CONTAINS

Sun Sound Special - Raunchy Rockabilly (CR 30147) Various Artists (1978)
Sun Sound Special - Shoobie Oobie (CR 30148) Various Artists (1978)
Sun Sound Special - Memphis Beat (CR 30149) Various Artists (1978)
Sun Sound Special - Tennessee Country (CR 30150) Various Artists (1978)
Sun Sound Special - Billy Riley (CR 30151) Billy Riley (1978)
Sun Sound Special - Carl Perkins (CR 30152) Carl Perkins (1978)
Sun Sound Special - Johnny Cash (CR 30153) Johnny Cash (1978)

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30147 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - RAUNCHY ROCKABILLY

The Sun Sound is special. The Sun label is one of the very few to have developed a unique and immediately identifiable sound. As a result, its reputation and its fine music have come through undiminished to the present day from its humble origin's in the Memphis, Tennessee, of the blues. Sun was launched by radio announcer and recording engineer Sam C. Phillips in 1952, and this series of Sun Sound Special covers every aspect of Sun's music, from the rhythm and blues of the early fifties through country, rockabilly and rock and roll into the beat era. Sun folded in its original form in 1968 and was moved to Nashville. But instead of being forgotten over the last ten years, the Sun Sound has been revealed to have been among the best and most important developments in American music.

For the most part this album comprises Sun masters that were not issued in the fifties when they were recorded, and have only recently become available for use by Charly (UK). They represent a collection of the very best Memphis rockabilly of the classic era.

JUNIOR THOMPSON
Thompson was among the first rockabilly artist in Memphis but somehow he never did got a record out on Sun. This previously unissued song was also recorded and released on another local labels, and both versions display the influence of Elvis Presley and also Charlie Feathers.

RHYTHM ROCKERS
This group was in fact two people, disc jockey Hardrock Gunter and buddy Sonny Durham. Sun purchased ''Jukebox'' from the Cross Country label of Wheeling, where the recording was made in West Virginia. This is a different uptempo country style from most of Sun's indigous rockabilly outputs and is much sought alter as a result. The song was also picked up by others, notably Tommy Mitchell who recorded it for Mercury.

SONNY BURGESS
Sonny entered into the abandoned spirit of rockabilly with no holds barred. He was very much influenced by rhythm and blues as both has songs included here show. They reveal all aspects of Sonny's style and can only lead us to regret that he has now given up music in favour of his shoe store in Little Rock. Nether of these recordings have been issued on a Sun album before, yet they still rave as among Sonny's best.

SMOKEY JOE
Joe Baugh's deep, breathless vocalizing marks all of his recordings and is applied quality successfully to country or to bluesy material. Here, the bluebeat rhythm and the rocking best of ''Listen To Me Baby'' combine with that voice to produce a most unusual rocking sound. Joe was from Arkansas and now lives in Waco, Texas.

VERNON TAYLOR
Taylor was from Maryland and he came to Sun from the Dot label in 1958, so he was by no means a padegree, his generation Sun rockabilly. But this is nevertheless a powerhouse rocking performance.

HAYDEN THOMPSON
Hayden Thompson's two songs illustrate the depth of the Sun catalogue, never having been out on an album before. The songs are not too strong, but the Sun musicians over-composite for that and turn in two top rockabilly performances. These is no sign here that Thompson would later turn out some totally uninspired country pop records.

RAY SMITH
Ray Smith has now settled in Ontario after many years of piano pounding and frantic, and lately not so frantic, vocalising for a multitude of labels. His Sun recordings were identifiable and among his best, and two are included here that have not been out on an album before Smith comes from Kentucky and his biggest American hits were ''Blonde Hair, Blue Eyes'' and ''Rockin' Little Angel''.

EDWIN BRUCE
Ed Bruce left this nicely rocking track in the Sun vaults as a result of his short Sun career that began before he left school in Memphis. He has had several country hits in recent years and in the long run has been one of Sun's most successful rockabillies.

JIMMY WAGES
The Sun files reveal nothing about Jimmy Wages. His recordings only tell us that he has an unusual voice and that he made this nice unissued rockabilly track, ''Miss Pearl''. A shot in the dark may be that he was related to Mildred Wages of Miller Sisters fame on Sun

DICK PENNER
Dick is teaching English at Tennessee State University and he continues and amazed and embarrassed by the interest in his old Sun recordings. This is another unissued one, and is worthy of release even after all the time. Dick was in London last year but is no longer interested in performing. Maybe next time.

DANNY STEWART
Stewart made one record for Sun's sister label, Phillips International, in 1958 and this single resulted. The artist has dated from our notice, but the in demand up to the present time.

DON HOSEA
Hosea's two formerly unissued tracks seem to display his style correctly since they are very simular to discs he had out in Memphis on the Rita label, ''John Henry'' in a rocking version of the traditional song and is by no mears a bad version. More recently, Hosea produced several country hits, notebly ''Welfare Cadillac'\'for Guy Drake.

Album compiled and liner notes by Martin Hawkins.

Side 1 Contains
1.1 - How Come You Do Me (Junior Thompson)
1.2 - Juke Box Help Me Find My Baby (Rhythm Rockers)
1.3 - Truckin' Down The Avenue (Sonny Burgess)
1.4 - Dabby Blues (Sonny Burgess)
1.5 - Listen To Me Baby (Smokey Joe Baugh)
1.6 - Your Lovin' Man (Version 1) (Vernon Taylor)
1.7 - Blues Blues Blues (Version 1) (Hayden Thompson)
1.8 - Fairlane Rock (Hayden Thompson)
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2 Contans
2.1 - Willing And Ready (Version 1) (Ray Smith)
2.2 - Shake Around (Version 1) (Ray Smith)
2.3 - Baby That's Good (Edwin Bruce)
2.4 - Miss Pewarl (Jimmy Wages)
2.5 - Fine Little Baby (Dick Penner)
2.6 - I'll Change My Ways (Danny Stewart)
2.7 - Never Did I (Don Hosea)
2.8 - John Henry (Alternate) (Don Hosea)
Originally Sun Recordings

For Biographies of Artists See: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30148 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - SHOOBIE OOBIE

The Sun Sound is special. The Sun label is one of the very few to have developed a unique and immediately identifiable sound. As a result, its reputation and its fine music have come through undiminished to the present day from its humble origin's in the Memphis, Tennessee, of the blues. Sun was launched by radio announcer and recording engineer Sam C. Phillips in 1952, and this series of Sun Sound Special covers every aspect of Sun's music, from the rhythm and blues of the early fifties through country, rockabilly and rock and roll into the beat era. Sun folded in its original form in 1968 and was moved to Nashville. But instead of being forgotten over the last ten years, the Sun Sound has been revealed to have been among the best and most important developments in American music.

It's not quite true that ''Shoobie Oobie'' is about as complicaded as the lyrics get on this album, nevertheless, the title is iliistrative of the fact that the album includes recordings made during the mid-fifties in the secular vocal group style of American black music. The second side contains eight tracks by four very different groups, all previously unreleased. This was largely due to the fact that the vocal group style was never as prevalent in Memphis as in northern cities and also because Sun was not geaned to that market. However some fine performances have been found in the vaults and together they make a race album. Although side one features two solo artists, they nevertheless used a group style on the songs, included here and the overall effect is of ''doo-wop'' music. Or ''Shoobie Oobie'' music, if you like.

BILLY EMERSON
Billy ''The Kid'' open the album in terrible rabble-rousing form with the previously unissued ''Shim Sham Shimmy''. Like most of the recordings it has a rocking drumbeat, bluesy guitar and solidly riffing sax section. Emerson came to Memphis from Florida and was first at Sun as a protege of Ike Turner, and later as a solo artist. In fact, he stayed at Sun later than most of the rhythm and blues artists, perhaps because of his willingness and ability to try novel lyrics and rhythms. His most successful variations being the famous ''Red Hot'' (see Charly CR 30103). The tracks included here very from dance numbers like ''Shimmy'' and ''Move Baby Move'', which is in the Joe Turner style, to the original version of Presley's slow blues ''When It Rains, It Really Pours''.

Emerson was an adequate vocalist and pianist and he employed a nice assortment of Memphis talent for these recordings, such as jazz sessionman Calvin and Phineas Newborn. When he left Sun in 1955, Emmerson moved to Chicago to record for Chess and later his own label but none of these approached the vitality of his Sun recordings.

ROSCO GORDON
Rosco's association with Sam Phillips lasted the longest of all Sun's rhythm and blues artists, commencing in 1951 with recordings such as ''Roscoe's Boogie'' leased to other labels. These included the massive hit, ''Booted''. by 1956 when the recordings include here were made, Rosco's famous shuffle rhythm was capable of adaption to a variety of blues and pop-aimed songs. All three songs have a novelty lyrics and broken rhythms even present in Rosco's attempts to hit the pop charts, while retaining the basic rhythm and blues line-up ol earlier years. Those more unconventional jumpblues recordings can be found on Charly CR 30133. Meanwhile, enjoy the conventional side of the singer, writer, bandleather and disc jockey, Rosco Gordon, particularly the weird ''Cheese And Crackers'', a song written by rockabilly Hayden Thompson and featuring Rosco on shouted vocal and Lionel Prevost on bopping sax solo.

THE FIVE TINOS
The Tinos recorded at Sun in 1955 and apart from the Prisonaires, were the only doo-wop group to get a disc issued on Sun. On the evidence of it and of this previously unissued track, they were a very good group capable of both solid rhythm and blues and of lighter ballads. Here, show are in the former mood, and very successfully, with excellent swinging support from a band led by Calvin Newborn on guitar. The file on the Tinos only Sun session in 1955 reveals that the musicians received fifteen dollars each and the Tinos were loaned five dollars to get home. They all gave addresses around Memphis, and most were care of their parents, so probably they were a teenage group. It is also noted that Marvin Walker's mother wrote some of their songs.

THE PRISONAIRES
As their name suggests, the Prisonaires were guests of the State of Tennessee, all serving long success in the Penitentiary in Nashville. They obviously bad time to practice and by 1953 they were good enough for Sam Phillips to persuade warden James Edwards to let him in to record then. Soon they had a rhythm and blues hit with ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'', which was later taken into the pop charts by Johnny Ray. They visited the Sun studio in Memphis under armed guard on several occasions after this in an attempt to recapture that hit sound. The recordings included here are all previously unissued, and they show the group's range and style.''That Chucks'' is a typical bawdy vocal group number starring Johnny Bragg on lead tenor as always and one group member on imitation trumpet. ''Rocking Horse'' is in similar vein, while ''Frank Clement'' is taken from gospel source. The arrangements is similar to many gospel hits of the time and the song celebrate Governor of Tennessee Frank G. Clement, who among other things helped to parole the group and said of them, ''The Prisonaires repreeerd the hopes of tomorrow rather than the mistakes of yesterday''. Johnny Bragg re-formed the group as the Marigolds and also pursued a solo career for a while during the late fifties before being jailed again in the sixties for a parole violation. He now lives (1978) in Nashville. ''Surleen'' is a more conventional doo-wop song, but again with a gospel phrasing.

THE FOUR DUKES
Nothing is known of the Four Dukes, except that they wandered along to Sun one forgotten day in the mid-fifties and recorded four greasy doo-wop numbers. The best, a rocking ''Baby Doll'', is included here. The back-up sounds an though, it could be rockabilly sessionmen such as Roland Janes, Jimmy Wilson and Jimmy Van Eaton which would place the recordings around 1956 or 1957.

HUNKY DORY
This group are as obscure as the Four Dukes, but they offer an interesting comparison. Their two tracks are different from the Dukes, more ethnic and also easily wider in range. One is firmly in the rhythm and blues style ''I Want My Baby Back'' is performed in ''a capella'' and with a gospel basis. While there were few local vocal groups singing secular songs, there were several top gospel groups such as The Spirit Of Memphis Quartet, and the five unknown members of Hunky Dory were presumably modelled after them, although their name itself is taken from a non-gospel slang phrase.

Album compiled and liner notes by Martin Hawkins.

Side 1 Contains
1.1 - Shim Sham Shimmy (Billy Emerson)
1.2 - Little Fine Healty Thind (Billy Emerson)
1.3 - Something For Nithing (Billy Emerson)
1.4 - When It Really Pours (Billy Emerson)
1.5 - Move Baby Move (Billy Emerson)
1.6 - The Chicken (Rosco Gordon)
1.7 - Cheese And Crackers (Rosco Gordon)
1.8 - Shoobie Oobie (Rosco Gordon)
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2 Contains
2.1 - Gonna Have To Let You Be (Five Tinos)
2.2 - That Chick's To Young To Fry (The Prosonaires)
2.3 - Surleen (The Prisonaires)
2.4 - What About Frank Clement (The Prosonaires)
2.5 - Rockin' Horse (The Prisonaires)
2.6 - Baby Doll (Four Dukes)
2.7 - Why Don't You Use Your Head (Hunky Dory)
2.8 - I Want My Baby Back (Hunky Dory)
Original Sun Recordings

For Biographies of Artists See: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30149 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - MEMPHIS BEAT

The Sun Sound is special. The Sun label is one of the very few to have developed a unique and immediately identifiable sound. As a result, its reputation and its fine music have come through undiminished to the present day from its humble origin's in the Memphis, Tennessee, of the blues. Sun was launched by radio announcer and recording engineer Sam C. Phillips in 1952, and this series of Sun Sound Special covers every aspect of Sun's music, from the rhythm and blues of the early fifties through country, rockabilly and rock and roll into the beat era. Sun folded in its original form in 1968 and was moved to Nashville. But instead of being forgotten over the last ten years, the Sun Sound has been revealed to have been among the best and most important developments in American music.

This is an album of recordings made just after the rockabilly era of Sun. They are rockers, or at last based on rock and roll for the most part, and they have a much fuller sound than the very early sixties when Sun's influences and powers of distribution were declining. For this reason, and because they often were issued alongside some dire comparisions, these records are usually overlooked, but this albumis an attemd to show that Sun continued to produce some fine rocking music in it's later years.

CLIF THOMAS
Thomas came out of Jackson, Mississippi as a sixteen year old hopeful to record for Sun in 1957, and he justified their faith in him with several minor hits on the Sun subsidiary Phillips International. His recordings with their Jerry Lee Lewis influences are among the best rockers or upbeaters made at Sun in the late fifties. The work of the session musicians is important here and Cliff's sister Barbara helps out on vocals but the real star is perhaps brother Ed Thomas on pounding piano. The recordings were produced by Bill Justis. The Thomas's later went back to college, recording early for local Mississippi labels notably Ace.

ERNIE BARTON
barton was basically a country pop vocalist with ambitions to sound like Johnny cash, but he also made some ricking sides at the bad end of the rock era and the best are included here. Both ''Starway To Nowhere'''' and ''Raining The Blues'' are nice songs with an infectious rocking best and could easily have been hits. Barton also one of the producers working at Sun at the time of these recordings, but he was not successful in this direction and had left the label by 1961.

CHARLIE RICH
The smooth country Charlie had not been born or even contempiated by the hip, was influenced Charlie Rich of the late fifties when this track '' There Won't Be Anymore'' was recorded. It is one of the best songs and this original vocal and piano version pulls it far more out of the song that the later hit versions on RCA and Epic.

BILLY ADAMS
Adams recordings were bright spots in the Sun catalogue of 1963 and 1964, being excellently solid recreations of rhythm and blues standards which were issued in some rather record rate company. Together with pianist Bill Yates, Adams has kept a bend and continued to record around Memphis for many years now, often playing cabaret stuff, but always returning to more substantial whenever possible. These recordings can be compared with these of the time by the black Louisiana band Cockie and the Cupcakes, and that ins't bad.

BILL JOHNSON
Johnson, a blues and soul artist born Augusta, Georgia made his recordings at Sun in 1960. It is in an interesting traditional style midway between rhythm and blues, rock and pop. It could well have been a hit with it's rhythm and blues sax break, it's reputation of other song titles and it's pop chorus. Johnson has also recorded for Federal and SSS with greater, though not great, success.

DON HINTON
Hinton is an obscure singer who turned up at Sun for one session in 1960 and put an Ekvisy rockabilly vocal track cover a rocksong backing already laid down by Charlie Rich, Billy Rilet and James Van Eaton. Little is known about him, probably because the Sun sound and musicians are the important part of ''Honey Bee'', which is a rather nice record. It was co-written by Hinton and Narvel Felts, who first brought Hinton to Sun.

VEL-TONES
The Tones were one of several black vocal groups recorded by but not issued by Sun in the fifties. The interesting thing about them, apart from the fact that nothing is known of them, is that the back-up includes a rocking guitar solo and seems to come from rockabillies such as Roland Janes, Billy Riley, and Jimmy Van Eaton. The result is rather rhythm and blues nor rock, but a fine greasy vocal group upbeater from the four Tones.

BARBARA PITTMAN
Barbara seemed to split her time between sounding like rocking Wanda Jackson and Janis Martin and sobbing Connie Francis. On this track she settles sounding like all three at ones. Although she did not have the style of her own, but did have a nice voice and made some good rockers with the help of Sun session-man like Carlie Rich, Roland Janes, and Billy Riley. She came to Sun originally from Clyde Leoppard's country band and later returned to her home in Chicago.

JEB STUARD
Stuart was being billed as the The Great Jeb Stuart around the type he cut this pop-rock version of Webb Pierce's country and pop boogie. More typically, Stuart could be heard on soul ballads, but this track bops along nicely with the unlikely mix of Booker T. and Scotty Moore in the background. Stuart was based in Florida and was not normally a part of the Memphis scene.

HAROLD DORMAN
Following his smash hit of 1960, ''Mountain Of Love'', another Memphis label owned by Billy Riley. Riley brought Dorman to Sun in an attempt to consolidate that success. Some good pop-rockers resulted but the sales dived despite the presence of fine musicians like Ace Cannon, Scotty Moore, and Bobby Wood.

RAY SMITH
''Rockin' Bandit'' is an enthusiastic attempt at cashing in on the ''Western Moves'' sounds of the Olympics and on Smith's own novelty hit, ''Rockin' Little Angel'', Smith shouts in typical fashion, while Charlie Rich pounds the piano and someone makes gunshots effects, a fittingly noisy end to an album which set out to prove the that Sun did not just lay down and die after 1958.

Album compiled and liner notes by Martin Hawkins

Side 1 Contains
1.1 - Sorry I Lied (Cliff Thomas)
1.2 - Stairway To Nowhere (Ernie Barton)
1.3 - Treat Me Right (Cliff Thomas)
1.4 - Raining The Blues (Ernie Barton)
1.5 - I'm On My Way Home (Cliff Thomas)
1.6 - Trouble In Mind (Billy Adams)
1.7 - Betty And Dupree (Billy Adams)
1.8 - Got My Mojo Working (Billy Adams)
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2 Contains
2.1 - There Won't Be Anymore (Charlie Rich)
2.2 - Bobaloo (Bill Johnson)
2.3 - Honeybee (Don Hinton)
2.4 - Fire (The Veltones)
2.5 - I'm Getting Better All The Time (Barbara Pittman)
2.6 - I Ain't Never (Jeb Stuart)
2.7 - Uncle Jonah's Place (Harold Dorman)
2.8 - Rockin' Bandit (Ray Smith)
Original Sun Recordings

For Biographies of Artists See: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30150 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - TENNESSEE COUNTRY

The Sun Sound is special. The Sun label is one of the very few to have developed a unique and immediately identifiable sound. As a result, its reputation and its fine music have come through undiminished to the present day from its humble origin's in the Memphis, Tennessee, of the blues. Sun was launched by radio announcer and recording engineer Sam C. Phillips in 1952, and this series of Sun Sound Special covers every aspect of Sun's music, from the rhythm and blues of the early fifties through country, rockabilly and rock and roll into the beat era. Sun folded in its original form in 1968 and was moved to Nashville. But instead of being forgotten over the last ten years, the Sun Sound has been revealed to have been among the best and most important developments in American music.

EARL PETERSON
Peterson had a distinctive country style which owened a lot to the country blues of the Jimmie Rodgers era and also to the singing cowboy style. When he came to record for Sun in 1954 with the nickname Michigan's Singing Cowboy he was already well known around Detroit and had made several records there. He later recorded for the major label, Columbia. These sure are probably his best sides, though, here reissued for the first time.

DOUG POINDEXTER
Doug only ever made one record, but it was a fine country and early rockabilly compiling. In 1954, Doug chose not to gamble, he stayed home while members of his band The Starlight Wranglers, Scotty Moore and Bill Black, went on the road with the young Elvis Presley. Doug is now (1978) a successful insurance salesman in Memphis.

HOWARD SERRAT
Howard also has made only one record. But it shows what a good country-gospel approach he had, and be no doubt could have made many more fine records if persuaded to turn to country as a career. A polio victim, Howard came from Manila, Arkansas. He began playing in country bands but he soon switched to playing solely gospel music. He plays harmonics and guitar and lives (1978) now in California.

MALCOLM YELVINGTON
Malcolm was the first of the unknown Sun artists I ever met, and he remains one of my favourit the country performers. I still have the vivid memory of him singing in his living room singing his heart out and playing his old Martin guitar for the sole beneath of Colin Escott and myself when we were researching the book ''Catalyst''. Malcolm played ''I've Got The Blues'' and ''Marie'' for us among others and here his original Sun recording of those songs are issued for the first time. The other two songs on this record came out originally as one of the early rockabilly records ever made.

ERNIE CHAFFIN
Chaffin made a series of recordings at Sun which were undoubtedly among the best and most individuality country records of their time. The style was simple, but very effective and mostly his songs, written by steelie Pee Wee Maddux from Biloxy, retain the interest of the listeners time after time.''I'm Lonesome'' was one of the best Sun sides ever issued. ''Please Don't Ever Leave Me'' was unfortunately the last of his Sun singles.

ONIE WHEELER
Onie has one of the most easily recognised styles in country music. Even the addition of the qualitydistinctive Sun sound does not daquise Onie's vocals. He has had many country hits and today (1978) plays harmonica for Roy Acuff and has a hand in a guitar manufactering business. He made one record for Sun. It didn't sell, butit is nevertheless and excellent one, even the title is unusual, and Onie has always specialized in novelty lyrics like ''I'm Gonna Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox''.

TEDDY REDDELL
Reddell real name Reidel, also sounds distinctive on wax. There is a tough of Jerry Lee but he is a tine artist in his own right. Now retired and writing only a few songs. he comes from Arkansas and has recorded for many local labels there over the years. His big hit was ''Judy'' issued to Atco. He did not have a disc out on Sun, and here he is heard on a previously unissued recording which gives a good indication of his style.

CARL MCVOY
As you will hear on this previously unreleased recording of the old Ted Daffin country hit of the forties, Carl McVoy is related to Jerry Lee Lewis. Like Lewis and Mickey Gilley, Carl also plays piano. His main claims to fame were as recordings for Hi Records of Memphis notable ''You Are My Sunshine''.

BILL STRENGTH
The late Texas Bill Strength came from Houston but lived latterly in the mid-west. He recorded briefly at Sun in 1960, having already been established as a country artist and disc jockey for many years. As early as the late forties he was traveling America for the Congress Of Industrial Organisations singing at labour conventions and Union meetings. His recording career was not a political one though. Here, he is heard in the pop-country style on ''I Guess I'd Better Go'', and also on the previously unissued ''Call Of The Wild'' which reminds me of Johnny Cash somewhat. This, incidentally, is not the Stan Kesler song associated with Sun artist Warren Smith, and recorded at around the same time for Liberty.

DANE STINIT
Another Cash follower was Dane Stinit, the last country artist to record for the original Sun label. The sound here on the formerlu unissued ''Ghost Of Marylou'' is a throwback to fifties Cash, although recorded in 1966. Stinit, actualy Stinnett, came from Hartford, Kentucky and little else has been heard of him since his two unsuccessful Sun singles.

Album compiled and liner notes by Martin Hawkins

Side 1 Contains
1.1 - Boogie Blues (Earl Peterson)
1.2 - In The Dark (Earl Peterson)
1.3 - Now She Cares No More (Doug Poindexter)
1.4 - I Must Be Saved (Howard Serrat)
1.5 - It's Me Baby (Malcolm Yelvington)
1.6 - I've Got The Blues (Way Down Blues) (Malcolm Yelvington)
1.7 - Goodbye Marie (Malcolm Yelvington)
1.8 - Roclin' With Me Baby (Malcolm Yelvington)
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2 Contains
2.1 - 'I'm Lonesome (Ernie Chaffin)
2.2 - Please Don't Ever Leave Me (Ernie Chaffin)
2.3 - I'm Gonna Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox (Onie Wheeler)
2.4 - Me And My Blues (Teddy Reddell)
2.5 - Born To Lose (Carl McVoy)
2.6 - I Guess I'd Better Go (Texas Bill Strenght)
2.7 - Call Of The Wild (Texas Bill Strength)
2.8 - Ghost Of Marylou (Dane Stinit)
Original Sun Recordings

For Biographies of Artists See: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30151 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - BILLY RILEY

The Sun Sound is special. The Sun label is one of the very few to have developed a unique and immediately identifiable sound. As a result, its reputation and its fine music have come through undiminished to the present day from its humble origin's in the Memphis, Tennessee, of the blues. Sun was launched by radio announcer and recording engineer Sam C. Phillips in 1952, and this series of Sun Sound Special covers every aspect of Sun's music, from the rhythm and blues of the early fifties through country, rockabilly and rock and roll into the beat era. Sun folded in its original form in 1968 and was moved to Nashville. But instead of being forgotten over the last ten years, the Sun Sound has been revealed to have been among the best and most important developments in American music.

There were very few people more involved with the Sun sound than Billy Riley. He made several fine singles between 1956 and 1960, but he was far more important that just for that. He played on hundreds of sessions and rehearsals at Sun, he acted as producer and talent scout , and he went on package tours spreading the name of Sun. He was a multi-instrumentalist, on several time record label owner, a great impersonator of Elvis and Little Richard on stage, and by all accounts a nice guy who never quite made it to the top. He was good enough to have made it in the music business, though, and this album is a genuise by request, more of type of album. Following up Charly CR 30131n this album include the most of Riley's solo recordings made at Sun and most of those made for Sun International in 1969.

These days Billy Riley live with his family near Jonesboro, Arkansas and is in one of his out of the music business phrases, although he did recently (1978) record at the Phillips International studio in Memphis and hopefully something will come of that. He is also in the market to tour, but until then we have only his older recordings to judge him by.

The earliest recording is ''Trouble Bound'' which was recorded in a garage on Fernwood Drive in Memphis soon after Riley came to town as a twenty-two-year-old country boy from Pocahontas, Arkansas. He was working at the Industrial Coverall Co. and hoping to become a singer and thus demo record seemed like a good opportunity. It was taken to Sun by musician and engineer Jack Clement who mastered the rough tracks recorded by Riley on guitar, bass, drums and vocal and who sold the finished product to Sam Phillips. He also got himself and Riley permanent jobs at Sun.

Before long Riley had several singles out and had recorded with the likes of Jerry Lee Lewis, who unfortunately was so successful as to be partly responsively for the fact that Riley's own discs were not promoted sufficiently strongly yo achieve the hit status that they undoubtedly deserved. Soon, Riley started going out on tour and developing a localized following for his near-hits, ''Red Hot'' and ''Flying Saucers Rock And Roll'' on CR 30131. ''Wouldn't You Know'', ''Pearly Lee'' and ''Just One More Time'' came out on singles and, while the rest of side one was part of a never completed album project. All these fifties recordings with the exception of ''Sweet Williams'' show Riley's liking for rhythm and blues, and it was this together with his country music background that made him so useful at Sun. He could and did play a range of instruments in a rage of style. The result of one of his session playing exploits was ''Itchy'' where taken lead on harmonica. The record came under Sonny Burgess' name but it really belongs to Riley and to producer Bill Justis.

Riley's last solo session at Sun was in 1960, although he stayed around Memphis during the sixties on and off, playing at Sun and also running his own label like Rita, Mojo and Nita. He also had stints at working for a singles company and at playing the right clubs in Las Vegas.

In 1969, Riley became the first artist to be signed by the new Sun International and SSS Int. labels of Nashville. ''Kay'' was their first single. By now ,Riley was putting out a much updated version of the southern mix of black and white music, but his musicianship was still excellent and his singing still, sharp and dedicated. As with his first record, he was back to playing all instruments and building up the sound technically. Thus was all done during a period when he was based in Florida and when he was able to concentrate on producing some of his own best work.

Little has been heard of Riley since 1969, though he did have a small American hit on Entrance records in 1973. It's time he had another, and hopefully the sales of this album will encourage his further success.

Album compiled and liner notes by Martin Hawkins

Side 1 Contains
1.1 - Pearly Lee
1.2 - Swanee River Rock
1.3 - She's My Baby
1.4 - Just One More Time
1.5 - Let's Talk About Us
1.6 - Searchin'
1.7 - Betty And Dupree
1.8 - Sweet William
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2 Contains
2.1 - Trouble Bound
2.2 - Wouldn't You Know
2.3 - Itchy
2.4 - Nitty Gritty Mississippi
2.5 - Tallahassee
2.6 - San Francisco Lady
2.7 - Kay
2.8 - Old Home Place
Original Sun Recordings

For Biography of Billy Riley See: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy Riley's recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30152 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - CARL PERKINS

The Sun Sound is special. The Sun label is one of the very few to have developed a unique and immediately identifiable sound. As a result, its reputation and its fine music have come through undiminished to the present day from its humble origin's in the Memphis, Tennessee, of the blues. Sun was launched by radio announcer and recording engineer Sam C. Phillips in 1952, and this series of Sun Sound Special covers every aspect of Sun's music, from the rhythm and blues of the early fifties through country, rockabilly and rock and roll into the beat era. Sun folded in its original form in 1968 and was moved to Nashville. But instead of being forgotten over the last ten years, the Sun Sound has been revealed to have been among the best and most important developments in American music.

In the music of Carl Perkins is emboded the Sun sound of the rockabilly era. This album collects together those Perkins' Sun recordings which are not included on ''The Original Carl Perkins'' Charly CR 30110, and for me it emphases the importance of his style, because, because despite there being few hit singles included here and despite the use of several alternate takes, the quality of the performances is still excellend and deserves the collective title - Sun Sound Special.

During this year (1978) Carl Perkins has been promoted in an exclusive and well deserved publicity campaign with the slogan ''O'l Blue Suede's Back, after his biggest hit song title. But for the real, original, raw excitement from this poet of the fifty blues, this album together with CR 30110 form the definitive collection . The songs range from Sun style country to rockabilly and rock and roll and all are performed with typical power and controlled enthusiasm by the Carl Perkins Band. They tell of the early rock and roll era, it's impact seen through a southern country boy's eyes and of Carl Perkins' own hopes and dreams.

Those dreams were formed during the depressed late thirties and early forties while Carl was growing up with his brothers Jay and Clayton amid a poor faming community in north west Tennessee. By the time the family moved into the town of Bermis and then Jackson, later in the forties, the boys, especially Carl,had decided that country dance music would be their life. They had formed the Perkins Brothers Band and were playing at school halls and also at somewhat rawer night spots. This way they were in touch with both teenage and country audiences and this is reflected time and again in the lyrics of songs like ''Dixie Fried'', Cat Clothes'' and ''Boppin' The Blues'', which is what the band were basically doing. The blues were an important part of Carl's early musical life and this is also strongly reflected here, particularly in his guitar playing and choice of such material as ''Right String Baby''.

Perkins was in his mid-twenties when the songs on this album were recorded. They were the initial recorded statement of his music and also a crystalisation of the Sun sound of Sam Phillips, the label boss. The two men had first met at the tall end of 1954 when Carl came to Memphis for an uninvited audition and though both were from the country. Sam knew far more about musical trends and their exploitation. Carl was just interest in playing his own style of music - be called it ''music with a beat''.

In the four years that followed their first meeting, Sam was able to take Carl's talent and promote it to an international audience. Despite setbacks following closely onto the smash hit ''Blue Suede Shoes'', Sam did just enough to ensure that Carl, the original rockabilly guitar man was never forgotten. In these grooves you will find out why his music has such lasting appeal.

Album compiled and liner notes by Martin Hawkins

Side 1 Contains
1.1 - Boppin' The Blues
1.2 - Right String Baby
1.3 - Only You
1.4 - I'm Sorry, I'm Not Sorry
1.5 - I'm Sure To Fall
1.6 - You Can't Make Love To Somebody
1.7 - Forever Yours
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2 Contains
2.1 - Tennessee
2.2 - Dixie Fried
2.3 - You Can Do No Wrong
2.4 - Pink Pedal Pushers
2.5 - Put Your cat Clotes On
2.6 - Perkins Wiggle\Roll Over Beethoven
2.7 - Y.O.U.
Original Sun Recordings

For Biography of Carl Perkins See: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30153 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - JOHNNY CASH

Through his early career. Johnny Cash provided many people around the world with their first taste of the Sun Sound. So it is fitting that this album should highlight not only the talent of Cash himself but also the country side of Sun. The title included here represent some of the best of Cash's recordings made for Sun between 1955 and 1958 with The Original Johnny Cash , Charly CR 30113, they certainly show off what what was special about the stark yet solid innovative. and often copied, Sun sound.

Johnny Cash's importance to Sun Records was two-fold: he not only provided Sam Phillips with the incentive to record more country artists, but his earlier performances such as ''Cry Cry Cry'', ''Forgot To Remember'' and ''Two Timin' Woman'' showed how closely rockabilly could related to his predominantly country style. Cash came to Sun's boss, Sam Phillips, singing religious songs. Before long he was persuaded that his experiences of farming in rural Arkansas of the Air Force, of the Detroit production line and of selling vacuum cleaners in the porer areas of Memphis gave him the basis for many fine secular songs, and that he would stand a better chance with them. But before he could record, he needed a band.

Our first session was really something' said Cash. 'I had been introduced to Luther Perkins and Marshall Grant who worked at the Chrysler plant in Memphis, and we formed a band. Luther had a little second hand amplifier and a six inch speaker. Marshall had a bass held together by masking tape and I had a little 4.80 dollar guitar I'd brought back from Germany. Sam Phillips had to be come kind of a genius to get anything out of that conglomeration''.

''Cry Cry Cry'' was Johnny Cash's first record, issued in June 1955. It was a country hit, and over the next three years the hits got bigger and bigger. This was largely due to Cash himself, with that famous. distinctive
voice, and also to Luther Perkins' enforcedly simplistic guitar style. But it was also due to the production work of first Sam Phillips, and mostly, Jack Clement. It was Clement who experimented with the basic Sun sound and brought in a piano and vocal chorus. These additions greatly helped Cash to reach the
pop audience, to whom his increasingly pop-styled songs sold in massive numbers through 1957 and 1958.

In retrospect, all the recordings included here, from the stark, brooding ''Doin' My Time'' the fuller sounding ''Hey Good Lookin', are classic Cash-styled country. In all cases the performances are dominated by Cash's vocal and the strong songs of Hank Williams of Cash himself. The gongs are nearly always either sad stories or mood songs. They are carmeos of adversity, with titles like ''Lonesome Whistle'', ''So Doggone Lonesome'', ''Always Alone'', ''Two Timin' Woman'' and the sarcastic ''Thanks A Lot''. Together, the songs of Cash and Williams provide a marvellous journey through life in rural southern America, taking in colourful visions of the railroad and the open road, the wide west and the confining jail, of farmlife and of city and juke-joint nightlife. These are rot the songs most associated with Johnny Cash, but this collection is undoubtedly my favourite and is highly recommended as being some of the of not only Cash but
also of Sun. A country Sun Sound Special.

Album compiled and liner notes by Martin Hawkins.

Side 1
1.1 - Cry Cry Cry
1.2 - I'm So Doggone Lonesome
1.3 - There You Go
1.4 - I Heard That Lonesome Whistle Blow
1.5 - Doin' My Time
1.6 - If The Good Lord's Willing
1.7 - Wide Open Road
1.8 Two Timin' Woman
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2
2.1 - Cold Cold Heart
2.2 - Hey Good Lookin'
2.3 - I Could Never Be Ashamed Of You
2.4 - Always Alone
2.5 - Thanks A Lot
2.6 - I Forgot To Remember To Forget
2.7 - New Mexico
2.8 - I Couldn't Keep From Crying
Original Sun Recordings

For Biography of Johnny Cash. See: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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