BUT NO OTHER TITLES EXTANT
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01(1) - "BLUE TRAIN" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Billy Smith
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 471 - Take 1 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 28, 1958

01(2) - "BLUE TRAIN" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Billy Smith
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 471 - Master Take 2
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Released: - April 27, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 376-A < mono
BLUE TRAIN / BORN TO LOSE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

"Blue Train" is another matter. This is really vintage Johnny Cash, and must have delighted his legion of fans who lamented the loss of the early Johnny Cash sound. Although early pressings of the record credited the song to Cash, in reality the song wasn't an original. The mistake seems natural enough since composer Billy Smith had done his share of listening to early Cash records. In truth, compared to vintage Cash train songs, this one was a little selfconscious and lyrically awkward in places.

Cash's stumbling over the words ("as half as bad") doesn't help matters, but on balance this was more than Cash fans had dared to hope for so long after the departure of their man from Sun in 1958. Luther's four bar solos sandwiched between verses add a nice touch and that steel guitar sound on the intro had pickers scratching their heads.

It would be two years before another Johnny Cash single was issued on the original Sun label, and it would be his last.

02(1) - "KATY TOO" - B.M.I. - 0:14
Composer: - Jack Clement-Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-3-5 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

"Katy Too", with its story of playing the field, deserved a better fate than to be relegated to the b-side when issued as a single. This is an up-tempo number that Cash handless magnificently. The three complete takes featured hardly differ showing that this was a song they were comfortable with well before they started recording.

02(2) - "KATY TOO" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Jack Clement-Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-3-6 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

02(3) - "KATY TOO" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Jack Clement-Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-3-7 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

02(4) - "KATY TOO" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Jack Clement-Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-3-8 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

02(5) - "KATY TOO" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Jack Clement-Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 359 - Master Take 5
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Released: - June 2, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 321-A < mono
KATY TOO / I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Katy Too" stems from one of this marathon sessions Johnny Cash held at the end of his tenure at Sun in May, 1958. The song is co-credited to Jack Clement and has his stamp all over it. Most obviously, it is cute and clever, and, as much, diametrically opposite to the more brooding opuses normally associated with Cash. In truth, it is a fine piece of material, full of whimsy and downhome charm. Cash turns in a strong reading and the track is mercifully free of overproduction.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR DON HOSEA
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MAY 28, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

Don Hosea had recorded some unissued material for Sun Records back in 1958, but it was his regional hit of ''John Henry'' on Roland Janes's Rita Records had re-captured Sun's attention.

01 - "JOHN HENRY" – B.M.I. 1:57
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1010-16 mono
SUN ROCKABILLIES – VOLUME 1
Reissued: - 1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30147-16 mono
RAUNCHY ROCKABILLY

02 – "NEVER DID I" – B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Don Hosea
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1010-15 mono
SUN ROCKABILLIES – VOLUME 1
Reissued: - 1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30147-15 mono
RAUNCHY ROCKABILLY

03 – "IF IT WASN'T LOVE'' - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Don Hosea
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sampler mono
DON HOSEA - SINCE I MET YOU

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Don Hosea – Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

For Biography of Don Hosea see: > The Sun Biographies <
Don Hosea's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 29, 1958 THURSDAY

Ray Price recorded the Bill Anderson-penned ''City Lights'' in the evening at The Bradley Studios in Nashville.

MAY 30, 1958

The movie ''High School Confidential'' debuts, with Jerry Lee Lewis singing the title track from the back end of a flatbed truck.

The entire population of the United States seemed to be outraged by the Jerry Lee and Myra scandal, but some found the situation laughable. One of these was right there at Sun Records, Jack Clement. The weekend following all the hubbub, Barbara Barnes went into the office to catch up her routine work they had neglected during the Jerry Lee Lewis crisis. Jack Clement was there with George Klein, one of Elvis' friends and a frequent visitor at Sun. As he had so many times, Jack said, ''B.B., I want you to listen to this''.

According to Barbara Barnes, ''I could hardly believe that years. It was a tape with George Klein supposedly doing a remote broadcast from the Memphis airport, greeting Jerry Lee on his return from England. George would ask a question and Jerry's answer would be a phrase from one of his recordings. For example, to ''How does it feel to be back in Memphis''? Jerry replied, ''Feels good''. When asked, ''What did Queen Elizabeth say about your marriage''? The response was, ''Great Balls of Fire''! Jack Clement and Barbara Pittman had put together this piece of satire, which was clever but hardly an enhancement to the public perception of Jerry Lee's situation. Nevertheless, Sam Phillips chose to release it and it sold a few copies.

Jerry Lee's personal situation was far from humorous. He was banned on many stations and ignored by most. Dick Clark cancelled future bookings, and Jerry Lee's personal appearances became increasingly infrequent and very poorly paid. Elvis spoke out in his behalf when asked, but only Alan Freed, of all the visible media personalities, continued to play Jerry Lee Lewis and to offer a rationale of sort to Jerry's actions. He said people from the South were different, had their own peculiar views of marriage. In Jerry's case, it was definitely true.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Trying desperately to save the situation about Jerry Lee Lewis, Sun adopted two tactics. The first was to satirize the issue with a novelty record concocted by Jack Clement. Titled "The Return Of Jerry Lee", it used clips from Jerry's records interspersed with questions, in the manner of Buchanan and Goodman's "Flying Saucer" records. For example, to the reporter's question, "What did Queen Elizabeth say about you?". Jerry called out "Goodness gracious, great balls of fire!". That alone ensured that the record would not be released in England.

At the same time, Sam Phillips and his press officer, Barbara Barnes, were composing a fully penitent and pious letter, published later that month in the trade papers. "I sincerely want to be worthy of the decent admiration of all the people who admired what talent (if any) I had", said the letter, in perhaps the most uncharacteristic utterance ever to have Jerry Lee Lewis' name appended to it.

STUDIO SESSION FOR GEORGE KLEIN AND JACK CLEMENT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY MAY 30, 1958 / COMPILATION SESSION
MUSIC: JERRY LEE LEWIS
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01 - "RETURN OF JERRY LEE" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Jack Clement-Barbara Pittman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - By Authority Respective Publishers
Matrix number: - U 314 - Master
Recorded: - May 30, 1958
Released: - June 15, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 301 < mono
THE RETURN OF JERRY LEE / LEWIS BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-2-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3
 

Narration by George Patrick Klein and Jack Clement, including extracts from previously recorded titles, ''Great Balls Of Fire'', ''You Win Again'', ''I'm Feeling Sorry'', High School Confidential'', ''Mean Woman Blues'', ''Don't Be Cruel'', ''Breathless'' and ''Crazy Arms''.

There's no need to recount the details of Jerry Lee's disastrous UK tour once again. We all know that the British sent him and his 13 year old bride packing, and that the reaction wasn't such warmer when he returned home. Faced with an ugly situation, Sun tried to deal with it humorously by issuing this record. The idea of using clips of recorded performances within a narrative was hardly a Sun original. Buchanan and Goodman had already hit paydirt with their "Flying Saucer" series of record (1956-1958). The idea for this narrative (by local disc jockey George Klein) was conceived by the unlike tandem of Jack Clement and Barbara Pittman.

The top side was issued as George And Lewis. For some reason, the top side was also issued under the name George And Louis. ''We think it's a cute record'', Sam Phillips told Billboard, after mailing out the sample to disc jockeys. ''It makes light of the British episode, which is th e way we think the whole thing should be treated anyway''. In fact, Sam said, if the response continued to be as good as initial radio reaction, he might even put out the record commercially, with Jerry Lee's own self-composed ''Lewis Boogie'' on the flip side. Which he did less than a week later.

There was no airplay for the new record, whose fine boogie-woogie B-side, cut more than a year earlier, merely reinforced the brash tone ''My name is Jerry Lee Lewis, I'm from Louisiana'', it began with typical panache, ''I'm gonna doya a little boogie on this here piana'' of the ''George and Louis Narration'', as it was billed. There was no uptick in sales, no diminishment of returns-nothing changed, except possibly for the worse. Even Dick Clark, long one of Jerry's greatest champions, had deserted him, not only dropping ''High School Confidential'' from his American Bandstand playlist but making it abundantly clear that he was not going to have Jerry Lee Lewis on his show again anytime soon.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
George Klein - Narration
Jack Clement - Narration

For Biography of George Klein, Jack Clement, and Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube < 

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