CONTAINS
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1956 SESSIONS (9)
September 1, 1956 to September 30, 1956

Studio Session for The Marigolds (Prisonaires), September 1956 / Excello Records
Studio Session for Luke McDaniel, September 4, 5, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Kenneth Parchman, September 9-10, 1956 / Sun Records

Another Star From Sun Records Tells His True Story

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Playlists of the Artists can be found on 706 Union Avenue Sessions of > YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 1956

The idea of marketing a new group obviously did not work out and when Johnny Bragg returned to Excello some seven months later it was on his own, even though the recordings he made would be billed on the label of Excello 2078 as Johnny Bragg and the Marigolds. Cut around March 1956 the disc coupled ''Beyond The Clouds'', a gospel lyric that sounded like an achingly sad popular song written by Bragg with Leon Luallen, with the bluesier ''Foolish Me''.

By the summer of 1956 Johnny Bragg was having to accept that Excello was not able to promote his discs to hit status, but he would have been cheered considerably to find that ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'' had been recorded by pop singer Johnnie Ray for Columbia Records. He would have been beyond the clouds to find that Ray's record started a six months stay on the pop charts in August and that it would peak at number 2 in Billboard on October 27. The song had been recorded in 1954 by Gene Autry whose Golden West Melodies publishing company had bought the copyright from Red Wortham.

Co-writer Robert Riley was interviewed when he left prison in October 1956 and a November 10, United Press report spread the word that: ''A couple of songwriters are making a lot of money, with ''Just Walkin' In The Rain''. It's the rage among the juke box set... (Writer Johnny Bragg's) collaborator is Robert S. Riley, 28, who has just finished a term. Riley said they wrote ''rain'' in 1953 on a typical April shower afternoon. They were walkin' from the main prison building when Bragg told Riley; 'Here we are walking in the rain – I wonder what the little girls are doing'. Bragg mused that the words sounded like a song title and ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'' was born, Riley said. Bragg has... what warden Lynn Bomar describes as a wonderful voice. Twenty percent of Bragg's earnings from ''Rain'' go into the prison recreation fund. Prisoners who work for pay contribute that amount to the fund.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY BRAGG & THE MARIGOLDS
FOR EXCELLO RECORDS 1956

NASHBORO RECORDING STUDIO
177 THIRD AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
EXCELLO SESSION: POSSIBLY SEPTEMBER 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – ERNIE YOUNG

As Johnnie Ray's disc was in the ascendant, producer Ernie Young had Johnny Bragg and the Marigolds back to the studio trying to find Bragg's next top song. They pinned their hopes on ''Juke Box Rock And Roll', a title that spoke for itself. The song was another shift in style for the group and featured an exuberant vocal by Bragg soaring above a piano-driven rocking beat and a classy sax solo by Freddy Young. The flipside ''It's You, Darling, It's You'' seems to come from the hit template of the Platters with its aching lead vocal, melding group voices, supportive sax and repeated piano notes. There is also a spoken section, probably delivered by Alfred Brooks. The September 29 issue of Cash Box magazine found that this fourth Marigold disc, Excello 2091, contained ''a couple of exceptionally strong sides... a tender love given a moving performance... a complete change of pace... a quick beat jumper with the sound and feeling that has the kids crazy today''.

Much of the group's material was still being written by Bragg and Riley though ''It's You, Darling, It's You'' was written in collaboration with another singing inmate, Sullivan Hayes, who would later join the group. The focus on songwriting as a serious mode of employment became even stronger after October 22, 1956 when Robert Riley was paroled and went to work for Ernie Young as a writer, soon joining one of Nashville's premier publishing companies, Tree Music. In November, Joe Perkins and the Rookies cut the Bragg/Riley song ''How Much Love Can One Heart Hold'' for release on Cincinnati's King label early in 1957. It was probably through Robert Riley that King's local agent booked the Marigolds to sing back-up on a King session held at Nashville's RCA studio at that time. The lead singer was Memphis rockabilly master Charlie Feathers whose session was deemed to need backing voices on several songs including ''When You Decide'' and ''Too Much Alike''. It is probably that Bragg and Feathers knew each other from their days in the Sun studio a few years earlier.

JUKE BOX ROCK AND ROLL
Composer: - Johnny Bragg-Robert Riley
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Excellorec Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Master (2:32)
Recorded: - Possibly September 1956
Released: - 1956
First appearance: - Excello Records (S) 45rpm Excello 2091-A mono
JUKE BOX ROCK AND ROLL / IT'S YOU, DARLING, IT'S YOU
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-21 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

IT'S YOU, DARLING, IT'S YOU
Composer: - Johnny Bragg-Robert Riley-Sullivan Hayes
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Excellorec Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Master (2:37)
Recorded: - Possibly September 1956
Released: - 1956
First appearance: - Excello Records (S) 45rpm Excello 2091-B mono
IT'S YOU, DARLING, IT'S YOU / JUKE BOX ROCK AND ROLL
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-22 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Bragg - Lead Tenor Vocal
John Drue - Tenor Vocal
Harold Hebb - Tenor Vocal
Alfred Brooks - Tenor Vocal
Willy Wilson - Bass Vocal
Freddy Young - Saxophone
Skippy Brooks - Piano
Kid King - Drums
Clifford McCray – Bass

Back in the penitentiary Johnny Bragg redoubled his songwriting efforts. He told Bill Millar fifteen years later, ''I put in maybe 16 to 20 hours a day just singing... I thought about the music so strong that when I went to sleep I'd go to dances in my dreams and every song they'd play seemed like a new song. I woke up in the morning and started writing them''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 1956

"Rockin' With My Baby" b/w ''It's Me Baby'' (Sun 246) by Malcolm Yelvington is issued at the beginning of the month, together with the debut single by Billy Riley and Sonny Burgess. Yelvington's single is reviewed as one which "may not break out of the territories".

"Dixie Fried" b/w ''I'm Sorry I'm Not Sorry'' (Sun 249) by Carl Perkins are also issued this month, as is Carl Perkins is now working rock and roll caravan tours with Little Richard, Bobby Charles and others, and has a regular slot on the Big D TV show in Dallas, Texas.

Billboard reports that Ernie Chaffin "recorded for Sun Records recently" and that "Sam Phillips, Sun prexy, is reported much impressed with Ernie's work on the new waxings". It is a little difficult to reconcile this report with the Sun session information since the first session was logged in December 1956.

Future (1959) Sun recording artist Mack Allen Smith, after entering college at Holmes Junior College in September 1956, Mack Allen hired Charlie McCarty from Kosciusko, Mississippi, to play drums, and Eddie Lee Alderman from Carroll County to play lead guitar. Mack Allen then changed the name of the band to Mack Allen Smith and the Flames. They performed on weekends at the 51 Club in Durant, Mississippi, and the VFW in Kosciusko and Greenwood, Mississippi.

SEPTEMBER 1956

IBM releases the first computer with a hard drive, the IBM 305 RAMAC, during September of 1956. The machine weighed about one ton and measured about 16 square feet. It was created by IBM employee Reynold Johnson and his research team. The hard drive stored about 5 megabytes of data and allowed users to immediately retrieve the data they needed without the use of punch cards. The development of the hard drive was a piece of revolutionary technology at the time and it greatly influenced the advancement of how we now use computers in the modern day.

SEPTEMBER 1, 1956 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley buys his mother a pink Cadillac and recorded ''Love Me'' at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard in Los Angeles.

SEPTEMBER 2, 1956 SUNDAY

Elvis Presley recorded ''Too Much'' at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

The Wilburn Brothers recorded ''Go Away With Me''.

Fats Domino guests on The Steve Allen Show., and Shirley and Lee release ''Let The Good Times Roll'', another Dave Bartholomew production.

Gene Vincent starts first professional tour.

SEPTEMBER 3, 1956 MONDAY

Police in Springfield, Missouri, answer a disturbance call to find Red Foley's wife, Sally, in the front seat of their car crying. Her face and forehead are covered with marks, and she accuses her husband of hitting her, though she does not file charges.

Ray Price recorded ''I've Got A New Heartaches'' in an evening session at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville.

SEPTEMBER 4, 1956 TUESDAY

Marty Robbins recorded ''Knee Deep In The Blues'' and ''The Same Two Lips'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

SEPTEMBER 5, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Ivory Joe Hunter recorded ''Since I Met You Baby'' in New York. Thirteen years later, Sonny James remakes it as a country hit.

ANOTHER STAR FROM SUN RECORDS TELLS HIS TRUE STORY - Luke McDaniel a.k.a. Jeff Daniels, the singer and guitarist from Ellisville, Mississippi, is in the recording room at Sun, Sam Phillips's little red-bricked studio on 706 Union Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee, where Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins and the other gods first recorded.

Dressed in a cowboy shirt embroidered with flowers, Western bow tie, and cowboy hat, he positions himself behind the mic: "Although your mama's looking/Your papa's at the door/Go ahead and kiss me/'Cause I can't wait no more'', he yelps on "Go Ahead Baby'', a lascivious rabble-rouser that, drenched in reverb and slapback echo, reveals a voice and style a little bit Elvis, a little bit Perkins, but all his own.

Elvis and Carl were pals of Luke's; they'd met in Shreveport, and both had told Luke to send Sam Phillips a demo. He'd already recorded cracking sides for independent labels, but never broke through, as he should have, with them. Sales figures aside, Sam liked what he heard and booked him in.

Four boppers and a ballad are put down live, all in one or two takes with the Sun house band, including guitarist Roland Janes, saxophonist Martin Willis, and drummer Jimmy Van Eaton. There's the amazing aforesaid "Go Ahead Baby'', plus the rockin' "Uh Babe'', "High, High, High'' and, the best of the bunch, perhaps, "My Baby Don't Rock'', defined by Luke's hair-raising yells and squeals, Willis's wailing sax, and a frantic guitar solo from Janes. The country-tinged "That's What I Tell My Heart'', sees a change of pace; an exquisite ballad, it shows there's more than one side to McDaniel at Sun. It also features Jerry Lee Lewis on piano.

When the session is over, Luke goes over to Sam. "Can I get my union fee?", he asks. Sam shakes his head. He doesn't pay union fees. Sparks fly, and the songs are put in the can, where they remain. Luke McDaniel's career at Sun Records was over just as it was beginning.

Before and after the Sun Records fiasco, from 1952 to 1960, Luke McDaniel tore it up with a series of hillbilly and rockabilly sides for Jackson, Mississippi, label Trumpet, for King Records over in Cincinnati, and for Meladee in New Orleans. He played alongside Hank Williams on TV, shared a stage with Elvis Presley, and saw his songs recorded by Buddy Holly, Jim Reeves, George Jones, and The Byrds. Yet he never received his due. He doesn't even get a footnote mention in Colin Escott and Martin Hawkins's Good Rockin' Tonight: Sun Records and the Birth of Rock 'N' Roll. Neither is he in Escott's Tattooed on Their Tongues nor his All Roots Lead to Rock. Ditto Nick Tosches's Unsung Heroes of Rock 'N' Roll. But while on this earth from February 3, 1927 to June 27, 1992, he blazed a trail with his exuberant, unfettered mix of white country and black rhythm and blues.

Enthralled by the sounds of Gene Autry, Ernest Tubb, Cowboy Copas, and the Bailes Brothers as an early teen, he picked up a mandolin, then moved on to guitar. He was good, and he honed his craft on the road with the Jamup and Honey Show, a blackface comedy duo, then played with Hank Williams at the New Orleans Coliseum in 1950.

About Hank Williams, "I saw him play live for the first time'', said McDaniel. "And it just about changed everything I had thought and done before. He set the standard: I wanted to sound like him, be like him. He really wielded an influence with songs like ''I Saw the Light'', ''Lovesick Blues'', ''Mind Your Own Business'', and he made me see I had to get a record made''.

Lillian McMurry's Trumpet label provided the means. She said to make McDaniel sound "like something that is selling right now...something like Hank Williams'', and his debut 1952 "Whoa, Boy!" did. Over infectious, western swing, he exudes: "Way down yonder in New Orleans/The black cat jumped on the sewing machine/The sewing machine caught the black cat's tail/And you could hear that black cat wail''. The record's flip side, "No More'', a mournful wail, is in the Williams mold, too, and when Williams died only months later, Luke cut a song called "A Tribute to Hank Williams, My Buddy''.

It was another Williams fan, singer/guitarist Jack Cardwell, who gave McDaniel his next break. Cardwell had also mourned Hank Williams's passing on wax with "The Death of Hank Williams'', and the pair found themselves sharing a bill in Mobile, Alabama. On his advice, Luke jumped ship to Syd Nathan's King, while "Whoa, Boy!" had been a local hit for Trumpet, Luke had received no royalties, and he put down three sessions of bop and boogie. These sessions gave rise to songs about cars in the rollicking "The Automobile Song'', and about girls in the poignant "Hurts Me So''.

He also appeared on Louisiana Hayride, a radio and TV country-music show that took place at the Shreveport Municipal Auditorium. "That's how I met Elvis Presley'', he said. "He had everything going for him. He looked mean, he sounded mean, he played mean, but he was a nice guy. He said he liked what I did, he was friendly, and he liked to encourage. He told me to keep singing and playing''.

Which is what Luke did. In 1955, due to contractual obligations, he penned a song called "Midnight Shift'', a red-hot rockabilly number à la Elvis, under the stage name of Earl Lee. It had all the crucial ingredients, barely disguised lewd lyrics, ample twanging guitar, but Luke never recorded the song. Buddy Holly, however, later succumbed to its allure, covering it on his 1958 album with The Crickets, That'll Be The Day.

By this time, McDaniel had upped sticks to Mobile, Alabama, and, signing to Mel Mallory's Meladee label, started recording less country and more rockabilly under the name Jeff Daniels. "I just thought that name sounded better'', he said. "I thought it had a star quality to it''. (And it did, years later, for the Georgia actor of that name). But it was ambition and not his stage name that was his downfall. When the unhinged "Daddy-O-Rock'', the very apotheosis of wild, raw rockabilly, started to sell for Meladee, Luke/Jeff set his sights on a bigger prize and struck up with Sam Phillips, only to walk out on him as well.

"The session went well, we got the songs down raw, it felt exciting to be standing in that studio, knowing Johnny Cash and Elvis and Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison had all recorded there before me. But I didn't think twice about leaving when Sam Phillips didn't pay. I blew it. Sun got the best out of me'', he said.

After that Sun session, Luke soldiered on, working on the Grand Ole Opry Big Tent Show in 1957 with The Everly Brothers and Bill Monroe, "That was a good one, you didn't realize the importance at the time, The Opry, The Everly Brothers, Bill Monroe, it was history in the making", and founding his own label Venus to release the plaintive "You're Still On My Mind'', soon to become a standard covered by the likes of George Jones and The Byrds. Next there were singles for Astro and, most notably, the furious "Switch Blade Sam'', for Hack Kennedy's Big Howdy label. But with no success, Luke hung it up. "My home life was hard. I divorced, had ten children to feed, and I wasn't making any money''. He left music, setting up a trucking company in Baton Rouge. By the 1980s, though, he was back doing what he did best. "The pull was too much, it was something I had to do. I needed to be in a studio and out on stage. I recorded for Duell, it felt right'', he said. H continued to do so up to his death in 1992, at age sixty-five. He may have died a cult hero, but he could have held his own on a bigger stage.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

In 1956 Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins urged Luke McDaniel to submit a demo to Sam Phillips. Sam was impressed and signed McDaniel to a contract with Sun Records.

It's unsure whether he cut two sessions or just one at Sun (either September 1956 or/and January 6, 1957). Nothing was issued though, as Sam and Luke had a financial disagreement. The unissued Sun sides have now seen the light of day thanks to reissue labels like Charly Records.

"Uh Babe" is more seminal-Sun rockabilly with Jimmy Van Eaton on fine form behind the skinned boxes. "Go Ahead Baby" is more exciting bop and sounds like a cross between Hayden Thompson and Gene Simmons.

STUDIO SESSION FOR LUKE MCDANIEL (A.K.A. JEFF DANIELS)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY/WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 4-5, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Luke McDaniel and Jimmie Otto Rodgers arrived at Sun Records in September 1956. The first session, which McDaniel recorded which culminated in a musically wonderful session. Musically wonderful, but financially not so! It seems that Luke had expected to pick up a session fee for the studio and work time he had put in, but it was not to be. Whilst Sam Phillips paid all the musicians, he would not pay Luke stating that he did not pay session fees to artists. Apparently harsh words were exchanged between Sam and Luke culminating in a very angry Luke McDaniel storming out of the studio.

Later, Luke was adamant that he only did the two day session at Sun in September 1956, despite claims to a second slightly later session. A change had also taken place in Luke's professional outlook.

With the up and coming new rocking music, Luke decided to use the more commercial name of Jeff Daniels, which began with the Mel-A-Dee single. Not surprisingly perhaps, Sam Phillips decided not to issue any of Luke's recording made at that session.

> UH BABE (HUH BABE) <
Composer: - Luke McDaniel
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:13)
Recorded: - September 4-5, 1956
Released: - 1995
First appearance: - Charly (LP) 33rpm MID 8099-15 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES VOLUME 1
Reissued: - 2008 Stomper Time Records (CD) 500/200rpm STCD 24-5 mono
MISSISSIPPI HONKY TONK ROCKABILLY MAN

It sounds as if McDaniel was working with the guys who'd played with Warren Smith on some of his 1956 sessions. ''We just went to Sun and Sam Phillips had made all the arrangements for the musicians'', McDaniel said later. ''Huh Baby'' was interesting because of the first licks on the guitar. I arranged those myself. I had never heard that particular sound before''.

> UH BABE (HUH BABE) <
Composer: - Luke McDaniel
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:10)
Recorded: - September 4-5, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1025 mono
ROCK-A-BILLY BLUES
Reissued: - 2008 Stomper Time Records (CD) 500/200rpm STCD 24-16 mono
MISSISSIPPI HONKY TONK ROCKABILLY MAN

> UH BABE (HUH BABE) <
Composer: - Luke McDaniel
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued (2:04)
Recorded: - September 4-5, 1956
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly (LP) 33rpm CR 30104-A-5 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 4 - COTTON CITY COUNTRY
Reissued: - 2008 Stomper Time Records (CD) 500/200rpm STCD 24-23 mono
MISSISSIPPI HONKY TONK ROCKABILLY MAN

> GO AHEAD BABY <
Composer: - Luke McDaniel
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (1:54)
Recorded: - September 4-5, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1025-1 mono
HOT FLOP AND FLY
Reissued: - 2008 Stomper Time Records (CD) 500/200rpm STCD 24-3 mono
MISSISSIPPI HONKY TONK ROCKABILLY MAN

> GO AHEAD BABY <
Composer: - Luke McDaniel
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:08)
Recorded: - September 4-5, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1019-12 mono
ROCK-A-BILLY BLUES
Reissued: - 2008 Stomper Time Records (CD) 500/200rpm STCD 24-14 mono
MISSISSIPPI HONKY TONK ROCKABILLY MAN

THE CAUSE OF IT ALL
Composer: - Luke McDaniel
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued - Incomplete
Recorded: - September 4-5, 1956

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Luke McDaniel (a.k.a Jeff Daniels) - Vocal and Guitar
Jimmie Otto Rodgers - Guitar
Roland Janes or Buddy Holobaugh - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Upright Bass
Martin Willis - Tenor Saxophone
Johnny Bernero or Jimmy Van Eaton - Drums
Unknown – Piano

The problems began for Luke McDaniel when the sessions ended. McDaniel expected to get AFM scale for the sessions but Phillips didn't work that way. He regarded the sessions as demos. He paid the backup musicians on an hourly basis (usually $2.00 per hour) and would not file the session with the AFM unless the results were destined for release. Upon release, Phillips would log a session with AFM members so that the titles could be cleared. McDaniel was probably expecting approximately $80 if not $160 as session leader and was told by Phillips that he was getting nothing unless the records were released. ''When I came out of the studio Sam Phillips was there and I was expecting to get paid for the session's'', he told Derek Glenister. ''I needed the money! Sam looked at me and said, 'We don't pay any pf the artists for the sessions. We take care of the musicians and then it's taken out of any money that is due to you''. I said, 'What do you mean you don't pay 'em? We're entitled to union scale'. That made me mad and Sam knew it. We just didn't see eye-to-eye at all and I let him know. And Sam let me know! He said, 'Well, if we can't come to an agreement then we just won't put the record out'. And that was that''. And so Luke McDaniel's affiliation with Sun Records ended on the sidewalk outside 706 Union. McDaniel was bitterly disappointed because he had broken his contract with Mel Mallory to sign Sun. The sidewalk outside Sun was the place to be in 1956 or 1957, but only if you were walking in, not if you were walking away pissed off.

For Biography of Luke McDaniel see: > The Sun Biographies <
Luke McDaniel's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 1956

Jackson, Tennessee, was a fertile source of talent for Sun Records. Carl Perkins and Carl Mann came from there, and never moved away. Cliff Cleaves, Rayburn Anthony, Ramsey Kearney, Curtis Hobock, Danny Stewart, and Tony Austin also came to Sun from Jackson without seeing much success, but Kenneth Parchman was the unluckiest of all. Two of Parchman's recordings, ''Love Crazy Baby''/''Feel Like Rockin''', were assigned a release number (Sun 252) but withdrawn after tapes had been sent for processing. If ''Feel Like Rockin'''had been a hit, there would have been a lawsuit because it was litigiously close to Piano Red's ''Rockin' With Red'', but ''Love Crazy Baby'' surely deserved a shot. Parchman's recording of ''You Call Everybody Darin'''came in the wake of the rocket-up-oldie formula that Carl Mann brought to Sun. Although Parchman eventually saw a release on Jackson Records, he soon gave up on music and became a successful house-builder.

A series of arrests and riots follow British screenings of ''Rock Around The Clock'', a movie featuring Alan Freed, Bill Haley and the Comets, and the Platters. The movie is subsequently banned in cities across Britain.

SEPTEMBER 7, 1956 FRIDAY

Sonny Burgerss and The Pacers makes a appearance on the Ozark Drive-In Theater in Harrison, Arkansas. Admission 50cents.

Songwriter Diane Warren is born in Van Nuys, California. Primarily a pop composer, she earns country hits with Trisha Yearwood's ''How Do I Live'', Mark Chesnutt's ''I Don't Want To Miss A Thing'', Sara Evans ''I Could Not Ask For More'' and Tim McGraw and Faith Hill's ''Just To Hear You Say That You Love Me''.

SEPTEMBER 8, 1956 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley makes the cover of TV Guide.

Singer/songwriter Eddie Cochran signs a recording contract with Liberty Records, where he recorded the original version of ''Summertime Blues''. The song will become a 1994 country hit for Alan Jackson.

Jimmy Boyd is arrested for reckless driving in Los Angeles after he was spotted drag racing and skidded into a fire hydrant on Kesler Avenue trying to elude the police. Boyd is fined $100.

SEPTEMBER 9, 1956 SUNDAY

Elvis Presley makes his first appearance on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. He sings four songs, including ''Love Me Tender'' and ''Don't Be Cruel'', shot only from the waist up. Charles Laughton hosts in place of Sullivan, recuperating from an auto accident.

SEPTEMBER 1956

At age 15, John Lennon formed the skiffle group, the Quarrymen. Named after Quarry Bank High School, the group was established by him in September 1956. By the summer of 1957, the Quarrymen played a "spirited set of songs" made up of half skiffle and half rock and roll. Lennon first met Paul McCartney at the Quarrymen's second performance, held in Woolton on 6 July at the St. Peter's Church Garden Festival, after which he asked McCartney to join the band. By the end of that year, both McCartney and George Harrison had joined the group, which eventually changed its name to Johnny and the Hurricanes. More name changes followed, until the group, with Pete Best on drums, settled on the Beatles. On February 21, 1961, the band began playing at the Cavern, a dark, dank, basement club located near Liverpool's docks. At the time, Liverpool had a thriving music scene, which was documented in a paper called Mersey Beat. In May 1962, the group, aided by manager Brain Epstein, signed with Parlophone Records, a division of EMI. That same month, Ringo Starr replaced Pete Best as the Beatles's drummer.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

When the rockabilly revival of the 1970s and 1980s and the exploration of the Sun Records catalog came about, one track was guaranteed to fill the dance floors of the rock and roll clubs, and it was ''Tennessee Zip'' by Kenny Parchman.

No one ever came closer than Kenny to having a record issued on Sun in its halcyon days. Release Sun 252 was assigned to ''Love Crazy Baby''/''I Feel Like Rockin''', but it was withdrawn at the last minute. We had to wait twenty-five years to get our hands on those and other great slabs of true original rockabilly music from Kenny Parchman.

STUDIO SESSION FOR KENNETH PARCHMAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SUNDAY/MONDAY SEPTEMBER 9-10, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

It was pianist Jerry Lee Smith who made the contact with Sam Phillips via Carl Perkins. Phillips liked ''Love Crazy Baby'' and ''I Feel Like Rockin''' and readied the record for release but at the eleventh hour decided not to issue. Two songs were cut, publishing contracts were signed, recordings were mastered, assigned an issue number, scheduled... then cancelled at the last moment.

The reasons for this have never explained but when Kenny was asked years later about the circumstances, he told Colin Escott: ''God man, I don't know why Sam Phillips never released my record. My manager left town shortly before the record was to be released''. ''Maybe Phillips didn't want to release a single if I didn't have a manager behind me. I felt for sure we were going to have a record out on Sun''.

> LOVE CRAZY BABY <
Composer: - Kenneth Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Master (2:03)
SUN 252 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) Sun 6-1 mono
SUN - ROCK AND ROLL ORIGINALS - VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2/23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

> LOVE CRAZY BABY <
Composer: - Kenneth Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:09)
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1025-5 mono
HOT FLOP AND FLY
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-25 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16

> LOVE CRAZY BABY < 
Composer: - Kenneth Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued (2:06)
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England 33rpm LP 1038-12 mono
FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'
Reissued: - 2004 Fury Records Internet iTunes MP3-20 mono
KENNY PARCHMAN - I FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'

With nearly 40 years' hindsight, it is clear that these sides would have broken no new ground for Sun. Parchman's style is credible, if a bit mannered and lightweight. The truth is, if a Sun record from the 250 series had to be lost, better this than "Ubangi Stomp". Parchman came back to 706 Union to record again, although release of his work had to wait for Sun archaeologists a quarter century later.

This version of "Love Crazy Baby" clearly comes probably from another session. The guitar is to the fore on this version, which probably dates from early 1957.

> I FEEL LIKE ROCKIN' <
Composer: - Kenny Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Master (2:29)
SUN 252 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun England (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 6-2 mono
SUN - ROCK AND ROLL ORIGINALS - VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2/24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

> I FEEL LIKE ROCKIN' < 
Composer: - Kenny Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:31)
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1038-6 mono
FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15213-3/2 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954-1959

I FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'
Composer: - Kenny Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - Sun Unissued

> TENNESSEE ZIP <
Composer: - Kenneth Parchman-Jerry Lee Smith
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:21)
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-4-1 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - I FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-14 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16

"Tennessee Zip" is very much in the mode of Sun's big star from Jackson, Carl Perkins. Parchman has nailed Perkins' style right down to the scats.

> TREAT ME RIGHT <
Composer: - Kenny Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Fast Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:11)
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1025-4 mono
HOP FLOP AND FLY
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-9 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

"Treat Me Right" came from sessions this year, and passed over yet again, Parchman went on to record for Jaxon Records.

> TREAT ME RIGHT <
Composer: - Kenny Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Slow Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:58)
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1036-5 mono
MORE SUNDOWN ROCKERS
Reissued: - 1998 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-6 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS

> TREAT ME RIGHT <
Composer: - Kenny Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Fast Take 3 - Not Originally Issued (2:09)
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1038-14 mono
FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'
Reissued: - 2004 Fury Records Internet iTunes MP3-18 mono
KENNY PARCHMAN - I FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'

TREAT ME RIGHT
Composer: - Kenny Parchman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - September 9-10, 1956

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Kenneth Parchman - Vocal and Guitar
Ronnie Parchman - Guitar and/or Drums
Jerry Lee Smith - Piano
R. Willie Stevenson - Bass

For Biography of Kenneth Parchman see: > The Sun Biographies <
Kenneth Parchman's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 9, 1956 SUNDAY

Elvis Presley makes his first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, introduced by Charles Laughton. Sullivan himself was recuperating from a car accident. Elvis performed ''Don't Be Cruel'', ''Love Me Tender'', and ''Ready Teddy'', to which he appended two versions of ''Hound Dog''.

During the final song, the cameras pulled away from Elvis's gyrating hips, so as not to shock the viewers. And there were a lot of them. More than 80 percent of American televisions were tuned to the show. At the end of Elvis's performance, Laughton joked, ''Well, what did someone say? Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast''? Elvis is paid $50,000 for three appearances.

SEPTEMBER 9, 1956 SUNDAY

Frankie Lymon and the teenagers are on "Rock And Roll Dance Party on CBS radio.

SEPTEMBER 10, 1956 MONDAY

Bobby Bare holds the first recording session of his career, at the Capitol Recording Studio in Hollywood. His caking band includes Jimmy Bryant and Speedy West, Buck Owens and future Buckaroo drummer Pee Wee Adams.

Decca released Webb Pierce's ''Teenage Boogie''.

Sam Phillips completed the purchase of a new house in a leafy area of Memphis ''out east'' that had barely been developed. The whole family had been driving around every Sunday for what seemed like weeks to ten-year-old Knox, looking at various other houses in the area, ''and we got to 79 South Mendenhall'', Knox recalled,,''man, that was it, all in turquoise and a beautiful sort of pink. It had been designed by the builder, Chester A. Camp, who specialized in ''houses of the future'', in a U shape, with an interior courtyard, a pale adobe exterior with red mortar to accentuate its delicate highlights and an overhanging turquoise-colored roof, a spacious den with a back wall and fireplace made from the same Arkansas cut stone that carried over onto the patio, and a latticed carport that looked like it had been made for Sam's two-tone, air-conditioned Cadillac.

SEPTEMBER 10, 1956 MONDAY

Wade Moore and Dick Penner sign contracts with Sun. The Paris News, October 17, reports that Wade and Dick were ''playing weekends dates in theatres and a few weeks ago they made some recordings for Sam Phillips' Sun Recording Co. of Memphis''.

SEPTEMBER 11, 1956 TUESDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''I'm Counting On You'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

SEPTEMBER 12, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Kitty Wells and Webb Pierce recorded ''O' So Many Years'' and ''One Week Later'' in Nashville at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

SEPTEMBER 13, 1956 THURSDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''Repenting'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

Seventeen-year-old David Allan Coe is discharged from the Army.

SEPTEMBER 14, 1956 FRIDAY

Singer/songwriter Beth Nielsen Chapman is born in Harlingen, Texas. Primarly a pop re

Filming concludes on Elvis Presley's first movie, ''Love Me Tender'', in Los Angeles.

SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 SATURDAY

Debby Boone is born in Hackensack, New Jersey. The daughter of Pat Boone and granddaughter of Red Foley, she earns a million-selling pop/country hit in 1977 with ''You Light Up My Life'', then scores a 1980 country hit, ''Are You On The Road To Lovin' Me Again''.

June Forester is born in Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia. The Forester Sister emerge as a tight-harmonied female vocal group in the 1980s, leaning toward positive messages with such hits as ''I Fell In Love Again Last Night'', ''You Again'' and ''Letter Home''.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1956 SUNDAY

Elvis Presley and Nick Adams fly back to Memphis from Hollywood, California, and later visited the Sun studio. Here Sam Phillips, Elvis Presley and Marion Keisker, together (above) on the birthday of Marion Keisker, front of 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee. Elvis also together with Sun recording star Warren Smith and some other Sun musicians, including band members of Johnny Cash.

SEPTEMBER 1956

The Party of 1956

It was the fall of 1956. The 20-year-old Roy Orbison was touring with his band, The Teen Kings, still enjoying the popularity of their hit "Ooby Dooby" released by Sun Records. The song peaked at number 59 on the Billboard Pop Chart and re-entered a couple of times. They were being booked by Stars Inc. in Memphis, sharing the stage with some other Sun Records acts like Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash and some country singers also. Some of them where Johnny Horton, Sonny James and Faron Young. Faron was a Capitol recording artist and had just had his first at number 1 country hit with Joe Allison's "Live Fast, Love Hard, Die Young" sometime back.

It is not clear exactly when this recording was made, possibly around or after September 1956, but after Elvis' "Hound Dog" was released, it would be wise to assume that it took place after a show with Roy and Faron Young. Some sources indicate that the location was Corpus Christi in Texas. For sure we know that it was made by Judy Baker into a home tape recorder using a hand microphone. Judy became a country music hostess but little we know about her. She was born in 1924 and died in February 2000, now buried in Goodlettsville, Davidson County, Tennessee. The tape stayed in her position through the years and surfaced after her passing. A few pictures were taken that night while the guitar was passed around to the hands of Roy and Faron. Elvis was Roy's favorite singer, and vice versa. Roy had seen a few of Elvis shows in Texas, and they met at the Overton Park Shell in Memphis, Tennessee in June 1956. Both Roy and Faron sing mainly Elvis songs, Roy also does a few Little Richard tunes and one of his first recordings "Hey Miss Fanny", was a hit by The Clovers a few years back.

The importance of this recording is enormous. To Roy Orbison fans, this reveals an early Orbison, casual and relaxed singing songs they have never heard him sing before, and we know how a fan feels like when something like this comes across. For Elvis's fans this means the discovery of new versions sung by Elvis's favorite singer. Either way, an early piece of history not to be missed.

by David Banner

SEPTEMBER 23, 1956 SUNDAY

NBC-TV debuts ''Circus Boy'', starring Micky Dolenz as an orphan. Dolenz goes on to sing lead on The Monkeys' ''Lat Train To Clarksville'', cited in the Country Music Foundation's ''Heartaches By The Number'' among country's 500 greatest singles.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1956 MONDAY

The singles, Sun 250 "Black Jack David" b/w ''Ubangi Stomp'' by Warren Smith; Sun 251 ''Rock House'' b/w ''You're My Baby'' by Roy Orbison; Sun 253 ''I Need A Man'' b/w ''No Matter Who's The Blame'' by Barbara Pittman; Sun 254 ''Where'd You Stay Last Night'' b/w ''Come On Little Mama'' by Ray Harris released.

The Grand Ole Opry fires Jim Denny, booking agent for Opry road shows, after Roy Acuff accused Denny of favoritism and misappropriation of funds.

Carl Smith recorded ''You Can't Hurt Me Anymore'' during the afternoon at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

Capitol released Faron Young's two-sided single, ''Turn Her Down'' and the B-side, ''I'll Be Satisfied With Love''.

SEPTEMBER 26, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Elvis Presley returned to Tupelo, Mississippi to perform two shows at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show. Elvis Presley Day is proclaimed in Tupelo, Mississippi. Elvis' parents join him as he returns to the town of his birth as a big star. He performs two shows at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show, the same fair at which he had performed at age 10. This time there are a hundred National Guardsmen surrounding the stage to control the crowds of excited fans. 14 year old Wynette Pugh (Tammy Wynette) watchs from the front row.

SEPTEMBER 28, 1956 FRIDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''Love Me Tender'' and ''Any Way You Want Me (That's How I Will Be)'' (RCA Victor 47-6643).

''The Eddy Arnold Show'' makes its final prime-time appearance on ABC-TV.

SEPTEMBER 28, 1956 SATURDAY

Rose Maddox joins the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Christian singer/songwriter Bob Carlisle is born in Los Angeles. He writes Dolly Parton's ''Why'd You Come In Here Lookin' Like That'' and gains a pop hit as an artist by recording ''Butterfly Kisses'', remade in country music by The Raybon Brothers.

Elvis Presley goes to number 1 on the Billboard country chart with a double-sided hit, ''Don't Be Cruel'' and ''Hound Dog''.

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© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©