CONTAINS
For music(standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

1952 SESSIONS 2
February 1 to February 28, 1952

Studio Session for Bobby Bland, Unknown Date 1952 (2) / Duke Records
Studio Session for Shirley Sisk & Judy Dismukes, February 8, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Howlin' Wolf, February 12, 1952 / RPM Records
Studio Session for Joe Hill Louis, February 23, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Walter Bradford, February 23, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jack Kelly & Walter Horton, February 25, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Joe & Jack, Possibly February 25, 1952 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Duke/RPM/Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 2, 1952 SATURDAY

MGM released Hank Williams' single ''Honky Tonk Blues'' backed with ''I'm Sorry For My Friend''

FEBRUARY 5, 1952 TUESDAY

Carl Smith recorded ''It's A Lovely, Lovely World'', ''That's The Kind Of Love I'm Looking For'' and ''Are You Teasing Me'' at the Castle Studio in Nashville.

FEBRUARY 6, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Pete Seeger is branded a member of the Communist party when actor Harvey Mutasow testifies before the House Un-American Activities Committee. Seeger will net country hits as a songwriter of ''Kisses Sweeter Than Wine'' and ''Gotta Travel On..

FEBRUARY 8, 1952 FRIDAY

Ray Price recorded ''Talk To Your Heart'' during the afternoon at the Castle Studio in Nashville's Tulane Hotel. The performance is rejected, and the ultimate single, his first hit, is recorded six days later.

Rex Allen and Slim Pickens are called upon to help unravel a murder in the movie debut of ''Colorado Sundown''. Woodwind player Darol Rice also appear on-screen.

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STUDIO SESSION FOR BOBBY BLUE BLAND
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1952 FOR DUKE RECORDS

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 – ''I.O.U. BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:11
Composer: - James Mattis-Don Robey
Publisher: - Lion Music Publisher
Matrix number: - ASA 2266 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Peacock Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Duke R 105-B < mono
I.O.U. BLUES / LOVIN' BLUES
Reissued: - 2011 Jasmine Records (CD) 500/200rpm JASCD 564-7 mono
BOBBY BLAND - IT'S MY LIFE, BABY

02 – ''LOVIN' BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - James Mattis-Don Robey
Publisher: - Lion Music Publisher
Matrix number: - ASA 2267 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Peacock Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Duke R 105-A < mono
LOVIN' BLUES / I.O.U. BLUES
Reissued: - 2011 Jasmine Records (CD) 500/200rpm JASCD 564-8 mono
BOBBY BLAND - IT'S MY LIFE, BABY

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Bobby Bland - Vocal
Adolph Billy Duncan – Tenor Saxophone
Johnny Ace - Piano
B.B. King - Guitar
George Joyner – Bass
Earl Forest – Drums

For Biographies of Bobby Bland see: > The Sun Biographies <
Bobby Bland's Duke/Chess/Modern recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SHIRLEY SISK
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FEBRUARY 8, 1952
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

Born Ernestine Brooks in Memphis. First recorded for Sam Phillips as a pianist and vocalist with her sister-in- law Judy Dismukes on guitar. The session was on February 8, 1952 when ''Let Me Count The Curls'' and ''Mean Old Memphis'' were recorded. Sam Phillips assigned Chess master numbers and shipped masters to Chess and to local radio stations. However, Chess did not release the titles, but Acuff-Rose picked up the publishing rights to the song ''Let Me Count The Curls''. By the late 1950s and early 1960s, Shirley Sisk was back in Memphis, working out of the Echo studios as a pianist and organist. She was featured on a Phillips International disc by the Memphis Bells and in her own right on Sun 365, recorded at the Echo studio on Manassas Avenue in 1961. She owned Permanent Records in Memphis, which did not live up to its name.

01 - ''LET ME COUNT THE CURLS''
Composer: Ernestine Brooks
Publisher: - Acuff-Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - February 8, 1952

02 - ''MEAN OLD MEMPHIS TOWN''
Composer: Ernestine Brooks
Publisher: - Acuff-Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - February 8, 1952

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Shirley Sisk - Vocal & Piano
Judy Dismukes - Guitar

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 9, 1952 SATURDAY

Rosco Gordon's ''Booted'' (Chess 1487) enters the National Billboard Rhythm & Blues Charts and peaks at number 1 in a 13-week stay (number 15 rhythm and blues record of 1952).

At the beginning of February, Jules and Joe Bihari announced the formation of a new label, Blues And Rhythm, ''which will concentrate on blues waxings from the Deep South'', with eighteen new artists already signed and a ''talent rep'' hired.

They were, clearly, seizing upon a whole new trend. For the first time in many months, Hal Webman wrote in his column in Billboard, ''Rhythm & Blues Notes'': ''the down-home, Southern-style blues appears to have taken a solid hold... The Southern market appears to have opened up to its widest extent in some time... (as) such artists as B.B. King, Howling Wolf, Rosco Gordon, Fats Domino, Sonny Boy Williamson, Lightnin' Hopkins, John Lee Hooker, Lowell Fulson, Billy Wright, Muddy Waters, etc., have taken a fast hold in such market areas as New Orleans, Dallas, Atlanta, Los Angeles, etc. Even the sophisticated big towns, like New York and Chicago, have felt the Southern blues influence in wax tastes.

FEBRUARY 13, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Studio session with Walter Bradford at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee. Session details unknown.

FEBRUARY 14, 1952 THURSDAY

Ray Price recorded his first hit ''Talk To Your Heart''.

Webb Pierce hires Tommy Hill, a future songwriter and record producer, as a fiddler in his band. Hill writes Pierce's ''Slowly'' and ''Red Sovine's Teddy Bear''.

FEBRUARY 15, 1952 FRIDAY

Chess and the Bihari brothers settled their ongoing squabble with an item in Billboard announcing, ''The Biharis turned over exclusive pact to Howlin' Wolf to the Chess Fraters, while Chess brothers gave four Rosco Gordon masters, and any claim to his contract, to Modern''. It seemed as if the Biharis might have gotten the better end of the deal, as Rosco's Chess recording of ''Booted'' (the Biharis had their own version out) was rapidly climbing the charts, on its way to becoming Rosco Gordon's first number 1 hit. For Sam Phillips that just may have been the trigger. He had two number 1 rhythm and blues hits now, and one number 4, in less than a year; he had discovered the Howlin' Wolf; and he had a wealth of talent still to record, but what did he have in the way of material reward to show for it?

FEBRUARY 18, 1952 MONDAY

Judy Kay ''Juice'' Newton is born at Lakehurst Naval Base, New Jersey. A distant descendent of Sir Isaac Newton, she earns pop/country crossover hits during the 1980s with ''Queen Of Hearts'', ''Angel Of The Morning'' and ''Break It To Me Gently''.

Decca released Red Foley's two-sided hit, ''Milk Bucket Boogie'' and ''Salty Dog Rag''.

FEBRUARY 21, 1952 THURSDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis marries his first wife, Dorothy Barton, in Mississippi, after lying about his age on the application for the license.

FEBRUARY 1952

Rhythm and blues magazine ''Beat'' report: ''Modern Records settled its differences with Chess Records of Chicago. The Biharis turned over exclusive pact to Howlin' Wolf to the Chess Fraters, while Chess brothers gave four Rosco Gordon masters to Modern''.

FEBRUARY 1952

Chess and the Biharis resolved their conflict in an agreement by which Chess kept Howlin' Wolf and the Biharis kept Roscoe Gordon from Sun Records. Chess released their second Wolf single immediately after the deal was struck. Nevertheless, both Wolf and Roscoe would have to wait a number of years to recapture their initial success.

"The first time I saw Howlin' Wolf", says Jim Dickinson on June 1990 in Hernando, Mississippi, "I was still too young to know any better. It was the early 1950s. I was with my father at a warehouse in West Memphis, Arkansas. My father and the warehouse manager were counting cartons of clothes pins. Over the hum of the big band built into the wall I could hear what sounded like jungle drums. I followed the pounding up wooden stairs to an office. Painted on the glass door was a lightning bolt and red letters KWEM RADIO. The door was open. Four negro men in unbleached work clothes were playing music. One man - bigger than the others - was growling words I could not understand into a silver microphone.

I watched until my father found me. The music stuck in my head and wouldn't go away. I found it later on the radio. KWEM - 1070 WDIA "The Black Spot On Your Dial" - WLOK 1340 with Hunky Dory - Dewey Phillips Red Hot And Blue on 56 WHBQ radio.

I had an older friend with a 78rpm copy of Wolf's "I Love My Baby". I listened to it over and over. Then one day in Ruben Cherry's "Home Of The Blues" record shop on Beale Street, I saw the grey album cover with the drawing of a lone wolf howling to the moon. I took it to the check-out counter, and Ruben said, 'Boy, you got the blues there'. "I was hooked. In 1958 my high school combo was playing versions of "Evil" and "Killing Floor" to our white teenaged Memphis audience. By the mid-1960s the Rolling Stones were playing Howlin' Wolf songs to the world.

I have heard Sam Phillips say that his discovery of Wolf was more significant than his discovery of Elvis Presley. The Only artist to share the surreal darkness of Robert Johnson, Wolf brings out his band an ensemble counterpoint unlike anything else in the blues. His voice seems to hang in the air, and make the room rumble with echo. His singing is so powerful that between the vocal lines the compressor-limiter through which the mono recordings were made sucks the sound of the drum and the French harp up into the hole in the audio mix. Notes blend together and merge into melody lines that are not being 'played' by any one instrument. Wolf is not bound by the three-chord blues pattern, and often seems to crass the bar lines of western music. He is a Primitive-Modernist, using chants and modal harmonies of the dark ritualist past brought up from mother Africa and slavery through electric amplifiers.

Like the unsolvable mystery of 'smokestack lightning', Howlin' Wolf contribution to the blues goes beyond musical phrases. The 'idea' of Howlin' Wolf makes blues history somehow deeper and richer. Bloody but unbowed, Chester Burnett is forever frozen in the time - space of these first recordings made by Sam Phillips. Howlin' Wolf sings out his frustrations, never surrendering to the hopeless situation of existence. The same giant pulled a plow like a man-mule in the Mississippi Delta, and lived to ride a Shriners' mini-motorcycle on-stage at the Newport Folk Festival. He toured the world playing the blues, and would sit in his hotel room in his boxer shorts and do-rag, and imitate Senator Everett Dirkson. His life is a legend. His legacy is a treasure as unique as the man himself. Share his vision of love, sex, death, and man's predicament in the Universe. Heed the call of the Wolf, the haunted cry of an animal alone in the night. And that music, loved Elvis Presley".

FEBRUARY 1952

Jackie Brenston and Ike Turner leave Sun Records for Chess Records in Chicago. Sam Phillips need to find new talent ever pressing, he turned to a precocious young piano player named Rosco Gordon. Eddie Hill leaves Memphis to work for WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee.

FEBRUARY 1952

Sam Phillips borrowed some money from Nashville record magnate Jim Bulleit to begin his Sun Records operation. Sam learned a great deal from Bulleit. Bulleit's company provided another model for Sun Records. Sam Phillips reasoned he could duplicate its success in Memphis. "I thought I could maybe make a go of a company that just recorded rhythm and blues numbers", Phillips recalled.

FEBRUARY 1952

Sam Phillips started off with a flurry of recording activity at the end of February 1952. He cut a seventeen-year-old disc jockey from Forrest City, Arkansas, Walter Bradford, with more of a gift for self-promotion than for singing, then on the same day scheduled another Joe Hill Louis session, but this one, marked ''SCP'', for himself. Veteran blues singer Jack Kelly ''came with ''Mumbles'' Horton for session'', Marion Keisker noted in the logbook, and in due course Sam sent the dubs off to Chess, along with dubs from the Walter Bradford session. Then on March 1 he recorded a fifteen-year-old sophomore from Melrose High School, one of Memphis' three colored institutions, each with its own distinguished music program, who had been coming by with his little rhythm and blues combo, the Rockets, for the past few weeks.

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After possibly two years in the service, at the age of 38, bluesman Howlin' Wolf (Chester Arthur Burnett) returned to farming in Mississippi but started playing in West Memphis, Arkansas around 1948. He probably continued to work on the farm for a while at least because people recall seeing him show up for radio station work in his farm overalls. At that time, West Memphis had longer drinking hours than Memphis, more gambling joints and a city administration willing to turn a blind eye. On Friday and Saturday nights, school buses brought sharecroppers in from the surrounding Delta country.

The Wolf and his small group (very young James Cotton and Little Junior Parker), plied their craft as the country folk boozed, whored and gambled away their meagre earnings. Pat Hare, who later played guitar with James Cotton and Muddy Waters, recalled that his first paying job was working with Howlin' Wolf in a West Memphis whorehouse in 1948 or 1949. Howlin" Wolfs band spotted broadcast over station KWM, where Sonny Boy Williamson II, had a spot.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR HOWLIN' WOLF
FOR RPM RECORDS 1951

KWEM RADIO STUDIO,
231 BROADWAY STREET, WEST MEMPHIS, ARKANSAS
RPM SESSION: TUESDAY FEBRUARY 12, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER
AND/OR JOE BIHARI

Howlin' Wolf last session for RPM/Modern Records.

01 - ''WORRIED ABOUT MY BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 12, 1952
Released: - 1966
First appearance: - United Records (LP) 33rpm US 7747-A-5 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF - THE ORIGINAL FOLK BLUES
Reissued: - 1991 Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm V2-86295-11 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

02 - ''HOUSE ROCKIN' BOOGIE'' - B.M.I. - 4:10
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 12, 1952
Released: - 1966
First appearance: - United Records (LP) 33rpm US 7747-B-2 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF - THE ORIGINAL FOLK BLUES
Reissued: - 1991 Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm V2-86295-1 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

Notes: ''House Rockin' Boogie'' is listed as ''House Rockers'' on original.

03 - ''BROWN SKIN WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 12, 1952
Released: - 1966
First appearance: - United Records (LP) 33rpm US 7747-A-2 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF - THE ORIGINAL FOLK BLUES

04(1) - ''CHOCOLATE DROP'' - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 12, 1952
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm V2-86295-7 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

04(2) - ''CHOCOLATE DROP'' - 2 - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 12, 1952
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm V2-86295-12 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

05 - ''DRIVING THIS HIGHWAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 12, 1952
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm V2-86295-13 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

06 - ''THE SUN IS RISING'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 12, 1952
Released: - 1969
First appearance: - United Superior (LP) 33rpm US-7779-B-3 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - ANTHOLOGY OF THE BUES VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 1991 Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm V2-86295-14 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

07 - ''MY FRIENDS'' - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 12, 1952
Released: - 1969
First appearance: - United Superior (LP) 33rpm US-7779-B-4 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - ANTHOLOGY OF THE BUES VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 1991 Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm V2-86295-16 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

08 - ''I'M THE WOLF'' - B.M.I. - 3:02
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 12, 1952
Released: - 1969
First appearance: - United Superior (LP) 33rpm US-7779-A-2 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - ANTHOLOGY OF THE BUES VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 1991 Virgin Records (CD) 500/200rpm V2-86295-17 mono
HOWLIN' WOLF RIDES AGAIN

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Howlin' Wolf - Vocal & Harmonica
Ike Turner - Piano
Willie Johnson - Guitar
Willie Steele - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE HILL LOUIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1952

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: SATURDAY FEBRUARY 23, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "DECORATION BLUES"
Composer: - Unknown Probably Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - February 23, 1952
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

02 - "ONE MORE DRINK"
Composer: - Unknown Probably Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - February 23, 1952
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis - Vocal, Guitar; more details unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WALTER BRADFORD
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: SATURDAY FEBRUARY 23, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "DREARY NIGHTS"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 53
Recorded: - February 23, 1952
Released: - Sun Unissued / Sun 176

02 - "NUTHIN' BUT THE BLUES"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 54
Recorded: - February 23, 1952
Released: - Sun Unissued / Sun 176

At this point we really should be writing about Sun 176 (''Dreary Night'' / ''Nuthin' But The Blues), but many people have spent many years searching for Sun 176 without finding it, and it seems fairly certain that it was scheduled but not pressed. Walter Bradford was a disc jockey in Forrest City, Arkansas and Phillips recorded him on February 23, 1952 with hopes and placing the titles with Chess. He noted the titles of three songs (the third being ''Five Days Rain''). After Chess rejected the recordings, Phillips slated ''Dreary Night''/''Nuthin' But The Blues'' for Sun's initial launch in April 1952. One day perhaps, one of the few acetates of Bradford's Sun 78 will show up, but this untitled song from a Memphis Recording Service acetate just might be half of one of the to missing songs. We know that acetates were made and shipped to disc jockeys locally but we do not know their fate. From what we can hear, this recording features the musicians listed by Phillips at the 'lost' February session. It is clearly Pat Hare on guitar, making this his first known recording. Could the lyrical pay-off have been dreary nights, or nuthin' but the blues? Possibly. Something else entirely? Equally possible. Barring the discovery of a copy of Sun 176, we'll never know.

03 - "FIVE DAYS RAIN"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - February 23, 1952
Released: - Sun Unissued / Tape Lost

04 - "UNTITLED BLUES" - B.M.I. - 1:11
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None / Incomplete
Recorded: - February 23, 1952
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-4-4 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

The incomplete as ''Untitled Blues'' may in fact be any one of the other three titles above, but this cannot determined from the lyrics

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter Bradford - Vocal
Louis Calvin Hubert - Piano
Pat Hare - Guitar
Jerry Lee Walker - Drums

For Biographies of Walter Bradford see: > The Sun Biographies <
Walter Bradford's recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JACK KELLY & WALTER HORTON
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: MONDAY FEBRUARY 25, 1952
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER

Sam Phillips recorded the duo of harmonica player Walter Horton and jug band veteran Jack Kelly, who together had worked up two tunes. Marion Keisker wrote in her logbook: ''2/25/52, Session with Joe Hill, Jack Kelly and, cut several sides on tape''. (See session below). Best were with Jack Kelly doing vocal and Mumbles (Horton) on harmonica. Tentatively billed on these numbers as ''Little Walter'' with ''Jackie Boy''. Under Kelly's name, she wrote that two cuts were made that day, ''Sellin' My Stuff (Ain't Had A Drink)'', and ''Wanderin' Woman (Blues In My Condition)''.

01 - "BLUES IN MY CONDITION" B.M.I.
Composer: - Jack Kelly-Walter Horton
Publisher: - Copyright Control - Promotional Copies Only
Matrix number: - None - Only Acetate
Recorded: - February 25, 1952
Released: - March 1, 1952 - SUN 174 was never issued
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78rpm acetate SUN 174-B mono
BLUES IN MY CONDITION / SELLIN' MY WHISKEY
Reissued: - 2010 JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm Internet Spotify CD 2-6 mono
BLUES HARMONICA GIANT 1951-56

Walter Horton and Jack Kelly were typical of the Delta bluesman who warmed to Sam Phillips' new recording climate. "Blues In My Condition, chosen from their various meanderings, was nominated as the first Sun single. However, due to an adverse reaction from area radio stations, the recording never made it past the promotional stage. Fortunately a fragment of the 'lower deck' survived, allowing the true beginnings of the Sun label to be represented, right at the moment of conception.

02 - "SELLING MY STUFF (WHISKEY)" - B.M.I. - 1:20
Composer: - Jack Kelly-Walter Horton
Publisher: - Copyright Control - Promotional Copies Only
Matrix number: - None - Only Acetate
Incomplete a fragment of the "lower deck" survived
Recorded: - February 25, 1952
Released: - March 1, 1952 - Sun 174 was never issued
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78rpm acetate > SUN 174-B < mono
SELLIN' MY WHISKEY / BLUES IN MY CONDITION
Reissued: - 1996 Charly (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-2-7 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Although scheduled for release as SUN 175 (and labels printed accordingly) this never made it to the final furlong, being scrapped following a lack of positive audience reaction after an acetate dub had been aired on WHHM. Sadly, neither does a complete version of this track appear to have survived - hence its inclusion here in its (only-known) fragment ed form.

The song itself - with its oddly bowdlerize title - harks back to Kelly's South Memphis Jug Band, with its romping rhythm and good-time lyric. Its a shame to hear only this truncated extract, and one can only speculate what Walter Horton might have brought to the original recording.

On March 5, 1952, Sam Phillips sent dubs (acetates run off the master tape) of the tunes to Chess, inquiring whether they would be interested in releasing them. Chess said they would not. On March 8, Phillips made up a new set of dubs of "Blues In My Condition" and sent one to Memphis station WHHM, asking that it be aired as the introduction to the Sun label.

The response was good enough to persuade him to ship the master for processing. "Sellin' My Stuff" was retitled "Sellin' My Whiskey" in anticipation of release, and the duo was dubbed Jackie Boy and Little Walter. By the time the stampers (the metal parts used in the manufacture of records) were shipped back from Shaw Processing, however, Sam Phillips had decided that Chess Records had been correct: the wasn't strong enough for release. The first Sun record, number SUN 174, was never issued.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jack Kelly - Vocal and Piano
Walter Horton - Vocal, Harmonica and Kazoo
Joe Hill Louis - Guitar and Drums
Probably Will Batts - Fiddle

Fiddler player Will Batts was born on January 24, 1904 in Michigan, Mississippi. A fiddler, Batts was the primary instrumentalist in Jack Kelly's South Memphis Jug Band, a popular string band whose music owed a heavy debt to the blues as well as minstrel songs, vaudeville numbers, reels and rags. Batts was working as a farm hand when he decided to pursue a career in music full-time.

Batts sooned joined Kelly's band, a fixture of the Beale Street area, and in 1933 they made their first recordings, followed in 1939 by a second and final session. Batts also backed a variety of other Memphis performers, including minstrel singer Frank Stokes. This 1952 session with Walter Horton was his last known recording date. Will Batts continued to work in Memphis, Tennessee until his death in Memphis on February 18, 1956.

According to Robert Henry, owner and Beale street connoisseur, ''Well one of the jug band players is still livin' right in the rear of my place of business here; that's Son Brimmer. His name's Will Shade but we called him Son Brimmer. It was a joke - one time I had some people out of New York come to listen to the jug men. So they tol' me, the jug band did, ''All right, but all we need now is for us to have a few drinks so we be feelin' good.''. So they did and we went along to hear the jug men start makin' records. Well, but the boys were so drunk that they wasn't able to stand. The people out of New York lauged and said, ''Well, they wanted to feel good, but they feel too good. Well we have to leave you; this ain't the people we was lookin' for''! But since then Son Brimmer has made several records of the old timers. So it is not many of them is living yet of the original jug bands. We lost one about two years ago - Willie Batts. He had one of the biggest jug bands - and they usually carry from four to five pieces in the band. Made some records with Jack Kelly once; he was a blues man come up from Mississippi. Willie Batts that was. Most of them uses the can for the bass, there's hardly nothing else left in there for them! Some of them do use a jug. There's not much left of them now, but they was mostly men play for parties, picnics and things; elections, for people won a race, and parties of the kind''.

''People who drink and have a good time - mostly the jug band plays for that, they don't play for dances. So that's why the jug band is made for the people, understand me, to have a good time, people who is havin' parties. At one time Batts' Jug Band used to play for conventions at Peabody Hotel. That's our biggest hotel. So we had a jubilee... to entertain the people. Most of the people - it was a hardware convention - was out of the East. So I went downstairs to send the people home in a taxi and when I got back upstairs the jug band had a hat down in the middle of the Peabody Hotel ballroom. But the money was piled in the hat, so I said, 'Well you-all ain't gettin' paid tonight for your act, I'm cuttin' in with you. Because you've got to much money in that hat there. You expect to draw ten dollars for your work'! Aw, it was fun. They played the Peabody for a night or so at a time. I used to book the jug bands on the jobs, but I'd always notify the people who they were workin' for, to be particular about them drinkin' because if they showed they'd got a bottle of whiskey they'd have a bunch of drunken people on they hands. Now they like to play but they sure like to get drunk. So you watch for the jug bands. When they don't get drunk, there's not much pep in them. But they really likes to drink that hooch''.

For Biographies of Jack Kelly and Walter Horton see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

POSSIBLY STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE & JACK
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: PROBABLY MONDAY FEBRUARY 25, 1952
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER

No Details

01 – ''YOUR CONSTANTLY''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably February 25, 1952

02 – ''AT THE END OF THE PRAYER''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably February 25, 1952

03 – ''MY BABY LOVES ME''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably February 25, 1952

04 – ''MY ONE AND ONLY YOU''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably February 25, 1952

05 – ''SO EASY''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably February 25, 1952

06 – ''LOVE YOU LIKE YOU WANT''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably February 25, 1952

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis – Vocals, Guitar & Drums
Jack Kelly – Vocals - Piano
Probably Walter Horton - Harmonica & Kazoo

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 22, 1952 FRIDAY

Columbia released George Morgan's ''Almost''.

FEBRUARY 23, 1952 SATURDAY

Del Wood makes her Grand Ole Opry debut, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Aerosmith guitarist Brad Whitford is born in Winchester, Massachusetts. The rock band scores a major pop hit in 1998 with ''I Don't Want To Miss A Thing'', which Mark Chesnutt immediately remakes for the country charts.

''Here Come The Nelsons'' debuts in movie theaters, the first film to feature future country star Ricky Nelson.

FEBRUARY 24, 1952 SUNDAY

Songwriter Cole Porter, who co-wrote Gene Autry's country hit ''Don't Fence Me In'' is honored with a two-hour tribute on CBS-TV ''Toast Of The Town'', later known as ''The Ed Sullivan Show''.

FEBRUARY 25, 1952 MONDAY

Burl Ives recorded a cover version of Hank Thompson's ''Wild Side Of Life'' with guitarist Grady Martin And His Slew Foot Five.

Jackie Boy and Little Walter recorded ''Blues In My Condition'' and ''Sellin' My Stuff'' (Sun 174) at the Sun Recording Studio in Memphis with producer Sam Phillips. The tracks make up the very first single release by the Sun label.

FEBRUARY 26, 1952 TUESDAY

Singer/songwriter Chris Wall is born in Los Angeles, California. He writes Confederate Railroad's ''Trashy Women''.

Songwriter Gary Burr is born in Meridan, Connecticut. Among his credits, Conway Twitty's ''That's My Job'', Patty Loveless ''I Try To Think About Elvis'', LeAnn Rimes ''Nothin' 'Bout Love Make Sense'' and ''Tim McGraw's ''Can't Be Really Gone''.

FEBRUARY 29, 1952 FRIDAY

Webb Pierce recorded ''That Heart Belongs'' during the afternoon at the Castle Studio in Nashville.

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© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©