CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS (6)
June 1, 1958 to June 30, 1958

Studio Session for Gloria Brady, Mid-1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bill Justis & Johnny Ace Cannon, June 5, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Townsel Sisters, Probably June 1958 / Sun Records

Studio Session for Ernie Chaffin, June 9, 1958 / Sun Records
- Come On Back Home - The True Story - 

Studio Session for The Veltones, June 9, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, June 16, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Narvel Felts, June 23, 1958 / Mercury Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, June 25, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tommy Blake, 1958 / Recco Records
Studio Session for Luke McDaniel, 1958 / Astro Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1958

The next stage to consider is the development of Jerry Lee Lewis' first, eponymous long playing album (SLP 1230) which, had Sam Phillips chosen to bestow upon it a poetical title, might justifiably have been called ''Songs Of Sadness, Sin And Redemption In The South''. Had Sam indeed been so bold, twenty-first century sociologists would no doubt immediately seize upon it as an artefact of immense cultural symbolism; which, of course, it is, notwithstanding the unimaginative original packaging.

There's some heavyweight material to be found, with representations of many societal ills; home-lessness (''Matchbox'' February/March 1958 session), prostitution (''It All Depends'' February 5, 1957 session), infidelity (''Crazy Arms'' November 14, 1956 session), suicide (''Goodnight Irene'' November/December 1956 session) and obsessive stalking, if treated somewhat light-heartedly, (''It'll Be Me'' February 1957 session).

There's even a reference to the entirely taboo subject of interracial coupling (''Ubangi Stomp'' February/March 1958 session). To counteract all the misery and controversy, it's rounded off with a couple of simple celebrations of the southern way of life in the down-home feat of ''Jambalaya'' (January 16, 1958 sessions) and the campfire revivalism of ''When The Saints Go Marching In'' (February 1957 session).(*)

And all this was supposed to be catering for teenagers who'd seen their new ''pop'' idol performing ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On'' and ''Great Balls Of Fire'' on ''The Steve Allen Show'' and ''American Bandstand''. Be that as it may, one thing Sam Phillips wanted to make sure of was the derivation of income from royalties on material in which he enjoyed a publishing interest. So, even though the selection needed to encompass a couple of well-known songs to catch the eye of a casual record buyer (''Don't Be Cruel'', ''Jambalaya''), Sam was keen to have Lewis try his hand at a few titles to be found in Sun's existing portfolio, notably ''Put Me Down'' (thereby providing income for writer Roland Janes), ''Rock 'N' Roll Ruby'' (Johnny Cash), ''Ubangi Stomp'' (Charles Underwood), ''So Long I'm Gone'' (Roy Orbison) and ''Matchbox'', which Carl Perkins had copyrighted notwithstanding its patent relationship to a folk-blues lament first performed before he was born.(*)

The recording of most of these tracks has previously been ascribed to a September 1957 date, the exception being 'Put Me Down''. The argument now presented is that all of these, including the trio of songs issued on Sun 45s by Warren Smith, were more likely to have been recorded in the spring (February/March) of 1958 in anticipation of the inclusion of at least two or three of them on the album. Insofar as the Warren Smith numbers are concerned, only one would make it; the choice ultimately being ''Ubangi Stomp'', despite Jerry Lee's failure to gain full command of the lyrics. It's contended that his slip (...he didn't need to ''roll over dead'' the first time) provides additional evidence that the recording was somewhat rushed, to get something ready for the LP. And not one of these readings of Warren Smith numbers is wholly convincing; the fact that ''Ubangi Stomp'', featuring a blatant error, was released while the others lay undisturbed until the mid-1970s also lends weight to the argument that the arbitrary classification of ''outtakes'' and ''masters'' is a spurious exercise in the context of much of Lewis' studio work.(*)

Sun 300 ''Sweetie Pie'' b/w ''I Dig You Baby'' by Tommy Blake released.

The singles PI 3527 ''Everlasting Love'' b/w ''Cold Cold Heart'' by Barbara Pittman; PI 3528 ''Stairway To Nowhere'' b/w ''Raining The Blues'' by Ernie Barton; PI 3529 ''Cattywampus'' b/w ''Summer Holiday'' by Bill Justis Orchestra; PI 3530 ''The Frog'' b/w ''A Little Bird Told Me'' by Lee Mitchell, all issued.

Jerry Lee Lewis returns from the aborted tour of Europe. "The Return Of Jerry Lee" b/w ''Lewis Boogie'' (Sun 301) is released this month as is Lewis' first Sun album.

Johnny Cash and Sonny Burgess tour California and the west coast.

Around this time, Tommy Blake's second and last single appeared, coupling "Sweetie Pie"/"I Dig You Baby", although it's unclear if it was recorded in January or March. Both songs were credited to Blake and his Marine Corps. pal, Jerry Ross, but it's likely that "Sweetie Pie" had already been recorded by Dale Hawkins... and the cowbells on Blake's record curiously echoed Hawkins' defining hit, "Susie Q".

JUNE 1958

The extended plays, Sun EPA 108 ''Jerry Lee Lewis Volume 1''; Sun EPA 109 ''Jerry Lee Lewis Volume 2''; Sun EPA 110 ''Jerry Lee Lewis Volume 3'' by Jerry Lee Lewis issued.

The extended plays, Sun EPA 111 ''Johnny Cash Sings Hank Williams''; Sun EPA 112 ''Country Boy'' and Sun EPA 114 ''His Top Hits'' by Johnny Cash issued.

JUNE 1958

SUN-LINERS - SUN-LINERS - SUN-LINERS

CASH AND LEWIS SCORE HEAVILY - With 2-sided hits. Johnny's "Guess Things Happen That Way" is the big one but "Come In, Stranger" has a following too! Jerry Lee's "High School Confidential" makes charts in record time, as "Fools Like Me" gets strong share of plays.

RE: RECENT RELEASES - Our pen-pal Dave Neuman (KAYO, Seattle) writes that he likes 'that wine-drinkin' song" which must mean he digs Gene Simmons' "Drinking Wine" (SUN 299)... Edwin Bruce knocked 'em cold when he played Youngstown, Ohio, early this month. have it no less authority than Dick Biondi.

Ed is personally cleancut, good-humored, intelligent, and as entertainer he has voice stage personality and genuine musical ability. His second Sun release "Sweet Woman" SUN 292) could be a real winner, given the proper exposure Jack Clement's "Ten Years" continues to sell consistently, Charted in Cash Box and Music Reporter. As a Cash Box "Sleeper" (pop) and "Bullseye" (country) "Ten Years" has shown great potential. However, Bob Ancell (WERE, Cleveland) picks "Your Lover Boy" as the side, and well as WJW-TV Bandstand host) have been playing it - with good audience response. Also accorded pop "Sleeper" honors in Cash Box is Rudy Grayzell's "I Think Of You" (SUN 290).

RAY SMITH - "So Young" by Ray Smith (Sun 298) has taken off like a house afire - and indicates that Sun has again discovered an artist with potential in take the record-buying public by storm.

Probably the outstanding characteristic of Ray Smith's performance in his unflagging enthusiasm and energy. Cutting a session is just plain for fun Ray, and the gusto with which he performs has made him a favorite of high school crowds throughout his native area - Kentucky, Missouri, and Illinois.

Like many performers before him, Ray plays guitar and sings at the same time - but his ability to project a pleasing personality is equalled by few.

Roy is managed by Charlie Terrell of Sikeston, Mo., and the first thing Charlie did upon signing the boy (now 21) was to bring him to Sun's Sam Phillips. If the initial reaction to "So Young" is indicative of Ray Smith's ultimate success - then the sky's the limit!

EARL MCDANIEL - Just about the swingingest disc jockey on the West Coast is Earl McDaniel who airs his platters and patter across the board from 3:00-6:00 PM (The "Thrix Show") on KDAY, Los Angeles. After a stint playing records for G.I's on Armed Forces radio Service in Japan, earl returned to build a successful disc jockey career in civillian life.

Nothing gives earl a greater thrill than to launch a new record that becomes top chart material - and he's good at picking winners. Business activities include doing package shows ("Swinging Production") for drive-ins around L.A. acting as executive of his own Swinger Music, and artist management.

Earl is head of a household that includes a lovely wife and two chicks - Cathy, 8, and Christy, 6. Off hours - Earl looks for peace and quiet in diversions such as golf and water skiing.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Attempts to locate Brady after all this time resulted in some interesting adventures, but no success stories. A Gloria Brady lived on Mason Street in Memphis until fairly recently, although her telephone had been disconnected. Spreading the net a bit wider, we discovered a movie actress named Gloria Brady who had appeared in such deathless classics as Blood Waters of Dr. Z, released in 1982. Since Gloria played the part of a woman in her 40s, the time line would be correct, assuming our Gloria tried her luck at acting after her music career failed to pan out. Then there was a recent news story about a woman named Gloria Brady who recalled being kissed on the cheek at O'Hare airport by Davy Jones of the Monkees. This Gloria Brady was on her way to Los Angeles to try her fortune as a porno actress - which would have been a grand story, although the age match doesn't quite suit our needs. If our Gloria ever kissed a Monkey, she would probably have been about 10 years old when she recorded these demos.

There are two Gloria Brady's in Marianna, Arkansas, both the right age, one white, one black. Unfortunately, neither sent demos into Sun records. Finally, there is Gloria R. Brady of New Orleans, who would have been in her late 50s when these demos were recorded. Unfortunately, she died in 1995. It is quite possible that our Gloria intensified the mystery by putting her music on the shelf, marrying, and changing her name. She might even be the mother of a contemporary folk artist like Sue Foley, whose style is uncannily like that of our Ms. Brady. In any case, if Gloria Brady is out there, we haven't found her.

STUDIO SESSION FOR GLORIA BRADY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS MID-1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE MID-1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Gloria Brady submitted a tape with seven demos in a bluesy rock and roll style somewhere around 1958. The material was kept but, as far as we know, no contact was made with the artist. Probably accompanying herself on guitar, Brady sang in an enthusiastic style revealing that she had done her share of listening to the blues.

01 - "FIVE MINUTES MORE" - B.M.I. - 1:19
Composer: - Gloria Brady
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Mid 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-6 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

02 - "TALK BABY TALK" - B.M.I. - 1:47
Composer: - Gloria Brady
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Mid 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-14 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

03 - "CHILLY BONES" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Gloria Brady
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Mid 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-15 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

04 – "I'M ON MY WAY" - B.M.I. - 1:43
Composer: - Gloria Brady
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Mid 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-14 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

05 - "LISTEN" - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Gloria Brady
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Mid 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-4-16 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gloria Brady - Vocal
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Gloria Brady see: > The Sun Biographies <
Gloria Brady's Sun recordings can be heard on her playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1958

Beyond the Riley and Justis bands, there were other regular session players at Sun. One was saxophonist Johnny Cannon, later known as ''Ace;; who started at Sun with the Johnny Bernero Combo before the pair split. He later had a big hit on Hi Records with ''Tuff'', in 1961. On his session on June 5, 1958, you hear a earlier version of that song made three years earlier with the Little Green Men. It was a tune Bill Justis fooled with several times, calling it ''Cattywampus''. Cannon also featured at least two singers on his session. One was the slightly mysterious Jimmy Pritchett who contributed a storming version of ''That's The Way I Feel'', a song he recorded at Sun but which appeared on Stan Kesler's Crystal label. There is another vocalist too, on ''That's Just Too Bad'', but we don't know for sure who it is. He sounds a little like several people but not a lot like anyone. If it's Cannon himself, he wasn't about to set the world on fire as a vocalist.

JUNE 1, 1958 SUNDAY

Capitol released The Kingston Trio's self-titled debut album. The folk act scores a pop hit with ''Tom Dooley'', which wins the first Grammy given for a country recording.

Jimmie Rodgers performs ''Secretly'' from a New York stage during CBS' telecast of ''The Ed Sullivan Show''.

Bass singer Ray Walker officially joins The Jordanaires vocal quartet.

JUNE 2, 1958 MONDAY

Johnny Horton holds an evening session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, recorded ''All Grown Up''.

''Maybelline'' songwriter Chuck Berry is arrested in St. Charles, Missouri, on a federal charge of transporting a firearm on the interstate. The charges are later dropped.

Columbia released Mel Tillis' ''A Violet And A Rose''. Little Jimmy Dickens earns a hit with the song four years later.

The Everly Brothers take over number 1 on the Billboard country singles chart with ''All I Have To Do Is Dream''.

JUNE 3, 1958 TUESDAY

Songwriter George Boulanger dies in Buenos Aires, Argentina. His song ''My Prayer'' was a 1956 pop hit for The Platters and will become a Top 15 country single for Narvel Felts in 1976.

JUNE 4, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis remarries Myra Gale Brown in Ferriday, Louisiana, after returning from a trip to Great Britain. Lewis' divorce from his second wife had not been finalized when he first married Brown, his 13-year-old cousin.

Ray Price and Charlie Walker find ''Pick Me Up On Your Way Down'' in a stack of demo tapes, the night before a schedule Walker session. Ernest Tubb helps them change the gender on the song, originally penned for Kitty Wells.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILL JUSTIS & JOHNNY ''ACE'' CANNON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY JUNE 5, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT
MUSICAL DIRECTOR - BILL JUSTIS

The Bill Justis Orchestra (not band) were back for their third release in four months. Never in the history of Sun Records had so many releases by a single artist appeared on the market in such a short time. The reason here was quite obviously the need to capitalize on the success of "Raunchy". Neither of two previous followups had managed the lofty sales figures or media attention of the original, and Sam Phillips didn't want to let this one get away from him.

01(1) - "TUFF (CATTYWAMPUS)" - B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Johnny Cannon
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporation
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 5, 1958 - with Studio Talk
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-12-17 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - RAUNCHY
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-8-30 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

''Tuff (Cattywampus)'' was recorded as ''Tuff'' with lead saxophone by Cannon but was issued (in another take) on Phillips International under the title ''Cattywampus'' by Bill Justis.

01(2) - "CATTYWAMPUS" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Johnny Cannon
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporation
Matrix number: - P 325 - Master
Recorded: - June 5, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3529-A < mono
CATTYWAMPUS / SUMMER HOLIDAY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

"Cattywampus" is an entirely different affair, not to mention a legal quagmire. Most fans of Memphis music will have no trouble identifying Johnny Ace Cannon's "Tuff" when they listen to this track. Cannon played lead sax on the Justis track. Four years later, after he had left the Justis band and was recording as a solo artist for Hi Records, he simply re-recorded the tune and watched in delight as it climbed the charts and became one of the premier hit instrumentals of the day.

But before Sam's lawyers could get their feet on the ground, everyone (including Cannon) was sued by the original composer, who pointed out that whatever these new fangled Memphis folks were calling it, this tune bore an uncanny resemblance to "Columbus Stockade Blues". As Cannon, Phillips, and the nice folks at Hi Records were learning, it was "tuff" to grow up in the south and create an original tune.

Sun's resident PR woman, Barbara Barnes, explained the title by saying, "It's an old Southern usage meaning sort of cockeyed or haphazard - and another entry from the Bill Justis catalog of nervous instrumentals". Justis premiered it on Dick Clark's Saturday night show, July 26, 1958.

02 - "SUMMER HOLIDAY"** - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Johnny Cannon-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 326 - Master
Recorded: - June 5, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3529-B < mono
SUMMER HOLIDAY / CATTYWAMPUS
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

The aptly titled "Summer Holiday" (the record was released in June 1958) tried to capture a different and very mellow sound. It features newly arrived session man Charlie Rich (whose first record was still months away) playing the glockenpiels.

03 – "SCUTTLEBUT" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - William Everette Justis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 5, 1958
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8302-9 mono
706 UNION INSTRUMENTALS

04 - "THE SNUGGLE" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Raymond Hill-William Everette Justis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - June 5, 1958
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1950 mono
CLOUD 9
Reissued: - January 26, 1999 Collectables (CD) 500/200rpm COL-CD-6018 mono
VERY BEST OF BILL JUSTIS - RAUNCHY

05 - "RAUNCHIHULA" - B.M.I.
Composer: - William Everette Justis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - June 5, 1958

06 - ''THAT'S JUST TOO BAD/706 UNION*'' - B.M. I. - 2:20
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 5, 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-12-19 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - RAUNCHY
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-8-31 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

We cannot say too much about the unknown artist. Whoever sing ''That's Just Too Bad'' and a false start of ''706 Union'' (?) was part of a session led by Johnny Ace Cannon. There is some reference in the files to Carl McVoy being on the session and there's the possibility that it could be Jimmy Pritchett who also recorded a vocal with Cannon's band around the same time.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny ''Ace'' Cannon - Saxophone
Unknown Singer - Vocal*
Bill Justis - Saxophone
Vernon Drake - Saxophone
Nelson Grill - Saxophone
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
J.M. Van Eaton – Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Charlie Rich - Glockenspiel**

For Biography of Bill Justis and Johnny ''Ace'' Cannon see: > The Sun Biographies <
Bill Justis and Ace Cannon's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on their playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

In June 1958, local Arkansas songwriter and promotor Floyd Huddleston became partners with John Pepper, the former co-owner of radio station WDIA in Memphis. Their label Pepper Records had its offices at 1074 Union Avenue, next to WDIA, they were just trying to get something started, recording and making demos all the time. Floyd worked with Les Paul & Mary Ford for a while, and then he started recordings with The Townsel Sister from Alabama.

The Sisters visited Sun Records during their trips to Memphis, but it is unlikely they recorded there. It seems likely that Floyd Huddleston left a tape copy of the Townsel Sisters demo at Sun Records in the hope of interesting Sam Phillips. It is this tape that apparently the song "The Whole Night Through", and is the same song that appeared as one side of their early Sky Records release, although its title on the 45 was "It's Over, I'm Through".

It is not known at this point whether the Sun demo and Sky release are identical versions of the song.

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE TOWNSEL SISTERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY JUNE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

01 - "THE WHOLE NIGHT THROUGH" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Carolyn Townsel
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 1956
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-6-11 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carolyn Townsel - Vocal and Guitar
Eloise Townsel - Vocal
Lana Townsel - Vocal
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of The Townsel Sisters see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Townsel Sisters' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 5, 1958 THURSDAY

Charlie Walker recorded ''Pick Me Up On Your Way Down'' in Nashville.

JUNE 6, 1958 FRIDAY

''Feudi' And Fightin''' singer Dorothy Shay marries automotive publicist Dick Looman in Los Angeles.

Billy ''Crash'' Craddock holds his first recording session for Columbia Records.

JUNE 7, 1958 SATURDAY

Jim Reeves takes over as a summer replacement host for Red Foley on the ABC-TV series ''Country Music Jubilee''.

JUNE 9, 1958 MONDAY

Columbia released Ray Price's two-sided hit, ''City Lights'' and ''Invitation To The Blues''.

Jerry Lee Lewis buys a five-page trade ad, explaining his marital problems, ''I hope that of I'm washed up as a performer, it won't be because of this bad publicity... I can't control the press or the sensationalism that these people will go to''.

Wynn Stewart signs with Gene Autry's new label, Challenge Records.

Decca released Kitty Wells' ''Jealousy''.

Tommy Edwards recorded the pop hit ''It's All In The Game'' at the Metropolitan Studios in New York. The song is remade for the country audience in 1977 by Tom T. Hall.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR ERNIE CHAFFIN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING STUDIO FOR SUN RECORDS 1958
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JUNE 9, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - BILL JUSTIS
 
It had been 14 months since Ernie Chaffin's last release on the Sun label and, sadly, things had changed in the music business. In October, 1958, Tommy Edward's smooth ballad "It's All In The Game" topped the charts. "Volare" wasn't far behind and so was "Tom Dooley". Nothing that sounded anything like "I'm Lonesome" or "Feelin' Low" was selling. And so, since neither Sam, Sun nor Bill Justis (the producer hired for this session) were registered charities, the results took a step toward the commercial marketplace.
 
Ernie Chaffin's third Sun release took him regrettably far from the wonderful sound that characterized his first two outings. Here, Chaffin performs as a romantic ballad singer, and a pretty conventional one at that. According to Union logs, Ernie Chaffin had his last recording session for Sun on this date. Presumably, all four sides of his last two singles were recorded at this date. In fact, it virtually contradicts it.
 
01(1) - "BORN TO LOSE" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - U 327 - Master
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Released: - October 15, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 307-B < mono
BORN TO LOSE / (NOTHING CAN CHANGE) MY LOVE FOR YOU
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3
 
There is perhaps a little more potential in Chaffin's reading of the standard "Born To Lose". In fact, it contained what Billboard described as a "mild rhythm and blues backin". Given Sun's output from a scant two years ago, however, this was pretty 'mild' indeed. The idea of turning "Born To Lose" into a pop hit had plenty of merit; even Teresa Brewer had tried her hand at it the previous year, but it wasn't until 1962 that Ray Charles showed the marketplace just how far uptown this title was able to travel.
 
01(2) - "BORN TO LOSE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16780-12 mono
ERNIE CHAFFIN - THE SUN YEARS
 
Ray Charles did taken "Born To Lose" to the middle reaches of the pop charts in May, 1962, by which time Ernie and the Sun label had parted company. One final postscript, Johnny Cash had recorded "Born To Lose" just weeks before Ernie in 1958. Whereas Ernie's version was released almost immediately in October, 1958, Cash version did not appear until April, 1962, when it competed head to head with the Ray Charles record.
 
01(3) - "BORN TO LOSE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16780-25 mono
ERNIE CHAFFIN - THE SUN YEARS
 
02(1) - "MY LOVE FOR YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Helen Hall
Publisher: - Glendell Music - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 326 - Master
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Released: - October 15, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 307-A < mono
MY LOVE FOR YOU / BORN TO LOSE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3
 
Billboard described "My Love For You" as a "heartfelt interpretation of a moving country ballad with nice choral backing". Those last two words tell the tale: the presence of the dreaded Gene Lowery singers. We've given you a revealing glimpse of how this ballad would have sounded without sweetening. At the least, you can hear and appreciate Ernie's vocal without interference. 
 
Undubbed takes like this make it clear that holes were purposefully left in the arrangement for the choral overdubbing that everyone knew would follow. There is a bit more potential in Chaffin's reading of the standard "Born To Lose".
 
In fact, it contained what Billboard' described as a "mild rhythm and blues backing". Compared to what Sun had issued the previous year, this was pretty "mild" indeed. But, after searching in the deepest recesse of the Sun vault, we now know that at one point Ernie had approached this song with substantially more backbeat and bluesy feeling.
 
Obviously, that arrangement got nixed in favor of the purer ballad, but it sure is an eye-opener to hear this brief experiment nearly a half-century later and think what might have been.
 
In all fairness, however, it is not even clear that an unadorned bad track would have been a substantial improvement.
 
02(2) - "MY LOVE FOR YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Helen Hall
Publisher: - Glendell Music - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16780-23 mono
ERNIE CHAFFIN - THE SUN YEARS

03 - "DON'T EVER LEAVE ME" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Singing River Music
Matrix number: - U 356 - Master
Recorded: - June 9, 1958 - Probably Recorded August 1958, Gulfport, Mississippi
Released: - April 27, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 320-A < mono
DON'T EVER LEAVE ME / MIRACLE OF YOU
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

The end of an era. This is Ernie Chaffin's fourth and final Sun single. All things considered, it wasn't a bad way to go out. On "Please Don't Ever Leave Me", Chaffin turns in a performance that recalls his best work - which is to say, his first two records. This side has all the best elements of Chaffin's Sun style: an emotional and bluesy vocal, percussive string rhythm, and a prominent steel guitar. Once again, Pee Wee Maddux has contributed some potent material for this tight little combo to display.

A steel player (probably Ernie Harvey) is present on "Please Don't Ever Leave Me" but makes no appearance on any of the other titles. It seems, likely that a separate session was held for the steel guitar title, which harked back to Ernie's best and earliest work for the label. Even if the session came after June 9, it is unlikely that Ernie Chaffin ever set foot into the Sun studio after 1958.

04(1) - "MIRACLE OF YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Singing River Music
Matrix number: - U 357 - Master
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Released: - April 27, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 320-B < mono
MIRACLE OF YOU / DON'T EVER LEAVE ME
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

This side is a credible entry into the country crossover sweepstakes. Chaffin's vocal is powerful, and the song itself is well crafted, although the dirge-like tempo doesn't help matters. The piano triplets make it clear that the pop market was in everybody's sights. Most notably, the chorus does not overwhelm the proceedings. Their sweetening is tasteful and minimal. Perhaps had either side of this outing showed some sign of commercial success, Sun would have extended its commitment to Ernie Chaffin. Sadly, he returned to Mississippi, where he continues to record Christian music in Gulfport, backed by his wife and children.

04(2) - "MIRACLE OF YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Singing River Music
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) BFX 15211-8-17 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-17 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

There's a whole other side to the story of "Miracle Of You" that isn't often told. Prior to this session, Maddux had written and recorded this same song at Sun with another of his proteges: this one a 15-year old girl named Hannah Fay. She had done a hell of a job on the title (arguably it's a far better record than Ernie's). Everyone, including Sam, Pee Wee, and Little Miss Hannah were thrilled. But, legally, Hannah was a minor and she needed Mama to sign the Sun contract. When Sam saw some reluctance, he took the wrong tack. He started talking about Brenda Lee, about making Little Hannah a star, etc. That was all Mama had to hear. Losing her little girl? Life on the road? Forget it. She was back into the car faster than the guitar player could pack his sax.

Poor Pee Wee Muddux once again drove back to Gulfport in a state of shock. Hannah's version of "Miracle Of You" remained unissued for over 40 years until we discovered it and included it on the Bear Family box set Memphis Belles (BCD 16609), along with stunning pictures of Little Miss Hannah Fay, who was quite a story in her own right. Never one to waste a precious resource, Maddux included "Miracle Of You" on his to-do list for Ernie's next visit to Sun and finally saw it released to the marketplace without material interference.

05 - "BE FAITHFUL TO ME" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-8-13 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-13 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

"Be Faithful To Me" is late night music. Some will associate it with Las Vegas lounges and others (more charitably) with the kind of material crooners like Eddy Arnold passed off as country music. Whatever its domain, it seems more than a little out of place here. This is by no means weak material; there's that little chromatic thing that happens at the top of the melody and some interesting chord changes in the release. Then there's that unexpected single-note piano solo. In somebody's else's repertoire, this could have been a real winner. It's just a bit hard to reconcile this performance with the one on "I'm Lonesome". This sounds like a finished master and may well have been slotted for release as one side of Ernie's last Sun single until it was supplanted by "Don't Ever Leave Me". Pee Wee Maddux continued to believe in the song, however, and it finally appeared as one side of Ernie's April, 1960 release on the River label.

As Ernie Chaffin explained it back in 1985, Sun Records never dropped him. He and Pee Wee Maddux just stopped making the trip to Memphis. The whole arrangement simply faded away and by 1959 Ernie had begun to record for a variety of small local labels.

This next track is biggest puzzle of the lot. It sits right in the middle of an Ernie Chaffin tape in the vault. Yet, there's something about it that just makes you wonder whether this is really Ernie. One of the problems, of course, is that we have so few examples of Chaffin singing uptempo. The first time we released it, on the Sun Country box (BFX 15211) we simply took the plunge and credited it to Ernie after pondering it for several weeks. The original notes called it "an out- and-out delight". No need to revise that opinion. I acknowledged that the lyrics were not exactly Cole Porter ("need a little polishing" was the phrase I used) but, on balance, it was declared a winner: Just redolent of pure country charm. And so it is.

But is it Ernie? After delaying things for a month more than we should have, we decided to make a final effort. The best alternative guess at who this might be was Mack Self. Just listen to a few Mack Self tracks on Sun and see if you can't hear the connection. And so we called him and explained the dilemma. "Just play it for me", he offered. "I'll tell you if it's me or not". And so we did. And Mack's reply? "Hmmmm. That is interesting. I'm not really sure. I don't remember recording it but... it could be me".

Great. Still no verdict. Then Mack made his final overture. "Let my wife listen to it. She knows me better than I know myself". And so we played it for Mack's wife Hazel. There was a pause and then she said, "I can see why you might think so. It does sound a bit like Mack. But it's not him. I'm sure. Plus I know everything he's ever written and I've never heard that before".

That's enough for us. It may confuse us and Mack Self, but we assuming nothing gets by Hazel. And so we hereby officially credit "Got You On My Mind" to Ernie Chaffin, late of Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

06 - "GOT YOU ON MY MIND" - B.M.I. - 1:46
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 9, 1958 - Probably Recorded August 1958, Gulfport, Mississippi
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-8-14 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-17 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Chaffin - Vocal and Guitar
Probably Ernie Harvey – Steel Guitar
Other Details Unknown

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt, Vocal Chorus

Less than two months after most interviews for the project of Ernie Chaffin were completed, the Gulf Coast was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, the region's worst natural disaster in modern history. Landmarks no longer exist. Many of the people who contributed to the project of Ernie Chaffin lost everything: their homes, business and personal possessions. Some of the notes, photographs and 45s related to the Ernie Chaffin CDs were destroyed or washed to the Gulf of Mexico. But we were also fortunate to have collected many photos before the hurricane. These documents would otherwise have been lost. The timing of the interviews was also fortuitous; you can't discuss 50-year old recording sessions with someone whose home, possessions and pets have just been swept out to sea.

For Biography of Ernie Chaffin see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ernie Chaffin's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

COME ON BACK HOME – THE TRUE STORY
by Carol Ann Fitzgerald

Ernie Chaffin was loyal. He held onto his friends and they held onto him. He was the calm one in relationships, focused and diligent and set in his ways. Maybe fighting in Europe in 1944 matured him; he wasn't yet eighteen (though he claimed to be) when he enlisted in the Marine Corps.

When Ernie came home, he was still young, and whole though, like a lot of the men who returned from that war, he never really talked about it. Is that what combat does? If you don't die or go nuts, you become stoic?

Water Valley, where Ernie is born in 1928, is a seven-mile speck in Northern Mississippi. A quiet town in Yalobusha County, Water Valley is primarily known among anglers as the home of the world's largest crappie (a fish that tastes, some say, like milk). Mississippi's Depression years are so well-documented that Ernie's childhood may be glibly placed in a threadbare rural landscape under a scratchy gray sky. Crop furrows colliding at the smudged horizon. The boy loves listening to The Grand Ole Opry on the radio. The Delmore Brothers, Roy Acuff, Bill Monroe. Porch-stompin' violins and blackface skits, hillbilly antics. The stage may be two hundred and fifty miles away, but the station's transmission power is mighty enough to stir listeners in remote spots, diminish their sense of isolation.

Ernie has three sisters and plays the mandolin. He sings in church. He's keen on the Nashville music and gospel, too. He is a handsome, dark-haired lad with a charming gap between his front teeth, his sisters must dote on him.

Mississippi's lumber boom was good while it lasted, the Chaffins are loggers, but there aren't anymore old-growth forests to plunder. While Ernie is off fighting, in Belgium? France? the Netherlands? (even his son doesn't know), the Chaffin family relocates farther south, settling in Gulfport. Seagulls, sailboats, the smell of moist, salty creatures. Tourists. Back from the war, Ernie joins his family and a bevy of relatives who live there, too, and maybe the balmy setting, the fluttery palms and gentle ocean, help scuff the death residue from him.

Ernie, now with guitar, enters local talent shows. His face is baby, but his singing voice is man. In one contest, he meets a singing and dancing cutie-pie named Avalon Jean who snags his heart (though he wins the competition). Two well-behaved kids giddy with desire (AJ eighteen, EC nineteen), two chirpy birds connected by song, only matrimony will suffice. The union lasts over forty years; it is serene.

The Gulf Coast in the 1950s is a jubilant, racy spot. Luxury hotels, gambling dens, and cheap martinis lure movie stars and high-rollers, plus crooks and alcoholics. Playing in a Biloxi pavilion, Ernie meets a stringy little fellow named Pewee Maddux, a gifted musician and songwriter with unstoppable ambitions. When Pewee (also spelled Pee Wee, Peewee, and PeeWee) hears Ernie's sunny twang, he gets a twitchy feeling, the recognition of talent. He's a scout of sorts, sensitive to possibility. Ernie, at five foot nine and solidly built (his confidence makes him seem an inch or two taller), enjoys the excitable little man and they partner up, friends for life. Collaborators. In the fashion of the day, they dress like squeakyclean cowboys, embroidered shirts with fancy cuffs and smiley pockets, neckties like ribbons on wreaths. They're both pals with another great Mississippi singer, Jimmy Donley, who adores Ernie when he's not feeling suspicious (Donley stabs his own wife for dancing with Ernie) and who is rambunctious and fierce but so shrimpy in size that folks also call him Pee Wee.

In 1954, Pewee Maddux takes Ernie to Nashville to meet country-music honchos. Ernie impresses Jim Denny, manager of the Grand Ole Opry, but something goes sour at Decca Records, the prestigious country label. Ernie doesn't click with Paul Cohen, the A&R man who signed and produced Kitty Wells and Bill Monroe, among others, and Ernie declines his offer. Pewee is exasperated, but Ernie won't budge. He trusts his intuition. Cohen's influence on country music is legendary but he is a businessman from Chicago and he doesn't have a soft touch (he fired Buddy Holly from Decca in 1957). Ernie's decision is final. Maybe Nashville is too slick, too phony. And he and Avalon Jean are planning to have kids. Pewee and Ernie disagree about what it means to succeed and to flourish.

Memphis, however, is more pleasing. Ernie arrives at Sun Studio in the fall of 1956 with Pewee and two Gulfport musicians, Ernie Harvey and Leo Ladner. The vibe is laid-back, as Ernie explains in a recorded interview unearthed from the Sun vaults: "You would just go in there and start picking around and playing around and first thing you know you was recording, you might be sitting on a vacuum cleaner or anything you could find to sit on, but that's the way it was at Sun Studio back when Sam Phillips had it."

Like Pewee, Sam Phillips responds to the special quality of Ernie's voice, but note the date: Phillips is busy, he's hit it big with Elvis Presley, and he's hooked on the new sounds, rock and roll and rockabilly, which Phillips describes as the merging of "a country man's song with a black man's rhythm''.

In 1957, Sun releases two sides by Chaffin, the country songs "Feelin' Low" and "Lonesome For My Baby" (both written by Pewee) on which he's backed by Harvey on steel guitar, Pewee on acoustic guitar, and Ladner on bass. The songs are spare and elemental, just a few instruments buffering the clear, expressive vocals. Billboard: "Sun Records may have another big-time artist in Ernie Chaffin. He warbles in the earthy Presley groove, with plenty of feeling, interesting phrasing, and spontaneous sounding vitality." Sales, however, are unremarkable.

Chaffin returns with the same gang to Sun for a session that yields "I'm Lonesome" and "Laughin' and Jokin'" (both again written by Pewee). (Billboard describes "I'm Lonesome" as "an appealing chant.") I'm in bed reading when I first hear "I'm Lonesome''. Ernie's voice comes at me like a searchlight, bright and shimmery but also jarring. The human voice conveys moods, but this one I can't figure out. Such a simple rhyme scheme (Feeling blue/Missing you), such an eerie sound. The dramatic shifts in register shouldn't work. The hint of ye olde Western should seem creaky. A minute or so into the song, he plunges into a deep bowl of polysyllabic oh's. He goes: "oh, oh, oh, oh, oh" and then "low, woe, own, some." It's graceful and vibrating and then the voice tilts up again.

A few more Sun sessions follow, but much of the material is unreleased. Chaffin's songs are engaging and warm, but it's hard-unkind, really-to imagine his polite rhythms and winsome croon competing with Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, and Elvis. Suddenly, Sun has attitude, their ads are even cocky:

You think Sun ain't hot! Is New York big! Has a cat got a tail! Ernie's singing is earnest, like his name. He is a romantic. He is married and, most likely, faithful. He is content, consistent. He is not an exhibitionist.

Sun tries to nudge Ernie toward rockabilly, but as Ernie explains, "I'm a country boy and I sing country music and I just never did care to sing the rockabilly. I guess it probably would have been profitable if I had, but I didn't do it anyway''.

Phillips later says if he had devoted himself to country music, with "stylists" like Charlie Feathers and Ernie Chaffin, he "could have had a darn good country label." But late-1950s Phillips craves the sexy and illicit. Miscegenation.

When someone, say, drops your heart in a sink and grinds it through the garbage disposal, how do you react? One kind of person sticks her hand down the drain and drags out the moist muck and then runs into the street, screaming murder, fingering culprits. Another kind of person stares down the drain, sorrowful, self-pitying, but allowing a smidgen of selfblame. This is the difference between rock and roll and country music. Rock and roll can admit to pain but it tends to project it: Look at this crap I've been through, how it's made me tougher. Country sucks in the grief, accepting as a sponge: You dumped me, but I still think you're all right, and I am going to sit here and weep, okay? Rock is obsidian; country is buttermilk. The genres overlap, but in essence they are like the eponymous characters in the Lydia Davis story "Head, Heart," attempting to persuade but unable to connect. Most of us favor one side or the other. If you are Manhattan, you disdain the call of country bumpkins.

With Ernie, the country ballad, more mid-tempo than drawly, fits him. He isn't a melancholy person, but his songs dwell in a lonely climate. "Pretty girls all around, and I'm the saddest guy in town," he sings, "because I'm lonesome for my baby." This is a sappy line, right? Still, the way he brings it out makes me shivery. I once was city, but Ernie confirms I'm also country.

Young writers are told to find their voice, but how do they recognize it? Does it stay fixed, like a parking spot you nose into every morning, or does it change and vanish? Ernie Chaffin found his voice early on-or more likely it found him. He opened his mouth, in a church pew? a bassinet? a music class?, and the sound swept out. It probably pleased him, like a laugh turned liquid, like a cartoon.

When a woman hears a male singing, she becomes a magnetic opposite, the object. But sometimes, more rare, she becomes him. Ernie Chaffin brings you so close you're inside him looking out. It may be the Gulf of Mexico you see, placid but seething with a violent past, more like jelly than surf, quivering.

Jimmy and Pewee, two of Ernie's best friends, kill themselves. Jimmy is holding Chaffin's phone number in his hand when he is discovered, self-asphyxiated. Ernie's Avalon Jean dies of cancer. He remarries. His two kids grow up. Ernie, Jr., graduates from Southern Miss., Celonne is a schoolteacher. Father and kids sing gospel, there are dozens of recordings in his son's possession. Ernie has a tractor and one day it rolls over on him, crushing him slowly. He is sixty-nine. He is pinned by thousands of pounds of machinery to Mississippi's rich, fertile soil. Do you know this is the third wettest state in the country? The river, the rain, the wetlands, the floodplains.

You play his songs when you are driving, alone, in Arkansas: His voice is not delicate, exactly, but it is unguarded: not right for parties. There are landscapes in the tunes, the steel guitar (Ernie Harvey) is prairie or seascape or moon, anywhere you consider the horizon as an extension of yourself or an equal. The voice cracks, deliberately, or bends an octave; it makes you aware of tectonic shifts in the earth and how they travel through the layers of history to resolve in our bodies, unnoticed. He didn't sing at The Opry, a disappointment, but he was a regular on Louisiana Hayride, he was pals with Elvis. Everyone liked him, he was cute and he was also unpretentious. He was a believer but his voice expresses finitude. Maybe he is telling you about death, which is either the ultimate lonesome or the end of all loneliness. This voice finds a hole in you and swims inside it. For now, you are not divided.

JUNE 1958

''One day in early June something rather astonishing happened to me'', says Barbara Barnes. ''I always imagined that if I ever met Elvis Presley, it would be at night, Elvis being the nocturnal creature of legend. As it was, I was heading through the studio to my little den, head down riffling through the day's mail, when I looked up and saw that I was within a foot of the back of a man in uniform. Sam, facing me, was deep in conversation with this figure. Sam stopped me ans said, ''Barbara, I would like you to meet Elvis Presley''.

Elvis stuck out his hand and said, ''Glad to meet you, ma'am''. ''I managed to contain my surprise and asked Elvis if he were enjoying his visit home from Fort Hood, and he said he was. We exchanged a couple of other pleasantries and I excused myself. I would have liked to talk with him some more, but the other part of my brain said it wasn't polite to intrude, especially with someone as constant prey as Elvis'', Barbara said.

Barbara still fully took in what a beautiful sight to behold the real Elvis Presley was that day. He no longer fit the stereotype that had been attributed to him, a sneering hillbilly cat with a pompadour, purple jacket, and teenager skin. Instead, they saw a fit and glowing specimen of manhood with a neat haircut and customtailored uniform that showed off his perfect physique. He looked me squarely in the face in a sincere manner as he said he enjoyed meeting here. The papers were full of news about his leave, his skating parties, his gang of friends who went everywhere with him, his girlfriend Anita Wood. He was of endless interest to everyone in Memphis and, judging from magazine covers they saw on newsstands, everywhere else, too.

JUNE 9-11, 1958

Jerry Lee Lewis had been blacklisted from the newly emerging Top 40 format. Without exposure, his records went back from the stores to the distributors, and from the distributors back to Sun. Sam Phillips was understandably dismayed. "It was a stupid damn thing. I think Jerry's innocence back then, and his trying to be open and friendly and engaging with the press, backfired''.

''They scalped him. It turned out to be a very ghostly and deadly thing. So many people wanted to point a finger of scorn at rockers and say, 'We told you so; rockers are no good'".

Oscar Davis made matters worse by booking Jerry Lee Lewis into the Café de Paris in New York City as a belated and futile stab at respectability.

Almost nobody showed up, and the booking was canceled by mutual agreement after two nights. Jerry returned to Memphis to lick his wounds. His first album was shipped at the height of the storm, together with three EPs drawn from it; but Sam Phillips held off releasing another single for two months in the hope that the furor would die away.

Jerry Lee Lewis' personal appearances were still successful, although without the hit records he could not command his accustomed fees. As Jerry himself said later "From $10,000 a night to $250 a night is a hell of a disappointment". He retreated back to the South, where his personal appearances were still riotously successful. A report of a show in Sheffield, Alabama, at the end of June 1958 noted that the hall was full, with 450 turned away: "There was a crowd as if the President was down to re-dedicate Muscle Shoals", said reporter Henry Mitchell. "Lewis began sedately at the piano, needing only a brace of candles to pass himself off as Liberace, but this calm rapidly vanished. His feet were the first sign, whisking back and forth like runaway pendulums. Soon they were on the keyboard, then on the music rack, and all the while a great noise came from the piano as his hands pounded with the tirelessness of an electric switch. By this point, Lewis could have kicked old ladies without changing the applause in the slightest. It is my considered opinion that Lewis has as strong an attraction for the leaders of tomorrow as ever".

Roland Janes says that Jerry Lee Lewis never showed that he had been hurt by the scandal. "He'a a very deep person", said Janes, who had become to know Lewis from days and nights spent together on the road. "He could be hurting and never let it show. I don't think he ever quite understood why it happened. He's such an honest person, and he didn't think he'd done anything that was unacceptable to anyone. He didn't think the public would be concerned about what he did if it didn't relate to his music, which was a total miscalculation on his part. The truth is that you've got the world, and you've got Jerry Lee Lewis. He'll do things his way regardless of what anyone thinks. He felt betrayed, though, and he had every right to, but he held his head up and didn't cry".

Roland Janes stayed on the road with Jerry Lee Lewis until 1959. "I think things were starting to look up for Jerry when I left - certainly in terms of bookings. However, Billy Riley and I decided to start our own record label, and I'd just got married. I wanted to do something in music other than work on the road. It was very painful to leave Jerry, though, because I loved him like a brother".

Roland Janes continued to play with Jerry Lee Lewis in the studio, as they struggled to find something that would tempt programmers to end their blacklist, But Jerry rarely wrote his own material, and music publishers were no longer sending him their hottest new prospects. This forced Jerry back to his roots; there was a heavier concentration of revamped older material in the years that followed his downfail.

According to Kay Martin, ''I went to this venue for at least one of the shows at Cafe de Paris. I was a little dismayed that Jerry was booked into a night club, when most of his fans were teenagers who would not be allowed into the place. It was strange... Jerry was rocking and the place was not packed''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE VELTONES (THE VEL-TONES)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: JUNE 9, 1958
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

The Veltones, where the vocals-house band at Johnnie Currie's Club Tropicana in North Memphis, and they had recorded a couple of demos at Sun in June 1958 that would remain unissued until the 1980s, they recorded as the first black artists as The Canes for Satelite in 1959, with a song written by Chips Moman and Jerry ''Satch'' Arnold, ''Fool In Love'', which would end up being leased to Mercury for national distribution. The Veltones recorded for Stax Records in 1962, and in 1966, they would cut two sides at Goldwax Records.

01 -''GOOD GRACIOUS (FIRE)'' - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - 1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30149-B4 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - MEMPHIS BEAT
Reissued: - July 1990 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD Sun 31-12 mono
SUN BLUES ARCHIVE - VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY

Note: ''Good Gracious'' issued as ''Fire'' on CR 30149.

02 – ''DID YOU'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: June 9, 1958
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun 1062-B2 mono
SUN BLUES ARCHIVE - VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY
Reissued: - July 1990 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD Sun 31-13 mono
SUN BLUES ARCHIVE - VOLUME 3 - DEEP HARMONY

More tracks recorded.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Veltones consisting of
Samuel Jones – Vocal
Willie Mull – Vocal
Alvin Standard – Vocal
John Reed – Vocal

Pee Wee Maddux – Guitar
Billy Riley – Guitar
Stan Kesler – Bass

For Biography of The Veltones see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Veltones' Sun recording can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 9, 1958 MONDAY

Billboard magazine publishes ''An Open Letter To The Industry From Jerry Lee Lewis''.

JUNE 10, 1958 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley begins an all-night recording session at RCA Studio B. in Nashville, his only session during his Army tenure. Recorded, ''I Need Your Love Tonight'', ''A Big Hunk O'Love'', ''Ain't That Loving You Baby'', ''(Now And Then) Fool Such As I'' and ''I Got Stung''.

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''Head Headed Woman'' backed with ''Don't Ask Me Why'' ( RCA Victor 47-7280).

JUNE 11, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Ernest Tubb recorded the Roger Miller-penned ''Half A Mind'' along with ''Next Time'', in an evening session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

The Patty Page-hosted music show ''The Big Record'' ends it nine-month prime-time run on CBS-TV.

''The Hand That Rocks The Cradle'' songwriter Ted Harris moves from Lakeland, Florida to Nashville.

JUNE 14, 1958 SATURDAY

The Everly Brothers are guests on the first installment of NBC-TV's summer replacement series ''The Bob Crosby Show''.

JUNE 15, 1958 SUNDAY

Patsy Cline writes to fan club president Treva Miller that her finances are sinking, ''I've got $1050.00 that's got to be paid before the month or I'll lose everything''.

JUNE 15, 1958 SUNDAY

Release of Sun 301 ''Lewis Boogie''/''The Return Of Jerry Lee''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JUNE 16, 1958
PRODUCER - BILL JUSTIS AND/OR CHARLIE RICH

Charlie Rich's first few months at Sun Records were one long round of demo sessions, with Sam Phillips doing his level best to nail down a precise musical direction. In the spring of 1958 he began cutting with the studio house band and this ensuing teen confection became tagged as an ostensible master. The fact that it didn't fuel Sam's proviso for the Rich debut, was almost certainly due to "Polly's" aberrant chorus: Flattened thirds didn't figure in rock and roll songs too much at the time.

01 - "POPCORN POLLY" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 16, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-25 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962
Reissued: - 2002 Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-3-26 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

Rich's wife, Margaret Ann, recalls writing this tune with Charlie more or less as a joke: "It was a silly little thing and we laughed about it. I don't even recall what we had in mind at the time. Maybe that someone like Dick Clark would take a liking to it".

In passing, Margaret-Ann described it as a "be-bop" tune which seems a curious choice of words. It certainly comes close to teenybopper music, although that 8-note-vocal riff that runs through the track might have worked as an instrumental figure on one of Dizzy Gillespie's off nights. The truth is, "Popcorn Polly" may have started out as somebody's joke, but it sure didn't end up that way. Despite its title, this song should not be confused with the rock and roll dross that Rich sank to during his earliest days as a Sun songwriter.

There is a lot more musical substance here despite the silly theme. This is really a surprisingly ballsy, very bluesy track, with different lyrics. might have ranked among Charlie's most memorable Sun performance.

Only the decidedly silly lyrics sabotage this underrated effort. Roland Janes recalls that Jay Brown, Jerry Lee's bass player/father-in-law, loved "Popcorn Polly". "He always wanted to record it. In fact, I think he did cut his own version for Sun, although I doubt it was ever released".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano
Billy Riley - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willis - Alt Saxophone

For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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JUNE 16, 1958 MONDAY

According Sun employee Barbara Barnes she says, ''When Sam Phillips told me were getting ready to release, on this date, a record by Jerry Lee Lewis' cousin, I thought, 'Oh, my! What will this one look like'! I was pleasantly surprised when Carl McVoy appeared, personable, with nice manners, a cute face, and short curly hair''.

''I liked his voice, too'', said Barbara. ''He sounded good, and different from Jerry Lee. I praised Carl in our release sheet for our distributors, urging them to stock the record. But I wasn't sure about the tunes, a country-rock number, ''Tootsie'', backed with the perennial Jimmie Davis tune, ''You Are My Sunshine''.

This was one of those rare times we released a record not cut in our studios. For $2,600, Sam Phillips had bought the master from Joe Cuoghi of Hi Records in Memphis, who had recorded it in Nashville with Chet Atkins in October and/or November 1957 at RCA Studio B. It had begun to sell regionally, and Sam liked it. I was thinking we'd have to sell many boxes of records to recover that up-front money plus sampling costs and the artist royalty of 3 percent. Possibly more for travel to promote it. It didn't look promising to me. We paid 14 cents to press a record, then sold it for 35 cents, so volume was the key'', says Barbara.

''Though he grew up in Arkansas, Carl was in part inspired to be a performer the same was Jerry Lee Lewis was, by watching the black entertainers who came to his uncle's nightclub in Ferriday, Louisiana. He was also related to Jerry's other cousins and musicians, the evangelist Jimmy Swaggart and Mickey Gilley, who sounded a lot like Jerry Lee in their singing and playing. Jerry Lee and Carl swapped visits in Arkansas and Louisiana as they were growing up'' Barbara continued.

JUNE 18, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Merle Haggard has a son, Marty, born in Bakersfield, California, while Merle is in prison. Marty charts five songs in the 1980s, though none of them emerge as hits.

JUNE 22, 1958 SUNDAY

Dallas and Sharon Frazier are married. The groom is destined to write such love songs as ''There Goes My Everything'', ''If My Heart Had Windows'' and ''All I Have To Offer You (It's Me)''.

JUNE 23, 1958 MONDAY

ABC debuts ''Polka-Go-Round'', a one-hour music show featuring Tom ''Stubby'' Fouts, the leader of the former hitmaking band Captain Stubby and The Buccaneers.

Johnny Cash takes ''Guess Things Happen That Way'' to number 1 on the Billboard country singles chart.

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Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR NARVEL FELTS
FOR MERCURY RECORDS 1958

RCA STUDIO B.
1610 HAWKINS STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
MERCURY SESSION: MONDAY JUNE 23, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – BOB CLOUD

01 – ''LITTLE GIRL STEP THIS WAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Narvel Felts
Publisher: - Mayflower Music
Matrix number: - YW 17622
Recorded: - June 23, 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Mercury Records (S) 45rpm standard single Mercury 71347-A mono
LITTLE GIRL STEP THIS WAY / VADA LOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220-20 mono
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME

02 – ''VADA LOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Narvel Felts
Publisher: - Mayflower music
Matrix number: - YW 17623
Recorded: - June 23, 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Mercury Records (S) 45rpm standard single Mercury 71347-B mono
VADA LOU / LITTLE GIRL STEP THIS WAY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220-22 mono
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Narvel Felts - Vocal & Guitar
Leon Barrett - Guitar
J.W. Grubbs - Bass
Bob Taylor - Drums
Jerry Tuttle - Saxophone

Mildred Millie Kirkham - Vocal Chorus
The Jordanaires consisting of
Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews,
Hoyt Hawkins, Raymond Walker - Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Narvel Felts see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 24, 1958 TUESDAY

Billy Riley stayed on at Sun Records until sometime in 1958 when his growing frustration with Sam Phillips putting all (or most) of his promotional resources behind Jerry Lee Lewis and not Billy Lee got the best of him. Several volatile encounters between Sam and Riley occurred. Riley recalled, ''Sam Phillips and I both had respect for each other, but we didn't get along too well at times. Mostly it was just words, but I did get a little riled one time and tore his studio up a little''. Sam sweet-talked Riley the first time, and the singer returned to Sun. Then it happened again. Things never got back to normal. The short version is that the multi-talented Billy Riley moved on.

JUNE 25, 1958 WEDNESDAY

The movie ''Summer Love'' debuts in New York City. Country music's Molly Bee is a co-star with Rod McKeuen.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Years ago, it looked pretty simple: Gene Simmons cut a single at Sun that came out around June 1958. It sounded a little anachronistic for 1958, but so what? Turns out, it sounded anachronistic because it had been recorded around two years earlier. And far from recording just that one single, Simmons was in and out for Sun for three or four years. ''Down On The Border'' on compact disc 4 (BCD 17313) probably dated to 1955 and there are entries in Sam Phillips' session log as late as June and September 1958 without titles attached to them. Piecing together those sessions isn't easy. Master numbers suggest that Sam Phillips scheduled Simmons' single for release around the same time as Kenny Parchman's abandoned release in the fall of 1956. According to Billboard, it finally came out in May or June 1958, but there has never been a convincing explanation for the delay. These titles, taken in conjunction with the two on compact disc 4, show the broad sweep of Simmons' career at Sun. Dating from 1955, the earliest cuts on compact disc 5 (BCD 17313) show that he'd taken his cue from another Tupelo boy. Later recordings have a slightly fuller sound. And then there's ''Drinkin' Wine''/''I Done Told You'', a classic rockabilly single if ever there was one. Writing to Simmons in September 19, 1958, Sam Phillips noted that during the first month or so on the street, the single had sold 1145 copies. After deducting eighteen dollars for registering the songs, Simmons was in the hole to Phillips for six bucks.

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JUNE 25, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "UNKNOWN TITLES''
This session are assigned in Sam Phillips' notebook to Gene Simmons,
but no further details unknown.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Jessie Carter - Upright Bass
Billy Weis - Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <
Gene Simmons' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR TOMMY BLAKE
FOR RECCO RECORDS 1958

DEE MARAIS STUDIO AND BAYOU RECORD SHOP
408 EAST 70TH STREET, SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA
RECCO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – HARDIN GUION DES ''DEE'' MARAIS

Now off Sun Records and without his regular backing group (Ed Hall and Carl Adams), Tommy Blake formed a partnership with sometime Louisiana Hayride artist Carl Belew. Later in 1959, Belew recorded two of Blake's songs, ''$F-Olding Money$'' and ''Cool Gator Shoes'' (see That'll Flat Git It Volume 9). ''Cool Gator Shoes'' was first recorded by Blake as ''Cool Alligator'' at Dee Marais', Shreveport studio at some point in 1958.

Faced with diminishing returns, the Rhythm Rebels had dissolved. The lack of success had amplified their differences. ''To get a clear image of out writing differences'', said Ed Hall, ''you need only listen to the songs ''Freedom'' or ''Koolit''. ''Freedom'' was me and ''Koolit'' was Tommy whereas ''Honky Tonk Mind'' was a close collaborative effort between all three of us. Had it been up to Blake, ''Freedom'' would never have been heard and had it been up to me. ''Koolit'' would never have been heard. The Hoody stuff resulted from Carl's driving guitar solo frenzies and the electric guitar rhythms I put behind them as the two of us jammed away for hours in my living room''. As noted, Carl Adams was hanging around with Dale Hawkins and Ed Hall went to Louisiana State University to work toward a degree in psychiatric social work. Hall later worked as a superintendent of several state institutions for the developmentally challenged. Carl Adams became dependent upon prescription drugs and died aged 30 of kidney failure on February 22, 1965

01 – ''COOL ALLIGATOR*'' – B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - La Dee Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - White Label Holland (LP) 33rpm WLP 8874 mono
TOMMY BLAKE & GENE WYATT
Reissued: 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-24 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 – ''I'LL BE FREE**'' – B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - La Dee Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - White Label Holland (LP) 33rpm WLP 8874 mono
TOMMY BLAKE & GENE WYATT
Reissued: 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-27 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tommy Blake – Vocal & Guitar
Carl Bailey Adams – Guitar
Unidentified – Bass
Unidentified – Drums
Unidentified - Piano*
Unidentified - Saxophone**

For Biography of Tommy Blake see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

A little later, former Sun recording artist, Luke McDaniel was doing a show in Bogalusa, Louisiana, when he met up with Carl Perkins. At this time Carl was still at the height of his ability to write great teenslanted rocking magic moments and he offered Luke the lyrically witty "Foxy Dan". Luke liked it and duly cut a terrific version at the Jimmy Rogers Studio, Mobile, Alabama in 1958. It was issued on Rogers own label Astro Records, but again, a cracking good record made no impression on the Billboard charts and Luke took a job at the radio station in Hattiesburg.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR LUKE MCDANIEL
FOR ASTRO RECORDS 1958

JIMMY ROGERS STUDIO
MOBILE, ALABAMA
ASTRO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – PROBABLY JIMMY ROGERS

01 – ''FOXY DAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Starway Music
Matrix number: - V-12822
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Astro Records (S) 45rpm standard single Astro JR 32-108-A mono
FOXY DAN / SOMEDAY YOU'LL REMEMBER
Reissued: 2008 Stomper Time (CD) 500/200rpm Stomper STCD 24-4 mono
LUKE MCDANIEL – MISSISSIPPI HONKY TONK ROCKABILLY MAN

"Foxy Dan" on Astro 108 is a different recording from Big Howdy 8121 (recorded in 1959 which was released in the 1970s).

02 – ''SOMEDAY YOU'LL REMEMBER'' – B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: McMurray
Publisher: - Starrite Music – Globe Music
Matrix number: - V-12823
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Astro Records (S) 45rpm standard single Astro JR 32-108-B mono
SOMEDAY YOU'LL REMEMBER / FOXY DAN

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Luke McDaniel as Jeff Daniels- Vocal & Guitar
Dusty Harrell - Lead Guitar
Henry Smith - Bass
Henry Bostick - Piano
Frank Stucky - Drums

For Biography of Tommy Blake see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 28-JULY 14, 1958

Jerry Lee Lewis on tour in the South with shows in Florida, Georgia, Alabama and Missouri.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 
 

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