CONTAINS
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1953 SESSIONS (12)
December 1, 1953 to December 31, 1953

Studio Session for Houston Stokes, December 4, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Unknown Artist (Rosco Gordon of Erskine McClellan), December 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charles White Jr., December 7, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for James Cotton, December 7, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Little Milton, December 23, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Houston Boines, December 23, 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Howard Seratt, Late 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for David ''Honeyboy'' Edwards, Probably Late 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Albert Williams, Probably Late 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Vincent Duling, Late 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Unknown Artist, Probably End 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Buddy Blake Cunningham, Unknown Date(s) 1953 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Hal Miller, Unknown Date 1953/1954 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Playlists of the Artists can be found on 706 Union Avenue Sessions of > YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HOUSTON STOKES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: FRIDAY DECEMBER 4, 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

In the original LP box notes, Bez Turner noted that, on the evidence of ''Blue And Lonesome'' and ''Baby's Gone And Left Me'', guitarist Erskine McClellan was as good as Pat Hare. So good in fact, it probably was Pat Hare. Houston Stokes actually recorded two sessions for Sam Phillips. The first in November 1952 featured the cream of Memphis's young jazz turks. The second, over one year later on December 4, 1953, featured Pat Hare, Billy Love, and Kenneth Banks. No titles were noted, but it's almost certainly the latter group we're hearing on this and ''Baby's Gone And Left Me''. The slow, grinding piano and fiery guitar certainly sound like hare and Love. There's evidence of what McClellan sounds like on ''We're All Gonna Do Some Wrong'', and it ain't like this. The day before this session, Stokes signed a one-year contract with Phillips, but nothing was ever released. On the log sheet, two phone numbers were noted, one between 9 a.m. And 6 p.m., and another after 6 p.m., so presumably he had a day job, but Phillips offered him no incentive to quit.

The song itself one moves at a slow, rolling pace, punctuated by Pat Hare's fiery guitar work and anchored by some rock-steady piano. Stokes' high-pitched vocal betrays his youth, but is no less effective for that. Part of the lyric is drawn from Walter Davis, and since another version was cut in Chicago by Blue Smitty, this was doubtless a popular song in the clubs of the deep south at the time.

< BLUE AND LONESOME <
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:01)
Recorded: - December 4, 1953
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4/2 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Taken at a very last clip and with a galloping drumbeat, this ''Baby's Gone And Left Me'' is essentially a workout for guitarist Pat Hare. The latter is something of an unknown quantity, which, given his evident virtuosity, is a great shame as he would appear to stand shoulder-to-shoulder beside men like Billy Love and Kenneth Banks. His solo here is particularly violent and of considerable length, which may just indicate that Stokes had precious few lyrics prepared.

> BABY'S GONE AND LEFT ME <
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate - Not Originally Issued (2:08)
Recorded: - December 4, 1953
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Record (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4/3 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 – 1958

Note: All the musicians were paid $12.50 each for this session, but saxophonist Tom Roane was also paid $5.00 suggesting that he played on some unissued version's of possibly one song.

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Houston Stokes – Vocal & Drums
Pat Hare – Guitar
Billy Love – Piano
Kenneth Banks – Bass
Tom Roane – Saxophone

For Biography of Houston Stokes: > The Sun Biographies <
Houston Stokes' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR UNKNOWN ARTIST
(PREVIOUSLY ATTRIBUTED TO ERSKINE MCCLELLAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY DECEMBER 4, 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS

In 1969, the Sun tapes were shipped from Memphis to Nashville. Some of the tapes boxes were falling apart and many of the old 7-inch tape reels were spliced together to create new 10'' reels. Some of the old reels were copied onto new reels as well. Teddy Paige of the Jesters did some of this work, as did researcher Steve LaVere. Someone copied an apparently unmarked tape with ''Got Me A Horse And Wagon'' and two other songs onto the end of a Houston Stokes reel. It was probably Paige who wrote ''Roscoe... good against Got Me A Horse And Wagon''. When Martin Hawkins and Colin Escott compiled the Sun discography in 1987, they didn't hear the tape and took their word for it, attributing this song to Gordon. Later, Martin and Hank Davis issued the song in their Blues Archive series on Charly Records and decided that, because the tape box said ''Rosco and Erskine'' and this song was on a reel with Houston Stokes, the singer must be Stokes' guitarist, Erskine McClellan. Now, on further review, there are several compelling reasons why this isn't from Stokes' session. First, the ensemble is different... notably lacking a guitar; second, the musicians on this song are nowhere near as good as the slumming jazz men on Stokes' tape with McClellan; and third, Stokes' session was held in 1952 and this song talks about 1952 and maybe even 1953 in the past tense. Our current best guess is that LaVere and Paige were half right: it truly does sound like Rosco Gordon's band, and it even sounds as if Rosco himself might be on piano. Who is singing? We have no idea. Why didn't Rosco sing if it's band? Possibly because he was under contract to Duke or RPM. One certainly: this is a fine song that places an exclamation point at the end of the car songs. (CE)

> GOT ME A HORSE AND WAGON <
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:53)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1953
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 38 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - VOLUME 6 - TOO BLUE TO CRY
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3/32 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Unknown Artist - Vocal (Rosco Gordon of Erskine McClellean)
Possibly the band of Rosco Gordon

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 4, 1953 FRIDAY

Slim Whiteman recorded ''Secret Love'' in Baltimore, Maryland.

DECEMBER 7, 1953 MONDAY

Studio session with Charles White Jr. at Sun Records in Memphis, Tennessee.

Suddenly, on 7 December 1953, Billy Love reappeared with Harvey Simmons and other known associates to record with vocalist James Cotton on a session that produced the Sun rhythm and blues sides ''My Baby'' and ''Straighten Up Baby''. The band also backed singer Charles White on sides that were not released and have never been found.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLES WHITE JR.
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY DECEMBER 7, 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

COUNTRY WISE MAMA
Composer: - Charles White Jr.
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 7, 1953

GOOD ROCKIN' MAMA
Composer: - Charles White Jr.
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 7, 1953

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charles White Jr. - Vocal
Pat Hare - Guitar
Kenneth Banks - Bass
Houston Stokes - Drums
Billy Love - Piano
Harvey Simmons - Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JAMES COTTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY DECEMBER 7, 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

James Cotton was just seventeen when he began hosting his own radio show over KWEM in West Memphis, Arkansas. That same year of 1952 he was playing harmonica with Howlin' Wolf, hanging out with Bobby Bland and playing on his first recording at 706 Union with drummer Willie Nix. He was also driving an ice truck at the time and had to obtain special permission to leave work early to make this session. Showing all the force of rock and roll, "My Baby" was the liner of his two Sun singles.

> MY BABY <
Composer: - James Cotton
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 98 - Dub Off Disc - Original Master Lost (2:20)
Recorded: - December 7, 1953
Released: - April 15, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records 78/45rpm standard single Sun 199-A mono
MY BABY / STRAIGHTEN UP BABY
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2/19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Its not known whether James Cotton's pronunciation (i.e. in "My Vavy") was slurred by his Mississippi origins, or the contents of a bottle of sauce - but its readily evident that he must have attended the same school of diction as Jimmy Reed. Nonetheless, Cotton manages to crank up a pretty rocking opus out of a fairly modest riff, whilst the saxes of Harvey Simmons and Tom Roane, and guitar of Pat Hare, cover the ground that might normally have been handled by a full horn section. Both solos evince distinct jazz feelings.

> STRAIGHTEN UP BABY <
Composer: - James Cotton
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 99 - Dub Off Disc - Original Master Lost (2:19)
Recorded: - December 7, 1953
Released: - April 15, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 199-B mono
STRAIGHTEN UP BABY / MY BABY
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2/20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

It really is unclear which side of SUN 199 was the designated plug side, as arguably both this and "My Baby" are competent performances with solid riffs. However, neither side quite possesses that special excitement which would distinguish them from the other thirty or forty rhythm and blues releases of that particular week in April 1954.

Another graduate of the Jimmy Reed School of Diction, James Cotton delivers a some what lackluster performance on "My Baby" (SUN 199) and the flipside "Straighten Up Baby" (SUN 199), both Cotton and the band are more focused and the results are far more engaging.

The May 1, 1954 issue of Billboard was singularly unimpressed, rightly observing that competent bank work was the high point here although, in their words, "nothing sensational happens".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
James Cotton - Vocal
Tom Roane - Tenor Saxophone
Harvey Simmons - Tenor Saxophone
Pat Hare - Guitar
Billy Love - Piano
Kenneth Banks - Bass
Houston Stokes- - Drums

The local response must have been good, though, because one month after its release on April 15, 1954, Sam Phillips called James Cotton back into the studio to cut a follow-up.

For Biography of James Cotton see: > The Sun Biographies <
James Cotton's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 13, 1953 SUNDAY

''Back In The Saddle Again'' songwriter Ray White joins the regular cast, including Dale Evans and Pat Brady, in an episode of NBC's ''The Roy Rogers Show'' titles ''The Peddler From Pecos''.

DECEMBER 14, 1953 MONDAY

Pee Wee King recorded ''Backward, Turn Backward'' at New York's RCA Studio.

DECEMBER 15, 1953 TUESDAY

Rex Allen portrays a marshall in a dispute over oil as the western ''Red River Shore'' debuts in theaters.

''Slipping Around'' singer Margaret Whiting is awarded an uncontested divorce from piano player Joe ''Fingers'' Carr in Santa Monica, California, on the grounds of cruelty. She claims he threw dishes at her in a fit of rage.

DECEMBER 15, 1953 TUESDAY

In an unfortunate sidebar, Sam Phillips once again found himself in a legal dispute with Don Robey, this time over Little Parker's contract. Perhaps in part settlement, the name "Phillips' now appears appended to Parker whenever the composer credits are listed for "Mystery Train".

Jud Phillips write a letter to Don Robey and reads:

Dear Gene:

"Record 192 by Little Junior is showing movement around you... Looks like both sides are selling but I think "Mystery Train" would be your side... How about checking it for me. I know you must have had a great day and I sorry that I failed to see while in town but I feel like I know you after our telephone conversation. Surely hope you can see fit to check this number and I know if you feel like it has it you can put it on the map".

Sincerely yours
SUN RECORD COMPANY, INC.

By Jud Phillips

DECEMBER 16, 1953 WEDNESDAY

Hank Snow recorded ''I Don't Hurt Anymore'' and ''Yellow Roses'' during an afternoon session at New York's RCA Studios.

DECEMBER 17, 1953 THURSDAY

Sharon White, of The Whites, is born in Wichita Falls, Texas. Along with father Buck and sister Cheryl, she participates in several bluegrass-tinged early-1980s hits and joins husband Ricky Skaggs on the duet ''Love Can't Ever Get Better Than This''.

DECEMBER 21, 1953 MONDAY

Columbia released Carl Smith's ''Dog-Gone It, baby, I'm In Love''.

DECEMBER 22, 1953 TUESDAY

Pop songwriter Burt Bacharach marries Broadway singer Paula Stewart. He's destined to earn success in country music when his songs are recorded by Marty Robbins, Reba McEntire, Ronnie Milsap and Sonny James.

DECEMBER 23, 1953 WEDNESDAY

Freddie Hart recorded the original version of his composition ''Loose Talk''. It becomes a hit in 1954 for Carl Smith and again in 1961 for Buck Owens and Rose Maddox.

Teenager Jimmy Boyd and his mother file a lawsuit in Los Angeles charging an assault case initiated against him is an attempt at extortion. The original suit will eventually be dropped.

DECEMBER 23, 1953 WEDNESDAY

Studio session with Little Milton and Houston Boines at Sun Records, Memphis, Tennessee. This session was intended for Houston Boines. However, Phillips' notes indicate that some Little Milton titles were recorded. Milton himself recalls being in the studio all day.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LITTLE MILTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 23, 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The recordings has been prepared from digital transfers off the original masters. Due to the age and conditions of the tapes, listeners may notice dropouts or distortion.

The day before Milton's first Sun single was shipped, he was back in the studio with much the same line-up. This time, five songs were recorded together with two more by Houston Boines, but nothing was released. early in his career, Milton almost had it all; he was a guitar titan; he was young and good-looking; and his voice dripped emotion at any tempo. All he need was some really fine original songs. This, like the others he recorded that day, was unmemorable. ''Back then, I didn't know who Little Milton was'', he concluded. But it's still clear why Phillips gave him more releases than any other blues artist on his label with the exception of Billy Emerson.

> I LOVE MY BABY <
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Memphis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:30)
Recorded: - December 23, 1953
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-B-1 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-6/13 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

> IF CRYING WOULD HELP ME <
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Memphis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (3:14)
Recorded: - December 23, 1953
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-B-4 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - 1990 Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 35-10 mono
LITTLE MILTON - THE SUN MASTERS

SOMEBODY TOLD ME
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 23, 1953

An problem lay in Milton writing. His songs were random collections of choruses without a ''hook'' that would be remembered by virtue of repetition if nothing else. Virtually all of his recordings could have any one of half a dozen titles, as those who later catalogued the tapes discovered to their chagrin. However, some of the writing was undeniably good. ''It's got to place lately where I can't tell that woman what to do'', bemoaned Milton in ''Running Wild Blues''. ''She sticks her finger in my face and says 'I'm working just like you''. (in fact, Milton was so enamored of what cameo of domestic grief that he reprised it word for word on ''That Will Never Do'' on Bobbin Records five years later).

> RUNNIN' WILD BLUES <
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Memphis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:38)
Recorded: - December 23, 1953
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-B-6 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - 1990 Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 35-8 mono
LITTLE MILTON - THE SUN MASTERS

LONESOME FOR MY BABY
Composer: - James Campbell
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 23, 1953

Name (or. No. Of Instruments)
Little Milton Campbell - Vocal & Guitar
Lawrence Taylor - Alto Saxophone
C.W. Tate - Tenor Saxophone
Ike Turner - Piano
Jesse Knight - Bass
Lonnie Hayes - Drums

For Biography of Little Milton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Little Milton's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HOUSTON BOINES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 23, 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

> CARRY MY BUSINESS ON <
Composer: - Houston Boines
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:29)
Recorded: - December 23, 1953
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-B-8 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES
First appearance: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-6/23 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Houston Boines remains something of an enigma, as very little is known about him. Even Little Milton, who played on this session and was responsible for bringing Boines along to the studio, knew little about him - as he recalled in a 1982 interview: "I met him in Leland, Mississippi... he played harmonica. I don't know where he is now - nobody seems to. He was quite an old guy when we recorded... he would be at least 70 by now". Nonetheless, Boines achieved an interesting feat: he wrote and performed the song which may well be the most lyrically noteworthy in this entire collection. (This is an alternate take to the version which appeared on the original Sunbox). However, we will probably never know, because his diction and delivery are sufficiently inaccessible to tempt, but ultimately frustrate, the listener. Its clearly a backwoods story/song, and it contains some fascinating couplets that can be instilled with as much (or as little) significance as you like - e.g: "I rode a white horse called Silver Streak one day/I met Old Man Quiggle and Old Boston along the way". There again, he could merely have been at the juice.

Undoubtedly, the song is rich in detail and rather obscure imagery - but you'd need an honours degree in deep South patois and backwoods mythology to get it all. Even Milton, from almost thirty years' distance, recalled during a Blues Unlimited interview: "We could never get the clarity on his recordings... we could never understand what he was saying. Sam Phillips didn't think it was good enough to release. We were supposed to go back into the studio and re-do the stuff because it was unfinished... but we never got back. We were in there all day long and part of the nights". Failing that, you can just sit back and marvel at the solid guitar work of Little Milton, or Ike Turner's fine piano - however, its Jesse Knight's simple slap bass which really propels this side along.

You might also notice that the disc is a strange paradox: a tale with roots way back in the country, yet sung to a modern-sounding blues backing. (The take used here is different to that used on the original Sun Blues Box). The melody was replicated from Boines' 1952 recording of ''Relation Blues''.

> CARRY MY BUSINESS ON <
Composer: - Houston Boines
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:31)
Recorded: - December 23, 1953
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Charly 67-20 mono
THE BLUES CAME DOWN FROM MEMPHIS

> STANDING IN THE COURTHOUSE CRYING <
Composer: - Houston Boines
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (3:00)
Recorded: - December 23, 1953
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Sun Box 7 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
Reissued: - 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-6/15 mono
THE BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

It seems as if Milton of Ike Turner sent the saxophones home when Boines stepped up to the mic, leaving Ike Turner playing doomy piano chords and Milton on lead guitar.

There are no worries about diction with this slow blues, of which two takes exist. Whereas the second take starts straight in with the first verse, this starts with an instrumental chorus centred around the dolorous metronome of Ike Turner's piano, with sundry outbursts from Little Milton's guitar and some tentative harmonica phrases off-mike by Houston Boines.

Despite lasting just under three minutes, there are only two verses of lyrica, both of which are notable for their stark imagery. "Took me 'way, took me 'way in the mornin' soon/when I couldn't see nothin' but just the stars and moon". In the second take, the singer is taken away on the morning train, "I was handcuffed and shackled with great long lengths of chain". A further verse adds a poignance missing here: "Wasn't it sad when I left my baby crying?/she said, 'Daddy, I can't go with you, but you'll be always on my mind".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Houston Boines - Vocal and Harmonica*
Milton Campbell - Guitar
Ike Turner - Piano
Jesse Knight - Bass
Lonnie Hayes - Drums

Houston Boines is an unknown, despite recording his fine side with Little Milton's band and broadcasting with him on radio KFFA.

Little Milton's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

HOUSTON BOINES - Houston Boines (or it may have been Huston) remains an obscure, shadowy figure despite having broadcast on KFFS' King Biscuit Time during one of Sonny Boy's regular prolonged absence. He was born in Hazlehurst, Mississippi, near Jackson, on December 30, 1918, and was still living there when he enlisted in the Army in January 1941, almost one year before the United States entered World War II. It's unclear how long he was in the service. Charlie Booker and Houston Stackhouse played with him after the War when he was still in Hazlehurst, but had only fleeting memories of him.

Boines played played harmonica in Eddie Cusic's combo, The Rhythm Aces. In 1952 he cut a couple of sessions in Greenville, Mississippi, which let to a releases ''Monkey Motion'' / ''Superintendant'' and ''Going Home'' / ''Relation Blues'', both recorded for RPM in January 1952, (plus a belated mid-1960s release on Blues & Rhythm/Blue Horizon) - but his December 1953 session at Sun would appear have been his (rather glorious) swansong.

Little Milton roomed with him around this time, recalling a stockily builtman in his late forties, whom he took to Sun. He was vaguely remembered by Charlie Booker and Houston Stackhouse, both of whom played with him, but Little Milton, his one-tome room-mate - who'd actually brought him along to 706 Union - remembered him best, recalling an "old man".

Stackhouse recalled that Boines was still playing harmonica in clubs until late in life. ''He used to be a terrible good harp player'', said Stackhouse, ''but he just faded on out. He'd drink so much''. Stocky in build, whom nobody could understand, was Boines the J.R.R. Tolkein of this publication, or merely a raddled old soak who couldn't quite get his tongue around the words?... we'll probably never know. Mississippi death records reveal that someone named Huston Boines died on November 8, 1970 in Jackson, and that could well be our man. Certainly, Houston Stackhouse confirmed that Boines died around that time. Those few memories underpinned by even fewer certain dates and a total of eight recordings are all that we know of him.

DECEMBER 24, 1953 THURSDAY

The singles Sun 193 ''Come Back Baby'' b/w ''Chicago Breakdown'' by Doctor Ross and Sun 194 ''Beggin' My Baby'' b/w ''Somebody Told Me'' by Little Milton are released.

DECEMBER 25, 1953

Patti Page joins Perry Como and Eddie Fisher on the Christmas cover of TV Guide.

DECEMBER 28, 1953

Ray Price recorded ''Release Me'' and ''I'll Be There (If You Ever Want Me)'' in an evening session at the Castle Studio in Nashville.

DECEMBER 29, 1953

Carl Smith Recorded ''Back Up Buddy'' at Nashville's Castle Studio,

DECEMBER 30, 1953

Eddy Arnold recorded ''Just Call Me Lonesome'' and ''Hep Cat Baby'' at the RCA Studios in New York City.

Pop singer Kitty Kallen recorded the original version of ''Little Things Mean A Lot''. It's remade by Margo Smith two dozen years later.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HOWARD SERATT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE LATE 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Despite Sam Phillips' affection for Seratt, there is not a single artifact in the Sun files to suggest that he was ever there. The tapes were probably recorded over when funds fell short. The session details were never entered in the log book and the record itself is obscenely rare. This side, while surprisingly melodic for its simple chord structure, does not have quite the same impact as ''Troublesome Waters''. Somehow the simplicity in Seratt's style is less in evidence here. Nevertheless, it is a beautiful recording. Even on another label or in another era, this would be a standard. Seratt or Phillips titled the song. It was a J.B. Coats hymn originally titled after the first line, ''In All My Sin There Was Not One Who Cared'', and first published in another 1940 songster ''Old Camp Meeting Songs''.

> I MUST BE SAVED <
Composer: - J.B. Coats
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 53X - Master (2:55)
Recorded: - Late 1953
Released: - February 20, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 198-B mono
I MUST BE SAVED / TROUBLESOME WATERS
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2/18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

One of the joys of being the sole proprietor of a record company is that one can issue titles that are commercial suicide but nevertheless deserve to be issued. Surely Sam Phillips could not have held out great hopes for this title but its overarching simplicity is so moving that it cried out for release. Even after the passage of 30 years, Phillips remembered Seratt, ''Oh that man. I never heard a person, no matter what field of music, could sing as beautifully. The honesty! The integrity The communication! He had such an unpretentious quality. It had a depth of beauty about it in its simplicity. Oh God Almighty, that was a sad thing because I could have recorded him 'ad infinitum' and never got tired'', told Sam.

The assumption underlying a lifetime pact with Sun, however, was that Seratt would have to switch to secular music and perhaps that would have been self-defeating because it is Seratt's faith, expressed in the understated gentleness of his style, that makes this performance outstanding. The hymn was an obscure one, Published in 1940 by Stamps-Baxter in a songster called ''Golden Key'' (another minor classic, ''Gathering Flowers For The Master's Bouquet'', first saw light-of-day there, too). The words were by Mrs. Karnes and the music by Ernest Rippetoe. Ten years later, Johnny Cash recorded it, crediting it to his mother-in-law, Maybelle Carter, her husband, Ezra, and their house-guest, Dixie Deen (the soon-to-be wife of Tom T. Hall). It's entirely possible that Cash remembered Seratt's record or remembered the song from the original hymnal. Flatt and Scruggs recorded it two years after Johnny Cash, similarly crediting the Carters and their housequest.

> TROUBLESOME WATERS <
Composer: - J.B. Karnes-Ernest Rippetoe
Publisher: - S.E.S.C.A.P. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 51 Master
Recorded: - Late 1953
Released: - February 20, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 198-A mono
TROUBLESOME WATERS / I MUST BE SAVED
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-2/17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Stunningly simple and beautiful record. It barely sold out its first scant pressing. And then Seratt and his acoustic guitar and harmonica were gone. Wheelchair and all. Back to Arkansas and the St. Francis Church in Blytheville, and then on to California.

PRECIOUS MEMORIES
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost
Recorded: - Late 1953

Sam Phillips never came to terms with recording gospel music, and it haunted him. From the frustration of not convincing Seratt to sing secular music, to fighting Jerry Lee Lewis' devils, to constant sparring with Johnny Cash about recording gospel music. Sam and Sun were located in the literal center of a gospel bonanza.

Black quartets shouted the Lord's praises from storefront churches every Wednesday night. The Evans Family and Blackwood Brothers were on his doorstep and even left a legacy of tapes, all of them unissued. Sam Phillips could simply not sell gospel music.

From left: Red Caudel, Lead Guitar, Harmony Vocals; Travis Burkett, Bass Guitar, Harmony Vocals; Howard Seratt, Lead Vocals, Harmonica, Rhythm Guitar; Keith Clayton, Lead Guitar, Harmony Vocals >

Years later, he reflected, "I known I missed out on a lot. But Sun was basically a one man operation. I had to draw some limits". Sun 198 is only a hint of what lay on the other side of those limits.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Howard Seratt - Vocal and Guitar
Red Candel - Guitar
Travis Burkett - Bass
Keith Clayton - Guitar

For Biography of Howard Seratt see: > The Sun Biographies <
Howard Seratt's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR DAVID ''HONEYBOY'' EDWARDS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

STUDIO SESSION: PROBABLY END 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

> SWEET HOME CHICAGO <
Composer: - David Edwards-Sonny Boy Williamson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Arc Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:57)
Recorded: - Possibly End 1953
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charlie Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4-13 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-5/5 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

In February 2012, President Obama hosted a musical evening at the White House that featured Buddy Guy and B.B. King. After a little prompting, Obama got up and sang a verse of ''Sweet Home Chicago''. That's how well known it is. Robert Johnson recording ensured its status as a totemic blues song, but Johnson didn't originate it. Kokomo Arnold reckoned that he wrote it as ''Old Original Kokomo Blues'', but its roots go back even further... almost to the dawn of recorded blues. That said, the song wasn't anywhere near as omnipresent when Honeyboy Edwards recorded it. It wasn't until Roosevelt Sykes recorded it in 1955 that the song began to be revived with any frequency; in fact, Junior Parker's 1958 record credits Sykes as composer. Edwards repeats Johnson's confusing geography: ''that land of California, sweet home Chicago''. His edgy slide tone precisely complements his coarse singing. It's hard, make that impossible, to date this recording. Edwards himself dated it to October 1952, telling Tony Burke and Norman Darwen in 1992 that he was living in Hughes, Arkansas, and came to Memphis with a harmonica player named Blue and Blue's brother Jesse. He remembered that Boyd Gilmore was there that day.

As far as we know, Gilmore only recorded once at Phillips' studio, and that was with Earl Hooker in July 1953, but of course he could have been present at other times. Compounding the confusion, Edwards' tape was credited to Albert Williams, and this song was first released on Charly Records under Williams' name. It almost certainly features some of the players who are on Williams' songs, heard on Williams session, though. One of those songs, ''Rumble Chillen'', seems to have been a purpose-built sequel to Junior Parker's ''Feelin' Good'', a hit in the late months of 1953. So October 1952? July 1953? Late 1953? Some other date? There's really no way of knowing.

About the song itself, David Edwards' searing slide guitar all but overwhelms the backing here. A much- travelled, favourite song among Mississippians - Chicago was often their goal - this is a particularly powerful version with Honeyboy's hoarse, declamatory vocal creating a strong country feel.

> SWEET HOME CHICAGO <
Composer: - David Edwards-Sonny Boy Williamson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Arc Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:58)
Recorded: - Possibly End 1953
Released: - August 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30127-A-7 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 12 - UNION AVENUE BREAKDOWN
Reissued: - 1990 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Instant INS 5039-9 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 1 - SUNRISE

You don't have to be a musician to notice the odd style of drumming on display here. Drummers normally accent on 2 and 4. For some reason this one punches the beat on 1 and 3. The effect is both leaden and unsetting. It's truly amazing that nobody, from Sam Phillips to one of the other musicians didn't run screaming from the room. This is more than a simple mistake. It changes the effect of the entire recording, and not for the good. This is the slightly different 1990s box version of the song issued on the original LP box.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Honeyboy Edwards - Vocal and Guitar
Albert Williams - Piano
Joe Wilkins - Guitar
Dickie Houston - Drums
James Walker - Washboard

For Biography of Honeyboy Edwards see: > The Sun Biographies <
Honeyboy Edwards' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on
 > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ALBERT WILLIAMS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: POSSIBLY 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Albert Williams, a pianist known as ''Joiner'' who played for Willie Nix and Joe Hill Louis and regularly with Howlin' Wolf around this period, also reveals his vocal prowess on different songs from around 1952/1953. ''Sweet Home Chicago'', with nice slide guitar, shows the dominant influences of Wolf and Elmore James, while ''Chillen'' is a variation both on John Lee Hooker and the ''Feelin' Good' theme of Junior Parker.

> RUMBLE CHILLEN <
Composer: - Albert Williams
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:29)
Recorded: - Possibly 1953
Released: - August 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30127-A-8 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 12 – UNION AVENUE BREAKDOWN
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4/14 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

All the elements are here: even the vocal cry from flatted 7 back up to 1 (it's in Bb - an odd key for a guitar record - so it goes from Ab up to Bb). In every way, it's ''Feelin' Good'' redux. Joe Willie Wilkins is charged with playing Floyd Murphy's part, and covers almost as much territory. Previously, this was issued as ''Rumba Chillen'', but it seems pretty clear that Williams is saying Rumble. ''Ramble'' would make more sense, especially as Junior Parker's own ''Feelin' Good'' sequel was ''I Wanna Ramble'', but 'rumble' it appears to be. In fifties-speak, a rumble was a street fight (making lines like ''old folks rumblin', young 'uns too'' doubly incomprehensible), so perhaps it was a dance. One thing is for sure, Williams hews even closer than Parker to the progenitor of ''Feelin' Good'': John Lee Hooker. In fact, Williams' version is titled after Hooker's ''Boogie Chillen'' rather than Parker's Sun hit. He even starts by taken us to Johnny Curry's Tropicana club on Memphis's Thomas Street, much as Hooker took us to Henry's Swing Club on Detroit's Hasting Street.

> HOO DOO MAN (MEMPHIS AL) <
Composer: - Albert Williams
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:48)
Recorded: - Possibly 1953
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4/15 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Albert Williams' vocal is rather more reflective on this - which is presumably his theme song - and he accompanies himself with swinging, but solid piano-playing. Joe Willie Wilkins' guitar solo is quite remarkable, being at once both forceful and lyrical.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Albert ''Joiner'' Williams - Vocal and Piano*
Joe Willie Wilkins - Guitar
James Walker - Washboard
Dickie Houston – Drums

Note: The two sessions listed David Edwards (above), and Albert Williams probably took place on the same day.

For Biography of Albert Williams see: > The Sun Biographies <
Albert Willims' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

PROBABLY 1953 UNKNOWN DATE

Studio session with Vincent Duling (Guitar Red) at Sun Records, Memphis, Tennessee. Session details unknown.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR UNKNOWN ARTIST
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY END 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

> JUICE HEAD <
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (1:35)
Recorded: - Probably March 1953
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm Redita 131 mono
KEEP ON ROLLING
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4/24 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

When ''Juice Head'' first appeared on a Redita Records LP, it was credited to Rosco Gordon. Redita owner, Robert Loers, found the acetate at Select-o-Hits, the distributorship owned by Sam Phillips' brother, Tom, where Sun artefacts were stored. The acetate had no name on the label, so Loers assigned it to Rosco Gordon. But it's not Rosco. It simply is not him. Really. Even Rosco confirmed that. It might not even be a Memphis Recording Service demo. Just substitute the words ''Hound Dog'' for ''Juice Head'' and what have you got? Of course the inspiration for this song came from Big Mama Thornton' ''Hound Dog'' or perhaps even from Rufus's Thomas ''Bear Cat''.

But the song's other parent is Eddie Vinson's slowed down ''Juicehead Blues'' which harks to the previous decade (for a slightly later glimpse of the impact of the song at Sun, check out Charlie Rich's late night demo version that appears on BCD 16152). If indeed this originated from Sam Phillips' studio, it was nothing that Phillips needed to touch because it was another lawsuit waiting to happen.

> V.O. BABY (1) <
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:07)
Recorded: - Probably March 1953
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm Redita 131 mono
KEEP ON ROLLING
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4/25 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Another booze-related song by an unknown singer not named Rosco Gordon. This time the product moves to the decidedly upscale Seagram's V.O. and the rhythm shifts from a Yancey bass to triplets. Some off-mic vocal encouragement appears throughout the recording. The sound suggest that the source of this track is more likely to have been an acetate demo sent to Sun than anything recorded on the premises. But we truly don't know.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Unknown Artist - Vocal and Piano
Unknown Banter - 1

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BUDDY BLAKE CUNNINGHAM
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1953
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

HOW LONG WILL IT BE
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1953

JEALOUS STARS
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1953

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Buddy Blake Cunningham – Vocal
Unknown Group

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1953/1954

That fall and winter Memphis was a hotbed of musical activity. Sam Phillips was scoring with his black artists. Memphis was becoming a secondary recording center, however small, to New York and Los Angeles. Black entertainers were making records in vacant rooms all over town, Black radio was vibrant, shaking the city to its foundations.

Caught up in the excitement of it all, Scotty Moore put together his first real band, the Starlite Wranglers. To front the group and sing lead vocals he recruited Doug Poindexter, a baker who had a Hank Williams type of voice. He added Bill Black on bass, Millard Yeow on steel guitar, Clyde Rush on guitar, and Thomas Seals on fiddle.

To cement the relationship, he had a lawyer draw up an ironclad contract that designated Scotty Moore as the personal manager of the group. Each member of the group would receive 16 2/3 percent of the net proceeds, except for Scotty, who, as manager, would receive an additional 10 percent. Under the terms of the contract, Scotty would make all the business decisions and collect the money. The signees agreed to ''abide by'' Scotty's directions and to ''carry out all engagements, appearances, and performances, faithfully and unless prevented by illness or good cause'' and to appear ''at all times promptly and faithfully for rehearsals under the direction of the manager''. A contract like this was rare for groups in Memphis at the time.

In the five years that had elapsed since he left the farm to join the Navy, Scotty had become savy to the ways of the world. The Starlite Wranglers contract offers a revealing glimpse of Scotty at that time. He wanted success, and all the trappings of success, but more than that he wanted control of his distiny. The best way to do that, in Scotty's mind, was to find people who were agreeable to ''fronting'' for his own ambitions. He was most comfortable when he was behind the scenes, pulling the strings that made the show work. The Starlite Wranglers were his creation. What did he care if people thought Doug Poindexter was calling the shots? More than glory, Scotty wanted anonymity.

Scotty booked the group at Shadow Lawn, then got bookings at various clubs around Memphis, including the Bon Air. Then he got the group on radio station KWEM in West Memphis. He dressed everyone in matching hats and shirts, and he constructed a large star out of Christmas lights and used it to illuminate the bands name.

Once he had all the pieces in place, he prepared for the final step. ''I knew that to get better jobs, we had to put a record out'', he says. ''You had to have a record to get radio play and you had to have radio play to get bookings. I had that much figured out''.

''At that time, there were two record labels in town. Modern/RPM. a West Coast label that had a branch office in Memphis on Chelsea Avenue, was operated by the Bihari brothers and specialized in blues recordings'', Scotty said''. Sun Records, a Memphis-owned label, was housed in Sam Phillips's Memphis Recording Service. Although both labels were targeting blues performers''. Scotty decided to focus his attention on Sun Records. As Elvis was going in one door of the Union Avenue studio, Scotty must have been going out another. They never met during that time, but they were wooing Sam and Marion at about the same time. It took a while, but Scotty finally talked Sam into giving the Starlite Wranglers a chance. ''Sam either came out to a club and saw us, or we went down to audition'', recalls Scotty. ''He finally agreed to put a record out on us''.

The Starlite Wranglers went into the studio in April 1954 and recorded two sides, bot written by Scotty Moore. The A-side was titled ''My Kind Of Carryin' On''. Scotty gave the songwriter's credit for the B-side, ''Now She Cares No More For Me'', to Poindexter because he was the singer, and he gave -one-third to his brother Carney because he wrote out the lead sheet for them. The song was released on May 1, 1954. It got a little airplay on radio, but not enough to generate sales. ''Of course, we didn't get anything to do the record'', says Scotty.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAL MILLER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1953/1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1953/1954
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

Hal Miller is something of an unknown quantity at the moment. His contribution to this recording is, however,, exactly the sort of music that radio stations WMC, WREC, KWEM and the rest beamed out of Memphis in the early fifties.

THERE OUGHT TO BE A LAW
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:21)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1953/1954
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm RLP 126-2-2 mono
COTTON CHOPPER COUNTRY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hal Miller - Vocal
Unknown Piano, Steel Guitar, Bass

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

THE SATERDAY NIGHT JAMBOREE 1953-1954 - Was a local stage show held every Saturday night at the Goodwyn Institute Auditorium in downtown Memphis, Tennessee in 1953-1954. It was founded by Joe Manuel, a popular Hillbilly Radio Star of the 1930's and 40's.

A lot of young musicians around Memphis grew up listening to Manuel's radio broadcasts and as young adults would congregate around him during their off time. Manuel recognized the talent in a lot of these young people. He realized that they they might succeed in the music business if given the opportunity. What they needed was a forum to show their talents to the public. He conceived the idea the idea of a stage show similar to the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. From this idea came the Saturday Night Jamboree.

The First show consisted of Joe Manuel and his band and Marcus Van Story and his band. (Joe and Marcus were old friends). Marcus would open the show, then, after intermission, He would come back on stage (hat turned around backward, front teeth blackend, tattered clothes,etc.), Joe would play straight man, and they would do a comedy routine. Then Joe and his band would close the show.

After a few weeks several of the young singers and musicians from the area started coming on the show. They were rapidly joined by others. Even entire bands began coming on the show. Soon the audience began to fill the Goodwyn Institute Auditorium. K.W.E.M. radio began broadcasting the jamboree. The show took off far beyond anything Joe Manuel expected.

Some of the Memphis area musicians who later became major artists, made some of their first public appearances on the Jamboree. Johnny and Dorsey Burnette were early performers before joining Paul Burlison to form the Rock N Roll Trio. Eddie Bond and his band came on the show. Charlie Feathers was a weekly performer. Johnny Cash was a regular the second year. He sang gospel at the time. This was before he signed with Sun Records.

Lee Adkins, Bud Deckelman, Harmonica Frank Floyd, Barbara Pittman, The Lezenby Twins, Lefty Ray Sexton, Lloyd (Arnold) McCoulough, Tommy Smith, Major Pruitt, Johnny Harrison and Larry Manuel (Joe's son), were all regulars on the jamboree.

A very young and totally unknown Elvis Presley performed on several of the early shows in 1953.

BACKSTAGE - But of more historical significance was something that was going on backstage in the dressing rooms. Every Saturday night in 1953, this was a gathering place where musicians would come together and experiment with new sounds - mixing fast country, gospel, blues and boogie woogie. Guys were bringing in new "licks" that they had developed and were teaching them to other musicians and were learning new "licks" from yet other musicians backstage. Soon these new sounds began to make their way out onto the stage of the Jamboree where they found a very receptive audience.

Within a year these musicians were going into the recording studios around town and recording these sounds. A couple of years later these sounds were given a name: "rockabilly." The Saturday Night Jamboree was probably where the first live rockabilly was performed.

THE BUSINESS END - As the show became a success, Joe Manuel knew he would need help in the business end. Joe was a highly talent entertainer, but he was not a businessman.

He approached an old and close friend, M.E. Ellis to ask his help running the business. Ellis had experience in business matters, owning a barber shop, half interest in another, and at one time was involved in the automobile business. He was both a fan and a friend of Joe's, and had been trying for some time to become Manuel's manager. After several discussions, the men reached a handshake agreement. Ellis would become Manuel's manager and in return would step in and help with the business needs of the Jamboree. M.E. Ellis played a valuable role in the success of the Saturday Night Jamboree.

CLOSING DOWN THE SHOW - The shoe lasted for two years. At the end of 1954 the Goodwyn Institute owners informed Joe Manuel that they were closing the auditorium for a year for remodeling. Also, by the end of 1954, many of the performers had signed recording contracts, were having hit records played on the radio, and were going out on the road on Saturday nights. With no other appropriate location available to hold the Jamboree and the talent dwindling, Joe decided to close it down.

The Saturday Night Jamboree was never intended to play an important role in the launching of the Memphis rockabilly movement, but it did. It was an event that was in the right place at the time. Not only did many performers become major rockabilly recording artists, many members of the various bands became session musicians at different recording studios around the Memphis area. Many of the sounds that were born in the dressing rooms backstage at the Jamboree were making their way into the studios and would soon be heard around the world.

After closing the, Joe Manuel began a slow withdrawal from doing stage shows on the road, but continued doing radio broadcasts. He and M.E. Ellis dissolved their management agreement but maintained their close friendship until Joe's death in 1959 (from melanoma cancer). Joe Manuel died, never realizing the unique role he had played in the conception of rockabilly music. He did, however, know that he had proven his point, that these young musicians that he saw around Memphis, could succeed in the music business if given the opportunity.(See: Joe Manuel - Sun Sessions 1954)

> Page Up <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©