CONTAINS
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1956 SESSIONS (3/2)
March 1, 1956 to March 31, 1956

Studio Session for Carl Perkins, Probably March 1956 (1) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, Probably March 1956 (2) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, Probably March 1956 (3) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, Probably March 1956 (4) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Roy Orbison, March/April, 1956 / Sun Records 

The Story About ''Ooby Dooby''

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Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
  
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY MARCH 1956-1
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

In the early 1956, after the great success of ''Blue Suede Shoes'', Carl Perkins purchased an $800 blonde Gibson ES-5 maple-top with three P-90 pickups with separate tone and volume controls for each. He also got himself one of the hand built EchoSonic amps from Ray Butts out of Cairo, Illinios for $250 down and $200 delivery. This session was his first he got his new ES-5.

What we casually refer to today as "rockabilly" of the Sun Sound, was new music back in early 1956. In fact, nobody knew what to call it. Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins were still being described as performing "Hillbilly Bop" when this record, SUN 243 came out. Billboard rightly described it as "loaded with flovor and potential for all three markets". The Memphis regional chart in May 1956 showed that Sam Phillips' vision had literally dominated the city's taste.

"Boppin' The Blues" sat at number 3 bettered only by "I Walk The Line" and "Blue Suede Shoes" (at numbers 1 and 2, respectively). The number 4-6 chart position were filled by "Heartbreak Hotel", "Ooby Dooby" and "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby". These were magic times to cruise down Union Avenue in your Chevy convertible with the radio blaring.

01(1) - "YOU CAN'T MAKE LOVE TO SOMEBODY" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1018-11 mono
RABBIT ACTION
On this LP Jimmy Haggett tracks are mistakenly attributed to Junior Thompson.
Reissued: - 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-13 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

Whether this new music needed drums was a matter of some debate at Sun. Sam Phillips thought it didn't but Perkins wanted a drummer so much that he created one. He recruited W.S. Holland to learn to play the drums and join the band. Holland was a complete novice. He borrowed a set of drums, set them up incorrectly (reversing the hi-hat and bass drum), and taught himself to play with that arrangement. ''Not knowing how to set the drums up or how to play is one of the reasons I've been playing drums for 62 years''.

This wonderful track ''You Can't Make Love To Somebody'', recorded after ''Blue Suede Shoes'' was a hit, gives us a fine exhibition of the transition from hillbilly bop to rock and roll. W.S. Holland provides a strong back-beat on the snare drum and his cymbal work is, uncharacteristically for a Sun recording, prominent in the mix. He also tosses in frequent little accent and short rolls. Those all sound like ad libs, feeling of the moment as if he were silently singing along with Carl. All of that doesn't add up to a truly rock and roll performance. Holland's drumming, and the totality of the record, is far more free, and swinging than, say, ''Blue Suede Shoes'' which the Perkins band had recorded fully four months earlier. And it's far less a rock and roll record than ''Boppin' The Blues'' which they recorded at this same session as this track. Their authentic country roots were still showing in this country song.

01(2) - "YOU CAN'T MAKE LOVE TO SOMEBODY" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-1-14 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

The nation that Carl's music was an irresistible and lifechanging force ("I still love you baby, but I'll never be the same") was a clever and powerful image. In fact, Carl took that idea one step further in "Boppin' The Blues". Like Dr. Ross ("The Boogie Disease") before him and Huey Piano Smith ("Rockin' Pneumonia" and "The Boogie Woogie Flu") after him, Carl likened his music to an infectious disease. One exposure and you've had it, whether you like it or not. Ironically, this was just the kind of perverse thinking that fueled anti-rock and roll boycots by the White Citizen's Councel. "Boppin' The Blues" was meant to capture the essence of the new music but instead it showed how closely Perkins was tied to the country tradition. In contrast, Elvis Presley's second record for RCA Victor, "I Want You, I Need You, I Love You", did not fit any definition of country music. "Boppin' The Blues" reached number 9 in the country charts but did no more than dart in and out of the lowest reaches of the pop charts.

02(1) - "BOPPIN' THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 0:18
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-2-1 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES
BOPPIN' THE BLUES

Sadly, all we've got for this important title, Carl's fourth Sun record, is two incomplete takes and one full outtake. If that's the bad news, the good news is that they’re all wonderful.

The first thing you'll notice about outtake number 1 is that it has a very different feel from the issued single. This one is far more countrified than the distinctively rock-oriented version we know. The mix is also different. Perhaps more than ever before, we can hear every instrument in Carl's small band. The biggest surprise is W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland. No longer buried in the mix or forced to use brushes, W.S. provides a strong backbeat. It's not obvious why this take was aborted after barely 13 seconds, but it would have been a dandy if it had kept on like tins.

On the next take, also aborted way too soon, the instrumental separation is again wonderful. You can even hear brother Jay's acoustic guitar against the drums, bass and Carl's lead guitar. This gets shut down after the second time Carl pops a ''P''. Again, the take was on its way to being a gem, perhaps even better than the issued version.

The first and only full outtake we could find has much to recommend it. For one thing, W.S. really swings here. We have never heard him play like this before, not just keeping time but providing lots of tills. Carl delivers a splendid vocal. If this single outtake were the only thing Carl had left in the Sun vault before vanishing, it's a safe bet he'd still have attained legendary status among fans and collectors. Thankfully we have much more to know and admire about Carl Perkins.

02(2) - "BOPPIN' THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 0:29
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Fragment 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-2-2 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(3) - "BOPPIN' THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 101 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-1-25 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

02(4) - "BOPPIN' THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 196 Master Take 2
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - May 29, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 243-A < mono
BOPPIN' THE BLUES / ALL MAMA'S CHILDREN
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

''ALL MAMA'S CHILDREN''

This song got released as one side of the follow-up to Blue Suede Shoes Coming up with another lyric that evolved shoes seems like a daunting task but Carl and Johnny Cash were up to it.

Here outtakes from two recording sessions. Outtakes 1 and 2 are from the earlier session; the remaining five are from the later one The first outtake begins with some attempt to talk through the arrangement and after a sloppy beginning is a respectable run-through of the song including that last verse that includes ''reelin' and rockin' and a knockin' their souls'' that never appears again. The second tries out a whole different approach to the song, beginning every verse with break downs. They didn't do that again either. On both these tracks, W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland plays a shuffle rhythm on the snare drum, another thing that won't reappear

The last five outtakes get closer to the version we know from Sun 243 Holland's drumming is now concentrated on the backbeat with tom-tom accents (and is really lively on the next-to-last outtake) and the slap-bass is better integrated into the overall sound.

One constant throughout all the recordings of this song is the peculiar sound of Carl’s guitar. It’s unlike anything he recorded on other songs and sounds as if he were playing an electric ukulele. We don't know just how he did it, why he did it on this songs, and why he didn't do it again. But his solos on all tracks stay pretty close to each other and to the released version, so we suppose he decided that these solos sounded good with that guitar sound.

Carl often ad libbed lyrics but keeping track of the lyrical changes on this song is a challenge. Sometimes it's an ''old woman'' who lives in the shoe and sometimes it's an ''old lady''. Sometimes the kids are ''pickin' ém up and puttin' ém down'' and sometimes ''pickin'' ém up and layin' ém down''. Sometimes the kids are ''children'' and sometimes ''young 'uns''. The final compromise occurs on the released version where he says ''alla mama's chunguns are doin' the bop''). Sometimes they're ''gonna roll, gonna rock, gonna bop til they pop'', sometimes they're ''gonna rock, gonna roll, gonna bop (or jump), gonna go''. AlI of these shuttle back and forth in different combinations. The lyrical version we know from Sun 243 is probably not the result of a plan but just the accident that happened on Sam's favourite performance.

03(1) - "ALL MAMA'S CHILDREN" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Carl Perkins-John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 2-4 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(2) - "ALL MAMA'S CHILDREN" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Carl Perkins-John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-1-23 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-2-5 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

''ONLY YOU''

There is no outtake, but there is a pretty good story. The Platters' record of ''Only You'' hit the charts on October 1, 1955 and stayed there for 22 weeks). It became a favorite of Carl's and he often sang the song for his own entertainment. On December 12, 1955. Carl played a show in Amory, Mississippi along with Johnny Cash and Elvis Presley (how'd you like to travel back in time to see that one?) Carl performed ''Only You'' to an enthusiastic response from the crowd, although he had never recorded it and it was not the kind of song audience expected Perkins to perform. W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland recalls that Carl ended up singing it three times that night. ''Elvis went over to Bob Neal and told him jokingly, 'Don't book me on any more shows with that Perkins boys''. After the show, Carl told W.S. And the band that they ought to think about recording it the next time they went for a session.

The most recent Carl Perkins discography (BCD 15494) shows the recording date as March 1956, only a few months after the Amory performance. The original Sun Session discography (Escott/Hawkins) showed the session implausibly taking place in early 1957. In any case, the track appeared on Carl's Sun LP issued in 1958 and can be heard on BCD 15494 and BCD 17213.

04 - "ONLY YOU" - B.M.I. - 3:19
Composer: - Buck Ram-Ande Rand
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SUN SLP 1225-6 mono
DANCE - THE BEST OF CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/22rpm BCD 15494 EH-1-28 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
''EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY''

Although this song got recorded at several sessions in March 1956, it remained unreleased until Carl's album came out in 1958. Its origins deserve some discussion. According to his biography, Carl claimed that he was inspired by an offhand remark that he made to Jay at a club date and it quickly turned into a song. When bio author David McGee pointed out that the song actually dated from the 1930s, Carl opined that perhaps he'd heard someone sing it at some honky tonk or another.

In fact, we know of four recordings of this song that pre-date Carl's - the first, by Rex Griffin in the late 1930s, one by Roy Newman, one by Jemmy Short ( (better known as Ernest Tubb's guitar player), and one by Gene Thompson in the early 1950s The styles evolve from western swing to hillbilly as the years go by, but the the song stays the same. It's a twelve-bar blues with a two-line verse followed by four lines of the title. The two-line verses vary from record to record All four of the early ones include ''They took some honey from a bee/Dressed it up and called it me'', which Carl modifies to ''honey from a tree''. All include waking up at half-past four with some number of women knockin' at my door; three of the records have fifteen women but Roy Newman has a near dozen. Carl did not make this up at a club.

There several full outtakes, a few fragments and false starts, and some discussions in which lyrics get composed. Obviously they were not satisfied with the arrangement and took a variety of approaches to it. The natural first question was how to open the song. Should they go right into it or have a few opening lines with stops? If there are stops should they be single-beat stops as in ''Boppin' The Blues'' or two-beat stops as in ''Blue Suede Shoes''? They try out all those possibilities. Should the guitar solos be rhythmic chords or single or double-note tunes or pedal steel-like chord sequences? They try out all those too. Carl's vocals range from energetic to subdued. They also try changing the key they play it in (the 7th and 8th outtakes are in a deferent key from the others). And even what little melody as there is in this song gets a revision in the 8th.

As we've seen, Carl often made up lyrics on the spot so it's no surprise that the verses change from take to take. But it is interesting to at half-past four. Most of the predecessor recordings of this song have fifteen. Carl has nineteen until the middle of the seventh outtake. In that take he sings the verse twice - there are nineteen women the first time but that shrinks to only the historically correct fifteen later in the take. And he sticks with fifteen thereafter. So what happened to the number nineteen, we wonder? Easy. In the version that was released on LP 1225 he adds a verse. ''Went out last night didn't mean to stay late/ Before home I had nineteen dates''. Nineteen is too good a number to abandon completely.

The band seemed never fully satisfied with any single approach to the song. Sam wasn't satisfied either, apparently, and sat on it until he finally put it on the album.

05(1) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 0:06
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: April 27, 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-11 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

05(2) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 1:00
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Fragment 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: April 27, 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-12 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

05(3) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: April 27, 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-13 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

05(4) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 0:17
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: April 27, 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-14 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

05(5) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 0:10
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: April 27, 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-15 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

05(6) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 0:17
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494 EH-1-24 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 172450 ER-2-16 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES
''PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON''

Recorded over three sessions March 1956-1/March 1956-3/December 4, 1956

Carl Perkins spent more studio time at Sun working on ''Cat Clothes'' than he did any other song. Thee sheer number of takes felt behind dwarfs any other title in Carl's Sun legacy. More than the total number of outtakes of ''Movie Magg'', ''Tennessee'', Blue Suede Shoes'', Honey Hon't'', ''Boppin' The Blues'', ''Matchbox'', ''Forever Yours'', ''Lend Me Your Comb'' and ''That's Right'' combined. And what came of it? Nothing. ''Put Your Cat Clothes On'' never appeared on the orginal Sun label - not as a single and not on Carl's Sun LP. There's quite ' a disconnect there. The title was worth all that studio time and tape, but the results were never good enough to release.

The saga began on or around March 1 956 when the first few takes were recorded, when Carl and the boys still sounded much like the country band they had been when they started. You can readily hear the difference in this approach from what emerged at the December 1956 session, when the final takes with Jerry Lee Lewis on piano were recorded. Obviously Sam and Carl had enormous faith in the song but never heard a take that satisfied them. And we thank we know what made this one so hard to get right.

There are eighteen full takes and some false ends. It's obvious why most - of them never made it out into the world - there are mistakes galore. But even the flawed ones have lots of virtues. The result is that listening to all of these takes not become boring. When the mistakes happen, they're a variously frustrating, disappointing, annoying and often interesting. But the energy driving this song is limitless and unrelenting.

We'll get to discussing why they could never get a perfect and satisfying take, but the lyrics of the song deserve some attention first. The song is, about Carl telling his woman to get dressed up sharp because they're going out dancing. The peculiar thing about that is that ''cat clothes'' was the term to denote fancy threads for men, purchased largely by African-American musicians, at Lansky's clothing shop on Beale Street in Memphis. Lansky customers went beyond local aspiring artists and included Billy Eckstine and B.B. King. Moreover, these hip threads were beginning to show up among a white clientele as well. Lansky's had the store windows into which Elvis Presley looked longingly during his earliest Sun days and where and where he bought lots of clothes once success came his way. By mid-l956, Cat Clothes were worn by hip black and white men alike, but in this song Carl is putting them on a woman. Calling her ''Kitty'' doesn't overcome the strangeness of the sex change.

And what a woman! She is such an energetic dancer that she not only ''knocks the polish off her toes'' but also, remarkably, knocks her toenails off as well. Luckily, that's not an emergency because they can he packed up the next day. Now that is peculiar-sounding. What it might be about, though, is the artificial nail extensions that were introduced in late 1954 and were the subject of a fashion article in ''Life'' magazine. The ''Life'' piece was all about fingernails, but we're guessing that Carl's woman used them on her toes. In any case, Carl seems to have had a particular fascination with the feet of dancing women. Not only do there toenails come loose in this song, they pick up sand from the dance floor in ''Hone Don't''.

Our last observation about the lyric is that songwriters who did not grow up in rural Tennessee would not thank to rhyme ''fruit far'' with ''tomorrow''.

Now to the central question: Why was this song so hard to get right in the studio? What repeatedly goes wrong with this song is the timing. Perhaps by design, or perhaps by mistakes, this song is often played as an 11 1/2-bar blues. In the first track is present, you can hear an example of the problem early. When Carl first sings ''Put your cat clothes on çause tonight we're gonna really do it right/Kitty put your cat clothes on...'' he should have waited a few beats longer between '''right'' and ''Kitty''. Timing mistakes at that spot in the song, and some elsewhere, plague these performances. You'll hear it happen often. Not surprisingly, getting perfect unfailing coordination among all the band members for this slight change from traditional 12-bar blues structure just didn't happen. The reason for it ls that, essentially it's written as a 24-bar blues; the chord changes are meant to happen slowly and the waiting time between them seems unnaturally long. As a results some musician or another either rushed in prematurely or held back too long. Although this might have come out fine I ''Cat Clothes'' were a solo a performance, getting an entire band to play a slight vacant on a familiar musical form with established chord structures didn't work. It certainly could have if Carl or Jerry Lee or somebody had taken the time to talk it trough before they played it. A little coordination is all it would have taken. If you want a great example of how this works when it's successful, listen to Billy Riley's record of ''Red Hot'' (Sun 271; BCD 17122). Riley and company remove a few beats here and there from the 12-bar construction to hurry up those ''Your gal ain t doodle squat'' replies. That shrunken structure didn't come naturally to any of them, but once they talked it through, it worked like a charm. Apparently Carl and the boys never had such a conversation and so we have over a dozen needlessly messy outtakes.

But even that doesn't entirely solve the mystery to our ears. Why didn't Carl or one of the instrumentals| or the engineer (Sam? Jack Clement'?) ...someone... notice that the band had gotten out of sync and stop the take? Why did they just play all the way through, thereby providing just one more unusable but complete outtake?

There are other interesting variations in the performances here present. Almost all begin with an instrumental introduction but on the 10th and 11th outtakes they begin with Carl saying . ''WeIl'' reminiscent of ''Boppin' The Blues''. Some are faster, some are slower. Some have the drums or the slap bass miked very prominently, others have them further back. Some have a guitar solos that are all chord work (including some odd Hawaiian-sounding stuff on outtake 14) and some are single-string tunes. Outtakes 13 and 14 have so many mistakes that we should wonder if too much bourbon was flowing though the session. Some have glorious moments like the final guitar run on the 12the outtake. Some have frustrating moments like Jerry Lee's change in piano style behind Carls beautiful second solo ín the final outtake. And all have W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland and brother Clayton playing their hearts out. One false start in the next-to-last outtake is particularly interesting. It sounds if Carl lost track of his own vocal and got distracted by something. But what could that have been? Wouldn't it be great of this false start marked the moment that Carl first saw Elvis's arrival on December 4, 1956, the occasion of Elvis's return to Sun Studio and the Million Dollar Quartet.

06(1) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-1 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

06(2) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-2 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

06(3) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-3 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

06(4) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-4 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

06(5) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-5 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

06(6) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-6 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

06(7) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 7 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-7 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

06(8) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 8 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-8 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

06(9) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 9 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-9 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

''Put Your Cat Clothes On'' was probably scheduled for release with ''Boppin' The Blues'' but replaced with ''All Mama's Children''. It was included in the safety masters with ''Boppin' The Blues''.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland – Drums

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun/Flip recordings can be heard on his
 playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY MARCH 1956-2
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "RIGHT STRING BUT THE WRONG YO YO" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Willie Perryman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm LP 1225-9 mono
DANCE - THE BEST OF CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494 EH-1-30 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

This nimble spokesphrase harks back to the early twentieth century, however, Carl would conceivably have picked up the lyric from hearing Piano Red's rhythm and blues rewrite in 1951. By a remarkable coincidence, Red was recording a new live version of the song in Atlanta just as Carl's permutation was being cut in Memphis.

02(1) - "ALL MAMA CHILDREN" - B.M.I.- 2:22
Composer: - Carl Perkins-John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-6 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

According to Cal Perkins, ''It was just the greatest way in the world to cut raw music, there was no rush, no clock on the wall, we didn't work it that hard, we really didn't take it that serious. It was just an easy carefree feeling, that was the beauty of it''.

''Sam knew when I made a mistake. He'd say, 'I know what you're talking about, I'll show you when we listen back to it. But, Carl, that's not bad, it's got too many good things in it'. I'd say, 'But, Mr. Phillips, it's full of mistakes', and he'd say, 'Okay, do it again'. But then he'd say, 'Listen, see, the excitement's gone. The mistake are not there, but it don't have the feeling the other one did'. And he'd always keep the one he liked''.

''Sam just seemed to know. He's step out from behind that little old glass window, and he'd say, 'All right, boys, we just about on it now, do it again. Do it one time for Sam'. Oh yeah, he did me that way all the time. It was just that type of thing, you just forgot about making a record and tried to show him. It was things like that that'd cause me, I'd walk out on a limb, I'd try things I knew I couldn't do, and I'd get in a corner trying to do it and than have to work my way out. I'd say, 'Mr. Phillips, that's terrible'. He said, 'That's original'. I said, 'But it's just a big original mistake'. He said, 'That's what Sun Records is. That's what we are'''.

02(2) - "ALL MAMA CHILDREN" - B.M.I.- 0:17
Composer: - Carl Perkins-John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-7 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(3) - "ALL MAMA CHILDREN" - B.M.I.- 2:29
Composer: - Carl Perkins-John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494 EH-2-1 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKIND
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-8 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(4) - "ALL MAMA CHILDREN" - B.M.I.- 2:51
Composer: - Carl Perkins-John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494 EH-2-1 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKIND
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-9 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(5) - "ALL MAMA CHILDREN" - B.M.I.- 2:17
Composer: - Carl Perkins-John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-10 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

SUN 243 is a fine two-sized record, although a note on the instrumental work on "All Mama's Children" is in order. W.S.'s drums and Clayton's slapped bass sound great, but Carl's guitar has never sounded cheesier. The problem seems to be that this side was cut in the Key of "C", thereby forcing Carl into some awkward chord inversions. This is odd because most pickers know that the Eleventh Commandments states, "Thou shalt never play rockabilly in "C". The blurring of racial lines that is essential to Carl's deep south patois has never been clearer than on these sides. Although the disc did not achieve the commercial success of "Blue Suede Shoes", it did solidify Carl's reputation as a solid southern rocker - both as a vocalist and an inventive guitarist. Nearly 40 years later that reputation is still intact.

02(6) - "ALL MAMA CHILDREN" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Carl Perkins-John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 195 - Master
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - May 29, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 243-B < mono
ALL MAMA'S CHILDREN / BOPPIN' THE BLUES
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

03(1) - "DIXIE BOP/PERKINS WIGGLE" - B.M.I. - 1"57
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 6467 028-7 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - VOLUME 3
On this LP Jimmy Haggett tracks are mistakenly attributed to Junior Thompson.
Reissued: - November Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-3-8 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: December 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-2-15 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Back in Jackson, Tennessee, the Perkins Brothers Band had developed a signature tune variously remembered as ''Perkins Boogie'' or ''Dixie Bop''. When this was recorded at Sun some years later, Sam Phillips wrote down the title as ''Perkins Wiggle''. This version features the 'Dixie Bop' line and starts with a very different opening lyric to that previously issued. The verses were obviously inter-changeable in Carl's mind. He plays a deliberate but still driving solo and it is surprising, as it is with many Perkins titles of the era, that this song was never worked up for release in the 1950s.

03(2) - "PERKINS WIGGLE" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-11-2 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: December 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-6-23 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland – Drums

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun/Flip recordings can be heard on his
 playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MARCH 1956-3
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01(1) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYIN' TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-3-14 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Recorded (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-2-18 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

01(2) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYIN' TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-18 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(3) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - 1985 Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1018-5 mono
RABBIT ACTION
On this LP Jimmy Haggett tracks are mistakenly attributed to Junior Thompson.
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494 EH-2-4 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

01(4) - "EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm LP 1225-10 mono
DANCE - THE BEST OF CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494 EH-2-6 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

02(1) - ''DIXIE FRIED" - B.M.I. - 0:57
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard "Curly" Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Fragment 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-20 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(2) - ''DIXIE FRIED" - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard "Curly" Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1018-8 mono
RABBIT ACTION
On this LP Jimmy Haggett tracks are mistakenly attributed to Junior Thompson.
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494 EH-2-3 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

''DIXIE FRIED''

Recorded over two Sessions

There's no doubt that Carl was drawing on some real life experience when he wrote the lyric for ''Dixie Fried''. But did Sam really thinks he could sell it? Were the same kids who danced to ''Blue Suede Shoes'' ready to join Carl in this after-hours romp thru the Jackson honky tonks? The interesting thing is, the title ''Dixie Fried'' was not a common term for being drunk. The words had a lot to do with how you might cook a steak or a chicken, but applying it to the after-efects of a bottle of Jim Beam was uniquely Carl's doing.

There's no doubt this is a clever lyric that, once again, showcases Carl's talent as a song writer. But the song was really written for the very people it showcases, and there just ain't enough of them to make a hit record. We hope you're interested in the song and its evolution because we've preserved just about every second of tape committed to it in the studio.

On the first outtake we join a performance already in progress. This early session shows a considerably more country approach to the song. Note how prominently mikes Clayton's slap bass.

The next one shows that early on, Sam, Carl and the band envisioned the song as a stop-rhythm track. That shouldn't surprise anyone since ''Blue Suede Shoes'' and ''Boppin' The Blues'' had both used that approach and made plenty of money. Maybe that’s what the record-buying public expected of Carl? The problem is, it just didn't work here and it took a few minutes of studio time to get it out of their system.

Again, the slap bass is very prominently miked, which saved Sam from having to record a full set of drums in his tiny studio. With the evolution of rockabilly and the growing importance of rock and roll, Sam would have to change his thinking. But in the middle of 1956 he was still hanging on to his approach.

You'll hear some alternate lyrics on this take, which is hardly unusual for a Carl Perkins song. Most everything Carl recorded was a work in progress. The guitar work in both the intro and solo here is progressing towards what Carl plays on the issued version of ''Dixie Fried''. This recording of the song still sounds a lot like ''Blue Suede Shoes'', although the addition of a piano in the next session would change all of that.

Our third outtake is much closer to the issued version, although it's clear at this point the boys aren't quite there. Carl certainly goes to some interesting places during his second guitar solo.

The fourth outtake is fascinating: You can hear Carl mess up after about half a minute and apologize to everyone in sight. About ten seconds later, he gets it wrong again. When it happens a third time about a minute into' the take, Carl vows he's '' gonna bust his GIT-ar''. He makes a comment about how much his newly purchased, barely affordable Gibbson Les Paul model cost him. And here he was, blowing a guitar riff over and over! It's a priceless moment for Sun fans and historians. When the boys finally get through the take, there are still some sections with odd timing. Carl also utters the curious phrase, ''I've got Dixie Fried''. Still, you can hear how close this is to the issued version of the song.

Next we have another false start followed by a full take Carl recites the lyric like he's reading a poem or acting out a play, which is no doubt how he saw this song all along. In it's own way, this is not so far from what Leiber and Stoller were writing for the Coasters, a story set to music.

There's a lot of energy in Carl's performance, and he continues to take some mayor liberties with both phrasing and accenting the vocal. The guitar solo is pretty well worked out by now and W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland has started tossing in those single stroke rolls that extend a beat or two into the next verse. It unusual, to say the least, and it produces a powerful effect that will become most noticeable on Carl's next record, ''Matchbox''.

The last outtake is another nearly perfect version, although one problem turns up here that also shows up on a number of Carl's recordings. You'll frequently hear his final vocal note waver in pitch when he has to sustain it at the end of the recording. Usually that happens as he attempts to hold the note while playing the closing guitar figure. In fairness, that's a lot to keep your attention on at once. and is a mayor reason that bands or self accompanied singers to lay down an instrumental bed track before the perform the vocal. That allows them to direct full attention to one thing at a time - a luxury Carl never had at Sun.

03(1) - ''PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 10 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-10 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(2) - ''PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 11 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-11 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(3) - ''PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1 - Take 12 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-12 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(4) - ''PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 13 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-13 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(5) - ''PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON" - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 14 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-3-14 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(6) - "PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON"* - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 15 - Not Originally Issued
This song was probably scheduled for release with "Boppin' The Blues",
but replaced with "All Mama's Children".
It was included in the safety masters with "Boppin' The Blues".
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1018-12 mono
RABBIT ACTION
On this LP Jimmy Haggett tracks are mistakenly attributed to Junior Thompson.
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494 EH-1-26 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
Thomas E. Cisco (Eddie Star) - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun/Flip recordings can be heard on his
 playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MARCH 1956-4
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCERS AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Anyone who doubts Carl Perkins' status as a folk poet of the rural south hasn't heard "Dixie Fried". This song may be an utter delight to fans of redneck rockabilly, but it stood as much chance of denting the national charts in October, 1956 as a Bach chorale.

"Dixie Fried" was perhaps the high point of Perkins' career on record and probably the best song he had a hand in writing. It was so determinedly rural in content and execution that it was inconceivable that Sam Phillips could have entertained serious hopes for it in the pop market. Gogi Grant was sitting atop the pop charts with "Wayward Wind" on the day that "Dixie Fried" was released. The two songs could have come from different planets.
"Dixie Fried" was a slice of life from the Jackson honky tonks. Talking to Ronnie Weiser, Carl Perkins gave a little background on the environment that had spawned the song: "The light from the jukebox was all we had. They had chicken wire around us and the jukebox to keep the bottles from hitting us.

(The bartender) had an axe handle behind the bar and about four or five inches on the big end of the axe handle was bored out and poured full of hot lead. When he said, 'That's it. That's enough. Get out!' you had just enough time to do it or they'd swing". In "Dixie Fried", Carl Perkins wrote: "On the outskirts of town, there's a little nitespot". Dan dropped in about "Five o'clock". He pulled off his coat, said "The night is short".

Reached in his pocket and he flashed a quart, hollerin', "Rave on, children I'm with you, rave on cats", he cried. "Its almost dawn and the cops are gone, Let's all get Dixie Fried". Dan got happy and he started ravin. He jerked out a razor - but he wasn't shavin'. All the cats knew to jump and hop "Cause he was borned and raised in a butcher shop...".

01(1) - "DIXIE FRIED" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard "Curly" Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-22 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(2) - "DIXIE FRIED" - B.M.I. - 3:29
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard "Curly" Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - 3x FS, Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494 EH-2-7 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-23 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

Carl Perkins co-wrote the song with Howard "Curly" Griffin, a disc jockey from Jackson. Whatever Perkins' role in the composition might have been, it is "Dixie Fried" rather than "Blue Suede Shoes" that is the vindication of his skill as a songwriter. The song is born and bred of illicit liquor delivered with the throwaway humour of Chuck Berry. One could make a movie out of it. And every record producer in New York, Nashville, or Los Angeles would have said, "I'm sorry Carl..." after hearing the first run-through. "Dixie Fried" did some business in the country charts on the lingering strength of "Blue Suede Shoes" but predictably failed to show up in the pop charts.

01(3) - "DIXIE FRIED" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard "Curly" Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - FS, Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-24 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(4) - "DIXIE FRIED" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard "Curly" Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-25 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(5) - "DIXIE FRIED" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard "Curly" Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 211 Master Take 6
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 249-B < mono
DIXIE FRIED / I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

If this slice of menacing southern low life appears as an unrepentant sneer at commercial record making, this flipside moved in quite the opposite direction. On "I'm Sorry I'm Not Sorry", Perkins tries his hand at a pop ballad, complete with some of the hiccupy mannerisms Presley was busy taking to the bank. It failed, not undeservedly, but it wouldn't be the last time Sam Phillips recorded Carl Perkins with one eye on the burgeoning teen marketplace.

''I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY''

To begin with, Sam had no idea what to do with Carl Perkins at this point. Perkins had come to him as a hillbilly singer in the Hank Williams mold. There was no denying Carl's talent as both a singer and songwriter, but Williams had been dead for over three years and his grip on country music was fading. Carl had shown a flair for songwriting, and his comic ode to a pair of shoes had made them both a lot of money.

But the follow-up to ''Blue Suede Shoes'' had failed to sustain the momentum. Sam had better do something fast, or Perkins might become just another one-hit wonder. On one side of Sun 249, Sam placed the clever but commercially untenable ''Dixie Fried''. On the other side he force-fed Carl a piece of late 1950s pop balladry, complete with piano triplets and hiccuppy vocal gimmicks. Was this the stylistic path Carl might follow? Luckily for us, it wasn't a hit, although at this point, anytime seemed possible. Certainly buyers who came to the party for this song would wonder what hit them when they flipped the record over. But the same can be said for buyers who came to hear ''Dixie Fried''.

For the first time, Carl's record featured material admittedly composed by somebody else. The song had been written by Wanda Bellman, an aspiring, singer/songwriter from Jonesboro, Arkansas. She submitted the song via demo to Sam and went from being an unknown to a professional almost overnight when her copyright appeared on one side of a Carl Perkins record. Pretty impressive stuff. We do know that Wanda engaged in an extended correspondence with Sam throughout this period. He stoked Wanda's fires even higher when he had her come to Memphis in 1957 and record five sides. None were released at the time although they continue to be resurrected on Sun reissues internationally. It is possible that Sam, being Sam, made the most of Wanda Ballman's enthusiasm when he acted as her a new found benefactor and champion. In later years, Wanda persevered and had her material recorded by main stream artists like Loretta Lynn and Charley Pride.

What we do know for sure is that this cleverly titled song went through half a dozen outtakes by Carl (all of which are included here). Its title managed to confuse one of us (HD) over the years (did It mean ''Sometimes I 'm sorry: sometimes I'm not'' or was it an apology Carl offers when he sings ''I'm sorry THAT I'm not sorry''?). The song was part of the ''clever title 'tradition of the day such as Elvis's ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' or ''I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone'' In any case, the record sank like a stone, although ''Dixie Fried'' has been recorded several times by other artists in the ensuing half a century.

In general these outtakes are a mess. Maybe it's because he isn't playing his own material, but the feeling in Carl's vocal seems contrived and his guitar work is uninspired and aimless – not qualities one usually associates with Carl's playing. Granted the issued version of the song doesn't make the ''Carl at Sun'' híghlight reel, but these outtakes are really inferior fare. On some, e g., the first, the shuffle rhythm is more pronounced than the single On others, the vocal hiccup quotient is measurably lower. On the fourth, Carl's singing is far more emotional during the release. The melody (what there is of it) is different during the early outtakes (e g. the first). Also note that the slap bass is more prominently miked than on the original release. The one thing that seems to have been steady and consistent is the brief instrumental kick-of. However, as late as our final outtake (which may have been recorded immediately before the released version) the ending is still a mess. All in all, this one sounds like it was a chore to record.

02(1) - ''I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-26 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(2) - ''I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY" - B.M.I. - 0:26
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-27 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(3) - ''I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY" - B.M.I. - 0:12
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-28 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(4) - ''I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-29 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(5) - ''I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY" - B.M.I. - 3:35
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 3 - False Start 4
- False Start 5 - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-30 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(6) - ''I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240 ER-2-31 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(7) - ''I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 210 Master
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 249-A < mono
I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY / DIXIE FRIED
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
Thomas E. Cisco (Eddie Star) - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums
Jimmy Smith – Piano

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun/Flip recordings can be heard on his
 playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 24, 1956 SATURDAY

Future Sun recording artist, Narvel Felts ran across Jerry Mercer one night at the Fourway Inn in Dudley, Missouri. Mercer got him to sing and invited him to come to Pop Schmitzer's, near Malden, the next night and sit in with him some more and this led to a regular job in Jerry Mercer's band along about the spring of 1956.

He played a lot of the local clubs in south-east Missouri, nort-east Arkansas and some in Illinois and played a package show that summer with Roy Orbison when ''Ooby Dooby'' was his current record and ''Go! Go! Go!'' the B-side of it. Eddie Bond and The Stompers were also on the show and Eddie's record on Mercury at the time was ''I Got A Woman'' and ''Rockin' Daddy''.

During 1956 from the spring until about mid-December, Narvel Felts worked with Jerry Mercer and he would;d play the slap bass when he was singing and he would play it when Narvel was singing. ''We would trade and both of us played'', remembered Narvel Felts. ''I would play rhythm guitar when I sang and he would play rhythm guitar when he sang. During this period of time we did that show with Roy Orbison and Eddie Bond at Dexter, Missouri, and within a couple of weeks after that show I wound up with an audition with Sun Records.

Calvin Richardson, who was my manager and a Dexter music store owner at the time, told me that Roy was going to help him get an appointment at Sun for me, so Leon Barnett and I drove down in my Chevrolet to Sun. I was very hot summer time, probably August or early September, when we auditioned for Jack Clement. Jack told us to write some more songs, bring the whole band back. However, we did not wind up doing that until early 1957. In the meantime, in December of 1956, Jerry Mercer got married and decided to quit the music business. The band now became Narvel Felts and the Rockets.

MARCH 26, 1956 MONDAY

Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings arrived in Memphis. The next days they re-recorded "Ooby Dooby", "Tryin' To Get To You" and "Go! Go! Go! (Down the Line)". Bob Neal, owner of Starts Inc., signed the group to a booking and management contract. They kicked off with an experimental tour of Southern drive-in movies theaters, performing on the projection house roofs between film showings.

Most of the time touring with Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Warren Smith, Sonny Burgess, Faron Young, Johnny Horton and then Jerry Lee Lewis and other Country and Rockabilly stars. Later, the single ''Ooby Dooby" hit the national charts in June 1956 but the next Sun singles did not chart and Roy started developing his songwriting talent. The Teen Kings split up in December 1956 and Roy used studio musicians for the upcoming Sun sessions. He stayed at Sun until 1958.

Roy Orbison was the most talented of the new wave of second generations rockers, a twenty-year-old college student from Wink, Texas, who had grown up with a deep love of country music, which his father, an oil rigger, had passed on to him. He was an odd duck in high school, short, jug-eared, and awkward-looking, with thick unflattering glasses that only emphasized a past, moon-faced complexion, he wrote poetry, drew cartoon, and at some point early on, perhaps to defuse the common perception that, with his poor eyesight and pale coloration, he was an albino, dyed his hair black.

END MARCH 1956

Johnny Cash completes a Sun tour of Texas, and goes on to tour Floridam Georgia and the Carolinas with Ferlin Husky.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROY ORBISON & THE TEEN KINGS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY MARCH 27, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND JACK CLEMENT

One of the many who came to Sun in the wake of Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins, Roy Orbison tried for a few years to become a rock and roll singer. By his own admission, his heart remained elsewhere. Despite the fact that Orbison made periodic forays back into the country and rock music of his youth, the heart of his style was rooted in pop ballads. Hillbilly and rockabilly were essentially southern musics; the hits Orbison scored in the 1960s were timeless and placeless. Like Elvis Presley, but unlike Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins Roy Orbison transcended his roots.

At Johnny Cash's suggestion, Roy Orbison had already approached Sam Phillips at Sun Records, but Phillips had rebuffed him, declaring, "Johnny Cash doesn't run my record company". But Orbison had stronger ally in Cecil "Pop" Holifield, who operated the Record Shop in Midland and Odessa and had booked Elvis Presley into the area. Holifield played a copy of the Je-Well Record of "Ooby Dooby" over the phone to Phillips, who heard something unique in the strangely fragile voice, and asked him to send along a copy. "My first reaction", recalled Sam Phillips many years later, "was that "Ooby Dooby" was a novelty-type thing that resembled some of the novelty hits from the 1930s and 1940s. I thought if we got a good cut on it we could get some attention. Even more, I was very impressed with the inflection Roy brought to it. In fact, I think I was more impressed than Roy".

01(1) - "OOBY DOOBY" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U-192 - Take 2 Master
Released: - May 29, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 242-A < mono
OOBY DOOBY / GO! GO! GO!
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

In Odessa, Texas, Roy Orbison roomed with James Morrow, Jack Kennelly, and Billy Pat Ellis, who recast themselves as the Teen Kings. The original bassist from the Wink Westeners, Charles Evans, had guit to get married and had been replaced by Jack Kennelly. The Teen Kings were joined by the diminutive Johnny "Peanuts" Wilson on rhythm guitar, and with that line-up they secured themselves on an television show on KOSA, sponsored by the local Pontiac dealer. Roy Orbison had also returned from Denton with original song, "Ooby Dooby", that he had acquired from Wade Moore and Dick Penner, who had written it in fifteen minutes on the flat roof of a frat house at North Texas State. It was copyrighted in May 1955, and Orbison apparently first recorded it at some point in late 1955 during a demo session for Columbia Records at Jim Back's studio in Dallas. That session also yielded a version of the Clovers hit, "Hey Miss Fanny".

It appears as though it was first recorded by the Wink Westeners, reconstituted as the Teen Kings, at Norman Petty's studio in Clovis, New Mexico, together with 12 or 14 other songs. At roughly the same time "Ooby Dooby" was re-recorded in Arlington, Texas. An acetate was submitted to Columbia who later gave it to Sid King, who recorded "Ooby Dooby" on March 5, 1956. A day earlier, Roy Orbison had re-recorded the song at Norman Petty's studio in Clovis, New Mexico. That session yielded essential rockabilly, such as "Domino", as well as "An Empty Cup (And A Broken Date)" pitched by Petty to Buddy Holly. In the Petty sessions the Teen Kings sang backup vocals similar to those popularized by rhythm and blues groups.

"Ooby Dooby" did good business nationwide, eventually reaching number 59 on Billboard's Hot 100 and selling roughly 200,000 copies. It would be the biggest hit that Orbison would have for four years. He bought his first Cadillac. "That's what we all wanted", he asserted, "a Cadillac and a diamond ring before out twenty-first birthday".

01(2) - "OOBY DOOBY" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 27, 1956
Released: - 1980
First appearance: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461 AH-1 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423 GL-2-1 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

There are many Sun out-takes of ''Ooby Dooby'', all of them very close to the finished version, and very close to the Je-Wel and Columbia versions. True, the song lacked profundity, but it was a remarkable record that can't be dismissed as easily as Roy later tried to dismiss it. Roy's guitar solo was marvellously lyrical. He repeated it note-for-note on the second break and on all existing alternate takes and alternate versions, proving that he was already a painstaking craftsman rather than a spontaneous creator. But the record's most unusual feature was its ending. What other record ended with five descending bass notes?

01(3) - OOBY DOOBY" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Wade L. Moore-Dick A.R. Penner
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 27, 1956
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461 AH-9 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423 GL-2-2 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

According to Sam Phillips, ''Roy was a perfectionist in the best sense. I don't think people generally know how good a guitar player Roy was. His timing would amaze me, with him playing lead and filling in... he would do a lot of combination string stuff, but it was all pushing real good''.

01(4) - "OOBY DOOBY" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Wade L. Moore-Dick A.R. Penner
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 27, 1956
Released: - 2001
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423 GL-2-3 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

Roy Orbison's version of "Ooby Dooby" from the Petty sessions was quickly released on Je-Wel Records, the name a rough acronym from Jean Oliver and Weldon Rogers. The label was underwritten by Oliver's father, Chester, an executive at Gulf Oil. The Teen Kings had met Jean, who played accordion and sang, and her boyfriend, Weldon Rogers, at some of the Friday night jamborees they played in West Texas. Sensing that "Ooby Dooby" might break like "Blue Suede Shoes", Sam Phillips moved fast and brought the Teen Kings to Sun Records to re-record the song.

According to Weldon Rogers, Sam Phillips called him during the ''Ooby Dooby'' session: ''After all of this, Sam Phillips had the nerve to call me one night home when they were doing the session down there. He couldn't get the sound in his studio that Norman Petty had gotten. He told me, ''This is Sam Phillips at Sun Records. Weldon, I understand you cut a record with Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings'. And I said, You ought to know about it'. He said, 'I hope there's no hard feelings... By the way, do you still have the master for that'? Yeah, I've got it'. I'm recording these boys down here and we can't get the sound that they had at Norman Petty's studio and I wonder if you would sell me that master'? I said, 'Yeah, I'll be happy to sell it to you'. 'What would it take to buy it'? I just pulled a figure out of the air: 'I'll take $1,100 for it'. Oh my, he said, 'You ain't got nothing like that much in it'. I said, 'It's not any of your business what I've got in it. You asked me what I'd sell it for. So I'll just keep it''.

From a point of view, the song is simply there to bracket the guitar solos. The solos, which are essentially identical, are two full choruses long (solos were usually only one verse long back then) and the record is built around them. The solo's first three lines follow the song's melody and then Orbison breaks free. He bends notes creating tension that gets resolved quickly; he attacks staccato chords; he runs up and down; and he closes with a satisfying final chord that leads back into the vocal. It's a well-crafted journey. In later years, Orbison did all he could to disavow his Sun recordings. But the evidence is clear: He was one hell of a guitar player.

"Go! Go! Go! was copyrighted in 1956 as a co-write between Roy Orbison and his drummer Billy Pat Ellis. In just a matter of months the song yielded further spoils when it was reworked as "Down The Line", the flipside of "Breathless" by Jerry Lee Lewis. By this stage, Roy had waved goodbye to The Teen Kings and Ellis' contribution was ungraciously erased. Sam Phillips wanted one of his own copyrights on the flip-side "Go!, Go!, Go!". The coupling was released in April 1956. Billboard praised its "spectacular untamed quality" and surmised that it would "cash in for plenty of loot in the rural sectors". In fact, it did good business everywhere, eventually reaching number 59 on Billboard's Hot 100.

02 - "GO! GO! GO!" - B.M.I. – 2:08
Composer: - Roy Orbison-Billy Pat Ellis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U-193 Master
Recorded: - March 27, 1956
Released: - May 29, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 242-B < mono
GO! GO! GO! / OOBY DOOBY
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

03(1) - "TRYIN' TO GET TO YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Margie C. Singleton-Rose Marie McCoy
Publisher: - Motion Music Company
Matrix number: - Undubbed - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 27, 1956
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1260-4 mono
ROY ORBISON AT THE ROCKHOUSE
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461 AH-10 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958

03(2) - "TRYIN' TO GET TO YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Margie C. Singleton-Rose Marie McCoy
Publisher: - Motion Music Company
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 27, 1956
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Some additional undubbed and unissued Sun masters.
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423 GL-2-4 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

Even stranger was the fact that Roy Orbison had recorded "Tryin' To Get To You" for Je-Wel Records. Never a real lover rhythm and blues, Orbison had latched on to an obscure song by the Eagles and recorded it at roughly the same time that Elvis Presley recorded a version for Sun Records (that remained unissued until 1956). The most likely scenario is that Elvis Presley sang the tune on one of his forays through Texas and that Roy Orbison learned it from Elvis Presley.

Orbison used Presley's shuffle rhythm and makes the same minor lyrical change that Elvis Presley made. An additional wrinkle was added to the story when Orbison's Je-Well record was leased to Imperial for a B-side to a Weldon Rogers single in 1956.

At the suggestion of Johnny Cash, Orbison approached Sam Phillips at Sun Records, but Phillips rebuffed him saying "Johnny Cash doesn't run my record company". However, Orbison had a stronger ally in Cecil Holifield who operated the Record Shops in Midland and Odessa and had booked Elvis Presley into the area. Holifield sent a copy of the Je-Well record to Sam Phillips who heard something unique in the strangely fragile voice and invited the group to Memphis.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Johnny ''Peanuts'' Wilson - Guitar
James Morrow - Electric Mandolin
Jack Kennelly - Bass
Billy Pat Ellis - Drums

Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings returned to West Texas immediately after the session and heard nothing until Sam Phillips called them one day in early May and told them that the record was breaking in Memphis and other markets. Sam Phillips placed the Teen Kings with Bob Neal's booking agency, Stars Incorporated, located at 1916 Sterick Boulevard, Memphis, Tennessee.

Dropping out of school just weeks before final exams, the Teen Kings hit the road as part of a package show with Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, and Warren Smith. ''We played trying to make stage shows out of one hit record, which is very difficult, so we jumped around on stage like a bunch of idiots''. Warren Smith's drummer Jimmie Lott, remembered that Roy wouldn't wear his glasses and was led to the microphone like a blind blues singer. ''We started in West Virginia or North Carolina'', Roy remembered, ''then wound up in Memphis''. Elvis made a surprise appearance at the Memphis show, held at Overton Park Shell on June 1, 1956.

For Biography of Roy Orbison see: > The Sun Biographies <
Roy Orbison's Sun recordings can be heard on his
 playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

THE STORY ABOUT ''OOBY DOOBY'' – In February 1955, Wade Moore and Dick Penner composed "Ooby Dooby", in fifteen minutes on the roof of the frat house, but nothing happened even when Roy Orbison recorded the song. That demo was sent to Don Law, a Columbia Records representative, in vain with "Hey, Miss Fanny" as B-side. However, Roy Orbison and The Teens Kings keep faith on the song and they will often perform it on stage. Soon Weldon Rodgers, himself a great singer, wanted to set a up session in Norman Petty's studio in December 1955. "Ooby Dooby" b/w "Tryin' to Get to You" was issued on JE-WEL 101.

That label was named from the first letters Jean Olivier (daughter of Weldon's label associate) and Weldon. The record was manufactured in Phoenix, Arizona and, in spite of good sales, Roy Orbison was still lookin' around for fame and fortune on a major label.

At last, Roy's demo record came between the hands of Sid King and The Five Strings who recorded the song for Columbia, on 5th March 1956. The session in Dallas and worked fine. One month earlier, as the same band had covered Carl Perkins "Blue Suede Shoes". Sam Phillips should have watching for them next record. In spite of the JE-WEL contract, Sam Phillips took on Roy and his band. A battle followed in court and the JE-WEL contract was cancelled as not signed by Roy's folks because he was still underage. The JE-WEL records had to be released from the records shops too. That's now a real rare record often gets bootlegged. So be aware if you are looking for one vintage copy.

On March 27, 1956, a Roy Orbison's session was at 706 Union Avenue. Sam Phillips was disappointed by the result and gave a phone call to Weldon Rogers in order to buy the JEWEL master. Weldon asked for a so high price than Sam Phillips issued what he got on the Sun 242. In June 1956, "Ooby Dooby" climbed to number 59 in Billboard's Hot 100 and quickly sold over 500.000 copies. Some covers followed, the better being recorded by rockabilly Queen Janis Martin for RCA records. The "Ooby Dooby" success led Sam Phillips to sign Dick Penner and Wade Moore on his label.

His birthplace Wink, Texas, built in two years after the 1930s oil boom, Wink is now nearly deserted. Roy Orbison grew up here in the 1940s and early 1950s and escaped as soon as he could. The street where he lived is now renamed Roy Orbison Avenue, but his house is gone. Shortly after the singer died, the mayor tried to get a $30.000 statue erected; only $5000 was donated, however, with many locals claiming not to know "The Big O" was, Wink now hosts an annual Orbison festival the second Saturday in June, with soundalike and lookalike contests.

A cut-out of Orbison stands by the door of the Roy Orbison Museum at 205 East Hendricks Boulevard, City Hall, Wink, which could kindly be said to lack funding. The people at City Hall can let you in during office hours, and with advance notice, a volunteer will give a talk on Roy Orbison.

Carl Perkins received a 1956 Cadillac Fleetwood (above) from Sam Phillips for one million sales of ''Blue Suede Shoes'', April 11, 1956. The Cad delivered by Southern Motors at 341 Union Avenue, two blocks west across street from Sun studio between Union and Gayoso at the corner of Danny Thomas Boulevard.

There was a story in the Press-Scimitar by Bob Johnson that pictured both the car Carl Perkins had wrecked and the car Carl was receiving as a gift from Sam Phillips, owner of Sun Records Co., with Sam handing over the keys to Carl. It was a moment he would always treasure, or at least treasure until years later when Carl realized that the cost of the Cadillac had been deducted from his royalties. For Sam Phillips this was something of a painful subject in later years, he was certain he had never spoken to Carl in the terms that Carl, with his natural generosity of spirit, had understood him to use. According to his own recollection, he had told Carl quite plainly that he wanted Carl to have a new car and that he would happily advance the money and get it for him at dealer's cost, which came to something like $1,500 below the sticker price. But he never corrected the newspaper caption, and from the perspective of Johnny Cash, who like Carl remained unaware of the accounting issue for many years, that simply raised the question ''Where's my Cadillac''? when his new single, ''I Walk The Line'', had accumulated sales of nearly a million some six months later. (Carl was touched beyond measure, he confided to Johnny Cash that Sam said he had made a vow to buy a brand-new Cadillac for the first Sun artist to sell a million records).

MARCH 28, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Peer Music registers ''Ooby Dooby''. The publisher is shown as Hi-Lo Music. ''Roy called Dad and told him that if he would allow him to record ''Ooby Dooby'', he would give him the royalties on his next four recordings'', said Lane Cowart (daughter of Wade Moore). ''My dad did not think this was fair to Roy so he turned down the offer and agreed to let Roy record it''. (In fact, a published song can be recorded by anyone, provided that the statutory royalty is paid).

MARCH 31, 1956 SATURDAY

Brenda Lee debuts on Red Foley's ''Ozark Jubilee'' TV-show in Springfield, Missouri, performing ''Jambalaya'' (On The Bayou)''. The program becomes a key component in launching her to national stardom.

Elvis Presley makes his final regular appearance on The Louisiana Hayride, although he does return to the show for one week in December 1956.

Alyce King, of The King Sisters, remarries, tying the knot with Robert Clarke, 10 years after the group earned a country hit with ''Divorce Me C.O.D.''.
APRIL 1956

The ensuing months on Sun were marked by disappointment for Carl Perkins, as he struggled to recapture the seemingly effortless success of ''Blue Suede Shoes''. They were also tinged with envy, as he saw labelmates Johnny Cash and then Jerry Lee Lewis achieve the success that eluded him. Finally, they were darkened by grief as he watched his brother Jay slowly fall victim to cancer.

After a short hospital stay, Carl Perkins was back in Memphis at the beginning of April 1956. The huge Chrysler that was ruined in his wreck had been a loaner from Southern Motors while Carl awaited the delivery of his obligatory Cadillac. Rarely one to miss a photo opportunity, Sam Phillips handed him the keys to the shiny new blue '56 Fleetwood as he and Perkins stood at the dealership on April 11. Perkins told the press that the car was a gift from Phillips, who had sworn that the first artist to sell a million copies of a record on Sun would receive a Cadillac. ''Carl says he'll drive it mighty careful'', said the report in the Memphis Press Scimitar - although the car would be wrecked on August 29 near Brownsville, Tennessee, when Perkins was speeding.

Sam Phillips had anticipated his record company might receive some attention as these two artists hit the top, and beginning in April he unleashed a full round of country rock and roll records: Warren Smith's ''Rock 'N' Roll Ruby'' b/w ''I'd Rather Be Safe Than Sorry'' (Sun 239), followed by Jack Earls and the Jimbos ''Slow Down'' b/w ''A Fool For Loving You'' (Sun 240), followed by Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two's rhythmic country hit ''I Walk The Line'' b/w ''Get Rhythm'' (Sun 241).

In May, Roy Orbison & the Teen Kings had ''Ooby Dooby'' (Sun 242), followed by Perkins' next disc after ''Blue Suede Shoes'', ''Boppin' The Blues'' (Sun 243), followed by Billy Lee Riley's first Sun release, ''Trouble Bound'' (Sun 245). Except for Earls' and Riley's, these platters caused commotion in markets across the U.S.A. (Riley made up for it the following year with ''Flying Saucer Rock And Roll'' and ''Red Hot'').

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
  
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©