CONTAINS
For audio recordings click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1954 Sun Schedule <

1954 SESSIONS (12)
December 1, 1954 to December 31, 1954

Studio Session for Doctor Ross, Unknown Date December 1954 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Snow, Late 1954/Early 1955 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Little Milton, Unknown Date(s) 1954/1955 / Sun Records
Probably Demo Session for The Burnette Brothers, Unknown Date Late 1954/1955 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Playlists of the Artists can be found on 706 Union Avenue Sessions of > YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 1954

The biggest-ever annual Goodwill Revue is staged by radio WDIA. Regulars on the station at that time include the Brewsteraires, the Jones Brothers, Dave "Honeyboy" Edwards, Rufus Thomas, Phineas and Calvin Newborn. Outside acts appearing include the El-Dorados and Eddie Boyd. Leonard Chess flies in for the occasion.

DECEMBER 1954

Roy Orbison signed up to attend the fall seminar at the North Texas State College in Denton, returned home for Christmas and played the New Year Dance on December 31, 1954 with the Wink Westerners, and than Roy subsequently transferred to Odessa Junior College for his second year.

He studied geology in Denton, preparing to follow his father into the oilfields if all else failed, but, after flunking his geology exams, he switched to English and History.

END 1954

Isaiah Doctor Ross spent the rest of his life as a permanent employee of General Motors, fitting in musical gigs when he could and recording occasionally. It was in 1955, now he was apart from guitarists Gatlin and Troy, that he upgraded his own guitar playing - left handed and upside down - and went on to perfect his act as a one-man band. He had encountered problems with musicians in Memphis. ''Wiley, he'd mess around (He'd say) Oh I ain't gonna get drunk. You playing about two in the morning, Wiley done fall drunk many times. I had to have somebody to pack him up. I'd say, 'It don't look good'. A musician trying to entertain the public and he got to get drunk himself, oh no''. Also, the musicians ''would always want to go on their own, so I'd have to go looking for new guys and then break them in. I just got tired of doing it''. Also, when he moved north, he found there wasn't the pool of blues talent to draw on: ''I couldn't get the band I anted in Flint so I had to get the one-man band going''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Sometime in late 1954 or early 1955, while Ross was still under contract to Sun, Ross made four solo sides, playing acoustic guitar and apparently using a harmonica rack to enable him to combine vocal verses with harp solos. On this session his guitar has a ringing tone and the harp sounds almost accordion-like. The sound of the session is very different from Sam Phillips' studio and the engineer calls out the take numbers before the songs, something Phillips never did. It is likely that the master tape was mailed down to Memphis from Flint as part of Ross's commitment to his renewed Sun contract.

Ross told researcher Mike Leadbitter a decade later that he had made the sides at ''the Bristow Bryant studio'' in Flint in December 1954. Four songs were recorded. ''Left Job Boogie'', an extended instrumental workout that uses the oft-repeated lick from ''Chicago Breakdown'' and its antecedents. It is unclear whether the title refers to Ross having left his place of work, or to Ross's lefthanded guitar playing.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR DOCTOR ROSS

PROBABLY BRISTOW BRYANT STUDIO, FLINT, MICHIGAN
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE DECEMBER 1954
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER – ISAIAH ROSS

''Left Job Boogie'', this track was in the original LP boxed set as a Sun recording, but it now seems likelier that Doctor Ross recorded it in his new home town, Flint, Michigan, and sent it to Sam Phillips sometime in 1954. Hence it appears here. From a distance of nearly 60 years, we can still appreciate why Phillips took such delight in the music of Isaiah Ross. What this track lacks in variety, it certainly makes up in sheer drive. The oft-repeated lick is one that the doc had already called ''Chicago Breakdown''. On this recording, the sound of Ross's harmonica has an unusual, almost accordion-like quality and it's a perfect match for his percussive acoustic guitar. Quite a tight little combo was Doctor Ross.

LEFT JOB BOOGIE
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Original Issued (3:45)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4/9 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

INDUSTRIAL BOOGIE
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Alibri Music
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Late October 1954

''Industrial Boogie'', a song about Ross's new home up north, because that appears again at Ross's next session. The titles included here are ''Going To The River'', taken from Blind Lemon Jefferson's ''Wartime Blues'' issued in 1926, and ''Good Thing Blues'' with the engaging line ''my baby makes good things come to my remind'', based on the popular ''Gold Chills'' recorded by Sonny Boy Williamson in 1946 and then popularised further by John Lee Hooker. Any of the titles from this session would have made a fine third Sun single, though ''Good Thing Blues'' was too long in this form, but Sam Phillips may have decided that Ross's commitment to life up North should send him to the end of the queue for Sun releases, particularly since Sun was preoccupied with Elvis Presley's career and the development of other hillbilly and rockabilly singers. For his part, Ross maintained, ''it was a long time that he wanted me to come back and so some recording. But I saw no future with him''. He told Chris Baird, ''the ''Boogie Disease'' was a real popular record and I asked Sam, 'Is this all we're going to get - about a hundred and fifty dollars'? 'That's all of it''. Said he had costs to pay and the first two records were for him and that the rest would be ours from the third record on''.

GOING TO THE RIVER
Composer: - Doctor Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (3:25)
Recorded: - Late October 1954
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Sun CD 37 mono
BACK COUNTRY BOOGIE – THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES VOLUME 5
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16939-21 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

GOOD THING BLUES
Composer: - Doctor Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - SNot Originally Issued (4:45)
Recorded: - Late October 1954
Released: - 1972
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (LP) 33rpm Arhoolie 1065 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - HIS FIRST RECORDINGS
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16939-22 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Note: Doctor Ross recorded other versions of these songs at this session.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charles Isaiah Ross - Vocal, Guitar, Harmonica, Drums

For Biography of Doctor Ross see: > The Sun Biographies <
Doctor Ross' Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FALL 1954

Old Memphis' patron, E.H. "Boss"Crump lay dying and Elvis Presley is just beginning to enjoy some local success with his first Sun singles, W.C. handy, by then totally blind, was honored as a guest performer with the Dixieland band at Billy Rose's Diamond Horseshoe nightclub in Manhattan.

DECEMBER 1, 1954 WEDNESDAY

Uncle Dave Macon's career is commemorated with a marker on U.S. Highway 70, near Woodbury, Tennessee.

Fred Rose dies in Nashville of a heart attack. Rose founded Acuff-Rose Publishing with Roy Acuff and wrote ''Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain''. He is one of the first inductees in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

DECEMBER 3, 1954 FRIDAY

Bass player Paul Gregg is born in Altus, Oklahoma. He joins Restless Heart, whose big, pop-tinged harmonies earn them a series of smooth country hits in the late-1980s and the Academy of Country Music's Top Vocal Group award in 1990.

In his second stab at the song, Webb Pierce recorded Jimmie Rodgers' ''In The Jailhouse Now'' at the Castle Studio in Nashville's Tulane Hotel.

DECEMBER 4, 1954 SATURDAY

Roy Acuff begins a one-months USO tour of Alaska, performing for American troops.

Former ''National Barn Dance'' star George Gobel appears on the cover of TV Guide.

DECEMBER 6, 1954 MONDAY

Capitol released Ferlin Husky's double-sided hit ''I Feel Better All Over (More Than Anywhere's Else)'' backed by ''Little Tom''.

DECEMBER 7, 1954 TUESDAY

Marty Robbins recorded a remake of Elvis Presley's ''That's All Right'' during an evening session at Nashville's Castle Studio.

DECEMBER 9, 1954 THURSDAY

Set to debut in movie theaters in January, ''Unchained'' premieres on a Los Angeles TV station. Starring NFL player Elroy ''Crazy Legs'' Hirsch, the film introduces ''Unchained Melody'' a future country hit for LeAnn Rimes and for Elvis Presley.

DECEMBER 12, 1954 SUNDAY

Marty Robbins recording contract with Columbia is renewed for another three years.

DECEMBER 13, 1954 MONDAY

John Anderson is born in Orlando, Florida. Borrowing vocally from Lefty Frizzell, he earns the Country Music Association's Horizon award in 1983 and nets hits with ''Swingin''', ''Money In The Bank'' and ''Straight Tequila Nights''.

Decca released Red Foley's ''Hearts Of Stone''.

Hank Thompson recorded ''Most Of All'' and ''Breakin' In Another Heart'' at Capitol's Melrose Avenue studios in Los Angeles.

Columbia released Carl Smith's two-sided hit, ''Kisses Don't Lie'' and ''No, I Don't Believe I Will''.

DECEMBER 14, 1954 TUESDAY

Hank Thompson recorded the instrumental ''Wildwood Flower'' in the early morning hours with the help from Merle Travis at the Capitol Recording Studios on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.

DECEMBER 15, 1954 WEDNESDAY

ABC-TV ''Disneyland'' begins a three-part portrait of Davey Crockett, setting off a national fascination. Tennessee Ernie Ford and Mac Wiseman each score hits with the ''Ballad Of Davey Crockett''.

DECEMBER 16, 1954 THURSDAY

Jim Reeves begins a USO tour of Europe that takes him overseas until January 3, 1955.

DECEMBER 18, 1954 SATURDAY

Pee Wee King begins a weekly TV show on Chicago's WBBM.

Justin Tubb recorded ''I Gotta Go Get My Baby''.

DECEMBER 19, 1954 SUNDAY

The Chordettes performs the future Emmylou Harris hit ''Mister Sandman'' on the Ed Sullivan-hosted CBS variety show ''Talk Of The Town''.

DECEMBER 20, 1954 MONDAY

Songwriter Marc Beeson is born in Chapaign, Illinois. He authors Restless Heart's ''When She Cries'', Billy Currington's ''We Are Tonight'', Exile's, Even Now'' and Pat Green's ''Let Me'', among others.

DECEMBER 21, 1954 TUESDAY

Steel guitarist Gary Morse is born in Lansing, Michigan. He plays on Sara Evan's ''Suds In The Bucket'', Steve Azar's ''I Don't Have To Be Me ('Til Monday)'' and Dierks Bentley's ''Lot Of Leavin' Left To Do''.

Maxene Andrews, of The Andrews Sister, is treated at Valley Receiving Hospital in Chatsworth, California, after swallowing 18 sleeping pills. She insists it was an accident and not a suicide attempt. The sisters had country hits by collaborating with Bing Crosby and Ernest Tubb.

DECEMBER 24, 1954 FRIDAY

Chicago area residents Nate and Pearl Rubenstein adopt a baby boy, naming him Sandy Rubenstein. He discovers in 1992 that his biological father is late guitarist Sammy Pruett, a former member of Hank Williams' Drifting Cowboys.

DECEMBER 25, 1954 SATURDAY

Rhythm and blues singer Johnny Ace shoots himself backstage in a game of Russian roulette at the City Auditorium in Houston, Texas. Ace dies the next day. His single "Pledging My Love" stays at number 1 in the rhythm and blues charts for ten weeks in 1955. Later his single ''Pledging My Love'' is covered as a country hit 30 years by Emmylou Harris and Elvis Presley.

Steve Wariner is born in Noblesville, Indiana. The singer/songwriter/guitarist arrives in Nashville as Dottie West's bass player at age 17, acquiring a recording contract in 1978 which yields a string of smooth singles that stretches more than two decades.

Jim Reeves spends Christmas Day at Orly Field, near Paris, France, during a USO tour in Europe.

The TV Guide Christmas cover highlights the Nelson family, including soon-to-be singer Ricky Nelson.

DECEMBER 26, 1954 SUNDAY

The Mutual Broadcasting Network airs ''The Shadow'' for the last time. The radio mystery, noted for the catch phrase ''Only the shadow knows'', is hailed in the lyrics of The Statler Brothers' 1972 hit ''Do You Remember These''.

DECEMBER 27, 1954 MONDAY

Columbia released Marty Robbins' remake of ''That's All Right''.

DECEMBER 29, 1954 WEDNESDAY

Pop and rhythm and blues drummer John ''J.R'' Robinson is born in Creston, Iowa. Known for his work with Rufus Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie, he also plays on several country hits by Clint Black.

DECEMBER 31, 1954 FRIDAY

Bill Monroe recorded ''Wheel Hoss'' in Nashville. Ricky Skaggs wins a Grammy award in 1985 for his recording of the song.

Singer/songwriter Charlie Major is born in Aylmer, Quebec. The Canadian star writes Ricky Van Shelton's 1992 hit ''Backroads''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE SNOW
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954/55

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE LATE 1954 / EARLY 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Eddie Snow first appeared on the doorstep at 706 Union in 1952 as the pianist and vocalist with Elven Parr's In The Groove Boys. They had journeyed from Osceola, Arkansas to make a demo for Chess. Snow reappeared at least twice more without Parr, probably once in 1954 and again at a logged session in 1955 that yielded his only Sun single. Seemingly taking his cue from Ray Charles' ''Mess Around'', on this track Snow kicks off three songs that probably come from this 1954 session. All of his songs are on tape together, but the mix on this and the two songs that follow is too sloppy and the recording quality too muddy for it to belong with the single. And it's unlikely that Phillips would have cycled Snow's vocal through tape delay on the single, but left it dry on these three cuts. The guitar is way upfront in the mix and takes a two-chorus solo. There's a lot of energy here; more energy than clarity, in fact.

> DON'T DOG ME AROUND <
Composer: - Eddie Snow
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:45)
Recorded: - Late 1954 / Early 1955
Released: September 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm B 1061 mono
RED HOT AND BLUE
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-8/14 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

A muddy sound and a key which puts more than the usual strain on Eddie Snow's vocal chords renders some of what he sings unintelligible. Its pretty clear he loves his baby, but she seems to be spending his money. "Well, I love you baby, don't fool around with my dough/if you fool with my money, baby, you know you can't live no more". A guitar solo follows which makes a solid virtue of brevity compared to the thundering herd behind him, or can we hear the posse as well?

> MEAN MEAN WOMAN < 
Composer: - Eddie Snow
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Previously Unissued (3:00)
Recorded: - Late 1954 / Early 1955
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 8-7/15 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Although not assigned to a specific session, its fairly safe to identify the proto-rockabilly guitar style of Floyd Murphy on ''Mean Mean Woman'', although he seems to have lost the fighting edge to be heard on Junior Parker's sides. The other possibility is that this is another guitarist attempting the Murphy style. The song's sentiments are roughly equivalent to the preceding track, and Snow makes it clear that if he can't be his woman's boss, he won't be her man at all. On those terms, he's likely to have remained a bachelor for the rest of his natural life.

Before Floyd Murphy was sidelined by a stroke, he remembered working a session with Eddie Snow, so it could very well be him. Snow was an unsubtle vocalist without much range, and on the evidence here his act probably worked better in clubs than on records, a judgment underscored by the fact that he didn't record again until late in life.

> STAY WITH ME BABY <
Composer: - Eddie Snow
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:36)
Recorded: - Late 1954 / Early 1955
Released: - October 1985
First appearance: - Krazy Kat Records (LP) 33rpm Krazy Kat KK 7427 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - UNISSUED TITLES FROM THE 1950S
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) CD SUNBOX 8-7/16 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS YEARS 1950 - 1958

Snow doesn't seem to be able to make up his mind whether to sing "Stay" or "Stick with me baby" he sings both during the course of this take and on the one that succeeded it. With the exception of a verse about the adverse consequences of playing the numbers, the singer spends his time ruing his previous actions in a manner that seems to guarantee his baby's departure. As the performance falls apart at its end, the drummer goes into whirlwind mode to prove it wasn't his fault. The sax man, probably Eddie Davis, here sounds so fluent and brimful of ideas that he could very well be jazz titan Eddie ''Lockjaw'' Davis. In 1956, Davis made some solo recordings for King Records. In New York leading a prototypical sax-organ combo, and he worked on and off with Count Basie from 1952 until 1955, so it's at least possible that it's him. It's clear that Eddie Snow had solidly commercial songwriting chops, but simply didn't have the distinctiveness as a singer needed to compete in rhythm and blues circa 1955.

> I GOT TO PUT YOU DOWN <
Composer: - Eddie Snow
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:59)
Recorded: - Late 1954 / Early 1955
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30126 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 11- MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Snow - Vocal & Piano
Probably Eddie Davis - Saxophone
Bennie Moore - Saxophone
Floyd Murphy - Guitar
Jeff Greyer - Drums

For Biography of Eddie Snow see: > The Sun Biographies <
Eddie Snow's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LITTLE MILTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1954/1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCED AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

I'LL SEE YOU DOWN THE ROAD*
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: n- None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1954/1955

I WANT YOU BABY
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: n- None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1954/1955

PLAY THIS BOOGIE WOOGIE
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: n- None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1954/1955

COME ON BABY
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: n- None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1954/1955

STANDING AT THE GREYHOUND STATION**
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: n- None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1954/1955

COME BACK PRETTY BABY
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: n- None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1954/1955

Tapes not heard. Possible a mistitling of another performances *
Possibly Houston Boines, Vocal **

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Little Milton Campbell - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Little Milton see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

By 1954, Johnny Burnette had a young family to raise. He's married Thurley Ruth Dángelillo in 1952, and their first son, Rocky, was born on June 12, 1953. Randy followed on October 28, 1954. At some point in 1954, Johnny Burnette was working as an appliance salesman alongside Johnny Cash. ''The manager nagged when we couldn't sell television sets or screen doors or metal siding''. Johnny told Helen Bolstad, ''but we braved it out. It was the unbreakable dishes that busted us. The manager said, 'Just throw s saucer down at the woman's feet. Don't say a word. She'll be so amazed when it doesn't break, she'll but every time'''.

Johnny Cash knocked. A woman came to the door, and Cash told her about the unbreakable dishes. Burnette threw a disc onto the steps as hard as he could and it shattered. The woman shrieked and her husband came to the door and asked them what they were doing. Cash replied that they were trying to sell unbreakable dishes. ''Unbreakable!'' said the man. ''You couldn't sell dollar bills for a dime''. Dorsey Burnette cared no more for his life an apprentice electrician. ''I worked for six years to get my license'', he said. ''I was crawling up into buildings and getting that fiberglass insulation down in your rear end where you can't scratch. I just hated it''.

PROBABLY DEMO SESSION FOR THE BURNETTE BROTHERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE LATE 1954 / EARLY 1955
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

Dorsey Burnette recalled that they recorded a demo session for Sun Records. ''We took Sam Phillips some songs and he turned 'em down'', he told Sanford Brokaw, ''but they weren't very good anyway''. Paul Burlison cannot remember going to Sun, but if the Burnettes didn't audition there, they were one of the few Memphis bands not to do so.

Al Vescovo worked a few sessions at Sun. He's on the books playing a Ramsey Kearney session in March 1954 and recalls working there on other occasions, but can't remember if he went there with the Burnettes. The Burnett Rhythm Rangers were a loose aggregation until 1956, so it's possible that they auditioned at Sun Records without Paul Burlison. Johnny certainly remembered going there. In an article for TV Radio Mirror in 1961, he told Helen Bolstad that he and Dorsey had auditioned ''Go Mule Go/Go Along Mule'' for Sun, but were tossed out onto the street when the fiddler's bridge broke. Paul Burlison recalls the same incident, but places it during the recording of ''Go Mule Go/Go Along Mule'' for Von Records. Music was not a fulltime occupation. Paul Burlison said that he and Dorsey were working day jobs with the Crown Electric Company as journeyman and apprentice electrician respectively, although Dorsey appears in the city directories working for Tri-State Electric and Philwood Electric, not Crown. Johnny held down a number of jobs. After door-to-door salesmanship didn't work, he became a repo man and debt collector for Severance Corporation.

GO ALONG MULE
Composer: - Johnny Burnette
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Old Judge Music - Sun Unissued - Lost
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1954 / Early 1955

UNKNOWN TITLES & LOST

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Burnette – Vocal & Guitar
Probably Al Vescovo – Steel Guitar
Dorsey Burnette – Bass
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

> Page Up <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©