CONTAINS
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1952 SESSIONS 6
June 1, 1952 to June 30, 1952

Demo Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, Summer 1952 / J&M Records
Studio Session for Billy Love, June 10, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Walter Bradford & Louis Calvin Hubert, June 14, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Luke McDaniel, June 15, 1952 / Trumpet Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

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JUNE 1952

Duke Records issues a second Rosco Gordon single "New Orleans Women", which the incorrigible Rosco also cuts for RPM Records. The Biharis duly issue an injunction against Duke, but the latter maintain that they have an AFM contract with Rosco, whereas RPM have an artist contract. Both are considered valid.

Sam Phillips records Billy Love, "Poor Man" is paired up with "My Teddy Bear Baby" for Love's last Chess release (Chess 1516).

JUNE 1, 1952 SUNDAY

Misty Rowe is born in Glendora, California. She joins the cast of ''Hee Haw'' in 1972, remaining with the show for 19 years.

JUNE 3, 1952 TUESDAY

Marty Robbins recorded his first charted single ''I'll Go On Alone'', plus ''Pretty Words'' during the afternoon session at Dallas' Jim Beck Studio.

Keyboard player Billy Powell is born in Corpus Christi, Texas. With Lynyrd Skynyrd, he performs on the rock classic ''Sweet Home Alabama'', cited in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number, among country's 500 greatest singers.

JUNE 5, 1952 THURSDAY

Porter Wagoner signs a recording deal with RCA Records though the label commits only to recorded four songs.

Woody Guthrie is released from the alcohol program at Kings County Hospital in New York following a three-week detoxification program. Within days, he is drinking again, and threatening to kill himself

A grand jury in Macon, Georgia, indicts Frank Tanner for the murder of Bud Penniman, the father of Little Richard, in February. The case is later dismissed. Little Richard writes the country hit ''Lucille (You Won't Do Your Daddy's Will)''.

JUNE 10, 1952 TUESDAY

Tom Schuyler is born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. He writes Kenny Rogers ''Love Will Turn You Around'', Lacy J. Dalton's ''16th Avenue'' and Eddie Rabbitt's ''I Don't Know Where To Start'' before joining Schuyler, Knobloch & Overstreet. He also serves as the head of RCA's country division.

Studio session with Billy Love at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.

SUMMER 1952

Demo session for Jerry Lee Lewis at Cosimo Matassa J&M Recording Studio, New Orleans.

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During the summer of 1952, a 16-year-old Jerry Lee Lewis and his buddy Cecil Harrelson were on the road looking out places for Jerry to get some steady gigs.

Lewis had recently finished a short stay at the Southwestern Bible Institute in Waxahachie, Texas, where he had been asked to leave for cutting loose on ''My God Is Real'' during assembly time; this popular gospel song has been recorded by such artists as Mahalia Jackson, Johnny Cash and Don Gibson. The dean was not impressed and sent Jerry Lee packing back to Louisiana.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

DEMO RECORDING FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE J&M RECORDING STUDIO 1952

COSIMO MATASSA'S RECORDING STUDIO
838 NORTH RAMPART STREET, NEW ORLEANS
PRIVATE RECORDING – MID SUMMER -1952
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – COSIMO MATASSA

After steady dates in his hometown of Ferriday, Louisiana, at the Dixie Club and the Hilltop Club in Natchez, Mississippi, Jerry Lee took off with Cecil to New Orleans to find work in the clubs of the Big Easy. While in New Orleans, Jerry Lee heard about Cosimo Matassa's J&M Recording Studios from local musicians and so he and Cecil headed over to 838 North Rampart Street and Dumaine. After making inquiries with Cosimo, Jerry Lee learned he could record a demonstration disc for the sum of $2.50. After forcing the money out of Cecil, Jerry Lee proceeded to the piano stool to record what has now been identified as his first studio recordings. At J&M he was following in the hallowed footsteps of hot New Orleans rhythm and blues artists such as Fats Domino, Roy Brown, Smiley Lewis, Professor Longhair and Lloyd Price.

1 – ''DON'T STAY AWAY ('TIL LOVE GROWS COLD)'' – B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Lefty Frezzell-Loys Sunderland
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Acetate
No tapes and no safety copies
Recorded: - Summer 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - J&M (S) 78rpm acetate mono
DON'T STAY AWAY (TILL LOVE GROWS COLD) / JERRY'S BOOGIE
Reissued: - June 13, 2006 Time Life Music (CD) 500/200rpm M19232-3-19 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS – A HALF CENTURY OF HITS

(P) 2006 Cecil Harrelson by arrangement with Brasstacks Alliance, and Courtesy of Cecil Harrelson and Pont Neuf by arrangement with Brassstacks Alliance.

Jerry Lee laid down two tracks that day in 1952: a recent Lefty Frizzell number 2 country hit, Don't Stay Away (Till Love Grows Cold) (a chart record from April through July) where Jerry's vocal hits the falsetto in all the right places and he plays along in a very confident manner; for the second track of his demo acetate Jerry Lee chose a self-composed instrumental Jerry's Boogie (aka New Orleans Boogie) and proceeded to play a very skillful piano boogie-woogie showcasing his immense talent even though only 16 years old. Little wonder then, some four years later Jerry Lee walked into another studio in Memphis, Tennessee, where Jack Clement and Sam Phillips struck gold. The Ferriday wonder kid would, of course, find fame and notoriety the world over. But full credit to Cosimo Matassa who can rightfully lay claim to recording Jerry Lee Lewis first, at J&M Studios in New Orleans.

2 – ''JERRY'S BOOGIE'' – B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Acetate (aka ''New Orleans Boogie'')
No tapes and no safety copies
Recorded: - Summer 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - J&M (S) 78rpm acetate mono
JERRY'S BOOGIE / DON'T STAY AWAY (TILL LOVE GROWS COLD)
Reissued: - June 13, 2006 Time Life Music (CD) 500/200rpm M19232-3-20 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS – A HALF CENTURY OF HITS

The instrumental's title has always been known to the Lewis fraternity as 'Jerry's Boogie', but ''New Orleans Boogie'' was chosen for a Time-Life release in acknowledgment of its recording location and is now the legal title.

(P) 2006 Cecil Harrelson by arrangement with Brasstacks Alliance, and Courtesy of Cecil Harrelson and Pont Neuf by arrangement with Brassstacks Alliance.

Name (Or. No. of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis – Vocal and Piano

Fast forward to January 2006, the acetate Jerry Lee laid down at J&M 54 years earlier was given a new lease of life when it was taken to the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville. There, studio engineer Alan Stoker, son of Jordanaires Gordon Stoker, transferred the acetate to digital format in the presence of Cecil Harrelson. Jerry Lee's first demo recordings finally saw release on a 3-CD Time-Life box set, A Half Century Of Hits in late 2006, thus allowing us the chance of hearing what Cosimo had recorded way back in 1952.

Notes: Jerry Lee had been performing in clubs since his early teens in various Louisiana towns and some in Texas. Despite his young age and regardless of local laws, he managed to find work with very little problem once club owners had heard him play.

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STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY LOVE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY JUNE 10, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

For some reason the June session for Love, featured an entirely different band featuring Jimmy Johnson and Harvey Simmons on saxes, Arthur Martin on drums and Lee Patterson on trumpet. The June session produced two instrumentals, neither of which have survived, and a song lodged as ''Poor Poor Man'' but issued correctly as ''Poor Man''. If ''Teddy Bear'' was great tun, in contrast ''Poor Man'' was a seriously slow blues, sung from the heart. Billy lists how every penny he gets goes to pay some kind of bill, and how he can't understand why he works hard but for nothing. His pleading vocal is underscored by an excellent, sax solo from Harvey Simmons.

01 – ''POOR MAN'' - B.M.I. - 3:18
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - 1034 Master
Recorded: - June 10, 1952
Released: - August 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1516-B < mono
POOR MAN / MY TEDDY BEAR BABY
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149 mono
GEE... I WISH

02 – ''UNTITLED INSTRUMENTAL''
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Sun Unissued/Lost
Recorded: - June 10, 1952

03 – ''UNTITLED INSTRUMENTAL''
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Sun Unissued/Lost
Recorded: - June 10, 1952

Chess 1516 was issued towards the end of 1952 and it is one of the rarest of all Chess discs. It seems to have received little promotion from Chess but Love was not alone in this. A blues on Checker by Woodrow Adams issued at the same time received little backing and even Muddy Waters's latest release went under- promoted at the time. Some of this may have been linked to the declining though still active relationship between Chess and Sam Phillips and some of it to the efforts the Chess company was making to promote two records that were hitting hard - Little Walter's ''Juke'' that topped the rhythm and blues charts that fall and Willie Mabon's ''I Don't Know'' that was number one by January 1953.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Love – Vocal & Piano
Arthur Martin – Drums
Jimmy Johnson – Tenor Saxophone
Harvet Simmons – Tenor Saxophone
Lee Patterson – Trumpet

We have no record of what Billy Love did to promote or cash in on the release of his two Chess discs during 1952 but he may have done some travelling either on his own account or with Rosco Gordon because Sam Phillips's notebooks have no studio entries for Love for a period of six months.

For Biographies of Billy Love see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy Love's Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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JUNE 11, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Multi-instrumentalist Nancy Short is born in Independence, Missouri. Following her marriage to folk artist Norman Blake, she's known as Nancy Blake, appearing on the Grammy-winning ''O Brother, Where Art Thou'' soundtrack.

Donnie Van Zant is born in Jacksonville, Florida. A brother of Lynyrd Skynrd's Ronnie Van Zant, he joins 38 Special in the 1970s and forms a side project, Van Zant, with brother Johnny, making inroads in country music in 2005

Sonny James holds his first Capital Records recording session.

JUNE 12, 1952 THURSDAY

Jamieson ''Junior'' Brown is born in Kirksville, Indiana. Hailed for his instrumental work on his self-designed steel guitar, he becomes a critics' favorite in the 1990s and wins the Country Music Association's video award for ''My Wife Thinks You're Dead''.

JUNE 13, 1952 FRIDAY

Hank Williams recorded ''Jambalaya (On The Bayou)'', ''Settin' The Woods On Fire'' and ''I\ll Never Get Out Of This World Alive'' at the Castle Studio in Nashville.

Jim and Jesse recorded ''Are You Missing Me'' in Nashville with Sonny James on fiddle. The song is ranked among country's 500 greatest singles in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.

Hank Snow visits patients at the Charles Camsell TB Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta. One of the patients, Harry Rusk, is inspired to become a singing Canadian evangelist.

JUNE 14, 1952 SATURDAY

Woody Guthrie is checked in to Bellevue Hospital in New York, after treatening to kill himself. Doctors label him schizophrenic, though they are uncertain about his illness. It is later discovered to be a rare disease, Huntington's chorea.

Hank Williams meets his future wife, Billie Jean Jones, backstage at the Ryman Auditorium during a Grand Ole Opry performance.

Rosco Gordon's ''Tell Daddy'' (Duke R1) enters the local charts in New Orleans.

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STUDIO SESSION FOR WALTER BRADFORD & LOUIS CALVIN HUBERT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: SATURDAY JUNE 14, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Walter Bradford was a 17-year-old disc jockey in Forrest City, Arkansas, and Sam Phillips cut these sides with the hopes a placing the titles with Chess Records. (A couple of months earlier, Bradford's "Dreary Nights"/"Nuthin' But The Blues" had been paired up release on Sun 176, but had been withdraw).

01 - "REWARD FOR MY BABY*" - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Walter Bradford
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 14, 1952
Released: - September 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30126-B-3 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 11 - MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-11 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

''Reward For My Baby'', this, however, is a powerful and arresting track and it bears an uncanny resemblance to James Cotton's "Cotton Crop Blues", recorded a couple of years later. Both titles feature guitarist Pat Hare, and it is Hare's work which enhances the similarity. This would only seems to have been Hare's second session - and if it was, then its readily apparent that he'd emerged from Arkansas with a fully- formed style, which already incorporated that familiar distorted tone. The sheer uninhibited force of his playing here really is quite remarkable - and to complete the parallel with "Cotton Crop Blues" there is the same ominous piano played by Louis Calvin Hubert , and an anguished vocal delivery by Bradford which is surprisingly similar to Cotton's version.

02 - "LOVE FOR MY BABY*" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Walter Bradford
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 14, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-12 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Like Willie Nix and Jimmy DeBerry a couple of months earlier, Bradford tackles Robert Lockwood's traditional ''Take A Little Walk'' - albeit with a slightly amended lyric. His high-pitched vocal delivery rather betrays his youth, and on this side he is frequently overshadowed by Pat Hare's merciless guitar chops. If a complete acetate of Bradford's Sun 78 is ever found, perhaps we'll hear something that Sam Phillips heard, and something we don't hear in the unissued sides.

03 - "TOO BLUE TO CRY*" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Walter Bradford
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 14, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 38 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - VOLUME 6 - TOO BLUE TO CRY
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-5-3 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Other than Pat Hare's dominant and unmistakable guitar playing on ''Too Blue To Cry'' there is little to commend this side to your attention. Hare's playing is usually cause for celebration. This is no excepten, although you have to put up with Bradford's unremarkable singing, consistently erratic sense of timing, and the presence of somebody ( Louis Calvin Hubert , perhaps?) crying incessantly throughout the track. This title, recorded in 1952, was part of the ''crying blues'' tradition that enjoyed some popularity in the early 1950s (see Rosco Gordon's ''Weeping Blues'' for a local example) before it mercifully wore itself, and many listeners, out. Again, Pat Hare offers a solo that comes close to his playing on ''Cotton Crop Blues'', two years before that iconic work with James Cotton was recorded.

04 - "LUCY DONE MOVED**" - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Louis Calvin Hubert
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 14, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm SUNBOX 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-13 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Although listed in the files as a Bradford vocal, the singer here on ''Lucy Done Moved'' is quite obviously older than the one heard on the previous songs. As we know what Pat Hare sounds like as a singer, we're guessing that pianist Louis Calvin Hubert takes the vocal here. It's a Joe Tuner-style blues without Turner's commanding presence, but still a solid performance highlighted by Hare's coruscating guitar. Hubert was the pianist on some of Howlin' Wolf's recordings, and made his last appearance at Sun with another Arkansas-based combo, Sammy Lewis and Willie Johnson. From there, his trail goes cold. Bradford reportedly moved to Kansas City, Missouri, and evokes just the faintest memories from those around at that time. He died in 1995. Drummer Jerry Lee walker later worked sessions in St. Louis and played with Oliver Sain and Little Milton... both of whom were based there, but he too is now deceased. Hare's story is recounted elsewhere on this sessions website.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter Bradford - Vocal*
Louis Calvin Hubert - Piano** and Vocal - 1
Pat Hare - Guitar
Jerry Walker – Drums

For Biographies of Walter Bradford see: > The Sun Biographies <
Walter Bradford's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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Back in Laurel, Mississippi played south-east Mississippi, venturing as far as New Orleans to open for hank Williams. ''I saw him play live'', said McDaniel. ''And it just about changed everything I had thought and done before. He set the standards: I wanted to sound like him, be like him. He really wielded an influence with songs like ''I saw The Light'', ''Lovesick Blues'', ''Mind Your Own Business'', and he made me see I had to get a record made''. The nearest record label of any size was Trumpet Records in Jackson, Mississippi. Operated by Mrs. Lillian McMurry, Trumpet was primarily a blues label, and McDaniel represented one of her first ventures into hillbilly music.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR LUKE MCDANIEL
FOR TRUMPET RECORDS 1952

RADIO WFOR STUDIO, HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI
TRUMPET SESSION: SUNDAY JUNE 15, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

Always stood high among rockabilly fans for ''Whoa Boy'', a seminal proto-rockabilly number from 1952 on Trumpet Records. Future Sun recording artist Luke Jefferson McDaniel was born in Laurel, Mississippi on February 3, 1927, and grew up in Ellisville, just north of New Orleans to Jesse and Viola McDaniel. With his parents separated early, Luke stayed with his mother until he left school at the age of 14, at which point he returned to Laurel to find a job. He shared lodgings with a local guitarist, Howard Overstreet, which helped to foster Luke's interest in the music of Gene Autry,Ernest Tubb and the Bailes Brothers.

Luke's first job in Laurel was at the local Cotton Mill, where he worked with an aspiring musician Red Davis. After a mutually satisfactory trade with Red, Luke ended up with a mandolin, which he learned to play in a matter of months. Howard, Red, Luke formed a trio to work regularly on early morning local radio, which in turn, encouraged Luke to learn to play guitar. Luke decided that life at the Cotton Mill was not for him and the trio became a full time band, working the local Night Club scene.

The traveling Jam Up & Honey Show staring Texas Ruby and Gabe Tucker came through Laurel and caught Luke's band in action and liked what they saw. They asked Luke to join the show, which he did, learning much from the sheer professionalism on display at every show.

A major attraction for Luke, at this time, was the fact that Ruby and Gabe were regular recording artists, something that Luke was now strongly aspiring towards. Meetings and watching Hank Williams in 1950 and again in 1952, fired up the young McDaniel's energy even more and in 1952, Luke approached Lillian McMurry of Trumpet Records in Jackson,
Mississippi.

Lillian and her assistant, Howard Kelly, both liked Luke's style and his writing ability, prompting them to offer him a four song session working with Jimmy Swan's band. From that session ''Whoa Boy" is probably the hit that never was, with strong guitar showing early leanings towards rockabilly. Luke also cut "A Tribute to Hank Williams - My Buddy" for Trumpet, which was drowned in the surfeit of Hank Williams tributes that emerged, after the singer's early death on January 1, 1953. "Whoa Boy" did well locally, especially in New Orleans, where local disc jockey Red Smith wore out the grooves.

01 - ''THIS CRYING HEART'' - B.M.I.
Composer: Luke McDaniel
Publisher: - Goble Music
Matrix number: - DRC-124
Recorded: - June 15, 1952
Released: - January 1953
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 45/78rpm Trumpet 185 mono
THIS CRYING HEART / A TRIBUTE TO HANK WILLIAMS, MY BUDDY

02 – ''WHOA BOY!' - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: Luke McDaniel
Publisher: - Diam Music
Matrix number: - DRC-125
Recorded: - June 15, 1952
Released: - November 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 45/78rpm Trumpet 184-A mono
WHOA BOY! / NO MORE
Reissue: - Stomper Time (CD) 500/200rpm Stomper Time STCD 24-7 mono
LUKE MCDANIEL - MISSISSIPPI HONKY TONK ROCKABILLY MAN

McDaniel's first single ''Whoa Boy'', sold well in some markets, particularly New Orleans. Issued in 1952, it was rooted in Hank Williams' up-tempo numbers. McDaniel's name is misspelled on his first Trumpet release. The second Trumpet single was a maudlin tribute to Williams, who'd died as 1953 dawned.

03 - ''NO MORE' - B.M.I.
Composer: Luke McDaniel
Publisher: - Diam Music
Matrix number: - DRC-126
Recorded: - June 15, 1952
Released: - November 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 45/78rpm Trumpet 184-B mono
NO MORE / WHOA BOY!

Trumpet 185 misnumbered as Trumpet 184

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Luke McDaniel - Vocal & Guitar
Roy Lofye - Guitar
Clayton Parker - Fiddle
Hilton Giger - Bass

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Sun 176 - "Dreary Nights"/"Nuthin' But The Blues", in all the forty-plus years that Sun Records have been collected no-one has yet found a copy of this, giving credence to the notion that it never reached the streets - not even in Bradford's home town, Forrest City, Arkansas. Bradford was a disc jockey there, so it would have been a politically correct move to release a record by him, but it appears as though the reaction to the advance dubs from other disc jockey was sufficiently negative to convince Phillips not to do it (Colin Escott).

JUNE 15, 1952 SUNDAY

Hank Williams writes ''Your Cheatin' Heart''.

The movie ''Rough, Tough West'' debuts in theaters, with a role for Pee Wee King and His Golden West Cowboys.

''I Dream Of Jeannie'', a biography of 19th-century songwriter Stephen Foster, appears in movie theaters, with Rex Allen narrating.

JUNE 16, 1952 MONDAY

Ernest Tubb recorded ''Fortunes In Memories'', during an afternoon session at the Castle Studio in Nashville.

JUNE 17, 1952 TUESDAY

MGM cancels its movie contract with Hank Williams.

JUNE 20, 1952 FRIDAY

Gene Autry and Rosemary Clooney recorded ''The Night Before Christmas Sing'' in Hollywood.

JUNE 21, 1952 SATURDAY

Capitol released Tex Ritter's ''High Noon (Do Not Forsake Me)'' one week before Columbia released Frankie Laine's version.

JUNE 21, 1952 SATURDAY

''Biharis Seek Injunction Against Tri-State: Hollywood The Biharis brothers, who operate the Modern and RPM labels here sought an injunction this week against a Memphis, Tennessee firm, the Tri-State Recording Company which has been issuing wax for the past three months on the Duke label. Action is intended to restrain Tri-State from releasing any further masters by Rosco Gordon, rhythm and blues vocalist whom the Biharis claim is contracted to them.

The Biharis claim they have an exclusive AFM pact with Gordon and a separate exclusive vocalist disking pact with the Tennessee singer, who has had a number of hits on RPM. Jules Bihari stated that Tri-State has issued disks by Gordon, with the label crediting 'Rosco Gordon'. The latest Duke release, they allege, is a copy of Rosco Gordon's current release on RPM, ''New Orleans Women''.

Several months ago, Gordon was the object of another hassle in which both Chess Records of Chicago and RPM were releasing Gordon masters. Differences were settled amicably when Chess and RPM swapped artists, masters and exclusive pacts''.

JUNE 23, 1952 MONDAY

Decca released Kitty Wells' ''Ii Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels'' and ''Till The End Of The World'', a country hit by Bing Crosby and Grady Martin and His Slew Foot Five.

JUNE 24, 1952 TUESDAY

Guitarist Steuart Smith is born in Baltimore, Maryland. He plays on hits by Rodney Crowell, Rosanne Cash, Vince Gill, Mary Chapin Carpenter and Wynonna.

JUNE 25, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Don Gibson signs with Columbia Records, his third label. He holds three recording sessions for the company over the next two years.

JUNE 26, 1952 THURSDAY

The ''Wayne King'' music series ends a three-year run on NBC-TV Midwest network. The show's theme song, ''The Waltz You Saved For Me'', becomes a country hit 10 years later for Ferlin Husky.

JUNE 28, 1952 SATURDAY

Future Academy of Country Music awards producer Dick Clark marries his first wife, Barbara Mallery.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

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