CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS (3)
March 1, 1958 to March 31, 1958

Studio Session for Ernie Barton, Probably March 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Dickey Lipscomb (Dickie Lee), March 3-5, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tommy Blake, March 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tommy Blake, March 15, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tommy Blake, March 16, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, Probably Mid-March 1958 / Sun Records (1)
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, Probably Mid-March 1958 / Sun Records (2)
Studio Session for Warren Smith, March 17, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, March 19, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, March 26, 27, 1958 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 1958

Bob Neal offered Roy Orbison a spot on an Everly Brothers show in Hammond, Indiana in March 1958. The Everly's needed a song for their new single and they asked Roy if he had anything. He sang his new composition "Claudette" and they asked him to write the words down. So he did, on the top of a shoebox. Later, Wesley Rose, from Acuff-Rose Music Publishing in Nashville, signed Roy Orbison with his Nashville publishing company. He also gave Roy a contract with RCA Victor where he briefly worked with Chet Atkins.

The Everly's "Claudette" was released on late March 1958 as the B-side of "All I Have To Do Is Dream". The A side went to number 1 and "Claudette" peaked at number 30. At this point, his songs had been recorded by Buddy Holly, Jerry Lee Lewis, Rick Nelson, Warren Smith, Johnny Cash and many others.

Wesley Rose rapidly got Orbison another contract with the new independent Monument Records when his RCA deal ran out in Mid-1959.

PI 3523 ''My Love Song'' b/w ''Point Of View'' by Wayne Powers issued.

PI 3524 ''After The Hop'' b/w ''Sally's Got A Sister'', by Bill Pinkney is released, the first on the Phillips label by a black artist, and credited on the label as Bill Pinky and the Turks.

PI 3525 ''Wild Rice'' b/w ''Scrougle'' by Bill Justis and His Orchestra issued.

MARCH 1, 1958 SATURDAY

Following his criticism of management at WSM Radio, Marty Robbins is fired by the Grand Ole Opry, which refers to him as a ''prima donna'' in an official statement, after his performance on the Saturday evening show.

Buddy Holli arrives in London for a 25-day tour of Britain which will be witnessed by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Keith Richard, Eric Clapton, Graham Nash and Elton John. Within months, Holly produces Waylon Jenning's first recording session.

New Orleans proclaims Elvis Presley Day while Elvis is in the city, ready to do location shooting for the movie ''King Creole''.

Bob Dylan is paid to perform for the first time when his group, The Golden Chords, appears at the Armory in Hibbing, Minnesota. He goes on to write the Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman hit ''You Ain't Going Nowhere''.

MARCH 2, 1958 SUNDAY

The Everly Brothers perform on CBS-TV's weekly variety series ''The Ed Sullivan Show'' from New York City.

MARCH 5, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Pop singer Andy Gibb is born in Manchester, England. He's established in the summer of 1977 with ''I Just Want To Be Your Everything'', covered as a country hit several months later by Connie Smith.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ERNIE BARTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY MARCH 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

By all account, Ernie Barton virtually lived in the Sun studio between 1957 and 1960. He recorded as vocalist and session guitarist and even took over management of the studio for a while. He was, to put it mildly, a fixture. There were actually plans for a Barton LP - a step that now seems fanciful given the fact that (1) Sam Phillips was uncomfortable with long playing records at the best of times (Cash, Perkins and Lewis being the best of times), and (2) Ernie Barton never had anything resembling a hit single on Sun Records. All of his studio activity resulted in the grand total of two releases on Phillips International. This atmospheric composition formed the topside of his first single and came from songwriter Allen Wingate, who was recording at the time as Allen Page for the local Moon label.

01 - "RAINING THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Alan Wingate-Jo Ann Wingate
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 324 - Master
Recorded: - Possible March 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3528-B < mono
RAINING THE BLUES / STAIRWAY TO NOWHERE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

"Raining The Blues" is, likewise, a fine production that works best when you just close your eyes and listen. Although it has a little more lyrical substance than "Stairway", close analysis won't bring you much. Barton is clearly striving for a "mood" here and succeeds. He also has some timing problems with his vocal right after the line "I thought you always knew". Amazingly, the chorus and band manage to follow him through this moment of ragged timing, thus suggesting that the entire performance was recorded live off the floor with everyone's eyes and ears fixed on the singer.

02 - "STAIRWAY TO NOWHERE" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Alan Wingate-Jo Ann Wingate
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 323 - Master
Recorded: - Possible March 1958
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3528-A < mono
STAIRWAY TO NOWHERE / RAINING THE BLUES
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

And the truth is, it is quite a likeable record. It also went a long way to assuage the doubts of Sun fans who thought they'd rarely hear anything like a vintage Sun record on the PI label. At the least, there's enough echo here - on both Barton's vocal and Roland Janes' guitar work - to satisfy any Sun purist. "Stairway To Nowhere" (a great title) borrows heavily from the gospel tradition and manages to work in a guitar figure that would have been at home in "Sittin' In The Balcony". In truth, the most important part of this song (other than Roland's guitar work) is the "doodley wop" riffing by the male chorus. The lyrics were probably knocked off in less time than it took to write the choral figure and make just as much sense. Like many such spontaneous compositions, this one works just fine.

03 - "THE MAN WITH THE HEART OF GOLD'' - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Ernie Barton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - H 301 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Possible March 1958
Released: - 1975
First appearances: - Bop Cat Records (LP) 33rpm Bob Cat 300 mono
I'M MOVING ON
Reissued: - 1987 White Label (LP) 33rpm WLP 8918 mono
MEMPHIS, ROCK AND ROLL CAPITAL OF THE WORLD - VOLUME 5

04 - "STEPPING ASIDE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Possible March 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Barton - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Bob Hadaway - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Vocal Chorus
Vernon Drane, Allen Page, Billy Riley

For Biography of Ernie Barton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ernie Barton's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR DICKEY LIPSCOMB (DICKEY LEE)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY MARCH 3-5, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT
AND/OR STAN KESLER

Sun-friendly disc jockey, Dewey Phillips was hero-worshipped around Memphis for his wild shows on WHBQ, particularly by the local music fraternity. Dickey Lipscomb was one such admirer and in the summer of 1957, the renegade broadcaster helped secure him an audition over at 706 Union. Dickey plundered an area more usually associated with groups like the Del-Vikings rather than Southern glee club traditions and his close-harmonied "Dreamy Nights" became Sun single number 2.

01 - "DREAMY NIGHTS" - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Dickey Lipscomb
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 309 - Master
Recorded: - March 3-5, 1958
Release: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 297-B < mono
DREAMY NIGHTS / FOOL FOOL FOOL
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Another outing in the not-very-typical Sun record sweepstakes. As on his previous outing (Sun 280) and on the obscure Tampa record that preceded it, Lee demonstrates his penchant for harmony singing. Lee had been parachuted onto Syn by dee-jay Dewey Phillips who had virtually demanded that Sam Phillips sign him. Lee cheerfully admits that he didn't belong there.

Neither side of this record is very southern. The ballad side, "Fool Fool Fool" (recorded August 10, 1957), contains some rather adventurous tempo changes that all but doom the tune as dance music. The uptempo "Dreamy Nights"" rocks along just fine, but it owes more to Dion and The Belmonts that to anyone in the vicinity of Union Avenue.

02 - "FOOL FOOL FOOL" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Dickey Lee-Allen Reynolds
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 308 - Master
Recorded: - March 3-5, 1958
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 297-A < mono
FOOL FOOL FOOL / DREAMY NIGHTS
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Dickey Lee made one more record at Sun Records in 1963, but the results were destined for the Dot label, where they were no doubt more at home. By that time, Lee had moved on to Jack Clement's little musical frontier in Beaumont, where he wrote "She Thinks I Still Care". ("I think of Jack Clement as Moses in another life because he led us all over the place", Lee once said). As a pop, then country singer, Dickey Lee charted consistently from the early 1960s until the early 1980s. At last sighting, he was Professional Manager at Polygram Music in Nashville, and had just written a charted song for MCA's Tracy Byrd - the latest in a long line of custom-written hits. Hus buddy in the Collegiates, Allen Reynolds, also went to Nashville, and became the producer of Garth Brooks.

03 - "HEY HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 3-5, 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-9-18 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - SHAKE AROUND
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-6-33 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments:
Dickey Lee - Vocal and Guitar
Allen Reynolds, Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

The Collagiates
Alan Reynolds - Chorus
Bill Talmadge - Chorus
David Moore - Chorus
Eddie Well - Chorus
J.L. Jerden - Chorus
David Glenn - Chorus

For Biography of Dickey Lee see: > The Sun Biographies <
Dickey Lee's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 1958

From ABC Television
7 West 66th Street
New York 23, N.Y.
March 4, 1958

MERV GRIFFIN, DON CORNELL ON "AMERICAN BANDSTAND" IN WEEK OF MARCH 10
American Broadcasting Net work star Merv Griffin, Don Cornell, The Four Lads and other front-runners in the pop music world will appear on Dick Clark's ABC-TV "American Bandstand" in the week of March 10. "American Bandstand" is televised Mondays through Fridays in two segments, 3:00-3:30 PM, EST, and 4-5 PM.

Guests in the week include:
Monday, March 10 Don Cornell and The Four Lads
Tuesday, March 11 Frankie Vaughan, The Four Lads and Jack Jones
Wednesday, March 12 Merv Griffin
Thursday, March 13 Eddie Robbins
Friday, March 14 Terry Nolan and the Cliff Thomas Trio.

GLASSO, ONE-FINGERED HANDSTANDER, ON "PAUL WINCHELL SHOW" MARCH 9

Paul Winchell and his hard-headed partners Jerry Mahoney and Knucklehead Smiff present Glasso doing his famous one-fingered handstand; the comic contortion act of the Florida Trio, and Ian Martin in a comedy skit with Paul on "The Paul Winchell Show", Sunday, March 9 (ABC-TV, 4:30-5 PM, EST).
MARCH 1958

One morning in early March, a lanky fellow came in the door and asked if Sam Phillips could see him. Regina Reese politely told him Sam wasn't in, but the visitor said he would wait in the studio. He seemed to know his way around and proceeded to go through the door to the studio, where he sat for several hours in a metal folding chair. He never came out to go for coffee or lunch or to speak with us.

When Barbara Barnes walked to the front of the building and then returned to the back, she glanced at him but never did say more than ''hi''. At first Barbara just saw a man with curly hair, a receding hairline, and an air of profound dejection. He was so thin as to look malnourished. A more experienced person would have known it was a look connected with alcoholism, but Barbara didn't recognize that. Something about his sadness and humility reminded her of those stray dogs that would come around her farmhouse looking for scraps.

Then it dawned Barbara. I've seen that man's picture, it's Carl Perkins! Still she didn't introduce herself, partly because he seemed so detached. Also, she had taken the attitude that she was there to do her work, and if the musicians didn't initiate talk with her, she usually didn't talk much with them. The regulars like Billy Riley, Stan Kesler, and Roland Janes were exceptions.

When Sam Phillips came in about two o’clock, Barbara was in the front and was the one to tell him Carl Perkins had been in the studio waiting for him a long time. Sam's expression didn't change, but his voice said a lot. ''Carl Perkins'' was all he said. But the irony in those two words conveyed a great deal of negativity. They got together for awhile and then Carl left. He probably had come to ask about having another session, but he must've gotten a rejection, because he never showed up again to my knowledge'', said Barbara.

Carl Perkins' album was selling pretty well, and I looked for a chance to ask Sam why they weren't promoting Carl more. Jud Phillips booked him for the Dick Clark nighttime show that summer, so he wasn't totally forgotten, but we didn't have a current record. When I asked him about this, he told me that he had pinned a lot of hope on Carl after he sold Elvis, and it looked like his hopes were being realized with the success of Car's million-seller, ''Blue Suede Shoes''. Sam had bought I nice toupee and the requisite Cadillac in celebration'', said Barbara.

''He came to me after hearing ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' by Elvis Presley on Bob Neal's radio show from Memphis'', said Sam. ''Carl’s was at home in Jackson, playing around there with his two brothers, and he said he did the same type of music Elvis was doing. When he came here, he brought a drummer, too, and some songs he had written. I've been working with him for three years, but he's never had a commercial record except ''Blue Suede Shoes'', according to Sam. ''But that was really big'', Barbara replied. ''And I loved it''. ''Yes, if he hadn't missing his timing, the momentum of that record could have been a springboard to bigger things'', said Sam. ''It wasn't his fault his driver went to sleep and had a wreck on the way to New York for his big TV appearance, but by the time he and his brothers were out of the hospital and could work again, Elvis' cover had come out and the public was confused. Instead of Carl singing the song on the Perry Como show as he had been booked to do, Elvis did it on the Ed Sullivan show. ''We have Steve Sholes and RCA to thank for that'', Sam added sarcastically.

He went on to say that he had a session on Carl just the past December 11, 1957, and had put out ''Glad All Over'', but it wasn't going anywhere. ''You haven't noticed any big stir, have you'', he said. ''You know Sam'', Barbara answer. ''I remember vaguely reading about Carl and Elvis getting together at this studio but not to record, just goofing around. That was before I know much about Sun Records. Was that when you were still trying to get a good release for him'', Barbara said. ''Oh, yesss'', he drawled. ''Carl was having a session, and what you might call a major disruption took place. Elvis came in and took over. He sat down at the piano and started singing gospel, and all the cats joined in. Jerry Lee Lewis was playing piano for Carl, first time Carl had had a piano for a session and the first time Jerry Lee had played on one. I called up Johnny Cash to come over, and also Robert Johnson, the entertainment editor from the paper, and Leo Soroka, you know them. They took some pictures and the next day the Press-Scimitar carried a photo of the guys, calling them ''Million Dollar Quartet''. That was December 4, 1956, after Elvis had left us. But he still had the habit of coming by. But back to Carl. I don't know we can get any more out of him than we already have. He's a good country singer, but that's not necessarily an asset in today's market. That's not the way we're going now. Country is just the same as dead. If you don't believe it, ask anybody in Nashville'', according to Sam Phillips.

MARCH 1958

Newspaper clipping, Jackson, Mississippi.

THOSE TUNEFUL THOMASES - The Thomas Trio, Cliff, Ed and Barbara, 512 Eastview Street, will appear on a national TV show, the American Bandstand, March 14, originating from Philadelphia, Pa.

Naturally they'll sing "I'm On My Way Home", a recent record release by Phillips International and which was composed by Ed Thomas, Jr. Their parents are Mr. and Mrs. Edward Thomas.

Elvis Presley starts his two-year stint in the U.S. Army.

MARCH 6, 1958 THURSDAY

The Everly Brothers recorded ''All I Have To Do Do Is Dream'' and ''Claudette'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

Five days after he was fired from the Grand Ole Opry, Marty Robbins and the Opry patch up their differences.

MARCH 8, 1958 SATURDAY

Jimmy Dean is a guest on NBC-TV's ''The Perry Como Show'' .

Days after, Jerry Lee Lewis sings "Breathless" at the Dick Clark's "Bandstand Show". Beechnut chewing gum had sponsored the networking, but initial response was unfavorable until Jud Phillips and Dick Clark figured out how to kill two birds with one stone with a cross-promotion deal. Dick Clark invited the kids to send 50 cents together with five beechnut chewing gum wrappers, to receive a 'free' autographed copy of "Breathless". The response was overwhelming. Barbara Barness, ordered a rubber autograph stamp, and everyone in Sun's tiny operation - including session musicians and lesser artists - were put to work autographing and mailing thousands of copies of "Breathless". Dick Clark received half of the proceeds from the sale of the thirty-eight thousands records shipped by Phillips during the promotion, which Phillips calculated at $2,746. Jerry Lee Lewis was persuaded to forgo artist royalties, and Phillips decided to forgo publishing royalties on the flip side - Jerry's cavalier reworking of Roy Orbison's "Go! Go! Go!", now doing business as "Down The Line". Also on the Bandstand Show, Johnny Cash is featured along with The Platters and The Silhouettes.

MARCH 9, 1958 SUNDAY

The Everly Bothers sing ''Wake Up Little Susie'' and ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'' on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The lineup for the CBS program, telecast live from New York, also features Jo Stafford.

MARCH 10, 1958 MONDAY

Columbia released Marty Robbins' double-sided hit, ''Just Married'' backed with ''Stairway Of Love''.

MARCH 11, 1958 TUESDAY

Fred Foster founds Monument Records in Baltimore, Maryland. Later relocating in Nashville, the label goes on to represent such acts as Roy Orbison, Kris Kristofferson, Dolly Parton, Billy Swan and, in the 1990s, The Dixie Chicks.

MARCH 14, 1958 FRIDAY

Sun artists, Cliff, Ed and Barbara Thomas appear on the national TV show, The American Band Stand, originating from Philadelphia, Pa. There sing "I'm On My Way Home" a recent record release by Phillips International and which was composed by Ed Thomas.

MARCH 1958

Filming ''High School Confidential''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR TOMMY BLAKE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE MARCH 1958
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

In March, Tommy Blake was back at Sun and received two advances totaling $175.05. Sam Phillips had a deeper problem, his franchise act, Johnny Cash, was not only leaving the Sun label but refusing to bring any of his own songs to his few remaining Sun sessions.

Around the time Johnny Cash hit with "Ballad Of A Teenage Queen" in 1957, a country singer from Shreveport, Louisiana, named Tommy Blake, he fronted an adolescent country outfit on local radio during the early fifties before upscaling to the Big D Jamboree in Dallas, Texas. Regional imprints took care of his early recording career before started to record at Sun. Perhaps Blake made a note of Cash's penchant for story songs, for a few months later he returned to Sun with several demos for Johnny Cash. One demo, "Diesel Train", was certainly in Cash's style.

But another, "Ballad Of A Broken Heart", had perhaps a wider appeal. Shortly after Blake previewed the son at Sun, Cash recorded it, and it later appeared on a single as "Story Of A Broken Heart".

Tommy Blake was one of the guys who never really made it, but got close enough to know what making it was all about. Close enough to know that he wanted it badly. Some guys can give it a shot, accept that the public doesn't want to buy what they have, then move on happy that they at least tried. Not Tommy Blake.

He looked like a star, even if his vocal abilities fell somewhere short of stellar. After his performing career was over, he tried to experience success vicariously by becoming a songwriter. Once again, he came close, even wrote a few hits, but never quite had the industry beating down his door.

Tommy Blake's life was a How-Not-To-Do-It manual. He angered Chet Atkins, changed names and aliases as often as he changed his socks, sold songs, then sold them again, drank, pilled, and beat up his wives.

01 - "BALLAD OF A BROKEN HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Tommy Blake-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-10-6 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-6-3 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

It appears as though Tommy Blake gained his entre to Sun by recording a set of demo tunes sometime in late 1957. By this point, Johnny cash was hoarding all his new material for his Columbia sessions some eight months distant, and Sun's little army of songwriters had a golden opportunity to pitch material at the departing superstar. Sam Phillips listened to the demo tape and wrote ''Ballad of a broken heart, real good'' on the slip of paper that accopanied the box.

It was indeed 'real good'. Blake had the good sense to demo the song with an approximation of Luther Perkins' guitar paret so that it would not require much imagination to hear how the finished product would sound, but he had the lack of good sense to sell the song outright to Sam Phillips. Throughout his life, Blake would sell songs; George Jones' ''Tender Years'' and Faron Young's ''Wine Me Up'' were just two of reportedly many hits he wrote and sold.

02 - "INTRODUCTION/DIESEL TRUCK" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-12 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03 - "WINDOW OF MY HEART" - B.M.I. - 1:37
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-16 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

04 - "CHUCKIE" - B.M.I. - 1:33
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-19 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

05 - "LITTLE LOVELIGHT" - B.M.I. - 1:24
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-23 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Tommy Blake also recorded "Freedom", now retitled "I Still Love You". If Cash had recorded it and Phillips had published it, Blake would have had another lawsuit on his hands.

06 - "(FREEDOM) I STILL LOVE YOU" - B.M.I. - 1:43
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-25 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

07 - "MY ALICE FAYE" - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-26 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

08 - "I DIG YOU BABY" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:43
Composer: - Tommy Blake-Jerry Ross
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1958
released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-14 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
Reissued: - May 29, Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-6-18 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

As Thomas Van Givens, Tommy Blake sounded like a portrait painter prior to his having aspirations to make it in music. Unissued, "You Better Believe It" stems from his second go round at 706 Union some six months later.

09 - "YOU BETTER BELIEVE IT" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1958
Released: - October 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30116-B-6 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 9 - MORE REBEL ROCKABILLY
Reissued: - April 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-17 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tommy Blake - Vocal & Guitar

For Biography of Tommy Blake see: > The Sun Biographies <
Tommy Blake's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR TOMMY BLAKE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY MARCH 15, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

On "Sweetie Pie", drummer Van Eaton lays down a really fine track, emphasizing the cowbell. The band trades two bar phrases with Blake, working a slowed down Bo Diddley rhythm.

01 - "SWEETIE PIE" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Tommy Blake-Jerry Ross
''Sweetie Pie'' was penned by Dale Hawkins and Carl Adams, not Tommy and
Jerry Ross as other sources have claimed. Curiously, Carl also co-wrote
Mrs. Mergitory's Daughter and Lovin' Bug with Dale.
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 312 - Master
Recorded: - March 15, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 300-B < mono
SWEETIE PIE / I DIG YOU BABY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Tommy Blake's second and last Sun single appeared, coupling "Sweetie Pie" with "I Dig You Baby", although it's unclear if it was recorded in January or March. Both songs were credited to Blake and his Marine Corps. pal, Jerry Ross, but it's likely that "Sweetie Pie" had already been recorded by Dale Hawkins, and the cowbells on Blake's recording curiously echoed Hawkins' defining hit, "Susie Q".

Shane Hughes asserts that Hawkins and Carl Adams (who worked for Hawkins by this point) wrote the song, but it became a moot point because Blake's version wasn't a hit and Hawkins' version wasn't released for decades. Jerry Ross incidentally, left a demo at Sun as Gene Ross and later recorded "Everybody's Tryin" (the song he'd demo'd at Sun) for Murco Records in Shreveport. Blake was credited as the co-writer under the name Thomas Givens, probably to sidestep the Sun publishing contract.

02(1) - "SHAKE AROUND" - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Raymond Eugene Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 15, 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-13 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02(2) - "SHAKE AROUND" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Raymond Eugene Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 15, 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-18 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02(3) - "SHAKE AROUND" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Raymond Eugene Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None – Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 15, 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-6 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313 HK-6-22 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1854 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tommy Blake - Vocal & Guitar
Carl Bailey Adams - Guitar
Edward "Eddie Hall" Dettenheim - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

and/or probably
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Stan Kesler - bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Probably Backing Vocal
Andre Mitchel, Johnny Pryor, Elijan Franklin and John Franklin

For Biography of Tommy Blake see: > The Sun Biographies <
Tommy Blake's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

CARL BAILEY ADAMS - Born in Rayville, Louisiana on November 7, 1935, the last of ten children, four of whom died at birth. On October 11, 1941, Carl's brother Clyde and his sister's husband, Alton, were planning a hunting trip and asked Carl and Clyde's father for his shotgun. They left the gun on the dinning room table where Carl began fooling with it, sticking his fingers into the barrels. Carl's sister screamed and Carl dropped the gun. It discharged, blowing off two fingers and killing his sister's young son. Carl held himself responsible for his nephew's death and became a troubled soul.

His hand was surgically repaired, and he learned to play the guitar left-handed with picks taped to his thumb and remaining fingers. Hughes draws a parallel to the Belgian jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt who had two fingers of his fretting hand destroyed in a fire, but Reinhardt was already a skilled musician at the time of his accident whereas Adams learned to play after the tragedy. Later, Carl Adams attended the Louisiana Technical College, where he met Ed Dettenheim.

Carl Adams was hanging around with Dale Hawkins, Adams became dependent upon prescription drugs and died aged 30 of kidney failure on February 22, 1965.

ED DETTENHEIM (ED HALL) - Born in Shreveport on February 23, 1934, Dettenheim took up guitar and then bass. He learned to play left handed first and switched to right, but he was never great a lead player, simply he could not move that picking with his right hand fast like flatpickers, but he could put harmony and rhythm to anything a picker could play. Dettenheim took the name Eddie Hall and Thomas Givens took the name Tommy Blake. "As to why he picked the name Blake I can only guess", said Hall. "Tommy was broadcast literate.

A single sylable last name that makes a harsh auditory impact makes for easy recall. Blake's sure makes a more lasting first impression than a flowing two-sylable name like Givens.

Tommy would have been very much aware and into stuff like that. He was the best salesman I ever knew. He just couldn't stop selling unless I intervened", said Dettenheim. Ed Hall went to Louisiana Sociology University to work toward a degree in psychiatric social work. Hall later worked as a superintendent of several state institutions for the developmentally challenged.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR TOMMY BLAKE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SUNDAY MARCH 16, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

This effort, which included the cream of Sun's studio musicians. Everyone is here, from Roland Janes to Stan Kesler to Jimmy Van Eaton. Yet the results still seem a bit forced. Its hard to blame the band for what goes wrong here. So why aren't the results more engaging? It comes down to Blake's performance. Unlike the best of Sun's rockabilly, Blake sounds like he's posturing here; almost like an old man trying to sing young folks' music.

"I Dig You Baby" featured on Tommy Blake's second and last single for Sun. Neither enjoyed much commercial success. In fact, a harsh verdict might be that both are deservedly rare. Blake's efforts have been minimized even by most collectors who lionize every minute of music that ever appeared on a yellow Sun label, or every note ever played in the tiny studio on the corner of Union and Marshall Avenues in Memphis.

01 - "I DIG YOU BABY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Tommy Blake-Jerry Ross
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 313 - Master
Recorded: - March 16, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 300-A < mono
I DIG YOU BABY /SWEETIE PIE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

The puzzle is even more pronounced on "I Dig You Baby". The band is superb. From the first four bars, this record sizzles instrumentally. How could anyone or anything dilute its effectiveness? A Tennessee hound dog howling against this backing track might have produced a classic Sun record, but Blake isn't up to the challenge. His lyrics are strained ("At the drug store we did meet"). And, once again, vocally he manages to drag the proceedings to the level of mediocrity. At best, this is an almost great record. You won't hear better, more powerful instrumental work anywhere in Sun's release schedule in the 300 series. But you're going to hear lots of vocals that'll make you wish Blake had stayed in Shreveport, Louisiana.

02(1) - "YOU BETTER BELIEVE IT" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 16, 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-22 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02(2) - "YOU BETTER BELIEVE IT" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 16, 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-28 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-6-23 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

02(3) "YOU BETTER BELIEVE IT" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Tommy Blake
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 16, 1958
Released: - April 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-9 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

The contribution of Sid Manker and Ed Bruce on the above session is only assumed. Both are confirmed to have appeared on the session, but in what capacity is uncertain. Ed Dettenheim recalls that Carl Adams was present at the session, although he may not have actually performed on the recordings.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tommy Blake - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Bailey Adams - Guitar
William Edwin Bruce - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

For Biography of Tommy Blake see: > The Sun Biographies <
Tommy Blake's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jerry Lee Lewis had rushed back to Memphis to record the final versions of "High School Confidential" during a break in the Allen Freed tour. "High School Confidential" had been concocted by MGM artist Ron Hargrave, although Oscar Davis had cut Lewis in for 50 percent of the composer credit. A similar ploy was used on the flip side, when Jack Clement cut himself in for 50 percent of Pee Wee Maddux's "Fools Like Me".

Rather than try a pop ballad, which Jerry Lee knew he could not handle, Sam Phillips and Jack Clement preferred to offer a country ballad with a pop flavor. The country flip sides also maintained Jerry's credibility in the country market - a consideration that would stand him in good stead when, then years later, he would begin to declare rather loudly that he had always been a country artist.

Session date taken from tape box. However, the Sun production log notes that Sun 296 "High School Confidential"/"Fools Like Me" was released on April 9. However, it is more probably that April 9 was the scheduled released date and that the single was still in preparation until later April and released in early May.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION 1: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY MID-MARCH 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN / DOUBLE SESSION
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

More than one session.

Although Jerry attempted ''Sexy Ways'' at two different sessions during this 1958 session, he never actually sung “Sexy Ways”: during his first attempt in January he changed the lyrics to “Cool Cool Ways”, and then on this session in on April this became “Carrying On”. Both are impressive, but none of them were released until a couple of compilations in 1974. By 1965 the world had changed a little and he finally felt brave enough to record the proper lyrics: with a superb drums and cymbals intro (probably by Buddy Harmon) this inspired performance was one of the many highlights of ''The Return Of Rock'' later that year.

1(1) - "CARRYING ON (SEXY WAYS)" (2) - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Hank Ballard
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-15 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(2) - "CARRYING ON (SEXY WAYS)" (2) - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Hank Ballard
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First a ppearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-7-17 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-11 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

2(1) - "FOOLS LIKE ME" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:13
Composer: - Jack Clement-Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - 4 False Starts - Incomplete Take
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-17 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(2) - "FOOLS LIKE ME" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Jack Clement-Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-11-10 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-18 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(3) - "FOOLS LIKE ME" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Jack Clement-Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-6-A9 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-10 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

''Fools Like Me'' recorded in March 1958 and released (with a male vocal group overdub) a few weeks later as the B-side to Jerry’s 5th Sun single ''High School Confidential'', this is one of his most memorable early ballads. The 1963 ''Golden Hits'' re-cut features a much fuller band complete with a string section, and this treatment suits the song perfectly, as do the girly backing singers.

2(3d) - "FOOLS LIKE ME" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Jack Clement-Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 307 - Overdubbed Master
Vocals chorus overdubbed, April 8, 1958
Roy Orbison, Jack Clement, Roland Janes
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958
Released: - May 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 296-B < mono
FOOLS LIKE ME / HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

This flipside of Sun 296, "Fools Like Me", it was the second time Jerry Lee Lewis had revealed his country leanings to the rockers who supported his hit records. His first country outing on Sun ("You Win Again" on the B-side of "Great Balls Of Fire") had shown his ability to interpret a classic Hank Williams tune. Here, the pianist offers a solid reading of a Pee Wee Maddux tune written especially for Jerry Lee Lewis, one on which Jack Clement had managed to cut himself in for half. This was hardly a throwaway outing. Considerable time went into the arrangement and recording. Even an unusually restrained chorus (consisting of Roy Orbison, Roland Janes and Jack Clement) was overdubbed for release. Billboard observed that Sun 296 was "strong stuff for all markets". In retrospect, it was the country flipside that did more to solidify Jerry Lee's career and point to the market that would extend him a lifetime welcome.

3(1)- "PUT ME DOWN" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Roland Janes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First a ppearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-9-10 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-20 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

''Put Me Down'', was initially the subject of a trio of relatively unappealing takes at a rather laboured rate of progress and then re-defined in three distinct guises before a recording deemed suitable for release was secured; what we hear are not so much alternate takes but instead radically different versions of the same song. And while many would reckon that the third of the four alternate arrangements produced commendable results, the two takes in this pattern were destined to remain unheard for a quarter of a century. It is, of course, reasonable both to assume that the four contrasting styles weren't all conceived on the same date and to acknowledge that all seven takes were almost certainly not taped consecutively; the likelihood is that progress towards the finished article would have been interspersed with the recording of other material. However, during this crowded period, i.e. the first half of 1958, one or two compromises have been made in the running order and it has been decided to present several songs en bloc to show their development, irrespective of the probable real time chronology, with ''Put Me Down'' being the most obvious example.(*)

3(2)- "PUT ME DOWN" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Roland Janes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First a ppearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-7-14 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-21 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

3(3)- "PUT ME DOWN" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Roland Janes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA 108-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-9 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

3(4) - "PUT ME DOWN" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Roland Janes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-6-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-13 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

3(5) - "PUT ME DOWN" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Roland Janes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take 5
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First a ppearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-9-11 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-24 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

3(6) - "PUT ME DOWN" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Roland Janes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - March 1985
First appearance: - Sun International (EP) 45rpm JLL EP 002-A1 mono*
THE FABULOUS JERRY LEE LEWIS - VOLUME TWO
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-21 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

* - Limited edition produced for the International Jerry Lee Lewis Fan Club, not on general sale.

3(7) - "PUT ME DOWN" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Roland Janes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 7 LP Master
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958
Released: - May 1958
First appearance: - June 1958 Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1230-A3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-14 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

4 - "I'M THROWING RICE" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: – Eddy Arnold-Steve Nelson-Ed Nelson
Publisher: - Warner Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 114-A3 mono
A TASTE OF COUNTRY
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1-6 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Jerry Lee Lewis' recording "I'm Throwing Rice (At The Girl That I Love)" is a 1949 hit written by Eddy Arnold, Steve Nelson and Ed Nelson, Jr. and first performed by Eddy Arnold. The Eddy Arnold version went to number one on the Country and Western Best Seller Lists for four weeks. Later in the year, Red Foley recorded his own version of the song which peaked at number eleven on the Country and Western Best Sellers charts.

''Your Cheatin' Heart, this Hank Williams country standard of course, though only 1 of the 4 recorded studio versions is actually performed country style. Both the Jerry Lee Sun versions are rocked up, with the later cut being the fastest yet most polished. This 1958 version was released on ''A Taste Of Country'' in 1970 and ‘Monsters’ in 1971, while the 1960 version had to wait until ''Keep Your Hands Off Of It!'' in 1970. The 1963 cut on the ''Golden Hits'' album is the most countrified version, albeit with backing that includes horns (thankfully not too high in the mix). Lastly is the unique 1975 version from ''Odd Man In'', with it’s ''Whole Lotta Shakin’'', styled intro, harmonica and croaky vocals. In 2006 Jerry taped an official DVD called ''Last Man Standing Live'' which included a duet with Norah Jones on this song (as well as ‘Crazy Arms’), something that would’ve fit perfectly into the current ''Mean Old Man'' album.

5(1) - "YOUR CHEATIN' HEART"* (1) - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 114-A5 mono
A TASTE OF COUNTRY
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-3 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"Your Cheatin' Heart" is a song written and recorded by country music singer and songwriter Hank Williams in 1952, regarded as one of country's most important standards. Country music historian Colin Escott writes that "the song, for all intents and purposes, defines country music''. He was inspired to write the song while driving with his fianceé from Nashville, Tennessee to Shreveport, Louisiana. After describing his first wife Audrey Sheppard as a "Cheatin' Heart", he dictated in minutes the lyrics to Billie Jean Jones. Produced by Fred Rose, Williams recorded the song on his last session at Castle Records in Nashville, Tennessee, on September 23, 1952.

"Your Cheatin' Heart" was released in January 1953. Propelled by Williams' recent death during a trip to a New Year's concert in Canton, Ohio, the song became an instant success. It topped Billboard's Country and Western chart for six weeks, while over a million units were sold. The success of the song continued. Joni James' version reached number two on Billboard's Most Played in Jukeboxes the same year, while Ray Charles' 1962 version reached number 29 on the Billboard Hot 100 and 13 on the UK Singles Chart. The song ranked at 217 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and was ranked number 5 on Country Music Television's 100 Greatest Songs in Country Music.

By 1952, Williams was enjoying a successful streak, releasing multiple hits, including "Honky Tonk Blues", "Half As Much", "Settin' The Woods On Fire", "Jambalaya (On the Bayou)" and "You Win Again". While his career was soaring, his marriage to Audrey Sheppard became turbulent. He developed serious problems with alcohol, morphine and painkillers prescribed to ease his severe back pain caused by spina bifida. The couple divorced on May 29, and Williams moved in with his mother. Soon after, Williams met Billie Jean Jones backstage at the Ryman Auditorium, a native of Shreveport, Louisiana, who was, at the time, dating Faron Young. Williams started dating Jones, upon the end of her relationship with Young and soon began to plan their marriage. While driving from Nashville, Tennessee to Shrevenport to announce the wedding to her parents, Williams talked to her about his previous marriage and described Audrey Sheppard as a "cheatin' heart", adding that one day she would "have to pay". Inspired by his line, he instructed Jones to take his notebook and write down the lyrics of the song that he quickly dictated to her. The finished composition included the line "You'll walk the floor, the way I do", which evoked Ernest Tubb's hit "Walking The Floor Over You".

Williams recorded the song on September 23 at the Castle Studios in Nashville. The session, which became Williams' last, also produced the A-side "Kaw-Liga", as well as the songs "I Could Never Be Ashamed of You" and "Take These Chains fRom My Heart". It was produced by Williams' publisher Fred Rose, who made minor arrangements of the lyrics of "Your Cheatin' Heart". Williams described the song to his friend, Braxton Schuffert, as he was about to play it, as "the best heart song (he) ever wrote". Williams is backed on the session by Tommy Jackson (fiddle), Don Helms (steel guitar), Chet Atkins (lead guitar), Jack Shook (rhythm guitar), and Floyd "Lightnin'" Chance (bass).

While traveling to a scheduled New Year's show in Canton, Ohio, the driver found Williams dead on the backseat of the car during a stop in Oak Hill, West Virginia. "Your Cheatin' Heart" was released at the end of January 1953. Propelled by Williams' death, the song and the A-side "Kaw-Liga" became a hit, selling over a million records. Billboard initially described the songs as "superlative tunes and performances", emphasizing the sales potential. Within a short time from its release, the song reached number one on Billboard's Top Country and Western Records, where it remained for six weeks. A demo version of Williams singing "Your Cheatin' Heart" with just his guitar, likely recorded in 1951, is also available.

Released in the wake of his passing, the song became synonymous with the myth of Hank Williams as a haunted, lonely figure who expressed pain with an authenticity that became the standard for country music. The name of the song was used as the title of Hank Williams' 1964 biopic. "Your Cheatin' Heart", as well as other songs by Williams were performed on the movie, with George Hamilton dubbing the soundtrack album recorded by Williams' son, Hank Williams, Jr. In the 2003 documentary series ''Lost Highway'', country music historian Ronnie Pugh comments, "It's Hank's anthem, it's his musical last will and testament. It's searing, it's powerful, it's gripping. If you want to say this is his last and best work, I wouldn't argue with that''. AllMusic described the track as the "signature song" of Hank Williams, and an "unofficial anthem" of country music. Rolling Stone magazine called it "one of the greatest country standards of all time", ranking it at number 217 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The song ranked at number 5 in Country Music Television's 100 Greatest Songs in Country Music in 2003, Two Pepsi Super Bowl commercials featured the song, one aired during Super Bowl XXX, featured Williams' recording while a Coca-Cola deliveryman grabbed a Pepsi. The second one, aired during Super Bowl XLVI, featured the same situation, but with the song covered by Jennifer Nettles of Sugarland. The song forms the title of the 1990 TV drama 'Your Cheatin' Heart' by John Byrne.

Other significant recordings are, February, 1953 by Hank Williams (MGM 11416); February, 1953 by Joni James; September, 1958 by George Hamilton IV (ABC Paramount 9946); March, 1959 by Billy Vaughn, an instrumental (Dot 15936); November, 1962 by Ray Charles (ABC Paramount 10375); 1965 Elvis Presley for his LP ''Elvis For Everyone'' (RCA Victor LSP-3450).

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Probably Roland Janes - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION 2: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY MID-MARCH 1958 (2)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN / DOUBLE SESSION
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Jerry Lee Lewis' "Crazy Heart" is a song first recorded by Hank Williams. It was written by Fred Rose and Maurice Murray and hit number 4 for Williams in 1951. It was recorded at Castle Studio in Nashville on July 25, 1951 with Fred Rose producing and backing from Don Helms (steel guitar), Jerry Rivers (fiddle), Sammy Pruett (lead guitar), Howard Watts (bass) and probably Jack Shook (rhythm guitar). It was one of Williams least commercially successful singles of the period, only spending two weeks on the chart, although Guy Lombardo dented the Top 20 with it, underscoring that the song was better suited to a palm court orchestra than Hank Williams. Other significant recordings are from Ernest Tubb released the song on Decca Records; Hank Williams, Jr. recorded this voice alongside Hank Sr's vocal on the song as an overdubbed duet in Nashville in the first session for the Grammy-nominated album ''Father and Son'' on MGM in 1965; Don Gibson covered the song in 1971 on Hickory Records, and Stonewall Jackson recorded the song in 1971.

6(1) - "CRAZY HEART"* (1) - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Fred Rose-Maurice Murray
Publisher: - Fred Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 1
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-6-B3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-12 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

A song upon which some time was spent but which didn't make it onto the album, Jerry Lee's first LP 1230, was a less well remembered Hank Williams number, ''Crazy Heart, which Jerry Lee executed six taking much the same course on each take. Whereas the unaccompanied version, which has been aligned with other so-called ''solo'' performances of various songs, needs no further word of explanation, the first two complete takes with the drummer and guitarist can most easily be split by reference to the piano breaks; in the second Jerry Lee displays a lighter touch and throws in an extra glissando. The higher register of the opening guitar figure of this pair distinguishes them from what went before while the first few notes that Jerry Lee Lewis strikes in each case help to differentiate the two; again, the solos can be relied upon for confirmation. Finally, a sixth, previously unreleased, take shows signs of a little more muscle with Jerry Lee's treatment of the ivories conveying a hint of intemperance; perhaps he was getting bored. (See also: before July 9, 1958 session).(*)

6(2) - "CRAZY HEART"* (1) - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Fred Rose-Maurice Murray
Publisher: - Fred Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-8-4 mono
SUN RECORDS – THE ROCKING YEARS - WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN'
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-30 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

6(3) - "CRAZY HEART" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Fred Rose-Maurice Murray
Publisher: - Fred Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Two guitars from this take onwards
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-31 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

6(4) - "CRAZY HEART"* (1) - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Fred Rose-Maurice Murray
Publisher: - Fred Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - August 1974
First appearance: - Power Pak (LP) 33rpm PO-247-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - FROM THE VAULTS OF SUN
Reissued: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-32 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

6(5) - "CRAZY HEART"* (1) - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Fred Rose-Maurice Murray
Publisher: - Fred Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - July 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm 6467 029-B6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - ROCKIN' AND FREE
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-33 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7 - "HELLO, HELLO BABY"* - B.M.I. - 3:21
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - LP Master
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958
Released: - December 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1265-A6 mono
JERRY LEE'S GREATEST
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-1 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Jerry Lee Lewis' recordings "Slippin' Around" is a song written and first recorded by Floyd Tillman in 1949. The most popular recording was a cover version by Margaret Whiting and Jimmy Wakely which reached number one on the Retail Folk Country Best Sellers chart. It is a song about a person cheating on his and her spouse.

Tillman wrote a follow-up song, the same year, with essentially the same melody, called "I'll Never Slip Around Again" in which the cheater has married the one that he and she cheated with, and is in turn worried that he and she is being cheated on. Tillman, as well as Margaret Whiting and Jimmy Wakely, recorded this song as well on July 20, 1949; and as did Doris Day.

8(1) - "SLIPPIN' AROUND"* (1) - B.M.I. - 0:29
Composer: - Floyd Tillman
Publisher: - Tillman Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-6-B6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-6-35 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

8(2) - "SLIPPIN' AROUND"* (1) - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Floyd Tillman
Publisher: - Tillman Music
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun NY-6-B5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - COLLECTORS EDITON
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-17 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Recorded at the same session that produced the single cut of ‘High School Confidential’, this 1958 version of ''Slippin' Around'' is performed as a blues song (despite it’s country origins). This first saw the light of day on the Dutch ''Collector’s Edition'' album in 1974 (many younger fans probably don’t appreciate how difficult it was to collect all of Jerry’s released Sun recordings prior to the 1980s box-sets!). While the 1968 version is far less adventurous musically, it’s a beautiful version. Initially released as the B-side to ''She Still Comes Around (To Love What’s Left Of Me)'' that year, it made it’s album debut 2 years later on ''The Best Of Jerry Lee Lewis''.

9(1) - "REAL WILD CHILD (WILD ONE)"* (1) - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Johnny O'Keefe-Johnny Greenan-Dave Owens
Publisher: - Wren Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm NY-6-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - COLLECTORS EDITION
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-19 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Jerry must’ve found this song ''Wild One'' while touring Australia at the beginning of 1958 (his first overseas tour), as it was originally recorded by Australian rocker Johnny O’Keefe and was a big hit in his homeland. Recorded here on March, this would’ve made a great A-side but instead remained unheard until the ''Rockin’ & Free'' collection in 1974 (with a slightly different alternate take appearing on ''Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumpin’ Piano'' a few months later). The producers of the ''Great Balls Of Fire!’ movie (perhaps inspired by Iggy Pop’s 1986 hit record version) must’ve seen the potential of this too, as they persuaded Jerry to re-record the song for the soundtrack album, and excellent it is too.

In both takes of ''Wild One'' Jerry Lee sticks to much the same script; even the ad-lib ''whoops'' don't vary from piece to piece. Individually these tracks are tumultuous but there's nothing disorganised here, as the similarities across the respective pieces make clear; the fervency in unfeigned yet controlled. In ''Wild One'', a repeated two-way rake of the keyboard heard at the outset of the guitar break in the first of the pair is the most obvious defining property, while the two recordings of ''Carryin' On'' here coupled together, and both divergent from a patently different third reading, can be separated courtesy of Jerry Lee opening the first with the words ''I said'' whereas in the next we hear the exclamation ''well''. The first of the two also features ten rapid fire ''wiggles'' at the start of the second verse as opposed to only six in the counterpart of the next, while in the initial attempt Jerry Lee chatters away through much of the instrumental break.(*)

9(2) - "REAL WILD CHILD (WILD ONE)"* (1) - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Johnny O'Keefe-Johnny Greenan-Dave Owens
Publisher: - Wren Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1974
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 300002-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AND HIS PUMPING PIANO
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-7-2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

''Wild One" or "Real Wild Child" is an Australian rock and roll song written by Johnny Greenan, Johnny O'Keefe, and Dave Owens. While most sources state that O'Keefe was directly involved in composing the song, this has been questioned by others. Sydney disc jockey Tony Withers was credited with helping to get radio airplay for the song but writer credits on subsequent versions often omit Withers, who later worked in the United Kingdom on pirate stations Radio Atlanta and, as Tony Windsor, on Radio London.

According to O'Keefe's guitarist, Lou Casch, the song was inspired by an incident at a gig in Newtown, Sydney, in about 1957. According to Casch, as O'Keefe and the Dee Jays played at an upstairs venue, an "Italian wedding" reception was taking place downstairs. Some of the dance patrons came to blows with wedding guests in the men's toilets, and within minutes the brawl had become a full-scale riot that spilled out into the street, with police eventually calling in the Navy Shore Patrol to help restore order. The release date of the single, 5 July 1958, is considered the birthday of Australian rock n' roll music.

O'Keefe was the first artist to record it, on his debut EP ''Shakin' At The Stadium'', released on the Festival label. This version, ostensibly recorded live at the Sydney Stadium, was in fact a studio recording, overdubbed with the sound of a real audience. The song was the first Australian rock recording to reach the national charts peaking at number 20. An alternate version was recorded and released outside Australia: in the USA (as "Real Wild Child") on Brunswick and in the United Kingdom on Coral Records.

In 1958 the song was released as a single by Jerry Ivan Allison, a member of The Crickets, using the name Ivan. Re-titled "Real Wild Child," the song became a moderate hit, peaking at number 68 on the Billboard Hot 100. "Wild One" was also recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis in 1958 but was not released until 1974 on Jerry Lee's album, ''Rockin' And Free''. His version also appears in the 1989 motion picture and soundtrack album for ''Great Balls Of Fire'' and ''Nowhere Boy''. The song was covered by Buddy Holly and is available on a 3 disc Collector's Edition by Universal Music Enterprises. (2007 Universal Music Enterprises, 3 disc set, Buddy Holly Collector's Addition). It was recorded and released as "Real Wild Child" by Jet Harris, former bassist with The Shadows, in 1962 on Harris' self-titled EP. A further version, "Real Wild Child (Wild One)" was recorded by British guitarist, Albert Lee, on his 1982 self-titled album. The song was again covered in 1986 when Iggy Pop included a version on his album ''Blah-Blah-Blah''. Titled "Real Wild Child (Wild One)," this became a number 10 hit on the United Kingdom Singles Chart in January 1987. It also charted on Billboard's Album Rock Tracks chart, peaking at number 27. The Iggy Pop version was featured in the films ''Crocodile Dundee II'', ''Adventures In Babysitting'', ''Problem Child'' and its sequel ''Problem Child 2''.

Other artists to record this song include Status Quo, Everlife, Joan Jett and The Blackhearts, Glamour Camp, Marshall Crenshaw, Brian Setzer, Teenage Head, Albert Lee and Wakefield. A cover by Christopher Otcasek appeared on the soundtrack to the film Pretty Woman. The cover by Wakefield appeared in the movie Eurotrip and its soundtrack. An up-tempo rock version of the song (titled as ''Real Wild Child'') was covered by the fictional band Josie and the Pussycats (lead vocals provided by singer Kay Hanley) in the 2001 film of the same name.

The most recent cover of the song, with the title "Real Wild Child," was by Levi Kreis portraying Jerry Lee Lewis on the original Broadway cast recording of the Broadway musical ''Million Dollar Quartet''. Kreis won a 2010 Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical.

10(3) - "CARRYING ON (SEXY WAYS)"* (3) - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Hank Ballard
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm NY-6-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - COLLECTORS EDITION
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-7-4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORK

11 - "LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL"* - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Sam Theard-Fleecie Moore
Publisher: - Hal Leonard Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - August 1986
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 1044-B6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE WILD ONE - ROCKIN' AND A-BOPPIN'
AT THE HIGH SCHOOL HOP!!
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-20 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

''Let The Good Times Roll" is a jump blues song recorded in 1946 by Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five. A mid-tempo twelve-bar blues, the song became a blues standard and one of Jordan's best-known songs. The song was written by Sam Theard, a New Orleans-born blues singer and songwriter, and was co-credited to Fleecie Moore, Jordan's wife, who never wrote a lyric in her life (however, her name was sometimes substituted for Jordan's to get around an inconvenient publishing contract; this strategy backfired when Louis and Fleecie divorced acrimoniously and she kept ownership of the songs he'd put her name on, thus denying him any income from them). Jordan and the Tympany Five performed the song in the 1947 film ''Reet, Petite, And Gone'', although the studio recording rather than a live performance is used in the soundtrack.

"Let The Good Times Roll" reached number two in the Billboard rhythm and blues chart in 1947. Its A-side, "Ain't Nobody Here But Us Chickens", was the top number one record of 1947, both songs spent nearly six months in the chart. In 2009, the song was acknowledged with a Grammy Hall of Fame Award and was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame in 2013 in the "Classic of Blues Recording, Singles or Album Tracks" category.

Numerous artists have performed "Let The Good Times Roll" and many have recorded it, including: Ray Charles (1959, The Genius of Ray Charles), Sam Butera and the Silent Witnesses (from the 1960 album The Wildest Clan), Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames (1964 Rhythm and Blues at the Flamingo), Muddy Waters (1975, Muddy Waters Woodstock Album), Koko Taylor (1978, The Earthshaker), Clifton Chenier and His Red Hot Louisiana Band (1982, Live at the San Francisco Blues Festival), a great version of Jerry Lee Lewis (from the 1986 album ''The Wild One, Rockin' And A-Boppin' At The High School Hop! (Sun International LP 1044); Buckwheat Zydeco and Ils Sont Partis Band (1992, Let the Good Times Roll, released 2009), Quincy Jones (with Stevie Wonder, Bono, and Ray Charles, 1995, Q's Jook Joint), and Rick Derringer (1998, Blues Deluxe).

B.B. King has recorded several studio and live versions, including with Bobby Bland and Tony Bennett. It also appeared in Five Guys Named Moe, the 1992 musical review about Louis Jordan, and in the 1980 film The Blues Brothers. Lynda Carter covered this song in her 2011 album ''Crazy Little Things''.

12(1) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL"* (3) - B.M.I. - 0:29
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Penron Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Breakdown
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-9-12 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-15 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Progress towards the end result can also be evaluated by reference to the structural properties of discrete batches of takes, looking at the order in which the elements are assembled. For example, whereas the very earliest takes feature a piano solo immediately followed by a guitar solo, the later recordings exhibit a revised pattern with the two instrumental passages divided by a further verse and refrain. The products of the final session are marked by the more emphatic presence of rhythm guitar and bass, creating a fuller sound and allowing Roland Janes to supply fills and his solo. Listen, for example, to the second instrumental break in the third complete take, which formed the basis of the master, from this later session; there's a lot going on here and Jerry Lee's piano is fighting for attention in the mix dominated by the two guitars.(*)

''High School Confidential'' obviously proved to be a troublesome exercise in arriving at a marketable release; despite more than twenty strikes it still required a bit of ingenious editing on Sam's part to coin the master, when he snipped the tapes and substituted the last few seconds of one attempt (take (12(5) in preference to the quite different ending of the chosen recording (take (12(2).(*)

It's a matter of some regret that the finished article, as released on Sun 296 and LP 1230, didn't extend any invitations to a ''pretty kitten'', or communicate that nimble couplet involving the burning of shoes and loss of leather heard in the film soundtrack version. Moreover, by the time of recording the master, the physical exercises had been confined to the comparatively innocuous ''hoppin''', ''boppin''' and ''rockin''', with none of the more challenging ''stompin''' and ''wigglin''' embarked upon during the earlier stages. The word ''wigglin''', of course, had a bit of history; it could be Jerry Lee had been asked to clean things up a bit, bearing in mind public concerns expressed over some of the phraseology employed in ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On''. Notwithstanding its status as the preamble to a drama which portrayed drug taking and other unsavoury antics, at least the lyrics of the issued cut of ''High School Confidential'' would be a tad more wholesome. Although all too soon, Jerry Lee would, of course, be in enough trouble anyway; a tour of the United Kingdom, destined to become one of the most notorious episodes in the history of rock and roll, with very little music even being played, lay ahead.(*) (See also: February 14, 1958 Session).

12(2) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL"* (3) - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Penron Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-9-12 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-7-6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

12(3) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL"* (3) - B.M.I. - 0:32
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Penron Music
Matrix number: - None - 2 False Starts
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - July 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (EP) 45rpm JLL EP 001-B1 mono
THE FABULOUS JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-7-7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

12(4) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL"* (3) - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Penron Music
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take 2
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - July 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (EP) 45rpm JLL EP 001-B1 mono
THE FABULOUS JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - October 2015 B ear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-7-8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

12(5) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL"* (3) - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Penron Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-6-B9 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-7-9 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Note: The master version (Sun 296) is a composite engineered from the greater part of (12(5) and the last few seconds of (12(2).

12(6) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL"* (3) - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Penron Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-7-10 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

12(7) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL"* (3) - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Penron Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 5
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-7-11 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

13 - "I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS"*- B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Isham Jones-Gus Kahn
Publisher: - EMI Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Instrumental Unknown Take
Only one guitar?
Recorded: - Mid-March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-6-B7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-18 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

This Jerry Lee Lewis' instrumental "I'll See You in My Dreams" is a popular song and written by Isham Jones, with lyrics by Gus Kahn, and was published in 1924. Originally recorded by Isham Jones and the Ray Miller Orchestra, it charted for 16 weeks during 1925, spending seven weeks at number 1.

The song was chosen as the title song of the 1951 film ''I'll See You in My Dreams'', a musical biography of Gus Kahn. Popular recordings of it were made by many leading artists including Marion Harris in 1924, Cliff Edwards, Louis Armstrong, Pat Boone, Doris Day, Ella Fitzgerald, Mario Lanza, Tony Martin, Anita O'Day, The Platters, Ezio Pinza, Sue Raney, Jerry Lee Lewis (1958, instrumental) and Andy Williams. A "Texas Swing" version of the song was recorded by Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys. The song was also recorded by Django Reinhardt and the Quintet of the Hot Club of France, and inspired Merle Travis to record it as a guitar instrumental.

Many other guitarists including Chet Atkins and Thom Bresh followed in Merle's footsteps. Michel Lelong, a French guitarist, published the first tab of this Travis' arrangement for the American publisher/guitarist Stefan Grossman's Guitare Workshop during the 1980s, following by Thom Bresh (Merle Travis 's son) for Homespun Tapes, and Marcel Dadi for Stefan Grossman 's Guitar Worshop.

The song was on the soundtrack for the 1940 film ''Kitty Foyle'', which won Ginger Rogers her only Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role. It was recorded by Mario Lanza on his Coca-Cola Show of 1951-2 and is available on a compilation album mastered from those same shows, and featuring the same title, ''I'll See You in My Dreams'', released by BMG in 1998. Instrumental versions of the song were featured prominently in the 1946 20th Century Fox motion picture ''The Razor's Edge'' arranged by Herbert Spencer; as well as in the opening of the 1946 Tom and Jerry cartoon episode, "The Milky Waif".

The Bachelors recorded their version of the song in 1963, which appeared on their first EP ''The Bachelors''. In 1976, Ron Goodwin and His Orchestra recorded the song on their album ''Rhythm And Romance''. In 1976, British female vocal duo the Pearls released a disco version of the song, which was pressed in the United States on a 10" promo disc as well as the regular 7" single. A 1953/54 version by Eddie Cochran was released in 1997 on the album ''Rockin' It Country Style''. In the late 1980s to the end of the 1990s, Mark Knopfler and Chet Atkins performed it live as a medley with John Lennon's "Imagine". In 1999, guitarist Alden Howard recorded an instrumental version of this song for the soundtrack of the movie ''Sweet And Lowdown''. The English singer Joe Brown performed a version of the song on the ukulele as the finale of the George Harrison tribute concert, ''Concert For George'', in 2002. In 2003, the Portuguese metal band Moonspell recorded a version that would serve as soundtrack for the short horror movie ''I'll See You in My Dreams'', of which was also recorded a music video. In 2005, American singer-songwriter Ingrid Michaelson recorded a cover of the song for her debut album ''Slow The Rain''. In 2010, Australian singer Melinda Schneider recorded the song for her Doris Day tribute album ''Melinda Does Doris'', and in 2013, The National frontman Matt Berninger recorded the song with Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks Orchestra for the third volume of the ''Boardwalk Empire'' soundtrack.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar *
Unknown - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WARREN SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY MARCH 17, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

''Goodbye Mr. Love'' was always a favourite Sun single, and to hear an even more countrified version complete with steel guitar is a real pleasure. Warren's vocal is perhaps a little more restrained than on Sun 314 but this was always a fine song and the lyric changes and markedly different approach allows us to look at an old favourite through new eyes. The song was written by Billy Byrd, a singer and guitarist from Belzoni, Mississippi (not Ernest Tubb's guitarist Billy Byrd). Byrd was a sharecropper who joined the Marines during the war and moved to Jackson in 1946. He played guitar in Emmitt Hawkins' band for a while and then he formed his own group, the Home Towners, who were on WRBC in Jackson for some years. Byrd recorded briefly for the local label, Delta Records, and had some success in 1954 with an event or disaster song about a child, Carol Ann Moses, trapped in a building after a tornado hit Vicksburg. Byrd wrote several good songs and was visited by Faron Young and other singers as well as Warren Smith. He remembered: ''Warren heard about the song and he came by here at after midnight one day to get the song off me. He turned up in a red Cadillac, I'll never forget that''. When the song was issued, Byrd saw that Smith's name was on it too, and he didn't forget that either.

01 - "GOODBYE MR. LOVE"* (1) - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Warren Smith-Billy Byrd
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Country Version - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 17, 1958
Released: - 1976
First appearance: -Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30117-B-6 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 10 - SUN COUNTRY
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-8-5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

02 - "URANIUM ROCK" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Lloyd George
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 17, 1958
Released: - May 1973
First appearance: - Phonogram Records (LP) 33rpm 6467 025-B8 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15514-23 mono
WARREN SMITH - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Al Hopson - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar* and Bass
Sid Manker - Guitar and Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

For Biography of Warren Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Warren Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SUN-LINERS - "So Young" by Ray Smith (SUN 298) has taken off like a house a fire - and indicates that Sun has again discovered an artist with the potential to take the record-buying public by storm. Probably the outstanding characteristic of Ray Smith's performance is his unflagging enthusiasm and energy. Cutting a session is just plain fun for Ray, and the gusto with which he performs had made him a favorite of high school crowds throughout his native area - Kentucky, Missouri, and Illinois.

Like many performers before him, Ray plays guitar and sings at the same time - but his ability to project a pleasing personality is equalled by few. Ray is managed by Charlie Terrell of Sikeston, Mobile, and the first thing Charlie did upon sign the boy (now 21) was to bring him to Sun's Sam Phillips. If the initial reaction to "So Young" is indicative of ray Smith's ultimate success - then the sky's the limit!

MARCH 18, 1958 THUESDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis on TV American Bandstand, hosted by Dick Clark, filmed in Philadelphia.

Wilma Lee and Stoney Cooper recorded ''Big Midnight Special''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY MARCH 19, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLIE RICH
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS
MUSICAL DIRECTOR - BILL JUSTIS

Recording session for March 19 and 26 are logged but it is not clear precisely which titles were recorded when. However, these early session produced Ray's first single "So Young"/"Right Behind You Baby" as well as "Why Why Why" and Break Up" both of which were left in the can.

If anyone could cope with changing times in the record business, it was Ray Smith. The man was a veritable chameleon. As his personal appearances of the day confirmed, he could offer convincing efforts in styles ranging from Elvis Presley to Frank Sinatra. What was a little bluesy funk to a man like that?. The Ray Smith who recorded this session and more in early 1962, was quite different from the rockabilly pretender Sun fans had come to adore during his 1958 stint with the label.

01 - "BREAK UP" - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 19, 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Charly 16-18 mono
THE BEST OF SUN ROCKABILLY
Reissued: - 1991 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 32-13 mono
ROCKIN' WITH RAY

Whilst Ray and the boys were away touring Jerry Lee Lewis cut "Break Up" which accounted for Ray's version being ignored. Ray was not amused by this bit of blatant poaching and tackled Lewis on the matter who denied knowing that it was Ray's song. Later the faux pas would be forgotten as Ray and Jerry Lee became firm friends, possibly recognising in each other kindred spirits.

02 - "SO YOUNG" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 310 - Master
Recorded: - March 19, 1958
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 298-A < mono
SO YOUNG / RIGHT BEHIND YOU BABY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Charlie Rich had a major hand in writing and producing Ray Smith's first Sun record. The results reflect the kind of rockabilly that was likely to emerge from Sun in 1958. There was plenty of energy here, but the sound was a little more intentional. This music has been thought through in advance, both lyrically and instrumentally. It is calculated for the teenage marketplace. The guitar solos are still hot and the vocals still sexy, but something had plainly been learned from all the wild excesses of 1956 - namely that radio didn't play them.

"So Young" tells the tale of teenage angst. In that sense, the results seem a little dated. There's something incongruous about the possibility of a wildman like Ray Smith crying when whispers drift his way. "Right Behind You Baby", creates a solid groove and never lets up. The double length instrumental solo is a special treat for Sun fans. Charlie Rich's presence on the session is subtle but undeniable. His piano turns those stop rhythm chords into inversions that might be more at home at a Stan Kenton session than a Union Avenue gig.

Such a solid piece of material (from the pen of Charlie Rich) as "Right Behind You Baby" should have catapulted Ray Smith into the Sun fast track. Unfortunetely, the record was released in April 1958, at a time when Sun had no less than nine singles to contend with.

03 - "RIGHT BEHIND YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 311 - Master
Recorded: - March 19, 1958
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 298-B < mono
RIGHT BEHIND YOU BABY / SO YOUNG
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

04(1) - "TWO PENNIES AND A STRING" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Charly International APS
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 19, 1958
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 32-6 mono
RAY SMITH - ROCKIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-22 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Dean Perkins - Guitar
Stanley Walker – Guitar
James Webb - Bass
Gary Diamond - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

Three Ray Smith singles were released between May 1958 and March 1959. The first, ''So Young'' earned him a spot on the Dick Clark Show for August 9, 1958, but the record didn't chart. ''Charlie Rich was on piano when we recorded that'', said Smith. ''The intro and the ending was the same and I remember we faded out on that damn thing. After we'd faded, Charlie was still sitting there playing his licks. We're finished! Charlie was feeling good. He'd reach up, get a drink, never miss a lick''. Stanley Walker remembered that session, too. ''We were recording ''So Young'', he said, ''and Jack Clement took my fingers and placed them and showed me just exactly the right idea on that. I tried to came up with my own stuff, and I did on all the others, the intros and the turnarounds''.

For Biography of Ray Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ray Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 21, 1958 FRIDAY

RCA Victor released ''Elvis' Golden Records'' ( RCA Victor LPM-1707).

MARCH 22, 1958 SATURDAY

Hank Williams Jr. makes his public stage debut as the age of eight at the Nancy Auditorium in Swainsboro, Georgia. The facility is owned by Webb Pierce and music executive Jim Denny.

Pee Wee King joins host Red Foley on ABC's ''Country Music Jubilee'', formerly known as ''Ozark Jubilee''.

MARCH 24, 1958 MONDAY

Elvis Presley is sworn into the U.S. Army in Memphis, Tennessee.

MARCH 25, 1958 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley receives a standard G.I. haircut at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas. As he receives his buzzcut, he quips, ''Hair today, gone tomorrow!''.

MARCH 26, 1958 WEDNESDAY

The Kalin Twins recorded ''When''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY/THURSDAY MARCH 26, 27, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLIE RICH
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS
MUSICAL DIRECTOR - BILL JUSTIS

01 - "YOU MADE A HIT" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Walt Maynard
Publisher: - Buna Music - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 26, 27, 1958

02(1) - "SHAKE AROUND" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Raymond Eugene Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 26, 27, 1958
Released: - 1978
First appearance: – Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30147-10 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - RAUNCHY ROCKABILLY
Reissued: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 32-2 mono
ROCKIN' WITH RAY

At the last tally, there were at least three Ray Smith's cutting sub-rock and roll records in the late fifties. Two contenders came from Oklahoma but the Ray Smith of Sun fame, was Kentucky born and bred. A multi-faceted performer (piano, guitar and drums were all part of Ray's impressive musical resume), he could also draft a half-decent piece of material when pushed by his producer, Bill Justis. The ebullient "Shake Around" was cut during Ray's first sortie to Sun early in 1958.

02(2) - "SHAKE AROUND" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Raymond Eugene Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 26, 27, 1958
Released: - 2009
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-24 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03(1) - "WILLING AND READY" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Raymond Eugene Smith
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 26, 27, 1958
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30147-9 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - RAUNCHY ROCKABILLY
Reissued: - 2009 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 32-14 mono
ROCKIN' WITH RAY

03(2) - "WILLING AND READY" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Raymond Eugene Smith
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 26, 27, 1958
Released: - 2009
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-25 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Dean Perkins - Steel Guitar
Stanley Walker - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Gary Diamond - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Ivor Lichterman - Slapping his thighs

For Biography of Ray Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ray Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 27, 1958 THURSDAY

New soldier Elvis Presley receives shots from the Army for typhoid and tetanus at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas.

Sometimes-country singer Sheb Wooley recorded the mammoth pop novelty hit ''The Purple People Eatier'' during the evening at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

MARCH 28, 1958 FRIDAY

The U.S. Army transport Elvis Presley from Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, to Fort Hood, Texas, for basic training.

Angry that Chuck Berry was selected to close the show Jerry Lee Lewis sets his piano on fire during ''Great Balls Of Fire'' at Alan Freed's Big Beat Show at the Brooklyn Paramount. Also appearing, Buddy Holly, Frankie Lymon and The Chantels.

Eddie Cochran recorded the original version of ''Summertime Blues'', destined to be remade as a country hit by Alan Jackson.

MARCH 28, 1958 FRIDAY

The Godfather Of The Blues, W.C. Handy, died of bronchial pneumonia in New York City at the age of 84. He was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, the burial site of such luminaries as Duke Ellington and Bat Masterson, the western lawman who ended his career as a New York sportswriter. Also this year, Handy received the ultimate Hollywood tribute: his own, bizarrely fictionalized film biography.

On Handy's death, the Commercial Appeal immediately began raising funds to erect a statue in Handy Park in Memphis, which the city had named in his honor all the way back in 1931. On May 1, 1960, the statue that stands there today was erected at a cost of fourteen thousand dollars and dedicated at a ceremony in which gospel great Mahalia Jackson sang.

Jerry Lee Lewis start with Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry and others, the 44-day Alan Freed's Big Beat Tour commenced at Freed's old stomping ground, the Brooklyn Paramount Theater in New York City.

The tour swung out through Ohio, up into southern Ontario, then back through Michigan and Missouri before doubling back through the Midwest and Canada, finally playing the Newark Armory on May 10. By this point, Jerry Lee Lewis had become the consummate showman, able to dominate a performance from a more or less seated position. His long hair tossed back and forth like a mane, he hammered the piano keys with hands like pistons. The ferocious energy was startling and sensational. We'll probably never know whether he actually set his piano afire after being told that Chuck Berry was topping the bill. Whether he did or not, the story is in character - which is probably why it has passed into Lewis mythology.

Before the Freed tour started, Jerry Lee Lewis had filmed a spot in another abysmal movie. Albert Zugsmith, who would later give the world "The Teacher was A Sexpot", had created a quickly exploitation movie around the teenage drug problem. Called "High School Confidential", it starred that old habituée of the casting couch, Mamie van Doren. Part of the movie was rendered in "bop talk", the mere remembrance of which can make one shudder years after having seen it. The sole redeeming element was the sight of Jerry Lee Lewis, his road drummer Russ Smith, and his uncle and father-in-law, Jay W. Brown, hammering out the title song from the back of a flatbed truck.

MARCH 29, 1958 SATURDAY

Tennessee Ernie Ford appears on the cover of TV Guide.

Les Paul backs out of an appearance on CBS-TV's ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' while he battles pneumonia.

MARCH 31, 1958 MONDAY

Chess released Chuck Berry's pop classic ''Johnny B. Goode''. The song is resurrected as a country hit by Buck Owens in 1969.

Bill Monroe recorded ''Wayfaring Stranger'' in Nashville. The song becomes a hit for Emmylou Harris in 1980.

Johnny Cash guests on the ABC music series ''The Lawrence Welk Show''.

Jerry Lee Lewis played at Alan Freed's ''Big Beat'' tour show at Loew's Paradise Theater, Bronx, New York City.

MARCH 1958

Billy Riley summarily quit Sun Records and went to Nashville to signed a one-off deal with Brunswick which resulted in a recording session with producer Owen Bradley produced single, "Rockin' On The Moon" and "Is That All To The Ball Mr. Hall" (Brunswick 55085). The awkward contrivance of the Brunswick single was in marked contrast to the spontaneity and vitality of even Riley's least distinguished Sun recordings.

Not even the change in label could spark a little action in Riley's career, although expressions of interest were coming from some unlike quarters. (See May 21, 1958 Bradley Session).

MARCH 1958

Billboard reported that rock and roll singer and songwriter Chuck Willis ''the king of the stroll'' dies of a perforated ulcer at age of 30. He wasn't like anyone else, wearing a far-out turban and dancing sinuously to his mellow crooning. The irony of his death and the titles of his last singles was chilling, ''Gonna Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes'' and ''What Am I Living For''?

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©