CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS (9)
September 1, 1958 to September 30, 1958

Studio Session for Mickey Milan, Probably September 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Roy Orbison & Ken Cook, September 4, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Roy Orbison, 1957/1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Cliff, Ed & Barbara Thomas, September 12, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, September 13, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, September 19, 1958 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 1958

After the payment-break on September 21, 1957 with Elvis Presley, Scotty Moore and Bill Black went their separate ways, though they stayed in close contact and occasionally worked together on recording projects. With the newly formed Memphis label Hi Records, a Memphis soul and rockabilly label started in 1957 by singer Ray Harris, record store owner Joe Cuoghi, Bill Cantrell and Quinton Claunch (formerly producers for Sun Records), and three silent partners, including Cuoghi's lawyer, Nick Pesce, just getting off the ground.

Bill started spending time at the label's headquarters and his recording studio named Royal Recording at 1320 South Lauderdale Street. While doing session work with guitarist Reggie Yound, he often expressed resentment about the treatment he had received from Elvis. He told Reggie that toward the end of their association with Elvis, he and Scotty were told not to talk to the star, except onstage.

For the first week after Elvis left, Scotty drew unemployment. Then he entered into a partnership with Roland ''Slim'' Wallace, the truck driver with whom Jack Clement had built end 1955 a garage studio named Fernwood Records. ''Slim had two or three microphones and a little mono tape recorder'', says Scotty. ''I took a few pieces of gear out and we started recording this and that''.

''One day, Thomas Wayne Perkins, Scotty's former paperboy at his old Belz Street address, asked him if he could stop by the house and audition for him. Perkins's brother, Luther, was the guitarist in the Johnny Cash Band, so Scotty thought it was worth a listen. The youngster, still a senior in high school, was so nervous when he arrived at Scotty's house that he sat on Bobbie's glass-topped coffee table and broke it. When he sang, Scotty liked what he heard, broken glass and all.

Scotty Moore worked with Perkins at Fernwood, but their first demos attracted no interest from the major labels. At one point, he and Wallace thought Mercury Records was interested in Perkins, but for some reason a deal never materialized. Without Scotty's wife Bobbie's job at Sears, they would been destitute that summer. ''I don't remember if Bill had a day job or not, but we were both scratching to stay afloat'', says Scotty. His work at Fernwood wasn't bringing in much money, but it helped him to keep the faith. Sooner or later something would break in his favor, he was certain of that.

One day Scotty Moore was walking along the street when he ran into Gerald Nelson, a disc jockey from Kentucky. They had met some time back in concert. Gerald told Scotty that he and Fred Burch, a college student, had written a song titled ''Tragedy''. Fred had snatched the title from a course he was taking on Aristotelian tragedies. Gerald said he had played the song for Chet Atkins, who had told him it sounded like a hit, but was not a song he could do anything with in Nashville because it wasn't country enough. Encouraged by Atkin's assessment of the song's potential, they had driven to Memphis, to the very cradle of rock and roll. ''We played it for Sam Phillips'', says Gerald, ''but he said he couldn't use it either''. As Scotty stood on the sidewalk and listened, Gerald sang the song to him, playing the music on his ukulele. Scotty loved it. He told Gerald he knew just the guy to sing it: Thomas Wayne Perkins. Fred and Gerald felt so encouraged by Scotty's reaction, they moved to Memphis to begin new careers as songwriters.

Unhappy with the technical limitations of Fernwood's garage studio, Scotty looked for a better place to record songs. In exchange for studio time at Hi Records' studio, Gerald sang background on one of their sessions. When they went in to record Thomas Wayne's session, they discovered the studio had installed new equipment; the studio was going to use them as guinea pigs to test the new machine. Thomas Wayne brought three girls from his high school, his girlfriend and her two friends, to sing background. Scotty and Bill were the only musicians.

''It was the first time (the tape machine) was used'', says Fred Burch. ''They couldn't get it to work. Finally, someone licked it and got it going. They cut the song three times and ended up using the first cut. There was no echo in the studio, so they took the tape to WMPS radio, where they had two Ampex machines.

Using the technique he learned from Sam for adding ''slapback'' to record, Scotty recorded a simultaneous dub on a master tape at the radio station. This time, instead of offering it to a major label, they put the record out on Fernwood Records. The A-side was an uptempo song written by Nelson-Burch ''Saturday Date'', the B-side was Tragedy''.

When ''Saturday Date'' was released in September, it had little impact on radio. But because Scotty believed in the record, he kept pushing it well into the spring of 1959. Finally, lightning struck. A disc jockey in Kentucky flipped the record and started playing the B-side in heavy rotation. As a result, phone requests for ''Tragedy'' started flooding into the radio station. Before Scotty knew what had happened, he had a hit record.

With its understated instrumentation and lush background vocals, Thomas Wayne's macho-breathless baritone carried the song. ''Tragedy'' was one of those 1950s-type ballads that never failed to get dancers hot and bothered. It was a Memphis thing; a song written by novices barely old enough to vote, sung by the producer's former paperboy, with background vocals provided by high school girls, recorded on bartered studio time. It was the stuff of Which Memphis magic was made.

 

''It was like it happened overnight'', Scotty says. ''We didn't have a dime to promote it'' As the orders started coming in, they hired a national promotion man, Stevie Brodie of Buffalo, New York, to push the record. ''He said, 'I can make this a big hit', so we paid him a nickel a record''.

Scotty Moore and Slim Wallace added a third partner, Memphis attorney Robert Buckalew. Their most immediate problem was getting large orders of record pressed.

Working together, Buckalew and Brodie persuaded record pressing plants to give them sixty days credit, since they knew it would be at least that long before the money started trickling in. Once that happened, Brodie started working the song on radio, beginning with his hometown of Buffalo. As it climbed the charts there, he focused his attention on larger markets.

By March, ''Tragedy'' had risen to number 8 on the national charts, making it a million-seller. Ironically, without trying to compete with Sun Records, Scotty had stolen its thunder. Before ''Tragedy'' hit, only three records recorded in Memphis had ever scored higher on the pop charts, and they were all Sun releases: Jerry Lee Lewis's ''Great Balls Of Fire'' and ''Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On'', and Carl Perkins's ''Blue Suede Shoes''.

Trying only to stay afloat, Scott had made history and a few bucks in the process. ''We grossed about $600,000'', says Scotty. ''Of course, when the money started coming in and I sat down and started writing checks, it went (out) pretty fast. I remember writing one check for $150,000 to the pressing plants. Oh, that hurt''.

After the record hit, Scotty send a copy to Colonel Parker, who responded on April 2 with a letter. ''Have just returned from a promotion trip on Elvis latest release and LP'', he wrote. ''Thought it only proper to congratulate you on the fine work you have been done with Mr. Thomas Wayne. My best wishes are with you and him for a big future''. He signed the letter ''Colonel''.

Scotty paid himself a salary from the record company with the agreement of the two other partners, but most of the money was funneled back into Fernwood Records. They rented an office downtown in the same building where their attorney (and new partner) was located. Later, they rented a building on 297 North Main Street and installed a fully equipment studio. It was located next door to a delicatessen that specialized in corned beef. What Scotty remembers most about the studio is the plentiful supply of food. ''I've never eaten so much corned beef in my life'', he says.

That spring and summer, Scotty Moore was on top of the world. He had a hit record and his own recording studio. It was another one of those rags-to-riches stories of which the music industry is so found. In March he purchased a C-5 Classic Gibson guitar for $85 from Chicago Musical Instrument Company and a black El Dorado Cadillac with a red interior.

To promote Thomas Wayne's record, he organized a touring band made of himself, Bill, D.J. Fontana, and Reggie Young. Scotty was coming and going so fast, he sometimes lost his sense of direction. Reggie remembers one night when they returned to Memphis at three o'clock in the morning. ''We pulled up in front of Scotty's house, stopping out in the middle of the street'', says Reggie. ''He just got out, left the car running, and went into the house and went to bed. Bill or someone slid over and took us home''.

Scotty often booked Reggie Young for sessions at Fernwood. They got to be good friends and usually wound up the sessions by sitting on the curb drinking cheap wine. Reggie went on to become one of the premier session guitarists in the country, working in Memphis with literally hundreds of artists including Neil Diamond, Wilson Picket, and Dionne Warwick, and then later in Nashville with Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, and Johnny Cash. But in those days he was just finding himself as a musician; the Blue Moon Boys were among his heroes.

''That whole deal of Scotty, Bill and Elvis was unique'', he says.''Scotty and Bill were as much a part of Elvis's music as he was. No one sounded like that. You always copy records you can play parts to. Scotty's parts, they weren't real easy to play, but they were playable. They weren't something you couldn't figure out. I'm sure a lot of would be guitar players sat down with Elvis's records and copied Scotty's licks. He was the first one to make people want to do that''.

Fernwood Records followed up ''Tragedy'' with a number of Thomas Wayne recordings including ''Scandalizing My name'', ''Girl Next Door'', ''Just Beyond'', and ''Guilty Of Love'', some of which were written by Burch and Nelson. One Thomas Wayne release, ''This Time'', was penned by a newcomer to Memphis, a young Georgian named Chips Moman. Unfortunately, none of Thomas Wayne's subsequent releases achieved the success of ''Tragedy''.

In the aftermath of ''Tragedy'', Sharri Paullus, a songwriter whose physician husband had started a record label named Rave Records, took two instrumental ideas to Fernwood. For that project, Scotty asked Bill Black to play bass and saxophonist Ace Cannon to do the horn work. The finished product, with its gritty, hypnotic groove, is remarkably similar to records later recorded by the Bill Black Combo. The songs, ''The Gambler'' and ''It's Not Fun Loving You'', were released on Rave Records. As the year ended, Scotty Moore reported his highest income to date, $13,547.64, but the money from Thomas Wayne's hit was quickly petering out at Fernwood.

SEPTEMBER 1958

Phillips International 3548 "Mad At You" b/w ''Willie Brown'' by Mack Self.

Eddie Cochran scores his biggest hit with "Summertime Blues".

The Microchip (integrated circuit), an essential piece of technology used in modern electronics, was created during September of 1958 by Jack Kilby. Kilby, a newly-hired engineer at Texas Instruments, came up with the idea to miniaturize all of the parts of an entire transistor circuit and connect them all together, creating a smaller and easy to produce unit called an integrated circuit. While Kilby was not the only person credited with the idea of an integrated circuit, he was the first to create a working model and file a patent for the technology. The creation of the integrated circuit led to much of the technology our modern computers and electronics are based on today.

SEPTEMBER 1, 1958 MONDAY

Review in Billboard magazine says, ''Break Up'' (Sun 303) is a rocker, and Lewis sells the tune with great drive and spirit. His pounding style of piano is prominent in support. Flip, ''I'll Make It All Up To You'', is a country and western ballad read along traditional lines. Chorus and work support help sell the side. It's a strong contender and a likely market click''.

After Johnny Cash finished his last Sun recordings, Sam Phillips wished him well, and he wished himself well, too, in a letter to the industry that appeared in both Billboard and Cash Box in September 1958. ''Sun Records has patiently recorded Johnny Cash with always potent material'', he pointedly wrote, ''first in the country category and gradually manipulating his material and approach to songs to gain him a fantastic following in the pop field.... Through the help of our Sun distributors and our ever faithful disc jockey friends we have built another artist into a solid commercial performer who sells records one after the other. Sun has always believed in building artists, not just selling a single record. This has been our aim since the beginning and will remain so''.

It was also Sun's aim, Sam Phillips stressed with no less sincerity than selfinterest, to continue selling Johnny Cash records. To that end, ever since learning of cash's intention to sign with Columbia, Sun had spent the last five months ''producing some of the finest sides for future Sun releases on Cash that we have ever had the pleasure of cutting''.

''Please believe us when we say you are in for some tremendous releases on cash on SUN for at least the next two years. Our thanks to Johnny for being a wonderful person to work with during our association. We are going to miss him no end around 706 Union, but our aim is to keep him ''hot'' on Sun 'If the Good Lord's Willing and The Creek Don't Rise'. Appreciatively, Sam C. Phillips, President Sun Record Co.''. For all of those reasons, and others unspoken, Sam put everything he had behind ''The Ways Of A Woman In Love'', the first departure-anticipatory Cash release, which rose to the top of the country charts in October 1958 and even reached number 24 pop, while Columbia's initial release languished in its wake.

The fledgling Warner Bros. Records released its first albums, an undistinguished . Eventually, the label adds a country division, with hit albums from Faith Hill, Randy Travis, Hank Williams Jr. and Blake Shelton, among others.

Decca released a pair of Webb Pierce hits, ''Tupelo County Jail'' and the flip side, ''Falling Back To You''.

SEPTEMBER 4, 1958 THURSDAY

Hawkshaw Hawkins holds his last RCA recording session.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

There were two Mikki's who recorded for Phillips International, which accounts for some measure of discographical confusion. Milan was the first, beating label mate Wilcox by nearly three years. Milan's record, released in 1958, was pure pop music and a thorn in the side of legions of Sun fans who came to the label for a steady diet of rockabilly. In fairness to Bill Justis, who arranged the date nearly a year after "Raunchy" unexpectedly hit the charts, this is a perfectly credible piece of hook-laden 1950s pop music.

Phillips International artist Wayne Powers Cogswell wrote one side of Mikki's single "Somehow Without You", and remembers her as 'an older women'. Milan's voice is rather strident, in a style not unlike Kay Starr's. In fact, Milan's "The Picture" is quite reminiscent of Starr's song "Half A Photograph". Vocal backing on this track was provided by The Montclairs, a group handled by Cogswell.

Although she never enjoyed a second release on Sun or Phillips International. Milan did spend considerable time in the studio. At some point she was turned over to Charlie Rich as one of his projects.

STUDIO SESSION FOR MICKEY (MIKKI) MILAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY SEPTEMBER 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Charlie Rich provided Milan with "Baby", one of his attempts at pop song writing. Its anybody's guess what Rich thought of Mickey Milan's vocalizing, but they did go through more than a dozen takes of his song over several different sessions.

Untimately, it came to nothing. Over forty years later, you can hear a sample of their work for the first time and decide for yourself whether Sam Phillips' judgement was sound.

01 - "THE PICTURE" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Wilson-Hess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 334 - Master
Recorded: - Probably September 1958
Released: - September 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3533-B < mono
THE PICTURE / SOMEHOW WITHOUT YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Take a deep breath. Mickey Milan makes her first appearance on the PI label with these two pop sides from September 1958. The original label credited her as working with the Bill Justis Orchestra. Either Sam Phillips or Bill Justis had found Mikki in New York, and thought she might fit Phillips International's uptown image. Wayne Cogswell had just appeared at the studio with "Somehow Without You", and either Sam Phillips or Bill Justis thought it suited Mikki's style. "I had my vocal group, the Montclairs, on that one", said Cogswell. "I remember Mickey Milan was an older woman. She never lived in Memphis. Just came down to record a time or two".

02 - "SOMEHOW WITHOUT YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Wayne Cogswell
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 333 - Master
Recorded: - Probably September 1958
Released: - September 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3533-A < mono
SOMEHOW WITHOUT YOU / THE PICTURE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Once again, it is best to view this music as lying deeply within the pop tradition. In fact, the simplest view is that Mickey Milan was a poor man's Kay Starr. Certainly Kay's record "Half A Photograph" seems to have cast a large shadow over these proceedings. Even relative to those standards, Mikki tends to be a tad shrill in places. Perhaps she was an acquired taste. More to the point, somebody at 706 Union acquired it. Mikki was back in the studio seven months later for a series of sessions that left not only a follow-up release on PI, but no fewer than 15 unissued titles, suggesting that an album was planned.

03 - "WHILE I'M TRYING" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably September 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-10 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS
Reissued: - 2014 Sun Entertainment Internet iTunes MP3-27 mono
THE DOOR TO BARBARA PITTMAN AND OTHER GIRLS

04 - "SWEETEST GUY" - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably September 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-11 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

05 – "BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably September 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-4 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS
Reissued: - 2014 Sun Entertainment Internet iTunes MP3-21 mono
THE DOOR TO BARBARA PITTMAN AND OTHER GIRLS

06 - "NOTHING TO COMPARE" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably September 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-21 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mickey Milan - Vocal

Bill Justis Orchestra
Sid Manker - Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

The Montclairs (PI 3533)

For Biography of Mickey Milan see: > The Sun Biographies <
Mickey Milan's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on her playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on
 > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROY ORBISON & KEN COOK
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS,
JACK CLEMENT AND/OR STAN KESLER

As a writer, Roy Orbison scored a fleeting Hot 100 hit for Warren Smith with "So Long I'm Gone". He had done even better when Jerry Lee Lewis revamped what he could remember of "Go!, Go!, Go!" as "Down The Line", giving Roy a free ride to the top of the charts on the back of "Breathless". He also submitted a few songs to the departing Johnny Cash, who recorded Orbison's "You Tell Me" during the final crush of sessions that marked his exit from Sun.

Sun fans looking for a fix in October 1958, or simply seeking reassurance that the Phillips International label would occasionally give them some of the real stuff were in a state of ecstasy when this record (PI 3534) appeared in stores. Perhaps more than any previous PI release, this one contained the maniacal raw energy one expected to find in a Sun recording.

01(1) - "I WAS A FOOL" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 336 - Master - Duet with Ken Cook
Recorded: - September 4, 1958
Released: - October 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3534-B < mono
I WAS A FOOL / CRAZY BABY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

This side, a duet with Roy Orbison, shows that even the ballad - or at least less frenzied side - of a good Sun record can also be inspiring. "I Was A Fool" is a really fine song; its simple, melodic and memorable. After a few listening, you really want to hear that chorus. The amusing thing is that now that Orbison's voice has become a cultural icon, and we've learned its Orbi harmonizing with Cook (something that nobody knew prior to the first wave of Sun archaeology in the 1970s), it seems so obvious. Try listening to the chorus and not focusing on the familiar quality of Orbison singing as loud and clear as he did on "Only The Lonely".

01(2) - "I WAS A FOOL"* - B.M.I. 2:15
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 4, 1958
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1036-1 mono
MORE SUNDOWN ROCKERS
Reissued: - July 6, 2012 Internet iTunes MP3-14 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK - THE MOST BEAUTIFUL 40 ROCK SONGS

02(1) - "CRAZY BABY"* - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Ken Cook
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 4, 1958
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1038-3 mono
FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'
Reissued: - 1999 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8353-9 mono
SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL - VOLUME 3

02(2) - "CRAZY BABY"* - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Ken Cook
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 335 - Master
Recorded: - September 4, 1958
Released: - October 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3534-A < mono
CRAZY BABY / I WAS A FOOL
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

"Crazy baby" lived up to its title. Everything about it exuded that pent-up madness fans had come to associate with 706 Union Avenue. That opening drum roll by Jimmy Van Eaton, followed by Roy Orbison's guitar figure lays out a powerful riff that grabs you by the collar and commands all your attention. The interplay between Orbison and Billy Riley on guitar is brilliant. Cook, who had done his share of listening to Jerry Lee Lewis records, sings like a man possessed. If his cry of the title phrase isn't passionate enough for you, then Bill Justis' screeching horn takes it to an even higher level. You can just feel the energy on this date. It builds and grows until even Van Eaton is forced to double up the backbeat during the "more more more" sections of Cook's vocal.

03 - "DON'T BE RUNNIN' WILD (PROBLEM CHILD)"* - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Roy Orbison-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 4, 1958
Released: - October 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30116-A5 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 9 - MORE REBEL ROCKABILLY
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-11 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

Looking to promote his publishing catalogue for Cook's master session, Sam hauled out the marginally delinquent "Problem Child", a song that Roy Orbison had recorded a year previously. Together the two performers delivered some exceptionally tight harmonies, a feature that inspired several Orbison backtracks to be tried out with Cook's vocal overdubbed.

04 - "I FELL IN LOVE"* - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - H. Hodson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Vocal Ken Cook - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 4, 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30105-12 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME - VOLUME 5 - REBEL ROCKABILLY
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-20 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16

"I Fell In Love" probably stems from Cook's sole Sun session that resulted in a single on the Phillips International label. For his part, Roy Orbison always refused to talk about Cook, so at this point he remains an enigma wrapped up in a tape box.

Ken Cook was primarily a rock artist, but on his only country recording here on this session at Sun he also adapted a country song and the old Carter Family favourite ''I'm Thinking Tonight Of My Blue Eyes'' is transformed into a tribute to ''Jenny''.

Ken Cook is almost completely obscure. All we know is that Roy Orbison brought him from Texas to Sun Records. Cook had an almost astonishing vocal similarity to Roy, and Sam Phillips was persuaded to issue one single by him on Phillips International.

05 - "(I'M THINKIN' OF YOU ALL THE TIME) JENNY"* - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Ken Cook
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Vocal Ken Cook - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 4, 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30117-B-5 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME - VOLUME 10 - SUN COUNTRY
Reissued: - July 6, 2012 Internet iTunes MP3-14 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK - THE MOST BEAUTIFUL 40 ROCK SONGS

06 - "THINKIN' TO-NITE OF MY BLUE EYES"* - B.M.I. - 3:42
Composer: - Ken Cook
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Vocal Ken Cook - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 4, 1958
Released: - 1985
First appearance: Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1026-8 mono
ROCKABILLY TUNES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ken Cook - Vocal*
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Lead Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Jack Clement - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Bill Justis - Tenor Saxophone

For Biography of Ken Cook see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ken Cooks's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on
 > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

To his chagrin, later in 1960, Sam Phillips found tape boxes filled almost exclusively with rockers that had been cut at his behest. He gave the stash of tapes to Vinnie Trauth and Scotty Moore, who added some extraneous instruments and a chorus to the masters. They reissued "Devil Doll" together with a complete album of doctored masters titled "At The Rockhouse".

The album justifiably infuriated Orbison, who wnet to see Sam Phillips in 1961 and reportedly demanded, unsuccessfully, that he hand over all of Roy's unissued tapes. The tapes that remained at Sun have been prolifically recycled since the Sun catalog was sold in 1969.

With hindsight, one can hear the roots of Orbison's future success in his phrasing and delivery on the slower Sun cuts, like "Trying To Get To You", "This Kind Of Love", and "It's Too Late". But over the best of these recordings hangs a feeling of missed opportunity, of perhaps the most singular chance Phillips failed to take.

Recalling his 1961 meeting with Sam Phillips in a conversation with Nick Kent, Orbison said, "Sam looked at me and smiled and said, 'You'll be back'. His brother Jud was in the room - he just looked at me, rolled his eyes, and said, 'The hell he will!'".

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROY ORBISON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956/1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES 1956/1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS & JACK CLEMENT

01 - "THE CAUSE OF IT ALL" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Roy K. Orbison-Sam C. Phillips
Punlisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Phonogram (LP) 33rpm Sun 6641 180 mono
THE SUN STORY
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-24 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

02(1) - "YOU'RE GONNA CRY" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006-4 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-25 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

02(2) - "YOU'RE GONNA CRY" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Dubbed Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1260-7 mono
ROY ORBISON AT THE ROCKHOUSE
Reissued: - 1984 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDX 4 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS

03 - "TRYING TO GET TO YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Margie C. Singleton-Rose Marie McCoy
Publisher: - Motion Music Company
Matrix number: - None - Dubbed Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1260-4 mono
ROY ORBISON AT THE ROCKHOUSE
Reissued: - 1984 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDX 4 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS

04(1) - "THIS KIND OF LOVE" – B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006-2 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-2-8 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

04(2) - "THIS KIND OF LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Dubbed Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1260-1 mono
ROY ORBISON AT THE ROCKHOUSE
Reissued: - 1984 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDX 4 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS

04(3) - "THIS KIND OF LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006-10 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-2-8 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

05(1) - IT'S TOO LATE" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006-3 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-27 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

05(2) - IT'S TOO LATE" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Dubbed Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1260-5 mono
ROY ORBISON AT THE ROCKHOUSE
Reissued: - 1984 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDX 4 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS

05(3) - "IT'S TOO LATE" – B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006-8 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423L-2-9 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

06(1) - "I NEVER KNEW" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006-3 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-28 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

06(2) - "I NEVER KNEW" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Dubbed Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1958
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1260-8 mono
ROY ORBISON AT THE ROCKHOUSE
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-28 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Groups
James Morrow - Electric Mandolin

After Roy Orbison left Sun, he went on to enormous success as a vocalist, scoring nine Top 10 hits in the years 1960-1963.

For Biography of Roy Orbison see: > The Sun Biographies <
Roy Orbison's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 1958

The Nashville music establishment had noticed with dismay and great resistance country's decline and the rise of rock and roll. They had even just this spring formed a group called the Country Music Association to promote cohesion in the country field and to promote it more heavily. The RCA offices there had snapped up Elvis, and now Nashville was after another of Sun's promising stars.

This time it was Roy Orbison. He had just returned from some dates on the road when next Barbara Barnes saw him, and this time it was not just to hang around or practice, but to discuss an urgent matter with Sam Phillips.

While he was touring, he had been on a bill in Indiana with the Everly Brothers. They had asked him if he had any song to show them, and he obliged. Phil and Don Everly especially liked and committed to record ''Claudette'', a song that Roy had written as a tribute to his wife.

A part of the deal was that the Everlys wanted him to go through Acuff-Rose publishing in Nashville, but he was under contract to Sun's publishing arm. They had just had a hit with ''Bye Bye Love'' and now they wanted ''Claudette'' for the B side of their new release, ''All I Have To Do Is Dream''. This development caused Roy to be more agitated than usual.

He came into to Barbara Barnes office exclaiming that he'd been trying to get in touch with Sam and Jud Phillips for about a week and they hadn't called him back. Through the Everly contact, he had met Wesley Rose of Acuff-Rose, and Rose asked him if he could break his songwriting contract with Sun and go with him. Roy was very insistent on speaking with someone who could make a decision about the matter.

When Jud Phillips called later that day, Barbara told him Roy's complaint. Jud answered in an angry and sarcastic manner, ''Tell him to can it or I'll come down there and knock that other eye cockeyed''. Barbara found Jud's response unhelpful and quite out of character.

Roy Orbison was still hanging around, so Barbara told a little white lie and said Jud wasn't where she could reach him and that he should wait and talk to Sam. According to Barbara, ''I wasn't in on the negotiations, but what it came down to in the end was that Roy bought out both his recording and songwriting contracts with Sun Records and went to Acuff-Rose, and that was the last we saw of Roy Orbison. The Acuff-Rose people git him a short-term recording contract with RCA Victor, but he didn't stay with them long, soon going to Monument and resuming his recording efforts.

SEPTEMBER 5, 1958 FRIDAY

David Allan Coe is released from Chillicote Reformatory in Ohio after serving two years for stealing a car.

The Country Music Association is chartered in Nashville. The CMA becomes a major marketing force for country music, best known for its annual awards show.

SEPTEMBER 6, 1958 SATURDAY

Comedian Jeff Foxworthy is born in Hapeville, Georgia. Based on his ''You might be a redneck if..'' routine, Foxworthy emerges as the best-selling comic of the 1990s.

SEPTEMBER 7, 1958 SUNDAY

Buddy Holly trades in his Lincoln for his first new Cadillac on his 22nd birthday, three days before producing Waylon Jennings' first recording session.

SEPTEMBER 8, 1958 MONDAY

Donny Young holds his first recording session, for Decca Records in Nashville. Young will come to prominence under the name of Johnny Paycheck.

SEPTEMBER 9, 1958 TUESDAY

Jim Reeves recorded the Roger Miller-penned ''Billy Bayou'' in the afternoon at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

SEPTEMBER 10, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Waylon Jennings has his very first recording session in Clovis, New Mexico, with Buddy Holly producing. He recorded ''Jole Blon''.

SEPTEMBER 11, 1958 THURSDAY

''Circus Boy'' ends its prime-time run on ABC, with future Monkee Micky Dolenz in the lead role. The Monkees' ''Last Train To CLarksville'' ranks among country's 500 greatest singles in the Country Music Foundation's ''Heartaches By The Number''.

SEPTEMBER 12, 1958 FRIDAY

Lefty Frizzell recorded ''Cigarettes And Coffee Blues'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

Rod Brasfield dies of a heart attack at his Nashville home. Brasfield had been a Grand Ole Opry comedian since 1947, and gave Hank Williams Jr. his ''Bocephus'' nickname, Brasfield posthumously enters the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1987.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CLIFF, ED & BARBARA THOMAS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 12, OR 21, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

01 - "LEAVE IT TO ME" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Ed Thomas Jr.
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 330 - Master
Recorded: - September 12 or 21,, 1958
Released: - September 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3531-B < mono
LEAVE IT TO ME / SORRY I LIED
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

On "Leave It To Me" you hear everything you need to know about Cliff, Ed and Barbara Thomas - the good, the bad and the ugly. The verdict on this talented family seems to be a strong thumbs up for Ed's piano playing, as well as his songwriting talents. Similarly, the three voices blend strongly and persuasively; the first six bars of ensemble harmonizing are a powerful way into this record. The biggest problem for most Sun fans is the assertively teenage sounding Cliff. Nobody could blame him for being a teenager, and he certainly grew out of the condition with minimal prodding. Its just that what might otherwise have been astonishingly good outings are diminished or transformed into commercial teen music. Tony Rossini with bite.

02 - "SORRY I LIED" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Ed Thomas Jr.
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 329 - Master
Recorded: - September 12 or 21, 1958
Released: - September 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3531-A < mono
SORRY I LIES / LEAVE IT TO ME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

"Sorry I Lied" shows yet again that the Thomas family could record, with remarkably little outside help, some totally engaging pop music in 1958. Ed's debt to a host of rhythm and blues masters, notably Ray Charles, is evident in every note of this record. It is no surprise that Sam Phillips continued to record the Thomasses. Quite apart from their potential for local promotion, they were genuinely talented people whose musical style had a directness and emotionally that must have brought a smile to Sam Phillips' face each and every time.

03 - "DANCE ON LITTLE GIRL
Composer: - Ed Thomas Jr.
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - September 12 or 21, 1958

04 - ''MEAN OLD WORLD''
Composer: - Ed Thomas Jr.
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - September 12 or 21, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ed Thomas Jr. - Vocal and Piano
Cliff Thomas - Vocal and Guitar
Barbara Thomas – Vocal
Billy Riley – Bass
Jack Clement – Guitar
Jimmy Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Cliff, Ed, and Barbara Thomas see: > The Sun Biographies <
Cliff, Ed, and Barbara Thomas' Sun/PI recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

An published note from Barbara Barnes from Sun Records to record dealers was sent reads:

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 12, 1958

For further information, contact: Miss Barbara Barnes, Phillips International Records, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee.

"There's not a duck-tail or gyrating pelvis in the group. No heavy-lidded eyes one sensuously formed lips moaning or mooning. They just open their mouths and sing... and the song is from the heart. For the hearts of the Cliff Thomas Trio are in the home... and music has been a staple expression in the Thomas home.

The Cliff Thomas Trio, Jackson, Mississippi's latest claim to fame, shows, promise of developing into one of the nation's top musical group. Their latest release on the Phillips International label is "Sorry I Lied" b/w "Leave It To Me", both original compositions of Ed Thomas, pianist for the group and a Notre Dame University grad. Company officials predict that it will make a strong bid for top position in the nation's charts of pop records.

The Thomas family is a big Catholic family and everyone from Mom and Dad on down to the pre-school children performs in family jam sessions. The Church plans a big part in the Thomas family, also. They are communicants of St. Mary's Church in Jackson. Monsignor Francis Quin is their pastor.

Cliff, Ed and Barbara are individually talented and, as a group have everything that it takes to win fans among the teen set. When they were promoting their first release, the Thomases made lots of friends at record hops and TV appearances throughout the country. They appeared on the Dick Clark Show from Philadelphia and were enthusiastically received in such cities as Chicago, Milwaukee and Memphis.

Cliff, whose husky, appealing baritone takes the lead in the trio, plays guitar and has eyes on a Notre Dame degree like brother Ed has. After that its a music career or a position with the family business.

Ed, the pianist and songwriter of the group, graduated from Notre dame in 1958 and is now selling whole sale drygoods for the family business.

Barbara, in audition to having what the boys cal "The best voice in the trio", adds a bit of feminine appeal to the group with her dark good looks. She attended St. Mary's Dominican College in New Orleans for two years, and took her B.A. in English at Millsaps College in Jackson, Miss. She now works for A.T.V. Station in Jackson in promoting and finds that particular area of show business almost as much fun as singing.

Her's a refreshing group. Give a listen!

SEPTEMBER 1958

The singles, PI 3531 ''Sorry I Lied'' b/w ''Leave It To Me'' by Cliff, Ed and Barbara Thomas; PI 3533 ''Somehow Without You'' b/w ''The Picture'' by Minkey Milan issued.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 13, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

01(1) - "WHY WHY WHY" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master
Recorded: - September 13, 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-10-3 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - WILLING AND READY
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-7-3 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1955

01(2) - "WHY WHY WHY" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 328 - Master
Recorded: - September 13, 1958
Released: - October 25, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 308-A < mono
WHY WHY WHY / YOU MADE A HIT
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Ray Smith's second Sun record was enough to restore some of the faith of Sun fans who had been traumatized by the last two releases. Smith delivers on both sides (SUN 308). "Why, Why, Why" confirms that the word 'ballad' does not spell disaster. Nor does the addition of a chorus necessarily undercut a recording's power. Billboard had it right when they described this track as a "deeply felt ballad effort by Smith. A soulful delivery in a slow tempo. Worth spins".

Like Elvis Presley, whose ballad style has plainly influenced these proceedings, Ray Smith was also influenced by Dean Martin. It seems a curious observation, but after his move to Ontario, Canada, Smith got plenty of work in local clubs alternating his Presley repertoire with "Dean Martin impersonations", as the local media called them.

02(1) - "LIFE IS THE FLOWER" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Ray Smith
Publisher: - Charly International APS
Matrix number: - None - Take 1- Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 13, 1958
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun 1009-4 mono
RAY SMITH - I'M RIGHT BEHIND YOU BABY
Reissued: - 1991 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 32-5 mono
RAY SMITH - ROCKIN" WITH RAY

02(2) - "LIFE IS THE FLOWER" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Ray Smith
Publisher: - Charly International APS
Matrix number: - None – Take 2 – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - September 13, 1958
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-3 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith - Vocal
Dean Perkins - Guitar
Stanley Walker - Guitar
Stan Kesler or James Webb - Bass
Gary Diamond - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

19 September 1959, Vocal group overdub by The Confederates on ''Why Why Why''

For Biography of Ray Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ray Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 13, 1958 SATURDAY

The Stoney Mountain Cloggers join the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

SEPTEMBER 14, 1958 SUNDAY

Pop singer/songwriter Tommy Edwards performs ''It's All In The Game'' during ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The song becomes a country hit for Tom T. Hall in 1977.

SEPTEMBER 15, 1958 MONDAY

Kenny Rogers' first daughter, Carole Lynne Rogers, is born.

Columbia released Johnny Cash's two-side hit, ''All Over Again'' backed with ''What Do I Care''.

Decca Records released Kitty Wells' ''Touch And Go Heart''.

SEPTEMBER 16, 1958 TUESDAY

Terry McBride is born in Taylor, Texas. He becomes the lead singer of McBride and The Ride, which has a series of hits from 1991-1993. As a songwriter, he pens the Brooks and Dunn singles ''I Am That Man'', ''Cowgirls Don't Cry'' and ''Play Something Country''.

SEPTEMBER 18, 1958 THURSDAY

Johnny Cash headlined the West Texas Fair in Abilene, Texas, where he performed two evening shows befor a total of 10,700 fans. Reporting on the event, the Abilene Reporter-News noted the next day that Cash played mostly his hits. Then near the end of the story was a throwaway line that probably caught the eye of more than a few members of the Cash entourage: ''Between the two shows, Johnny Cash and Lorrie Collins managed to tour the carnival as well as sign hundreds of autographs''.

''Cat On A Tin Roof'' opens at New York's Radio City Music Hall. The movie stars Paul Newman and Elizabeth Taylor and sometimes-country singer Burl Ives.

Van Stoneman, of The Stoneman Family, marries Helen Alvey.

SEPTEMBER 19, 1958

Elvis Presley leaves Fort Hood, Texas, with his Army unit. destined for Brooklyn. From there, the troops are headed to West-Germany.

RCA Victor released the Elvis Presley movie soundtrack ''King Creole'' ( RCA Victor LPM-1884).

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SEPTEMBER 19, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

"UNKNOWN TITLES"

Name (OR. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Jessie Carter - Standup Bass
Otis Jett - Drums

Note: This session are assigned in Sam Phillip's notebook to Gene Simmons, but no furter details could be found.

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 20, 1958 SATURDAY

Sun 305 ''Sally Jo'' b/w ''Torro'' by Rosco Gordon is released.

SEPTEMBER 21, 1958 SUNDAY

A check for $76.11 is issued to future country producer Jimmy Bowen by Stamford Productions for a television appearance. The document is later used as evidence in the payola trial of rock and roll disc jockey Alan Freed.

SEPTEMBER 22, 1958 MONDAY

Private Elvis Presley leaves America for Germany on the U.S.S. General Randall. An Army band plays ''All Shook Up''.

With Gracie Allen's retirement from the show business, ''The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show'' airs for the last time on CBS-TV. Burns goes on to recorded the country hit ''I Wish I Was Eighteen Again''.

Columbia released Stonewall Jackson's first hit, ''Life To Go''.

SEPTEMBER 22, 1958 MONDAY

Bill Riley starts with his band a 72 musical marathon at the Starlight Superclub, Highway 51 North, Frayser, Tennessee. It was the first musical marathon of its kind.

The Memphis-Press reported that after the marathon gig for 72 hour straight, the five men made music at the Starlight Club, 3987 Thomas. Bill Riley claims his band has the marathon music-making championship of the world.

He claimed the record at 9:30 last night when a packed house heard the band tear into ''When The Saint Go Marching In''. When the last second had ticked by, the fellows jumped over cups and other paraphernalia and headed for beds. ''Man, I'm gonna sleep for a month'', yawned sax man Martin Willis.

The men took their meals on the stands, drank instant coffee, had no intermission, just the usual rest between each number. Why did they do it? To set the record, of course. And for the publicity . Left to right above as they put there names in the musical history books are Jimmy Wilson, Martin Willis, Jimmy M. Van Eaton, Billy Riley and Pat O'Neill.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1958 WEDNESDAY

''The Patti Page Show'' debuts on ABC-TV.

SEPTEMBER 26, 1958 FRIDAY

The syndicated TV show ''Frontier Doctor'' debuts, with Rex Allen in the leading role as Dr. Bill Baxter.

SEPTEMBER 28, 1958 SUNDAY

Newspaper advertisement in the Brownwood Bulletin for the movie ''High School Confidential'' starring Mamie Van Doren, Russ Tamblyn, Jan Sterling, John Drew, Jackie Coogan, Diane Jergens, and Michael Landon. The film also features a cameo by Jerry Lee Lewis who opens the movie singing a song of the same name, which Lewis co-wrote with Ron Hargrave. Lewis released the title track as a Sun Records 45 single which became a Top 40 hit, reaching number 21 in the Billboard charts. The film is listed in Golden Raspberry Awardfounder John Wilson's book The Official Razzie Movie Guide as one of The 100 Most Enjoyably Bad Movies Ever Made. According to MGM records the film earned $1,290,000 in the US and Canada and $625,000 elsewhere, resulting in a profit of $578,000.

Phil Spector's first hit, ''To Know Him Is To Love Him'' by The Teddy Bears, is released. The song is remade as a country hit in 1987 by Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1958 TUESDAY

Marty Stuart is born in Philadelphia, Mississippi. He plays mandolin for Lester Flatt as a teen before building a solo career that features rockabilly-tinged hits and a Golden Globe nomination. He marries fellow Grand Ole Opry star, Connie Smith.

The Stanley Brothers begin two days of recording in Cincinnati, their first session for the King label.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©