CONTAINS
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1954 SESSIONS 3
March 1, 1954 to March 31, 1954

Studio Session for Little Junior Parker, March 2, 1954 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ramsey Kearney, March 11, 1954 / Or May 9, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Little Milton, March 30, 1954 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 1954

Sam Phillips temporarily resolves the problems which have kept Little Junior Parker out of the Sun studio since November, and a recording session is fixed for this month. Parker had been touring with Duke Records artists, and had been approached by Duke to record for them since December 2, 1953.

MARCH 1, 1954 MONDAY

Slim Whiteman recorded ''Rose-Marie'' in the studio at Shreveport radio station KWKH.

Janis Oliver is born in Torrance, California. She joins younger sister Kristine to form Sweethearts Of The Rodeo, who rise in the 1980s behind a rockabilly-tinged sound. By that time, her last name is changed, following her marriage to Vince Gill.

Actress Catherine Bach is born in Warren, Ohio. She appears in the CBS series ''The Dukes Of Hazzards'' as Daisy Duke. The character is referenced in the 2002 Mark Wills hit ''19 Somethin'''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Little Junior Parker had been part of Johnny Ace's revue, but in January 1954 Don Robey made him the headliner of his own show, later adding Bobby Bland to form Blues Consolidated. Clearly, Robey knew he was courting trouble by recording Junior in December 1953 because he held back ''Sittin', Drinkin' And Thinkin''' until June 1954, and by then there had been a lawsuit from Sam Phillips. Upon release of the Duke version, Billboard said, ''Ork weaves a moody backdrop. A good blues etching that can easily into the money''. In 1958, Junior recorded the very similar ''Sittin' And Thinkin'''for Duke (credited to Joe Scott and Don Robey), and in 1977 his Sun recording finally appeared.

STUDIO SESSION FOR LITTLE JUNIOR PARKER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY MARCH 2, 1954
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The following month, Little Junior Parker broke his contract with Sam Phillips and signed with Duke Records. Phillips sued Parker, won a $17,500 settlement from Don Robey, but found little personal gratification in it. Parker was an act he loved, and he had hoped to find him a hit record. But Little Junior Parker was forgotten as Phillips began looking for new talent. The business end was now complete, and the stage was set to find a superstar act. Amidst the controversy over Parker, young Elvis Presley came into the Sun Records fold.

01 - "SITTIN' DRINKIN' AND THINKIN*'" - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Herman Parker
Publisher: - Bluesman Music
Matrix number: - U 105 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 2, 1954
Released: - November 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30135-7 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS – JUNIOR PARKER & BILLY LOVE
Reissued: - 1990 Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 38-7 mono
MYSTERY TRAIN

''Sittin' Drinkin' And Thinkin''', this song comes from an unknown session, which is believed to have taken place on March 2, 1954. The guitarist is audibly Pat Hare, who provides incessant fills around Junior's vocal, along with a marvelously jazzy solo, whilst the latter delivers one of his more relaxed vocals, a la Roy Brown. Just a few weeks after this session Parker broke his contract with Sun Records and was installed in Duke's Houston studio where he re-cut this song (Duke 127). However, this is clearly a finished take, neither a run-through nor demo. Reportedly, Duke's Don Robey was more comfortable with Junior's jazz inclinations than Sam Phillips, who was willing to record these efforts, but more likely to release the rockin' sides.

02 - "SITTIN' AT THE BAR" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Herman Parker-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 2, 1954
Released: - November 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30135-6 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS – JUNIOR PARKER & BILLY LOVE
Reissued: - 1990 Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SS 38-8 mono
MYSTERY TRAIN

Someone - either Junior Parker himself or Sam Phillips - was obviously obsessed with the rhythm possibilities of "Feelin' Good". So much so that little effort has gone into the lyrics, which have Junior ringing his baby to get her to "come on, down". From this lukewarm enthusiasm, he may get some competition from Hot Shot Love and Kenneth Banks if she ever arrives. The identity of the guitarist here is unknown: from the amplification its tempting to identify Pat Hare again, although there's equally good reason to suggest it might be Floyd Murphy playing through a defective amplifier.

03 - "SITTIN' AT MY WINDOW" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Herman Parker-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Bluesman Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 2, 1954
Released: - November 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30135-5 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS – JUNIOR PARKER & BILLY LOVE
Reissued: - 1990 Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SS 38-9 mono
MYSTERY TRAIN

From the instrumentation, this seems to come from the same session that produced "Sittin' Drinkin' And Thinkin'", with Junior's dept to Roy Brown even more apparent.

The song is yet another variation on B.B. King's "Woke Up This Morning", with its combination of latin and fast 4/4 rhythms. This time one of the tenor players takes a two-chorus solo, which doesn't really get off the ground, hampered perhaps by the drummer's inability to swing. Junior was always a consistent seller so it's hard to penetrate Phillips' reasoning in not issuing this, unless, as mentioned earlier, he was legally enjoined from doing so.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Little Junior's Blue Flames consisting of
Herman Parker - Vocal
Pat Hare - Guitar
Unknown - Alto Saxophone*
Raymond Hill - Tenor Saxophone*
James Wheeler - Tenor Saxophone*
Bill Johnson - Piano
Kenneth Banks - Bass
Houston Stokes - Drums

Note - these three sides may not all have been recorded the same day, but one or more of these titles might date to the November 18, 1953 session.

Herman Parker had joined fellow Memphians Bobby Bland and Johnny Ace on a package show booked through the Buffalo Agency in Houston, a subsidiary of Duke/Peacock Records. The owner of Peacock, Don Robey, had already sued Sam Phillips over "Bear Cat" and offered an inducement for Parker to sign with him. Herman "Junior" Parker completed a final session at Sun which featured "Sittin' Drinkin" And Thinkin'".

It was scheduled for release with "Feelin' Bad" when Sam Phillips discovered that Parker had been lured away by Don Robey, owner of Peacock Records, and had re-recorded "Sittin' Drinkin' And Thinkin'".

Sam Phillips filed suit against Robey and, when the case of "Bear Cat" from Rufus Thomas came to trail in 1955, he was awarded a $17.500 judgement which must have represented sweet revenge for the lawsuit he had lost to Robey on "Bear Cat". At the same time, Sam Phillips secured 50% of "Mystery Train", which would prove to be a better investment than he could ever have imagined.

By the time Parker quit Sun, he had taken on a new guitarist. He replaced the technical adroitness of Floyd Murphy (brother of Matt Murphy" with the raw power of Auburn "Pat" Hare. It is Hare who can be heard on "Sittin' Drinkin' And Thinkin'" (both the Sun and Duke cuts). Once at Duke, Parker also cut another "Feelin' Good" sequel, "I Wanna Ramble", and re-cut "Sittin' At My Window" as "Please Baby Blues" with Pat Hare.

For Biography of Herman Parker see: > The Sun Biographies <
Herman Parker's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 3, 1954 WEDNESDAY

Fiddler Gordon Terry and his wife, Virginia, have a daughter, Ronda Gayle Terry.

MARCH 5, 1954 FRIDAY

Fiddler George Wilkinson dies. He was the founder and leader of The Fruit Jar Drinkers, a string band that was a mainstay of the early Grand Ole Opry.

MARCH 6, 1954 SATURDAY

Ray Price recorded ''Much Too Young To Die;; during an afternoon session at the Castle Studio in Nashville's Tulane Hotel.

Elvis Presley files his first federal income tax return. His job classification is checked off as "semi-skilled", and his return shows income of $129.74 from M.B. Parker and $786.59 from Precision Tool, with no deductions or exemptions.

Songwriter Kimmie Rhodes is born in Wichita Falls, Texas. Rhodes' composition ''Ordinary Heart'' is recorded by Emmylou Harris for the ''Happy, Texas'' soundtrack.

Starday released George Jones' debut single, ''No Money In This Deal''.

MARCH 8, 1954 MONDAY

Decca released Kitty Kallen's ''Little Things Mean A Lot''. The pop hit provides a point of reference for Margo Smith's 1977 country version.

MARCH 11, 1954 THURSDAY

Steel guitarist Jerry Byrd and his wife, Thelma, have their second daughter, Luana June Byrd, in Nashville. Byrd has amassed recording credits with Red Foley, Hank Williams and Jimmy Wakely.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAMSEY KEARNEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MARCH 11, 1954 / OR MAY 9, 1956
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

After graduation from Boliver Central High School, Ramsey moved to Memphis, Tennessee to further his career and get more experience. Ramsey was lead vocalist and front man for the Snearley Ranch Boy's, who played night clubs in Memphis and Arkansas. During this period in time, Ramsey also had a daily radio show on KWEM in West Memphis, Arkansas.

In 1953 Ramsey Kearney was drafted in the U.S. Army. During his first army leave, Ramsey was visiting his friend Sleepy Eyed John (John Lepley), a popular disc jockey at WHHM. He told Ramsey that Sam Phillips was about to do something recording wise. According to Kearney, ''We went to Sam and discussed the possibilities... we decided on what musicians to use, and Sam called the session. We did three songs, ''The Work Of The Lord'' which I wrote, ''New Low Price Of Love'', which I co-wrote with John Lepley, and the third song was ''I've Never Stopped Loving You'', another song I wrote''. Sam seemed to be well pleased with these recordings, especially with ''The Work Of The Lord'', but to Ramsey's dismay, Sam Phillips never released these recordings.

01 - ''THE WORK OF THE LORD - B.M.I.
Composer: - Ramsey Kearney
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 11, 1954 / Or May 9, 1956
Released: - Sun Unissued

02 - ''NEW LOW PRICE OF LOVE - B.M.I.
Composer: - Ramsey Kearney-John Lepley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 11, 1954 / Or May 9, 1956
Released: - Sun Unissued

03 – ''I'VE NEVER STOPPED LOVING YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Ramsey Kearney
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 11, 1954 / Or May 9, 1956
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8181 mono
SUN HILLBILLY

04 - ''UNISSUED UNKNOWN TITLE''

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ramsey Kearney – Vocal
Paul Brazile – Guitar
Albert Evescove – Guitar
J.R. Ledbetter – Bass
Al Vescovo - Steel Guitar
Paul Buskirk - Unknown

For Biography of Ramsey Kearney see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ramsey Kearney's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 14, 1954 SUNDAY

Jann Browne is born in Anderson, Indiana. A member of Asleep At The Wheel from 1981-1983, she blossoms on the West Coast circuit, creating one minor hit with 1989's ''Tell My Why''.

MARCH 15, 1954 MONDAY

Jim Ed and Maxine Brown recorded ''Looking Back To See'' in Shreveport. It becomes the first hit for the Browns.

Billy Walker recorded ''Thank You For Calling'' in a morning session at the Jim Beck Studio in Dallas, Texas.

Jan Howard, going under her married name Lula Grace Smith, has her fourth child, Janet Louise Smith, in Columbus, Ohio. The baby dies one month later.

Columbia released Carl Smith's ''Back Up Buddy''.

Record executive Mike Dungan is born in Cincinnati, Ohio. He becomes the head of Capitol's Nashville division in 2000, taking part in the careers of Keith Urban, Lady Antebellum and Luke Bryan, among others. In 2012, he leads the merged Universal Music Group, which includes MCA and Mercury.

MARCH 16, 1954 TUESDAY

Faron Young recorded ''If You Ain't Lovin' (You Ain't Livin')'' at the castle Studio in downtown Nashville. He also makes his first attempts at cutting ''I've Got Five Dollars And It's Saturday Night''.

Jim Reeves recorded ''Penny Candy'' at Shreveport's KWKH Radio.

Tim O'Brien is born in Wheeling, West Virginia. A member of the bluegrass act Hot Rize, he writes Kathy Mattea's 1986 hit ''Walk The Way The Wind Blows'' and joins her on her 1990 duet ''The Battle Hymn Of Love''.

MARCH 18, 1954 THURSDAY

Red Foley recorded ''Jilted''.

MARCH 19, 1954 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley leaves Precision Tool, where he is not particularly happy with either the work or the razzing he is forced to put up with because of the length of his hair. Tool is the same employer that fired him three years earlier for being under-age.

MARCH 20, 1954 SATURDAY

Jim Seales, of Shenandoah, is born in Hamilton, Alabama. The guitarist is a key ingredient to such hits as ''Next To Me, Next To You'', ''The Church On Cumberland Road'' and ''Two Dozen Roses''.

MARCH 22, 1954 MONDAY

Hank Thompson recorded ''Honky Tonk Girl'', ''We've Gone Too Far'', ''If Lovin' You Is Wrong'', ''Tears Are Only Rain'' and ''Annie Over'' at the Capitol Studios on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.

Capitol released Hank Thompson's double-sided hit, ''Breakin' The Rules'' backed with ''A Fooler, A Faker''.

MARCH 24, 1954 WEDNESDAY

Hank Thompson recorded ''The New Green Light'' at the capitol Studios on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.

Wanda Jackson and Billie Gray recorded ''You Can't Have My Love'' in an evening session as the Capitol Studios on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.

MARCH 26, 1954 FRIDAY

Jackie Gleason makes the cover of TV Guide, seven years before he earns a country hit as the writer of Jimmy Dean's ''To A Sleeping Beauty''.

MARCH 27, 1954 SATURDAY

Opera meets the Opry: opera singer Helen Traubel makes a guest appearance on the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

MARCH 29, 1954 MONDAY

Jimmy Dean's wife, Sue, gives birth to their daughter, Connie Elizabeth Dean, at the Seventh Day Adventist Hospital in Takoma Park, Maryland. Connie inspires his 1962 recitation ''To A Sleeping Beauty''

MARCH 30, 1954 TUESDAY

Steel guitarist Gary Hogue is born. He appears on the multi-artist Grammy-winner ''Same Old Train'', a 1998 recording produced by his employer, Marty Stuart.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LITTLE MILTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY MARCH 30, 1954
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCED AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER
AND/OR SAM C. PHILLIPS

The recordings has been prepared from digital transfers off the original masters. Due to the age and conditions of the tapes, listeners may notice dropouts or distortion.

There are at least five takes of "Lookin' For My Baby". Milton's final record for Sun, in the tape vaults. The issued version is undoubtedly the cleanest, as well as the slowest. The use an American movie rating metaphor, Sam Phillips has issued the PG version - not an unreasonable choice, commercially speaking. The problem for the Sun fans is that there were several R, perhaps even X-rated versions that languished in the archives for ever 20 years before seeing daylight (Sunbox) 105 and ZuZazz 2007). On the technically flawed alternatives, Milton's guitar virtuosity shone to a level one can only guess at from his issued records.

The version of "Lookin' For My Baby" that appeared on Sun in 1955 is still a fine record by any reckoning, from Milton's idiomatic spoken intro, "...see can't I find her", to the trainlike riffing horns, to Milton's pleading vocal and searing guitar work. Even when his fires were damped down, the man was still s fine musician.

01(1) - "LOOKIN' FOR MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 152 Master Take 1
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - June 21, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 220-B < mono
LOOKIN' FOR MY BABY / HOMESICK FOR MY BABY
Reissued - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-4-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

01(2) - "LOOKIN' FOR MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1990 Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 35-7 mono
LITTLE MILTON - THE SUN MASTERS

The remarkable alternate track of ''Lookin' For My Baby'' succeeds at at levels, from the matter-of-spoken introduction and the stinging rigour of Milton's guitar solo to the raucous support from Ike Turner's band. Milton is deceptively relaxed as he informs us, "People, you know what? My baby's left me and she hasn't come back. And I'm gonna get on this old train and see can I find her". His cutting amplification alone would have roused the outkirts of Memphis. Lonnie Haynes sets up a loping shuffle as the horns bray out a train-whistle riff. Although his records from this period are chameleon-like, Milton here begins to show the originally he would quickly again. Milton was tantalizingly close to success in commercial rhythm and blues. Just one great song was all he needed, but ''Alone And Blue'' wasn't it, and he wouldn't find it until ''We're Gonna Make It'' eleven years later.

02 - "ALONE AND BLUE" - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 109 Master
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - April 15, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 200-B < mono
ALONE AND BLUE / IF YOU LOVE ME
Reissued - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Milton had a penchant for spoken introductions around this time. He oozes sincerity (of a sort) as he addresses his woman: "Darling, I've a story to tell you/can't reach you but maybe my story will". The song itself works up from the template of a B.B. King blues ballad, although Ike's horn players lack the polish of their counterparts. That's illustrated to dubious effect when C.W. Tate takes a tremulous (and poorly piched) solo chorus. In a bid to cover all the bases, Milton even calls on both God and his mother to bring his baby back - all to no avail.

The uptempo side of Milton's second (SUN 200) single is by far the more interesting of the pair. Milton begins with some strong guitar licks lifted straight from Elmore James "Dusty My Broom". Milton was not the first, and will not be the last bluesman to steal this riff. If nothing else, it was the inspiration for B.B. King's "Please Love Me". Milton turns in a solid vocal and guitar performance, but it may be Ike Turner's pounding piano, almost buried in the mix, that takes top honours.

03(1) - "IF YOU LOVE ME BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - James Cambell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 108 Master
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - April 15, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 200-A < mono
IF YOU LOVE ME / ALONE AND BLUE
Reissued - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Once again Milton displays his gift for imitation bordering on plagiarism - however, on this occasion it barely matters that he is ploughing someone else's furrow. having purloined that irresistible intro from Elmore Jame's "Dust My Broom" he turns in a polished vocal performance, ably later, B.B. King recalled Ike Turner as one of the finest backing pianists he'd ever heard, and these sides by Milton bear evidence of this.

03(2) - "IF YOU LOVE ME" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Alternate Take SUN 200 master, original master lost, and garnered any
attention, this side would not have deflected disc jockey action.
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 35-5 mono
LITTLE MILTON - THE SUN MASTERS

"Homesick For My Baby", has not been a popular candidate for reissue. Although an alternate take appears on Sunbox 105, the original issue is nowhere to be found on any major Sun blues retrospective, including a collection of Milton's best Sun recordings (ZuZazz 2007). The oversight probably reflects the fact that, while a competent recording, "Homesick" is not a particularly exciting record. From a marketing point of view, it probably made good sense to attach it to the flipside of "Lookin' For My Baby" (or "Rode That Train All Night Long", as the tape box calls it) and hope that stellar A-side would find a clear track to market success.

04(1) - "HOMESICK FOR MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 153 Master Take 1
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - June 21, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 220-A < mono
HOMESICK FOR MY BABY / LOOKIN' FOR MY BABY
Reissued - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-4-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

04(2) - "HOMESICK FOR MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - 1986 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956

A straightforward blues outing, this is an alternate take of the original B-side of SUN 220. Distinguished by yet another superlative guitar solo - once again demonstrating Milton's flair for aggressive phrasing - the saxes (Lawrence Taylore and W.C. Tate) weight in with some rather soulful notes, whilst Ike Turner really shines in his somewhat limited supporting role on piano. The only sour note in the performance is literially the last - which is probably why it remained in the can. The only sour note in the performance is literally the last but, as Sam Phillips would have told them, ''It's the feeling that counts''.

05 - "RUNNING WILD BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 35-8 mono
LITTLE MILTON - THE SUN MASTERS

06 - "I LOVE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Zu-Zazz Z 2007 mono
HITTIN' THE BOOGIE - MEMPHIS DAYS
Reissued: - 1990 Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 35-9 mono
LITTLE MILTON - THE SUN MASTERS

As the above tracks show, Milton had a problem with song titles. If that isn't enough, there are actually two different songs with this title. This straightforward boogie kicks off with Ike Turner's piano. The lyrics begin by warming aspirants away from his woman, but then go on to prove that his own status with her is somewhat less than solid. After effective guitar and tenor solos, he concludes on a note of hope, "So I guess that's all for now and I'll see you down the road/but the next time I see you, be sure you have your clothes".

07 - "IF CRYING WOULD HELP ME" - B.M.I. - 3:11
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 35-10 mono
LITTLE MILTON - THE SUN MASTERS

08(1) - "OH WEE, WEE BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 35-11 mono
LITTLE MILTON - THE SUN MASTERS

Unquestionably the most unusual track Little Milton recorded for Sun. If Sam Phillips was looking for hybrid material, he should have stayed with this effort. It's got a clear streak of hillbilly running right through it and the title suggests a throwback to the 1940s. Originally logged and issued as ''Re-Beat'', this song has an engaging rhythm and a sixeable hook. This is about as far as Milton ever strayed from traditional blues during his early career. Talking to Steve LaVere, Milton was adamant that the song was called ''Re-Beep'', though he didn't say what he meant by that, and if you listen closely that is indeed what he's saying.

08(2) - ''OH WEE, WEE BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1954/1955
Released: - October 1985
First appearance: - Krazy Kat Records (LP) 33rpm KK 7427 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - UNISSUED TRACKS FROM THE 1950s
Reissued: - June 25, 2006 Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
LITTLE MILTON - LOOKING FOR MY BABY

09 – "RE-BEET (RE-BEAT)" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1990 Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 35-13 mono
LITTLE MILTON - THE SUN MASTERS

10 - "SHE'S MY QUEEN" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-7-17 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

A straightforward blues outing which doesn't really distinguish itself until Milton unleashes a stinging guitar solo, after which it really soars. There are shades of Guitar Slim here, but Milton remain essentially his own man. No one would ever want to deny Milton his 1960s and 1970s successes, but its a shame he had to achieve it in a musical style which wholly submerged both his blues roots and magnificent guitar playing. During the 1960s when Milton didn't bring his guitar to recording sessions, someone should have started a petition to keep the solos coming.

11(1) - "RODE THAT TRAIN ALL NIGHT LONG" - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Memphis Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-B-2 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-6-21 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

On the tape box, Sam Phillips logged this song as ''Rode That Train All Night Long'' but issued it as ''Lookin' For My Baby''. The first take was unusable because Phillips changed levels on the fly, first during Milton's guitar intro and again when the horns came in.

By the second take, issued first on Zu-Zazz and reissued here, Phillips had his acte together and Milton was still on fire. His guitar has a filthy tone, and he's really buston' out his licks, taking two choruses instead of the single chorus on the released version. More than that, there's a spectacular untamedness to this take that was lost by the time they reached the issued fifth take.

11(2) - "RODE THAT TRAIN ALL NIGHT LONG" - 2 - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Memphis Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 30, 1954
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2007 mono
LITTLE MILTIN - HITTIN' THE BOOGIE
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-9-18 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

12 - ''NEXT TIME I SEE YOU BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: n- None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1954/1955
Released: - 2012
First appearance: Sun Records X5 Music Group Internet iTunes MP3-12 mono
SUN BLUES ARCHIVES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Milton Campbell - Vocal and Guitar
Ike Turner - Piano
C.W. Tate - Tenor Saxophone
Lawrence Taylor - Alto Saxophone
Cleophus Robinson - Bass
Probably Jesse Knight JR. - Electric Bass
Lonnie Will ''Cool Breeze'' Haynes – Drums

For Biography of Little Milton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Little Milton's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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